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Keyword: memory

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  • Intel, Micron unveil memory chip 1,000 times faster than Flash

    07/28/2015 2:40:21 PM PDT · by aimhigh · 29 replies
    Oregonian ^ | 07/28/2015 | Mike Rogoway
    Chipmakers Intel and Micron said Tuesday they've created a hyperfast memory chip, up to 1,000 times faster than standard NAND Flash memory. Intel and Micron say they've been working more than a decade on their new, "3D XPoint" chip, which is based on a new, three-dimensional structure and a different set of materials than standard memory chips. The new chip doesn't use transistors, which are the standard on/off switches in microprocessors and nearly every other category of computer chip.
  • Sweet Tooth Causes Some Major Side Effects On your Brains! (Memory loss)

    06/26/2015 1:22:12 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    Sweet Tooth Causes Some Major Side Effects On your Brains! June 24, 2015 If you love your fried, fatty foods smothered in chocolate and generously dusted with icing sugar? Then, you might just have to say goodbye to mental acuity.A new research conducted in Oregon State University has revealed that a high-sugar, high-fat diet can drastically modify your gut bacteria which in turn may lead to significant losses in ‘cognitive flexibility’ – a measurement of the brain’s ability to switch between thinking about one concept to another, and to adapt to changes in the environment.The study, which was conducted on...
  • Pondering Prudence and Its “Parts” – A Reflection on the Sometimes-Misunderstood Virtue of Prudence

    05/07/2015 7:21:48 AM PDT · by Salvation · 7 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 05-06-15 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    Pondering Prudence and Its “Parts” – A Reflection on the Sometimes-Misunderstood Virtue of Prudence By: Msgr. Charles PopeAs a follow-on to yesterday’s post on the spiritual work of counseling  the doubtful, I would like to say a little more about prudence.Prudence is often misunderstood by those who reduce it to mere caution or reluctance to act. It is true that sometimes prudence indicates caution and that hasty action is seldom prudent. However, sometimes it is prudent to act quickly. Having long discussions about the best way to put out a house fire before acting is not prudent. Quick, expedient action is the...
  • How to: How much RAM do you really need?

    04/11/2015 11:25:09 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 126 replies
    PC Authority ^ | Friday 21 March 2014 | Darien Graham-Smith
    Typically, today’s budget PCs come with 4GB of RAM. A mid-range configuration may offer double that, and high-end gaming systems and workstations go as high as 16GB or more. There’s no doubt which way the wind’s blowing, either: Windows 8 supports up to 128GB of physical memory (assuming you’re running the 64-bit edition), while Windows 8 Pro can go up to 512GB. Does anyone really need this much RAM? Memory isn’t as expensive as it used to be, but there’s obviously no point paying for gigabytes of RAM from which you’ll receive no material gain. Does more equal faster? Many...
  • No, it’s not always quicker to do things in memory (computer)

    03/26/2015 8:27:11 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 67 replies
    ITworld ^ | March 25, 2015 | Phil Johnson
    It’s a commonly held belief among software developers that avoiding disk access in favor of doing as much work as possible in-memory will results in shorter runtimes. The growth of big data has made time saving techniques such as performing operations in-memory more attractive than ever for programmers. New research, though, challenges the notion that in-memory operations are always faster than disk-access approaches and reinforces the need for developers to better understand system-level software. These findings were recently presented by researchers from the University of Calgary and the University of British Columbia in a paper titled When In-Memory Computing is...
  • Think You Can Draw The Apple Logo From Memory? You Sure?

    03/17/2015 7:53:11 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 35 replies
    Forbes ^ | March 17, 2015 | Davd DiSalvo
    Pick any ranking of publicly traded companies, and year after year you’ll find Apple AAPL +1.73% in the top three worldwide. To say that its famous logo is ubiquitous is an understatement. It’s everywhere and then some. There’s a decent chance you’re holding it in your hand as you read this article. This is all true – but right now, without any help, do you think you could draw the Apple logo from memory? If you’re like participants in a recent study on memory, you probably feel confident you could pull it off without peeking. But you may find, as...
  • Remembering a Crime That You Didn’t Commit

    03/08/2015 7:07:27 PM PDT · by Incorrigible · 19 replies
    The New Yorker via MSN ^ | 3/8/2015 | Douglas Starr
    Remembering a Crime That You Didn’t Commit In 1906, Hugo Münsterberg, the chair of the psychology laboratory at Harvard University and the president of the American Psychological Association, wrote in the Times Magazine about a case of false confession . A woman had been found dead in Chicago, garroted with a copper wire and left in a barnyard, and the simpleminded farmer’s son who had discovered her body stood accused. The young man had an alibi, but after questioning by police he admitted to the murder. He did not simply confess, Münsterberg wrote; “he was quite willing to repeat his...
  • Dogs Don't Remember

    03/02/2015 10:55:47 AM PST · by Red Badger · 130 replies
    www.psychologytoday.com ^ | May 01, 2010 | by Ira Hyman
    Dogs Don't Remember: Episodic Memory May Distinguish Humans Dogs are wonderful creatures. Our dogs recognize me and are always happy to see me. Dogs are also smart and successful creatures. Our dogs have learned several cute tricks. But dogs (and other non-human animals) are missing something we take for granted: episodic memory. Dogs don't remember what happened yesterday and don't plan for tomorrow. In defining episodic memory, Endel Tulving argued that it is unique to humans. Experience influences all animals. Most mammals and birds can build complex sets of knowledge or semantic memory. You and I also remember the experience...
  • Has Stanford University found a cure for Alzheimer's disease?

    01/06/2015 4:49:09 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 101 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 12/08/2014 | By Sarah Knapton, Science Editor
    Alzheimer's could be prevented and even cured by boosting the brain's own immune response, scientists at Stanford University believe. Researchers discovered that nerve cells die because cells which are supposed to clear the brain of bacteria, viruses and dangerous deposits, stop working. These cells, called 'microglia' function well when people are young, but when they age, a single protein called EP2 stops them operating efficiently. Now scientists have shown that blocking the protein allows the microglia to function normally again so they can hoover up the dangerous sticky amyloid-beta plaques which damage nerve cells in Alzheimer's disease. The researchers found...
  • Compound in cocoa found to reverse age-related memory loss

    10/26/2014 5:34:31 PM PDT · by Innovative · 46 replies
    Washington Post ^ | Oct 26, 2014 | Fredrick Kunkle
    In case anyone needed another reason to love chocolate, a new study suggests that a natural compound found in cocoa, tea and some vegetables can reverse age-related memory loss. The findings suggest that the compound increases connectivity and, subsequently, blood flow in a region of the brain critical to memory, the researchers said. Researchers said that if a person had the memory of a typical 60-year-old at the beginning of the study, after three months, on average, that person’s memory would function more like a 30- or 40-year-old’s. The researchers also cautioned that more work is needed because of the...
  • Non-volatile memory improves energy efficiency by two orders of magnitude

    09/03/2014 11:38:25 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 03 Sep 2014 | by Lisa Zyga
    (Phys.org) —By using voltage-generated stress to switch between two magnetic states, researchers have designed a new non-volatile memory with extremely high energy efficiency—about two orders of magnitude higher than that of the previous most efficient non-volatile memories. The engineers, Ayan K. Biswas, Professor Supriyo Bandyopadhyay, and Professor Jayasimha Atulasimha at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, have published their paper on the proposed non-volatile memory in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters. "We are excited that we have been able to come up with the idea of a strain-switched memory element capable of 180° switching using a simple geometric...
  • Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of brain boosts memory

    08/29/2014 8:47:09 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 4 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | Provided by Northwestern University
    Stimulating a particular region in the brain via non-invasive delivery of electrical current using magnetic pulses, called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, improves memory, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. The discovery opens a new field of possibilities for treating memory impairments caused by conditions such as stroke, early-stage Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, cardiac arrest and the memory problems that occur in healthy aging. "We show for the first time that you can specifically change memory functions of the brain in adults without surgery or drugs, which have not proven effective," said senior author Joel Voss, assistant professor of medical social...
  • Scientists find secret of reversing bad memories

    08/28/2014 10:14:21 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 54 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 6:00PM BST 27 Aug 2014 | By Sarah Knapton, Science Correspondent
    Bad memories could be reversed after scientists discovered the part of the brain which links emotions to past events Bad memories of past trauma can leave people emotionally scarred for life. But now neuroscientists believe they can erase feelings of fear or anxiety attached to stressful events, in a breakthrough which could help treat depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. Researchers at MIT, US, have discovered which brain circuits attach emotions to memories, and crucially, how to reverse the link. They managed to ‘switch off’ feelings of fear in mice which had been conditioned to feel anxious. It is likely the...
  • Memory and learning deficits restored in Alzheimer's mouse models (brain cell transplantation)

    07/17/2014 3:56:32 AM PDT · by Innovative · 4 replies
    Medical News Today ^ | July 16, 2014 | Honor Whiteman
    Now, researchers from the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco, CA, and the University of California-San Francisco reveal they have successfully reversed learning and memory deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's through transplantation of healthy brain cells. The team transplanted inhibitory neuron progenitors - early-stage brain cells that can change into mature inhibitory regulator cells - into the hippocampus of two mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. One mouse model possessed the apoE4 gene, while the other had the apoE4 gene alongside a build-up of amyloid-beta - a protein also believed to play a role in Alzheimer's development. The researchers found that...
  • How the Web Affects Memory (Internet Hive Mind Emerging)

    03/20/2014 3:06:36 PM PDT · by Dallas59 · 17 replies
    Havard Magazine ^ | 11-12/2013 | Havard Magazine
    Google and other search engines have changed the way we use the Internet, putting vast sources of information just a few clicks away. But Lindsley professor of psychology Daniel Wegner’s recent research proves that websites—and the Internet—are changing much more than technology itself. They are changing the way our memories function. Wegner’s latest study, “Google Effects on Memory: Cognitive Consequences of Having Information at Our Fingertips,” shows that when people have access to search engines, they remember fewer facts and less information because they know they can rely on “search” as a readily available shortcut.
  • Why Steve Jobs’ Computer Paradigm Shift Prediction Panned Out, and What it Means for the Market

    03/08/2014 12:36:27 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 70 replies
    The Wiglaf Journal ^ | March 6, 2014 | David Dalka, New Media Editor
    <p>Traditional hard drive manufacturers are currently going through a paradigm shift—one where new solid-state hard drives, known as SSD, are taking market share and slowly eliminating traditional hard drives. SSD hard drives of one terabyte or more are slowly becoming affordable to the masses.</p>
  • Fish oil could help prevent Alzheimer's and also give you a bigger brain

    01/22/2014 7:14:40 PM PST · by Innovative · 13 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | Jan 22, 2014 | Jenny Hope
    Research shows people with higher levels of the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil may also have larger brain volumes in old age This would be the equivalent to preserving one or two years of brain health. Eating more fish could give you a bigger brain - and greater protection against diseases such as Alzheimer’s, claim researchers. They found people with higher levels of the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil may also have larger brain volumes in old age. This would be the equivalent to preserving one to two years of brain health, says a new study...
  • Study: Elderly Memory Loss Due to Lack of Deep Sleep

    01/29/2013 1:01:23 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 29 replies
    Dailytech ^ | January 29, 2013 8:23 AM | Tiffany Kaiser
    Slow waves are generated by the middle frontal lobe, and as this region deteriorates with age, the elderly tend to lose the ability to experience long REM sleep University of California, Berkeley, scientists have found a connection between the amount of sleep one gets in their old age and the quality of their memory. The UC Berkeley team, led by Matthew Walker, believes that forgetfulness in old age may be attributed to a lack of deep, non-rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. According to the study, the slow brain waves produced during deep REM sleep help move memories from the hippocampus (short-term memory storage...
  • Brains of elderly slow because they know so much

    01/20/2014 2:51:32 PM PST · by Sir Napsalot · 122 replies
    Telegragh (UK) ^ | 1-20-2014 | Sarah Knapton
    The brains of older people only appear to slow down because they have so much information to compute, much like a full-up hard drive, scientists believe. Older people do not decline mentally with age, it just takes them longer to recall facts because they have more information in their brains, scientists believe. Much like a computer struggles as the hard drive gets full up, so to (sic) do humans take longer to access information, it has been suggested. Researchers say this slowing down it is not the same as cognitive decline. “The human brain works slower in old age,” said...
  • ...middle-aged men, drinking more than two pints of beer a day speeds up memory decline...

    01/17/2014 12:34:00 PM PST · by Loyalist · 46 replies
    National Post ^ | January 17, 2014 | Sarah Knapton, The Daily Telegraph/National Post Wire Services
    Middle-aged men who drink the equivalent of two and a half pints a day risk speeding up memory loss and mental decline by six years, researchers have warned. A 10-year study of more than 7,000 male and female civil servants found men who regularly drank significant amounts of alcohol suffered notable mental decline. The study was reported in the journal Neurology. In contrast men who drank less than one and a half pints a day, or a glass and a half of wine suffered no impact on mental ability. The heaviest drinkers were found to have the equivalent memory of...
  • Study: Drink two espressos to enhance long-term memory

    01/13/2014 7:44:20 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 6 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 01/13/2013 | Simon Makin
    Coffee has long been a friend of students working through the night, but it does more than just keep us awake. A study provides the first convincing evidence that caffeine enhances long-term memory in people – provided the dose is right. The effects mirror similar results seen in honeybees, where a boost to memory from caffeine-laden nectar may help bees return to certain plants. Researchers strongly suspected that caffeine enhances memory, but studies that tried to show this in people weren't conclusive, as any apparent benefits in memory could have been due to increased attention, a known benefit of caffeine....
  • How coffee can perk up your memory: Drinking a strong mug can improve recall

    01/12/2014 5:50:56 PM PST · by Innovative · 36 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | Jn 12, 2014 | UK Daily Mail Reporter
    Researchers in Baltimore, Maryland, carried out tests on 100 people Showed them a series of images which they had to remember Then gave some participants 200mg of caffeine - the same as a strong cup Those who took dose could remember pictures more clearly the next day Coffee doesn’t just perk you up – just one mug a day can give your memory a boost too, experts claimed yesterday. ‘We have always known caffeine has cognitive enhancing effects, but its particular effects on strengthening memories and making them resistant to forgetting has never been examined in detail in humans. We...
  • Teen pot use could hurt brain and memory, new research suggests

    12/16/2013 9:17:13 AM PST · by Zakeet · 69 replies
    NBC News ^ | December 16, 2013 | Brian Alexander
    Teenage pot smokers could be damaging brain structures critical to memory and reasoning, according to new research that found changes in the brains of heavy users. Research released Monday in the journal Schizophrenia Bulletin showed the brains of young heavy marijuana users were altered in so-called sub-cortical regions — primitive structures that are part of the memory and reasoning circuits. And young people with such alterations performed worse on memory tests than non-using controls, despite the fact that the heavy users had not indulged for more than two years, on average, before the testing. [Snip] When the groups were given...
  • Historical "Memory" Is All The Rage These Days

    11/09/2013 7:06:35 AM PST · by Davy Buck · 3 replies
    Old Virginia Blog ^ | 11/09/2013 | Richard G. Williams, Jr.
    "our most important orientation toward time is a positive appreciation of the past. The more we savor memories of relationships and let go of grudges ... the more we connect to our roots and let go of our forebears' failings ... the more we treasure their legacy and let go of the myth that we are self-made: the stronger our sense of a positive past, the better grounded and centered we will be." ~ Dr. Dr. Christine Chakoian Doesn't this explain a lot of what professional and academic historians are writing these days?
  • Memory Protein Fades With Age

    08/29/2013 10:58:26 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    Science Magazine ^ | 2013-08-28 18:00 | Amanda Mascarelli
    It’s an inconvenient truth of aging: In our 30s and up, it gets increasingly harder for most of us to recall names, faces, and details from the past. Scientists have long debated whether this gradual decline is an early form of Alzheimer’s disease—a neurodegenerative condition that leads to severe dementia—or a distinct neurological process. Now, researchers have found a protein that distinguishes typical forgetfulness from Alzheimer’s and could lead to potential treatments for age-related memory loss. Previous studies have shown that Alzheimer’s disease and age-related memory loss involve different neural circuits in the hippocampus, a seahorse-shaped structure in the brain...
  • What's In Chocolate, Cocoa That Might Benefit Brain Health?

    08/08/2013 7:17:43 PM PDT · by Innovative · 40 replies
    FORBES ^ | Aug 8, 2013 | Alice G Walton
    In the new study, the team from Harvard randomly assigned 60 elderly people to drink two cups of flavanol-rich or flavanol-poor cocoa every day for a month. There weren't any overall differences between the high- and low-flavanol groups in terms of cognitive abilities, so the researchers looked a little deeper. They found that people who had compromised blood flow to the brain and white matter damage at the beginning of the study did show a difference after drinking the cocoa for a month: Blood flow in their brains improved by about 8%, and the time it took them to complete...
  • Let Us Now Praise Knowing Stuff

    08/07/2013 3:58:53 PM PDT · by BruceDeitrickPrice · 10 replies
    American Thinker ^ | April 6, 2013 | Bruce Deitrick Price
    A reporter asked me, "Would you prefer that students know information, or how to find information?" Clearly she thought that knowing where to find information was best. Actually knowing facts was, in her mind, not important. That was the old way, the medieval approach, when children were whipped to make them memorize the state capitals and other such irrelevant stuff. Thank goodness, she clearly believed, we have moved on to more civilized ways. Children no longer know anything. All they know is that they must go somewhere to find what they want to know. But why would the reporter believe...
  • Crossbar's RRAM to boast terabytes of storage, faster write speeds than NAND

    08/07/2013 12:31:10 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 4 replies
    Engadget ^ | Aug 6th, 2013 at 3:54 AM | Alexis Santos
    Hardware makers often sing the praises of their latest and greatest flash memory, but the folks at Crossbar are ready to show them up with resistive RAM (RRAM) that they've been quietly working on. Compared to NAND, RRAM comes in at half the size and boasts 20 times faster write speeds (140MB/s), reads data at 17MB per second, guzzles 20 times less power and has 10 times more endurance. Since RRAM is non-volatile memory, it can keep data even when it's powered off, á la NAND. As if that weren't enough, 3D stacking construction allows for several terabytes of storage,...
  • Scientists Make Mice “Remember” Things That Didn’t Happen

    08/05/2013 10:23:42 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | 25 July 2013 | By Susan Young
    Researchers manipulate mouse neurons to create a false memory; the work could lead to a better understanding of how memories form. Remember this: The red neurons are the brain cells in the hippocampus of a mouse carrying a new memory of a particular place. Scientists have created a false memory in mice by manipulating neurons that bear the memory of a place. The work further demonstrates just how unreliable memory can be. It also lays new ground for understanding the cell behavior and circuitry that controls memory, and could one day help researchers discover new ways to treat mental illnesses...
  • Two ayurvedic drugs hold out hope for Alzheimer’s patients

    04/01/2013 11:21:25 PM PDT · by Jyotishi · 43 replies
    The Indian Express ^ | Tuesday, April 2, 2013 | Pritha Chatterjee
    New Delhi - It's a disease long associated with the elderly but is now diagnosed in younger people as well and with no permanent cure available till date. However, in what could give hope to thousands suffering from Alzheimer's Disease (AD), the pharmacology department in AIIMS has identified Ayurvedic drugs which could have a role in preventing the onset of AD and also restricting its spread in affected patients. AD is a degenerative neurological disorder leading to progressive loss of cognitive abilities, including the patient's memory due to a drop in chemicals — known as neurotransmitters — which transmits messages...
  • A Nanofabrication Technique Doubles Hard Drive Capacity

    03/20/2013 9:09:20 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 6 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | 03-19-13 | By Mike Orcutt
    Laboratory advance shows that nano-imprinting could help the hard drive industry meet its long-term goals for data storage capacity. Researchers at HGST, a major manufacturer of hard disk drives, have shown that an emerging fabrication technology called nano-imprinting could be used to double the data storage capacity of today’s hard disks. They say the patent-pending work, done in collaboration with a company called Molecular Imprints, could lead to a cost-effective manufacturing process by the end of the decade. Hard disk drives store data in magnetic material on the surface of a spinning disk. During production, this material is deposited as...
  • Fabrication Trick Offers Fivefold Leap in Hard-Disk Capacity

    11/19/2012 7:38:08 AM PST · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | November 16, 2012 | By Tom Simonite
    Current hard-drive designs are reaching their limit in data storage, but a new manufacturing technique could allow drive capacities to keep expanding. A technique that enables the nanopatterned layers that store data in hard disk drives to assemble themselves has been improved to better suit mass production, and could enable disks that store five times as much data as the largest available today. Using self-assembly instead of machines that print or etch out features has long been considered a potential solution to a looming barrier to expanding the capacity of hard-disk designs. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin...
  • Is there a superior brand or preparation of Gingko Biloba product to recommend to seasoned citizens?

    10/06/2012 9:31:05 AM PDT · by Tuanedge · 10 replies
    My "seasoned citizen" mom is concerned that she might be having memory issues, and feels that she's slow on the uptake on some things during conversations. In the past I've tried to recommend ginkgo to her, but she's resistant to try new things... but now, it seems she's willing to give gingko a shot. I understand some preparations are better than others, and I we sure the natural healing community on FR would have some recommends... My mom works here, she's not a member, but I'm going to send her a link to this thread, she'll read what you advise...~*Thank...
  • Secondhand Smoke Linked to Memory Problems

    09/16/2012 6:48:40 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 60 replies
    Health.com ^ | September 14, 2012 | Health Editor
    FRIDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) — Regular exposure to secondhand smoke has a negative effect on brain function, according to a new British study that found people who live with or spend a significant amount of time with a smoker are damaging their memories. “According to recent reports by the World Health Organization, exposure to secondhand smoke can have serious consequences on the health of people who have never smoked themselves, but who are exposed to other people’s tobacco smoke,” Dr. Tom Heffernan, a researcher at the Collaboration for Drug and Alcohol Research Group at Northumbria University, said in a...
  • Neuroscientists successfully control the dreams of rats. Could humans be next?

    09/03/2012 5:35:56 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 17 replies
    io9 ^ | 9/3/12 | George Dvorsky
    Researchers working at MIT have successfully manipulated the content of a rat's dream by replaying an audio cue that was associated with the previous day's events, namely running through a maze (what else). The breakthrough furthers our understanding of how memory gets consolidated during sleep — but it also holds potential for the prospect of "dream engineering." Working at MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, neuroscientist Matt Wilson was able to accomplish this feat by exploiting the way the brain's hippocampus encodes self-experienced events into memory. Scientists know that our hippocampus is busy at work replaying a number of...
  • River of Blessings & Tanyard Ln.

    07/01/2012 9:11:51 AM PDT · by Revski
    Youtube, Revski ^ | 7-1-20012 | Revski
    The story of this blessing, is true and the place where this story happened is Chepachet Rhode Island in the late 1960s. The actual river sound was recorded from the Chepachet river. This video is in memory of Roy, my nephew who was young when he went to his final home a few years later in the early 1970's and had faith in his Savior Jesus Christ the Lord.
  • June 10 - Personal Thoughts

    06/12/2012 12:33:34 AM PDT · by kathsua · 13 replies
    town Hall ^ | June 09, 2012 | William D. Dannenmaier
    I had a bad night last night, one filled with dreams and memories of my time in combat – six months of front line duty with the 15th Infantry Regiment, four of them as a scout for which I foolishly volunteered. Tomorrow is the 10th of June. Sixty years ago, on the 10th, I was on a daytime patrol. I never enjoyed those, you always got shot at by someone and if you have once heard a bullet go past your head from a sniper, you would just as soon not have another one. Anyway, after returning safely, I was...
  • How Exercise Could Lead to a Better Brain

    04/22/2012 11:40:21 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies
    NY Times ^ | April 18, 2012 | GRETCHEN REYNOLDS
    The value of mental-training games may be speculative, as Dan Hurley writes in his article on the quest to make ourselves smarter, but there is another, easy-to-achieve, scientifically proven way to make yourself smarter. Go for a walk or a swim. For more than a decade, neuroscientists and physiologists have been gathering evidence of the beneficial relationship between exercise and brainpower. But the newest findings make it clear that this isn't just a relationship; it is the relationship. Using sophisticated technologies to examine the workings of individual neurons - and the makeup of brain matter itself - scientists in just...
  • Safety Alerts Cite Cholesterol Drugs’ Side Effects

    02/29/2012 11:44:07 AM PST · by neverdem · 36 replies · 1+ views
    NY Times ^ | February 28, 2012 | GARDINER HARRIS
    Federal health officials on Tuesday added new safety alerts to the prescribing information for statins, the cholesterol-reducing medications that are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the world, citing rare risks of memory loss, diabetes and muscle pain. It is the first time that the Food and Drug Administration has officially linked statin use with cognitive problems like forgetfulness and confusion, although some patients have reported such problems for years. Among the drugs affected are huge sellers like Lipitor, Zocor, Crestor and Vytorin. But federal officials and some medical experts said the new alerts should not scare people away...
  • A Miracle

    02/15/2012 11:21:24 AM PST · by Revski · 1 replies
    Revski's Youtube Classics ^ | 2-15-2012 | Revski
    The story of, A Miracle, is true and the place that this story happened is in, Chepachet Rhode Island in the late 1960s. Roy was young when he went to his final home a few years later in the early 1970’s and had faith in his Savior Jesus Christ the Lord. In Loving Memory of Roy, past tragically in early 1970's. The instrumental medley of this video is, Precious Memories, In The Garden and Precious Lord Take My Hand, author is unknown.
  • Study finds jolt to the brain boosts memory

    02/09/2012 3:12:23 PM PST · by Dysart · 18 replies
    LA Times ^ | 2-9-2012 | Melissa Healy
    The arrow on this MRI of a brain shows areas where researchers applied electrical stimulation. In an experiment likely to raise new hopes for those with memory-robbing diseases such as Alzheimer's, researchers have found that sending an electrical jolt to a part of the brain that plays a key role in memory improved people's ability to learn — and remember — their way across an unfamiliar landscape. The study, conducted at UCLA and published in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, was small and highly preliminary, involving just seven patients with epilepsy. But deep brain stimulation helped...
  • IBM researchers make 12-atom magnetic memory bit

    01/13/2012 5:03:47 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 9 replies
    BBC News ^ | 1/13/12 | BBC
    Researchers have successfully stored a single data bit in only 12 atoms. Currently it takes about a million atoms to store a bit on a modern hard-disk, the researchers from IBM say. They believe this is the world's smallest magnetic memory bit. According to the researchers, the technique opens up the possibility of producing much denser forms of magnetic computer memory than today's hard disk drives and solid state memory chips. "Roughly every two years hard drives become denser," research lead author Sebastian Loth told the BBC. "The obvious question to ask is how long can we keep going. And...
  • Nature, Memory And Alfred Hitchcock: On The 90th Anniversary Of His Filmmaking

    01/09/2012 2:20:30 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 7 replies
    Forbes ^ | 1/09/2012 | Craig Silver
    2012 marks the 90th anniversary of what is believed to be Alfred Hitchcock’s first directorial effort: an unfinished, now lost silent film called No. 13. I’ve been holding my own private Alfred Hitchcock festival at home for several weeks, using DVDs, streaming video, even a VHS. I’m not aware of any other, official celebrations out there, but Hitchcock doesn’t really need any: His work is never out of circulation, and he’s often in the news for one reason or the other. Image by AFP via @daylife For instance, it was recently reported on LiveScience.com that scientists believe they’ve ascertained the...
  • Walking through doorways causes forgetting, new research shows

    11/19/2011 6:43:57 AM PST · by decimon · 82 replies
    University of Notre Dame ^ | November 18, 2011
    We've all experienced it: The frustration of entering a room and forgetting what we were going to do. Or get. Or find. New research from University of Notre Dame Psychology Professor Gabriel Radvansky suggests that passing through doorways is the cause of these memory lapses. "Entering or exiting through a doorway serves as an 'event boundary' in the mind, which separates episodes of activity and files them away," Radvansky explains. "Recalling the decision or activity that was made in a different room is difficult because it has been compartmentalized." The study was published recently in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental...
  • Source found for immune system effects on learning, memory

    10/26/2011 3:52:34 PM PDT · by decimon · 10 replies
    Duke University ^ | October 26, 2011
    DURHAM, N.C. - Immune system cells of the brain, which scavenge pathogens and damaged neurons, are also key players in memory and learning, according to new research by Duke neuroscientists. Earlier studies by Staci Bilbo, an assistant professor in psychology & neuroscience, had shown that laboratory rats experiencing an infection at an early age have an aggressive immune response to subsequent infections, which also harms their learning and memory. In a study published in the Oct. 26 Journal of Neuroscience, Bilbo's team identifies the source of the learning difficulties and traces it back to the immune system itself. The researchers...
  • PC Question, Tell me this won't work

    10/19/2011 8:15:00 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    My imagination | 10-19-2011 | Red Badger
    I have an older PC computer that is kinda slow. It has a SD Card reader, that functions like another drive. Can I reconfigure the system so that Windows 'scratch pad' memory is on a 8 GB SD card in the slot so that it doesn't have to use the hard drive, and thus would be faster? Thanks in advance for all your comments..........
  • New 'FeTRAM' Is Promising Computer Memory Technology

    09/28/2011 4:07:15 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 4 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 27 September 2011 | Emil Venere
    The technology combines silicon nanowires with a "ferroelectric" polymer, a material that switches polarity when electric fields are applied, making possible a new type of ferroelectric transistor. "It's in a very nascent stage," said doctoral student Saptarshi Das, who is working with Joerg Appenzeller, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and scientific director of nanoelectronics at Purdue's Birck Nanotechnology Center.The ferroelectric transistor's changing polarity is read as 0 or 1, an operation needed for digital circuits to store information in binary code consisting of sequences of ones and zeroes. The new technology is called FeTRAM, for ferroelectric transistor random...
  • Flash Memory That'll Keep On Shrinking

    09/02/2011 11:19:10 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 41 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | Friday, September 2, 2011 | By Katherine Bourzac
    Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, and one of the largest manufacturers of computer memory, Samsung, have created a new kind of flash memory that uses graphene—atom-thick sheets of pure carbon—along with silicon to store information. Incorporating graphene could help extend the viability of flash memory technology for years to come, and allow future portable electronics to store far more data. Chipmakers pack increasing amounts of data in the same physical area by miniaturizing the memory cells used to store individual bits. Inside today's flash drives, these cells are nanoscale "floating gate" transistors. Recent years have seen the...
  • Korean researchers report creation of faster, more resilient ReRam (10nS!)

    07/20/2011 6:45:42 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 07-20-2011 | Staff
    Korean researchers working out of the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology report in a paper published in Nature Materials, that they've been able to create a non-volatile Resistance RAM (ReRam) chip capable of withstanding a trillion read/write cycles, all with a switching time of just 10ns (about a million times faster than current flash chips), paving the way for a possible upgrade to flash memory cards. ReRam chips are non-volatile, meaning they can retain stored information in the absence of power and are currently made using a Ta2O5 (tantalum) film, the new chips developed by the Samsung team uses Ta2O5-x/TaO2-x...
  • IBM makes breakthrough in new kind of “universal” memory chip

    07/01/2011 11:41:34 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 12 replies
    VentureBeat ^ | 6/29/11 | Dean Takahashi
    IBM researchers have made a breakthrough in a new kind of memory chip that can record data 100 times faster than today’s flash memory chips. That means scientists are one step closer to creating a universal memory chip that is fast, permanent, and has lots of capacity. If they really work as billed, these multi-bit phase-change memory chips could transform enterprise computing and storage by around 2016, according to IBM. The technology could lead to chips that are lower cost, faster, and more durable in storing applications for consumer devices, including mobile phones and cloud storage. It could also benefit...