Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $49,432
56%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 56%!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: neurology

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Clinton campaign released additional health details on candidate

    09/14/2016 2:16:10 PM PDT · by scouter · 84 replies
    Fox News ^ | 9/14/2016 | FoxNews.com
    The Hillary Clinton campaign on Wednesday released what it called a “comprehensive update” on the candidate’s medical information, describing the illness that took her off the trail this week as a mild and non-contagious bacterial pneumonia.
  • Biologists discover bacteria communicate like neurons in the brain

    10/21/2015 1:13:24 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 10/21/2015 | University of California - San Diego
    Biologists at UC San Diego have discovered that bacteria--often viewed as lowly, solitary creatures--are actually quite sophisticated in their social interactions and communicate with one another through similar electrical signaling mechanisms as neurons in the human brain. In a study published in this week's advance online publication of Nature, the scientists detail the manner by which bacteria living in communities communicate with one another electrically through proteins called "ion channels."
  • Is There a Brain Region Associated with a Belief in Social Justice?

    06/17/2014 7:31:51 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 28 replies
    IO9 ^ | June 17, 2014 | Anale Newiitz
    Is There a Brain Region Associated with a Belief in Social Justice? Some people believe that we could live in a just world where everybody gets what they deserve. Others believe that's impossible. Now, neuroscientists say they have evidence that the "just world hypothesis" is a cognitive bias that's connected with a specific part of the brain. This does not mean there is a "social justice center" in your brain. What neurologist Michael Schaefer and colleagues discovered is that there is a slightly different pattern of electrical impulses shooting through the brains of people who believe in a just world....
  • 5 California Children Infected by Polio-Like Illness

    02/28/2014 9:58:03 PM PST · by neverdem · 33 replies
    LiveScience.com ^ | February 23, 2014 | Cari Nierenberg
    Over a one-year period, five children in California developed a polio-like illness that caused severe weakness or paralysis in their arms and legs, a new case study reports. In two of the children, their symptoms have now been linked with an extremely rare virus called enterovirus-68. Like the poliovirus, which has been eradicated in the U.S. since 1979 thanks to the polio vaccine, strains of enterovirus in rare cases can invade and injure the spine. These are the first reported cases of polio-like symptoms being caused by enterovirus in the United States. During the last decade, outbreaks of polio-like symptoms...
  • Brain research results in better understanding of behavior

    02/16/2014 2:40:31 PM PST · by usalady · 12 replies
    Examiner ^ | February 16, 2014 | Martha
    As neuroscientists from around the world continue to unravel brain processes they include a multidisciplinary approach that goes beyond the brain cells. New research has used neurobiology and nano-scale engineering to study neural circuits and their link to behavior.
  • Literally Messing with their Brain. What Recent Scientific Studies Can Teach Us About...

    12/10/2013 3:40:51 AM PST · by markomalley · 15 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 12/9/2013 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    In modern times there has been a tendency to downplay the differences between men and women, preferring to see whatever differences have historically existed as simply social constructs. This thinking was insisted upon by many as a kind of political correctness that must be held otherwise punishment and excoriation was sure to follow.Nevertheless, most people with common sense have always known that men and women are very different, and that these differences are not simply the result of social constructs or the way people were raised.Now scientists have made discoveries not only affirming that men and women are different, but...
  • Seizure Disorders Enter Medical Marijuana Debate

    08/14/2013 7:08:13 PM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies
    Medscape Medical News ^ | Aug 14, 2013 | Nancy A. Melville
    The role of cannabinoids in the treatment of seizure disorders in children has come under the spotlight in recent months amid a string of media reports of parents obtaining the substances in states where medical marijuana is now legal and claiming "miraculous" reductions in seizures with the treatment. Among the reports was that of a 6-year-old boy with Dravet's syndrome, a rare form of childhood epilepsy, reported by CNN. In an interview, the parents said the boy was left immobilized by the 22 antiseizure pills a day required to control his seizures, but after treatment with a liquid, nonpsychoactive form...
  • The 'Garbage Truck' of the Human Brain: New Clues to Treating Alzheimer's

    06/28/2013 11:08:37 PM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    Science World Report ^ | Jun 28, 2013 | Catherine Griffin
    The brain works like a complex machine, sending electrical signals that allow us to perceive and understand the world around us. Now, scientists have discovered a new system in this brain that acts as a "garbage truck," removing waste that might affect the brain. The findings could have large implications for treating neurological disorders like Alzheimer's disease. The body defends the brain like a fortress, ringing it with a complex system of gateways that control which molecules can enter and exit. This "blood-brain barrier" was known to exist for quite some time, but it's only now that researchers are beginning...
  • Beer's taste triggers dopamine release in brain

    04/20/2013 5:34:09 PM PDT · by Jyotishi · 55 replies
    DNA ^ | Tuesday, Apri 16, 2013 | ANI
    The taste of beer, without any effect from alcohol itself, can trigger dopamine release in the brain that is associated with drinking and other drugs of abuse, researchers have claimed. Using positron emission tomography (PET), the researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine tested 49 men with two scans, one in which they tasted beer, and the second in which they tasted Gatorade. The researchers were looking for evidence of increased levels of dopamine, a brain neurotransmitter that has long been associated with alcohol and other drugs of abuse. The scans showed significantly more dopamine activity following the taste of...
  • Two ayurvedic drugs hold out hope for Alzheimer’s patients

    04/01/2013 11:21:25 PM PDT · by Jyotishi · 43 replies
    The Indian Express ^ | Tuesday, April 2, 2013 | Pritha Chatterjee
    New Delhi - It's a disease long associated with the elderly but is now diagnosed in younger people as well and with no permanent cure available till date. However, in what could give hope to thousands suffering from Alzheimer's Disease (AD), the pharmacology department in AIIMS has identified Ayurvedic drugs which could have a role in preventing the onset of AD and also restricting its spread in affected patients. AD is a degenerative neurological disorder leading to progressive loss of cognitive abilities, including the patient's memory due to a drop in chemicals — known as neurotransmitters — which transmits messages...
  • Putting Themselves to Sleep

    11/24/2012 11:24:40 PM PST · by neverdem · 39 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 21 November 2012 | Greg Miller
    Enlarge Image Self-medicated. A new study suggests that some people suffer from excessive sleepiness due to a naturally occurring compound that acts like a sedative. Credit: Digital Vision/Thinkstock Hitting the wall in the middle of a busy work day is nothing unusual, and a caffeine jolt is all it takes to snap most of us back into action. But people with certain sleep disorders battle a powerful urge to doze throughout the day, even after sleeping 10 hours or more at night. For them, caffeine doesn't touch the problem, and more potent prescription stimulants aren't much better. Now, a...
  • The Hazards of Growing Up Painlessly

    11/24/2012 10:31:19 PM PST · by neverdem · 14 replies
    NY Times Magazine ^ | November 15, 2012 | JUSTIN HECKERT
    The girl who feels no pain was in the kitchen, stirring ramen noodles, when the spoon slipped from her hand and dropped into the pot of boiling water. It was a school night; the TV was on in the living room, and her mother was folding clothes on the couch. Without thinking, Ashlyn Blocker reached her right hand in to retrieve the spoon, then took her hand out of the water and stood looking at it under the oven light. She walked a few steps to the sink and ran cold water over all her faded white scars, then called...
  • Vegetative man tells doctors ‘I’m not in pain’ via MRI communication

    11/14/2012 6:20:31 AM PST · by NYer · 67 replies
    Yahoo ^ | November 14, 2012 | Eric Pfeiffer
    More than 12 years after a car accident left him in a vegetative state, a Canadian man has begun communicating with doctors who are monitoring his brain activity through Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans. The BBC reports that 39-year-old Scott Routley has been able to communicate to doctors that he is not in any pain, marking the first time an uncommunicative, severely brain-damaged patient has been able to give direct answers regarding their care and treatment."Scott has been able to show he has a conscious, thinking mind," British neuroscientist Adrian Owen told the BBC. "We have scanned him several...
  • Neuroscience Reveals Brain Differences Between Republicans and Democrats (Barf Alert)

    11/01/2012 10:32:37 AM PDT · by lbryce · 29 replies
    Science Daily ^ | Novembr 1, 2012 | Staff
    Full Title:This Is Your Brain On Politics: Neuroscience Reveals Brain Differences Between Republicans and Democrats ScienceDaily (Nov. 1, 2012) — New research from the University of South Carolina provides fresh evidence that choosing a candidate may depend largely on our biological make-up. That's because the brains of self-identified Democrats and Republicans are hard-wired differently and may be naturally inclined to hold varying, if not opposing, perceptions and values. This study showed a strong link with broad social connectedness with Democrats, and a strong link with tight social connectedness with Republicans. With the U.S. presidential election just days away, new research...
  • Drug 'may prevent stroke damage'

    10/08/2012 9:08:55 AM PDT · by Silentgypsy · 19 replies
    BBC News ^ | 10/07/2012 | Unattributed
    It may be possible to use a drug to prevent some of the lasting and crippling damage caused by a stroke, according to doctors in the US and Canada. A safety trial, published in the Lancet Neurology medical journal, suggested the chemical NA-1 was safe to use. The study on 185 people also hinted that patients given the drug developed fewer regions of damaged brain tissue. The Stroke Association said that it was promising, but needed more research. Tests in primates had suggested NA-1 prevented brain cells dying when a stroke starved them of oxygen.
  • How Blasts Injure the Brain

    08/04/2012 2:01:57 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 22 July 2011 | Greg Miller
    Enlarge Image Occupational hazard. A new study provides clues about the cellular mechanisms of traumatic brain injury, a signature injury of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Credit: Adrees Latif/Reuters According to some estimates, more than 300,000 United States troops have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Most of these injuries have resulted from blasts from roadside bombs and other explosives planted by insurgents. The lack of knowledge about how an explosive blast injures the brain has hampered efforts to treat these injuries. Now, two studies offer a potentially important insight,...
  • Cocaine May Age the Brain

    04/28/2012 4:27:41 PM PDT · by neverdem · 32 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 24 April 2012 | Elizabeth Norton
    Enlarge Image Old beyond years. A 3D model of merged imaging scans shows the brain areas affected by age (blue) in healthy people (left) and longterm cocaine users (right). Credit: Karen Ersche/University of Cambridge Add this to the list of reasons not to take cocaine: Chronic use of the drug may speed up the aging process. According to a new imaging study, cocaine abusers in their 30s and 40s show brain changes more commonly seen in people over 60. The finding also calls attention to the special medical needs of older drug users—a group that, until now, hasn't garnered...
  • Decoding the Brain’s Cacophony

    11/04/2011 2:52:30 PM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies
    NY Times ^ | October 31, 2011 | BENEDICT CAREY
    ST. HELENA, Calif. — The scientists exchanged one last look and held their breath. Everything was ready. The electrode was in place, threaded between the two hemispheres of a living cat’s brain; the instruments were tuned to pick up the chatter passing from one half to the other. The only thing left was to listen for that electronic whisper, the brain’s own internal code. The amplifier hissed — the three scientists expectantly leaning closer — and out it came, loud and clear. “We all live in a yellow submarine, yellow submarine, yellow submarine ....” “The Beatles’ song! We somehow picked...
  • A Drink a Day May Keep Alzheimer's Away (Analysis of 143 studies shows risk decreased by 23%)

    08/26/2011 12:49:36 PM PDT · by Stoat · 47 replies
    Medscape Medical News ^ | August 26, 2011 | Fran Lowry
    A Drink a Day May Keep Alzheimer's Away Fran Lowry   August 26, 2011 — Light to moderate drinking seems to reduce the risk for dementia and cognitive decline, according to a new study published in the August issue of Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. A meta-analysis of 143 studies on the effects of alcohol on the brain showed that moderate drinking, defined as no more than 2 drinks a day for a man and no more than 1 drink a day for a woman, reduced the risk for Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia by 23%. "It doesn't seem...
  • Bachmann Migraine Story Underscores Lingering Stigma

    07/22/2011 1:29:50 PM PDT · by Stoat · 46 replies
    Medscape Today ^ | July 22, 2011 | Nancy A. Melville
    Bachmann Migraine Story Underscores Lingering Stigma Nancy A. Melville July 22, 2011 — In a summer of unusually heated political turmoil and mudslinging from both sides of the aisle, the medical issue that has unexpectedly become caught in the crossfire seems somehow appropriate — migraines, and specifically, Rep. Michele Bachmann's migraines.The GOP presidential candidate's migraines became big news this week following a report on the Daily Caller Web site that an adviser to Representative Bachmann (R-Minnesota) said the congresswoman suffers from "intense" migraines, that when she gets them "she can't function at all," and she "takes all sorts of pills" for...