Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $25,028
29%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 29% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: medicine

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • China researchers link obesity to bacteria

    12/20/2012 4:07:35 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 30 replies
    The New York Daily News ^ | December 20, 2012
    Chinese researchers have identified a bacteria which may cause obesity, according to a new paper suggesting diets that alter the presence of microbes in humans could combat the condition. Researchers in Shanghai found that mice bred to be resistant to obesity even when fed high-fat foods became excessively overweight when injected with a kind of human bacteria and subjected to a rich diet. The bacterium -- known as enterobacter -- had been linked with obesity after being found in high quantities in the gut of a morbidly obese human volunteer, said the report, written by researchers at Shanghai's Jiaotong University....
  • Woman Dies After Receiving Smoker's Lungs in Transplant

    12/19/2012 9:23:13 AM PST · by Baynative · 37 replies
    GMA news ^ | 12/19/12 | LIZ NEPORENT |
    Jennifer Wederell, a 27-year-old British woman with cystic fibrosis, died of lung cancer after she received the lungs of a heavy smoker in an organ transplant.
  • Grapefruit Is a Culprit in More Drug Reactions

    12/18/2012 8:13:07 PM PST · by neverdem · 61 replies
    NY Times ^ | DECEMBER 17, 2012 | RONI CARYN RABIN
    The patient didn’t overdose on medication. She overdosed on grapefruit juice. The 42-year-old was barely responding when her husband brought her to the emergency room. Her heart rate was slowing, and her blood pressure was falling. Doctors had to insert a breathing tube, and then a pacemaker, to revive her. They were mystified: The patient’s husband said she suffered from migraines and was taking a blood pressure drug called verapamil to help prevent the headaches. But blood tests showed she had an alarming amount of the drug in her system, five times the safe level. Did she overdose? Was she...
  • Authorities Scramble to Kill off Fictional Swede

    12/11/2012 8:11:43 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 6 replies
    The Local ^ | 11 Dec 12
    The Swedish Tax Authority (Skatteverket) scrambled this week to block a personal identification number, linked to Wednesday's date, which could have given a newborn boy a lengthy and somewhat confusing health record. Tolvan Tolvansson (tolv means "twelve" in Swedish) is constantly ill and pops up at hospitals and clinics across the country. At one point, he was both pregnant and suffering prostate cancer, medical journal Dagens Medecin reports. Tolvansson has also been pronounced dead on numerous occasions. Yet he is a completely fictional character, made up for health care staff to learn their way around different databases. He never really...
  • New Bacteria Raises Concern

    12/03/2012 1:31:48 AM PST · by neverdem · 167 replies
    KDLT ^ | November 29, 2012 | Laura Monteverdi
    A deadly bacteria known as Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, is raising concerns in the medical community. Jennifer Hsu in an Infectious Disease Physician at Sanford Health and has been closely studying this 'super bug' which is best known for it's ability to defy even the strongest of drugs. “What has happened over time with increasing exposure to antibiotics the bacteria have developed ways to evade those antibiotics and they become resist to a certain class of antibiotics,” said Hsu. In the United States, the bacteria have been found primarily in healthcare facilities and hospitals and are known to prey on...
  • Bostwick Labs to cut 90 of 154 workers at south Orlando facility (Florida)

    12/09/2012 9:31:21 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    The Orlando Sentinel ^ | December 7, 2012 | Marni Jameson
    Bostwick Laboratories Inc. will lay off 90 of 154 employees in its Orlando lab between now and next August, the company said Friday. In a layoff-warning letter sent to the state, human-resources manager Michael Tenney said the employees would be let go from the south Orlando facility at 7001 Lake Ellenor Drive. Positions being eliminated range from medical technologists, lab specialists and lab assistants to purchasing and distribution specialists. Virginia-based Bostwick, founded in 1999, specializes in diagnosing cancer through such methods as analyzing prostate biopsies and urine tests...
  • Rogue Dentist’s 30-Year Crusade Against Wisdom Teeth Removal Extracts Results

    12/04/2012 9:41:47 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 40 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | Mon, Dec 3, 2012 | Liz Goodwin
    Dr. Jay Friedman relishes his role as dental outcast. Like a pesky younger brother who enjoys watching his siblings squirm, the 86-year-old dentist and public health advocate has for decades been poking and prodding at the oral health community over his personal obsession: wisdom teeth. Friedman has argued for more than 30 years that removing a young person's healthy wisdom teeth -- called "third molars" by professionals -- is an unnecessary and irresponsible practice. While many dentists and oral surgeons have dismissed him as a traitor and a zealot, in 2007, people in the public health arena began to listen....
  • Geron drops brain cancer drug, plans layoffs (40% of workforce)

    12/04/2012 12:24:52 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    MedCity News / Reuters ^ | December 3, 2012 | Vidya P L Nathan
    Geron Corp confirmed it will discontinue development of an experimental drug to treat cancer that has spread to the brain from elsewhere in the body and also cut about 40 percent of its workforce, after patients failed to respond to the drug in a mid-stage study. The company said it will now focus on the development of another drug candidate, imetelstat, as a treatment for blood cancers and some types of solid tumors. The brain cancer drug, GRN1005 and imetelstat's development in blood cancers were the only hopes that Geron's shareholders had after the company warned investors in September that...
  • MDMA keeps severe stress at bay

    11/21/2012 11:42:29 AM PST · by Renfield · 22 replies
    Nature ^ | 11-20-2012 | Arran Frood
    The benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) persist years after the first treatment with the drug (also known as ecstasy), according to a follow-up study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology1. The finding gives hope to people with PTSD who do not respond to conventional treatments. However, the results come from a small-scale pilot study, and the outcomes have not been so convincing in other recently published work. In the original trial, 20 patients with PTSD who had not responded to either psychotherapy or to conventional psychopharmacological drugs received MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine) or a placebo during...
  • Ticked Off About a Growing Allergy to Meat

    11/19/2012 4:49:18 AM PST · by Renfield · 5 replies
    Science Magazine ^ | 11-16-2012 | Gretchen Cuda Kroen
    Tick bites have long been synonymous with bad news, responsible for transmitting diseases such as Lyme disease, Ehrlichiosis, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever, but this must be a carnivore or BBQ lover's worst nightmare. A growing body of research suggests that bites from a particular tick are causing an unusual allergic reaction to meat. At an allergy meeting last week, for example, a diagnostics lab presented evidence that the highest prevalence of the allergy is in the southeastern United States, where the tick primarily thrives. Yet American BBQ lovers and carnivores elsewhere may not rest easy; the allergy mysteriously afflicts...
  • Just Before Organ Harvesting, Comatose Patient Recovers

    11/16/2012 2:06:14 PM PST · by NYer · 36 replies
    NC Register ^ | November 15, 2012 | STEVE WEATHERBE
    AARHUS, Denmark — Carina Melchior is a 20-year-old Danish woman who was plunged in the middle of controversy by two close encounters with death — the first in car crash last year that put her in a coma; the second in a hospital, where doctors persuaded her parents to donate her organs and shut off her life support. But Carina recovered, and she now is at the center of a storm of questions about the criteria for brain death, over-aggressive transplant agencies and the commodification of the human body. What might have been played out quietly in an obscure Danish...
  • Psychiatrists Becoming Doctor Joke

    11/15/2012 11:59:32 AM PST · by Academiadotorg · 42 replies
    Accuracy in Academia ^ | November 14, 2012 | Malcolm A. Kline
    There may actually be some good news coming out of academia. “This really is a profession that has run amok,” Robert Whitaker, author of Anatomy of an Epidemic said of psychiatrists in a recent interview with Celeste McGovern which appeared in Citizen magazine. “People are beginning to question its legitimacy and they are beginning to mistrust its values, its diagnoses and its treatments.” McGovern writes that, “Even medical students are avoiding it, he adds, as the average age of psychiatrists is now 57.” Citizen is published by Focus on the Family. McGovern is based in the United Kingdom. “Every day...
  • ABC News: Hey, This Doctor Shortage Could "Crash" Obamacare

    11/15/2012 8:43:01 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 122 replies
    Townhall ^ | 11/15/2012 | Guy Benson
    Just in case the unaffordable price tag and rising costs don't quite do the trick, America's spiraling dearth of doctors will contribute heavily to the collapse of our re-engineered health care system, according to a new study:   The United States will require at least 52,000 more family doctors in the year 2025 to keep up with the growing and increasingly older U.S. population, a new study found. The predictions also reflect the passage of the Affordable Care Act -- a change that will expand health insurance coverage to an additional 38 million Americans. "The health care consumer that values...
  • Doctor Shortage Could Cause Health Care Crash

    11/15/2012 12:55:40 AM PST · by CutePuppy · 71 replies
    ABC News ^ | November 13, 2012 | Nisha Nathan
    The United States will require at least 52,000 more family doctors in the year 2025 to keep up with the growing and increasingly older U.S. population, a new study found. The predictions also reflect the passage of the Affordable Care Act — a change that will expand health insurance coverage to an additional 38 million Americans. "The health care consumer that values the relationship with a personal physician, particularly in areas already struggling with access to primary care physicians should be aware of potential access challenges that they may face in the future if the production of primary care physicians...
  • Battle over US environment agency's human studies

    11/06/2012 2:44:11 AM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 2 November 2012 | Rebecca Trager
    PM2.5 air pollution is generated by combustion © ShutterstockThe US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finds itself in an unusual position. Two prominent Republican politicians, who have repeatedly accused the EPA of killing jobs through overregulation, are condemning the agency for lax oversight of its ongoing human research studies involving concentrated airborne particles.Representative Paul Broun, who chairs the investigations and oversight subcommittee of the House of Representatives’ Science Space and Technology Committee, has asked the EPA Inspector General (IG) to investigate a series of EPA studies. Conducted in 2004, they involved exposing humans to fine particulate matter around or smaller than...
  • Out of the Exam Room and Into the Voting Booth

    11/05/2012 4:59:15 AM PST · by Mad Dawg
    confidential | 11/3/2012 | A Catholic Physician
    I’ve generally stayed quiet during this election season, but as the election draws near and I’m seeing posts saying that voting for Romney is a step backwards for the country…I am going to speak why I’m not supporting reelecting Obama—probably different than what you’re hearing. I honestly fear for the future of my job if he is reelected. His moves against the Catholic Church with the contraception mandate frustrate me—for my Church, as well as for me personally. You may or may not know that I have not prescribed or referred for contraception, abortion or sterilization for 16 years. That...
  • Six out of ten doctors would retire today if given the opportunity (casualties of obamacare)

    10/21/2012 10:11:13 AM PDT · by NYer · 9 replies
    Illinois Policy ^ | October 15, 2011 | Jonathan Ingram
    The Physicians Foundation has completed one of the largest and most comprehensive physician surveys ever conducted in the United States. The new survey covers a number of topics, ranging from what they think about ObamaCare to how satisfied they are in their careers, from whether they will continue to accept Medicare and Medicaid patients to what they think about the current state of the medical profession. The whole thing is worth reading, but here are a few highlights: A whopping 61 percent of doctors said they would retire today if they had the ability to do so. That's up...
  • 'Poop Transplants' May Combat Bacterial Infections

    10/20/2012 6:36:10 PM PDT · by Uncle Slayton · 59 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 10/20/12 | Karen Rowan
    "Poop transplants" are an effective way to treat people with one type of intestinal bacteria infection, a new study shows. Researchers transplanted fecal matter from healthy people into the colons of people infected with the notoriously hard-to-treat Clostridium difficile bacteria, which causes severe, watery diarrhea. The researchers found that 46 out of 49 patients got better within a week of the treatment.
  • Fungal Meningitis Deaths Climb to 21; 271 Infections

    10/20/2012 6:11:08 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 3 replies
    -Excerpt- Nearly 14,000 patients may have received the fungus-contaminated shots distributed by the New England Compounding Pharmacy in Framingham, Mass., since May. -Excerpt- A second pharmacy connected to the NECC is also being investigated. Ameridose LLC said on Friday that it has agreed to extend a temporary shutdown while state and federal regulators continue an investigation into the company. Ameridose, based in Westborough, Mass., shares some common ownership with NECC. Investigators launched an investigation on Oct. 10.
  • CDC says deaths rise to 19 in worsening meningitis outbreak

    10/18/2012 4:22:08 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 13 replies
    The number of U.S. deaths from fungal meningitis linked to potentially contaminated steroid injections rose to 19 with confirmation of two new fatalities in Tennessee and one each in Florida and Virginia, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Wednesday. The deadly outbreak of the rare disease showed no signs of abating, as 14 new cases of meningitis were reported, bringing the national total to 245, plus two peripheral infections in joints.
  • Dirty shoes? How did US steroids get contaminated?

    10/17/2012 3:35:59 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 3 replies
    Financial Express ^ | Oct. 17, 2012
    Was it some moldy ceiling tiles? The dusty shoes of a careless employee? Or did the contamination ride in on one of the ingredients? There are lots of ways fungus could have gotten inside the Massachusetts compounding pharmacy whose steroid medication has been linked to a lethal outbreak of a rare fungal form of meningitis. The outbreak has killed at least 15 people and sickened more than 200 others in 15 states. Nearly all the victims had received steroid injections for back pain. Federal and state investigators have been tight lipped about any problems they may have seen at the...
  • CDC says another 19 people diagnosed with meningitis in U.S. outbreak (over 230 cases now)

    10/16/2012 4:49:34 PM PDT · by nuconvert · 22 replies
    Another 19 people have been diagnosed with fungal meningitis linked to possibly tainted vials of a steroid medication, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Tuesday, bringing the total number of cases to 231. The CDC said there were two additional cases of infection in joints after a steroid injection but these were not confirmed as meningitis, bringing the total of infections nationwide to 233. The death toll from the unprecedented outbreak was unchanged at 15, the CDC said.
  • UK: Convicted criminals recruited as carers for elderly (ObamaCare Preview?)

    10/14/2012 4:47:45 PM PDT · by Stoat · 12 replies
    The Telegraph (U.K.) ^ | October 14, 2012 | John Bingham
    Frail and vulnerable elderly people are being forced to rely on care in their homes from workers with convictions for theft and violence, an investigation has found.   Private care agencies, fulfilling contracts for councils across the country, have been employing convicted criminals to work in elderly people’s homes. In some cases, the criminals have been sent in without police checks or risk assessments being carried out, publicly available records show. One agency in Birmingham hired 23 people with criminal records, including assault and theft. Another in Sussex had five criminals on its books including a woman who was...
  • Meningitis Death Toll Rises To 15

    10/14/2012 3:45:19 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 28 replies
    WBUR/AP ^ | Oct 13, 2012
    -excerpt- The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the outbreak has now sickened 197 people in a 13 states.
  • Medicine Is In Your Mouth

    10/12/2012 12:03:36 AM PDT · by Frank Broom · 7 replies
    10-12-12 | Frank Broom
    One of the most important things people overlook in dealing with sickness is what they speak out of their mouth. You can't just speak anything because your words have an effect on your body. In the book of James he says, if you offend not in word, you are able to bridle your whole body. He also goes on to say your tongue is like the rudder of a ship, so if you want to go from sickness to healing then you are going to have to set your tongue to healing and not sickness. In 1Peter 3:10 he says,...
  • Black mamba bite packs potent painkiller

    10/11/2012 9:58:39 PM PDT · by neverdem · 23 replies
    ScienceNews ^ | October 4, 2012 | Tanya Lewis
    Study of snake venom in mice reveals potential new strategy for relieving agony A snakebite may bring on a world of hurt, but a substance found in black mamba venom could actually relieve pain. The finding reveals a new possible approach for pain treatment, researchers report online October 3 in Nature. The black mamba, Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis, is one of the most lethal snakes on Earth. But a team of researchers in France found that compounds in the snake’s venom have the same pain-banishing effect on mice that morphine does. The compounds, called mambalgins, appear to work by blocking certain...
  • Scientists Win Nobel Prize for Stem-Cell Work [ELIMINATES NEED FOR EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS!]

    10/08/2012 6:01:57 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 30 replies
    WSJ ^ | 10/8/12 | GAUTAM NAIK
    John B. Gurdon of the U.K. and Shinya Yamanaka of Japan shared this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work in so-called cellular reprogramming, which has unleashed a wave of advances in everything from cloning to the possible treatment of diseases using stem cells.... It also allows scientists to create human embryonic stem cells without having to destroy human embryos, sidestepping an approach that has long been fraught with ethical controversies. Most important, perhaps, it has significantly advanced the prospect of using a patient's own mature cells to create fresh tissue and treat disease.
  • Drug 'may prevent stroke damage'

    10/08/2012 9:08:55 AM PDT · by Silentgypsy · 19 replies
    BBC News ^ | 10/07/2012 | Unattributed
    It may be possible to use a drug to prevent some of the lasting and crippling damage caused by a stroke, according to doctors in the US and Canada. A safety trial, published in the Lancet Neurology medical journal, suggested the chemical NA-1 was safe to use. The study on 185 people also hinted that patients given the drug developed fewer regions of damaged brain tissue. The Stroke Association said that it was promising, but needed more research. Tests in primates had suggested NA-1 prevented brain cells dying when a stroke starved them of oxygen.
  • Vitamin B3 May Help Kill Superbugs

    10/07/2012 11:17:41 AM PDT · by CutePuppy · 43 replies
    Medical News Today (MNT) ^ | August 25, 2012 | Catharine Paddock, PhD
    Nicotinamide, commonly known as vitamin B3, may help the innate immune system kill antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria, the so-called "superbugs". In lab work done with mice and human blood, researchers found high doses of the vitamin increased the ability of immune cells to kill the bacteria by 1,000 times.The discovery opens the door to a new arsenal of tools for dealing with antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, such as those caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA, that have killed thousands of people around the world. They are increasing in hospitals and nursing homes, and also rising in prisons, among athletes, people in...
  • Ketamine for Depression: The Most Important Advance in Field in 50 Years?

    10/06/2012 4:37:30 PM PDT · by Renfield · 67 replies
    Time Healthland ^ | 10-05-2012 | Maia Szalavitz
    In any given year, 7% of adults suffer from major depression, and at least 1 in 10 youth will reckon with the disorder at some point during their teenage years. But about 20% of these cases will not respond to current treatments; for those that do, relief may take weeks to months to come. There is one treatment, however, that works much faster: the anesthetic and “club drug” ketamine. It takes effect within hours. A single dose of ketamine produces relief of depression that has been shown in studies to last for up to 10 days; it also appears to...
  • Common heart treatment fails to help - Beta blockers may offer little against heart attack, stroke

    10/05/2012 10:59:15 AM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    ScienceNews ^ | October 2nd, 2012 | Nathan Seppa
    Beta blockers may offer little against heart attack, stroke Commonly prescribed drugs called beta blockers fail to protect against heart attacks and strokes even while helping to control heart rate and blood pressure, researchers report in the Oct. 3 Journal of the American Medical Association. Beta blockers also didn’t lessen the odds of a heart-related death, in heart attack patients or others at risk, over a median follow-up of 44 months. The American Heart Association had previously discouraged the long-term use of beta blockers as a post–heart attack treatment beyond three years. The new findings further dim the prospects for...
  • Rapid test pinpoints newborns' genetic diseases in days

    10/04/2012 8:09:31 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies
    NATURE NEWS ^ | 03 October 2012 | Monya Baker
    Method raises hopes for routine whole-genome sequencing in neonatal intensive care. A faster DNA sequencing machine and streamlined analysis of the results can diagnose genetic disorders in days rather than weeks, as reported today in Science Translational Medicine1. Up to a third of the babies admitted to neonatal intensive care units have a genetic disease. Although symptoms may be severe, the genetic cause can be hard to pin down. Thousands of genetic diseases have been described, but relatively few tests are available, and even these may detect only the most common mutations. Whole-genome sequencing could test for many diseases at...
  • 4 Dead from Rare Meningitis, More Cases Expected

    10/04/2012 7:31:35 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 10 replies
    Fox/AP ^ | October 04, 2012
    -excerpt- All received steroid injections, mostly for back pain, a fairly typical treatment.
  • Surprises in breast cancer genetics study

    09/23/2012 5:15:01 PM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | September 23, 2012 | Victoria Colliver
    In a move that could alter the way that breast cancers are treated, researchers have redefined the disease into four main classes and determined that one type of breast cancer has more in common with an aggressive form of ovarian cancer than other breast cancers. The finding that a form of breast cancer may be genetically similar to a type of ovarian cancer underscores a new way thinking about cancer that moves away from defining cancers by the organ of origin. The findings are the result of the largest and most comprehensive study of the genetics of breast cancer to...
  • 2C-I or 'Smiles': The New Killer Drug Every Parent Should Know About

    09/21/2012 7:16:55 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 37 replies
    Witnesses described the 17-year-old boy as "shaking, growling, foaming at the mouth." According to police reports, Elijah Stai was at a McDonald's with his friend when he began to feel ill. Soon after, he "started to smash his head against the ground" and began acting "possessed," according to a witness. Two hours later, he had stopped breathing
  • Obamacare and Laptop Medicine

    09/18/2012 7:19:47 AM PDT · by arthurus · 7 replies
    Right Side News ^ | 18 September 2012 | Charles G. Battig, M.D.
    The era of laptop medicine is now upon us. Make that, laptop-computer medicine. Visit your physician and odds are that he will enter the examining room with his shiny new laptop in hand. The push for electronic records in the name of medical record portability and efficient record keeping is documented in the press, and the potential advantages appear convincing.
  • Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Not Associated With Lower Risk of Major Cardiovascular Disease...

    09/17/2012 10:37:49 PM PDT · by neverdem · 33 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Sep. 11, 2012 | NA
    Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Not Associated With Lower Risk of Major Cardiovascular Disease Events In a study that included nearly 70,000 patients, supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was not associated with a lower risk of all-cause death, cardiac death, sudden death, heart attack, or stroke, according to an analysis of previous studies published in the Sept. 12 issue of JAMA. "Treatment with marine-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for the prevention of major cardiovascular adverse outcomes has been supported by a number of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and refuted by others. Although their mechanism of action is not clear,...
  • Layoffs: Medical device companies cut 2,000 jobs in 2 months

    09/17/2012 8:55:45 AM PDT · by Sopater · 21 replies
    Mass Device ^ | September 14, 2012 | MassDevice staff
    Cost-cutting moves by medical device companies have resulted in the loss of more than 2,000 jobs over the past 2 months. Medical device companies are molting at a reptilian rate, shedding more than 2,000 jobs over the past 2 months as they look to slash costs across the board. Several of the med-tech companies that are scrapping jobs say the 2.3% medical device excise tax in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, slated to begin in January 2013. Others deny that the tax is the sole cause of their moves, saying it's a factor but not determinative. Seven medical...
  • Superbug kills 7th person at Md. NIH hospital

    09/15/2012 4:43:18 PM PDT · by nuconvert · 13 replies
    A deadly germ untreatable by most antibiotics has killed a seventh person at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Maryland.
  • A Doctor's Thoughts on Antibiotics, Expiration Dates

    09/14/2012 4:31:38 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 142 replies
    Survival Blog ^ | 7/26/10 | Dr. Bones
    As a recently-retired physician who is married to a nurse-midwife, my preparedness group looks to us as the post-TEOTWAWKI hospital and medical staff. Medical progress has been exponential and even just the last decade of scientific breakthroughs can equal a century of improvement in medical treatments, surgical techniques and pharmaceuticals. However, in the years (months?) ahead, the crumbling of the infrastructure and devolution of society in general will very likely throw us back to a medical system that existed in the 19th Century. Let’s take an example: When the U.S. was a young nation, the average woman could expect to...
  • Regenerative Medicine Helps Rebuild Wounded Warriors

    09/13/2012 3:50:35 PM PDT · by Nachum · 7 replies
    abc ^ | 9/13/12 | KATIE MOISSE
    Ron Strang lay helpless in the dirt as the hole in his leg was packed with gauze and swathed in bandages. The Marine sergeant was on foot patrol in Afghanistan's Helmand Province when an improvised explosive device tore through his left thigh, shredding his muscle and draining half his blood. "I'm sure I would've died without the quick actions of my fellow Marines," said Strang, 28, who endured more than a dozen surgeries and painful skin grafts to close the gaping wound. Though his skin eventually healed, Strang was left with half the quadriceps he once had. "I had to...
  • Anti-inflammatories tied to cardiac risk

    09/11/2012 12:03:55 PM PDT · by neverdem · 33 replies
    ScienceNews ^ | September 10th, 2012 | Nathan Seppa
    Heart attack survivors using certain painkillers are more likely to die or suffer another event People who have survived a heart attack seem to increase their risk of having another one, or of dying, by taking common painkillers called NSAIDs, a popular class of drugs that includes ibuprofen. The unsettling link between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and heart attack risk is not new. The American Heart Association released guidelines in 2007 discouraging the use of any NSAIDs among people with a history of cardiovascular disease. Researchers in Denmark now bolster that link with the largest study to date of NSAID use...
  • The Obama Campaign Should Rethink The "GM Is Alive" Meme... (pic)

    09/10/2012 9:59:01 AM PDT · by The Looking Spoon · 7 replies
    The Looking Spoon ^ | 9-10-12 | The Looking Spoon
  • U.S. Health Care Waste Larger Than Pentagon Budget

    09/08/2012 2:36:42 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    The American Interest ^ | September 7, 2012 | Walter Russell Mead
    It’s not exactly earth-shaking news that there’s a lot of waste in the U.S. health care system, but this item we came across still managed to stagger us: A report by the Institute of Medicine estimates that as much as $750 billion is wasted in the U.S. health care system each year. Three quarters of a trillion dollars. Every year. As the Wall Street Journal notes, that’s bigger than the Pentagon budget, amounting to roughly 5 percent of GDP. The report offers a familiar laundry list of problems. Unnecessary services are the leading driver of waste, but administrative expenses and...
  • Marijuana Fights Cancer and Helps Manage Side Effects, Researchers Find

    09/08/2012 12:51:31 PM PDT · by neverdem · 179 replies
    Newsweek/The Daily Beast ^ | Sep 6, 2012 | Martin A. Lee
    Cristina Sanchez, a young biologist at Complutense University in Madrid, was studying cell metabolism when she noticed something peculiar. She had been screening brain cancer cells because they grow faster than normal cell lines and thus are useful for research purposes. But the cancer cells died each time they were exposed to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal psychoactive ingredient of marijuana. Instead of gaining insight into how cells function, Sanchez had stumbled upon the anti-cancer properties of THC. In 1998, she reported in a European biochemistry journal that THC “induces apoptosis [cell death] in C6 glioma cells,” an aggressive form of...
  • OMG, Obama Must Go, as TV AD Urges Voters Replace Him

    09/06/2012 9:23:12 AM PDT · by arthurus
    Right Side News ^ | 04 September 2012 | Eric Cornett
    As the political season heats up this Fall, a new television ad campaign has been released to the airwaves by Americans For Prosperity. If you’re like me, you’ve heard the stories over the years of Canadian citizens coming in droves across our northern border for decent health care (legally, I might add). In the latest Americans For Prosperity video ad, we hear the story of one Shona Holmes, a Canadian citizen who relied on American healthcare for her own wellbeing. “The American system was there for me when I needed it,” said Shona. “It’s time for American’s to get engaged...
  • Doctor refuses to treat overweight Shrewsbury patient

    09/01/2012 8:36:40 AM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 38 replies
    WCVB-TV (ABC - Boston) ^ | August 24, 2012 | Pam Cross
    SHREWSBURY, Mass. — Ida Davidson is the first to admit her weight goes up and down, but the Shrewsbury resident said she was stunned when a new primary care physician said she could not become a patient because she weighed more than 200 pounds.
  • Green Tea Eyed As Possible Skin Cancer Treatment

    08/23/2012 2:20:57 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 6 replies
    Medical Daily ^ | August 22, 2012 | Christine Hsu
    Scientists have discovered a chemical extract in green tea that can treat two types of skin cancer, without producing the harmful side effects associated with chemotherapy.While the epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) compound is too weak to make an impact when consumed in tea, scientists were able to kill or shrink two-thirds of cancer cells within a month when they applied the extract to tumor cells in the lab. What's more, the chemical compound did not appear to affect any other healthy cells or tissues in the body.Researchers from the universities of Strathclyde and Glasgow believe that their study is the first...
  • Dealing With Medical Emergencies (preppers)

    08/20/2012 8:52:47 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 22 replies
    Personal Liberty Digest ^ | August 20, 2012 | Bob Livingston
    The prepper can take many lessons from the situation that developed in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. One lesson is that when the social order breaks down for a period of days or weeks, adequate medical care will disappear. So preparedness requires a medical kit. And no medical survival kit is complete without a good book or two on emergency medicine, anatomy, drug reference and medical terminology. Some good ones to choose from are:
  • How Obamacare's $716 Billion in Cuts Will Drive Doctors Out of Medicare

    08/20/2012 4:50:47 AM PDT · by NCjim · 66 replies
    Forbes ^ | August 20, 2012
    There are 600,000 physicians in America who care for the 48 million seniors on Medicare. Of the $716 billion that the Affordable Care Act cuts from the program over the next ten years, the largest chunk—$415 billion—comes from slashing Medicare’s reimbursement rates to doctors, hospitals, and nursing homes. This significant reduction in fees is driving many doctors to stop accepting new Medicare patients, making it harder for seniors to gain access to needed care. Here are a few of their stories. Paul Wertsch is a primary physician in Madison, Wisconsin. In 1977, he and his two partners invested $500,000 of...