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Keyword: medicine

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  • Knee replacement may go poorly for people who think life isnít fair

    08/24/2014 5:32:17 AM PDT · by RoosterRedux · 28 replies
    People who tend to blame others for their suffering and think setbacks in their lives are irreparable tend to report more pain after knee replacement surgery, according to a new study. This is not the first time feelings of personal injustice have been tied to longer recovery times and increased disability after injury, the authors write. ďPain is a complex phenomenon that is influenced by biological, social, and psychological factors,Ē said lead author Esther Yakobov, a doctoral student in clinical psychology at McGill University in Montreal. ďStudies conducted with patients who suffer from chronic pain because of an injury demonstrated...
  • Type 1, Type 2 Diabetes Share Underlying Mechanism

    08/20/2014 8:42:35 PM PDT · by Pining_4_TX · 27 replies
    BioscienceTechnology.com ^ | 08/20/14 | University of Manchester
    Work by scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Auckland suggest that both major forms of diabetes, type 1 and type 2, are the result of the same mechanism. The findings, published in the FASEB Journal, provide compelling evidence that juvenile-onset or type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are both caused by the formation of toxic clumps of a hormone called amylin. The results, based on 20 yearsí work in New Zealand, suggest that type 1 and type 2 diabetes could both be slowed down and potentially reversed by medicines that stop amylin forming these toxic clumps.
  • Frankenstein Science: Head Transplants Are Now Possible?

    08/18/2014 3:25:03 PM PDT · by NYer · 33 replies
    Seasons of Grace ^ | August 18, 2014 | Kathy Schiffer
    ‚ÄúPotentially unethical.‚ÄĚ That‚Äôs how one expert described an Italian scientist‚Äôs plan to perform a ‚Äúhead transplant‚ÄĚ by severing two heads at the same time, then cooling and flushing out the ‚Äėrecipient‚Äô head before attaching it to its new body with polymer glue.That is ‚ÄúPOTENTIALLY unethical?‚ÄĚ Making one person out of two, and throwing away the unused halves, is only ‚Äúpotentially‚ÄĚ unethical?Shock and awe.* * * * *Neuroscientist Sergio Canavero is undeterred by criticism, however. Canavero now reports that it‚Äôs possible to merge bone marrow, surgically cut with an ultra-sharp knife, when fusing one person‚Äôs head onto another person‚Äôs spine. The...
  • Ground-breaking medical research millions choose to reject [Because it was developed by Israelis]

    08/19/2014 9:04:34 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 10 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 08/19/2014 | Carol Brown
    Dr. Leslie Lobel is an Israeli virologist conducting cutting edge research on a cure for Ebola -- a cure he believes is three to five years away. As reported in the Times of Israel: Unlike many people, Dr. Leslie Lobel has not been shocked to hear about the current Ebola epidemic in West Africa, the largest ever recorded since the virus’s discovery in 1976 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (then Zaire). A Ben-Gurion University of the Negev virologist and a leader in the search for a cure for the devastating disease, Lobel had been predicting such an outbreak. (snip)...
  • Cancer Screening in Seniors Yields Few Benefits

    08/18/2014 6:42:51 PM PDT · by Innovative · 63 replies
    Medpage Today ^ | Aug 18, 2014 | Charles Bankhead
    Screening older patients for cancer provided minimal benefit at considerable cost and increased use of invasive procedures, reported investigators in two separate studies. "It is particularly important to question screening strategies for older persons," Gross continued. "Patients with a shorter life expectancy have less time to develop clinically significant cancers after a screening test and are more likely to die from noncancer health problems after a cancer diagnosis."
  • ďI was in a coma for four daysĒ

    08/17/2014 10:42:05 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 5 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 08/17/14 | Patrick D Hahn
    Part 1: ďITíS A NIGHTMAREĒ After the Avandia debacle, is history about to repeat itself? Amy Lynn Evans remembers the onset of the illness that left her with seven hundred thousand dollars in medical bills. The morning began like any other. ďMy son was getting ready for work, and he said to me ĎMom, you donít look too well.í When I went to the emergency room, they found a blood clot on my lung.
  • A bacterium that destroys tumors' dark heart shows promise

    08/16/2014 7:50:12 PM PDT · by Innovative · 14 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | Aug 16, 2014 | Melissa Healy
    When scientists injected spores of a weakened form of the bacterium Clostridium novyi directly into the soft-tissue tumors of dogs and that of a single human subject, the results were not only abscesses, fever and pain at the site--all inflammatory responses that showed the immune system had been drawn to the area. In a matter of hours, the bacterial spores quickly found their way into these tumors' necrotic cores and began replicating madly, in several cases killing the malignant tissue. In three of 16 dogs treated with the C. novyi, tumors disappeared altogether and the animals were cured. In three...
  • Boston Researchers Train Bees To Detect Diabetes

    08/16/2014 7:30:12 PM PDT · by Innovative · 18 replies
    CBS Boston ^ | Aug 14, 2014 | Dr. Mallika Marshall
    ďDiabetes is reaching epidemic proportions, not only in the U.S. but worldwide,Ē says Dr. Allison Goldfine, a diabetes specialist at the Joslin Diabetes Center. She is helping foreign graduate students Tobias Horstmann and Juliet Phillips with their research project. Theyíre trying to use bees to sniff out diabetes. In collaboration with the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, they are using a device to house the bees and observe the beesí reaction. If a patient breathes into the device and acetone is detected, the bees stick out their tongues in response.
  • Low-Salt Diets Shown to Pose Health Risks

    08/13/2014 6:26:20 PM PDT · by Innovative · 35 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | Aug 13, 2014 | Ron Winslow
    The new study, which tracked more than 100,000 people from 17 countries over an average of more than three years, found that those who consumed fewer than 3,000 milligrams of sodium a day had a 27% higher risk of death or a serious event such as a heart attack or stroke in that period than those whose intake was estimated at 3,000 to 6,000 milligrams. Risk of death or other major events increased with intake above 6,000 milligrams. Last year, a report from the Institute of Medicine, which advises Congress on health issues, didn't find evidence that cutting sodium intake...
  • Pioneering new injection to cure heart failure without need for major surgery

    08/11/2014 11:13:46 PM PDT · by Innovative · 12 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | Aug 11, 2014 | Sarah Knapton
    The technique, which involves a simple injection, could aid the recovery of hundreds of thousands of heart failure patients - and could even consign heart transplants to history. Researchers hope to increase levels of SERCA2a, a protein in heart muscle cells that plays an important role in heart muscle contraction The technique, which involves a simple injection, could aid the recovery of hundreds of thousands of heart failure patients. Heart transplants could even be consigned to history thanks to a trial by Imperial College, London, which aims to show for the first time that gene therapy could repair failing organs....
  • The Merry Old Land Of Oz

    08/06/2014 10:09:38 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 4 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 8/6/14 | Michael D. Shaw
    The career path of Dr. Mehmet Oz is most puzzling. Boasting a fine education (Tower Hill prep; Harvard undergrad; Penn med school; and Wharton), Oz did his residency at New Yorkís Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, and is now an attending surgeon at the same hospital. He also holds various academic appointments at Columbiaís med school. His name appears on more than 150 research papers, and he has published over 20 booksómost of which have ďYouĒ in the title. Oprah called him ďAmericaís doctorĒ in 2004, and following more appearances on her program, the TV Queen gave him his own show on...
  • Meet the Tiny Company Behind the Experimental Antibodies for Ebola

    08/05/2014 8:24:52 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 12 replies
    WPRO 630 ^ | 08/05/2014
    (SAN DIEGO) -- The companies manufacturing an experimental drug treating two American Ebola patients aren't among the largest multinational pharmaceuticals in the world. In fact, leading the effort is a small nine-employee firm in San Diego. Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., founded in 2003, says on its website that it develops, "novel pharmaceuticals for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases, focusing on unmet needs in global health and biodefense." Mapp's commercialization arm is LeafBio Inc., which has no employees and just two owners, Mapp President Larry Zeitlin tells ABC News. Mapp, along with LeafBio and Defyrus Inc. in Toronto, Canada, collaborated...
  • US government, military research program helped identify experimental Ebola treatment

    08/05/2014 7:05:15 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 13 replies
    Fox News ^ | 08/05/2014
    The experimental drug used to treat two American aid workers who have been infected with the Ebola virus has never been tested on humans before and was only identified earlier this year as part of an ongoing research program backed by the U.S. government and military. Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol have each received doses of the drug, known as ZMapp, aimed at boosting the immune system's efforts to fight off Ebola and is made from antibodies produced by lab animals exposed to parts of the virus. The Associated Press reported that Writebol, 59, had received two doses of...
  • Ebola Comes to the United States: Deadly Virus Crosses U.S. Border

    08/03/2014 6:00:55 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    Decoded Science ^ | August 3, 2014 | Janelle Vaesa, MPH
    Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia are going through the worst Ebola outbreak in history and health officials believe that it has killed more than 700 people there. Now, for the first time, Ebola has entered the United Sates via two health aid workers that contracted the disease while working in Africa where the Ebola outbreak continues. Ebola in the U.S. The first patient landed in the United States on Saturday, August 2, 2014. Dr. Kent Brantly was then flown from Africa to the United States and then transported via ambulance to Emory University Hospital. The second person, Nancy Whitebol, will...
  • Barney Frank on Obamacare rollout: ĎThey just lied to peopleí

    08/03/2014 8:56:52 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 47 replies
    Washington Times ^ | 8-3-14 | Kellan Howell
    the mishandling of the new health care law. ďThe rollout was so bad, and I was appalledóI donít understand how the president could have sat there and not been checking on that on a weekly basis,Ē the former Democratic congressman told the website. ďBut frankly, he should never have said as much as he did, that if you like your current health care plan, you can keep it. That wasnít true. And you shouldnít lie to people. And they just lied to people,Ē he added. Mr. Frank told The Huffington Post that Mr. Obama should have better explained the situation...
  • Blood test predicts suicide risk, study suggests

    08/02/2014 9:43:39 PM PDT · by Innovative · 15 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 31, 2014 | Rachael Rettner
    A new gene linked to suicide risk has been discovered, and researchers say the finding could lead to a blood test that predicts a person's risk of attempting suicide. The model correctly identified 80 percent to 96 percent of people who experienced suicidal thoughts or attempted suicide. It was more accurate among people at severe risk for suicide. If the findings are confirmed and lead to a blood test for suicide risk, such a test might be used to screen people in psychiatric emergency rooms or to determine how closely a person needs to be monitored for suicide risk, the...
  • Chili peppers can decrease colorectal cancer risk, claims new research

    08/02/2014 6:16:12 AM PDT · by Innovative · 50 replies
    Tech Times ^ | Aug 2, 2014 | Judy Mottl
    If you don't eat chili peppers or hot curry much you may want to reassess that given new research that claims the peppers and curry can play a role in reducing the risk of colorectal and bowel tumors, as well as extend a person's lifespan by 30 percent. The study claims the active ingredient in chili peppers, called dietary capsaicin, decreases the cancer risk as it triggers chronic activation of an ion channel called TRPV1, which is a sensory neuron that protects the intestine against acidity and spicy chemicals. In essence adding chili peppers and hot curries to the diet...
  • A Response to the "Open Letter for the People in Gaza"

    07/31/2014 9:57:46 AM PDT · by Piranha · 6 replies
    Israeli Medical Association ^ | July 27, 2014 | Eidelman, Leonid, MD and Afek, Arnon, MD
    .... The assertion that Israel has no regard for the lives of Gazan citizens is utterly false. Israel continues to supply electricity and water to Gaza even during this unfortunate conflict. Since the beginning of the current conflict, 1248 trucks entered Gaza from Israel, 4.44 million liters of diesel were delivered for the power station, and 48 infrastructural repairs were carried out. On July 27, 170 trucks were scheduled to enter but the crossing was forced to close at 14:00 because of Hamas activity in the area. The 94 trucks that entered delivered, among other thing, 1165 tons of food,...
  • 11th Circuit: Constitutional to Bar Doctors from Asking Patients About Firearm Ownership

    07/29/2014 2:15:40 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 57 replies
    Breitbart's Big Government ^ | July 28, 2014 | AWR Hawkins
    On July 25 the United States Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit "eliminated the injunction" against the enforcement of Florida's "gun gag" law, which restricts doctors from asking patients if they own a firearm unless asking is necessary to a patient's treatment. According to Law360.com, the 11th Circuit ruled that barring doctors from asking about firearms "doesn't violate the First Amendment." Florida Governor Rick Scott (R) signed the NRA-backed "gun gag" legislation in 2011. Suit was brought against the State of Florida over the law by "the Florida chapters of the American Academies of Pediatrics and American College of...
  • Doctor who contracted Ebola is in grave condition

    07/29/2014 12:13:32 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 80 replies
    NY Post ^ | 7-29-14 | Chris Perez
    A doctor from Texas is in grave condition and terrified for his life after he contracted the incurable Ebola virus he was treating in West Africa, colleagues said Monday. Dr. Kent Brantley, 33, is one of two Americans in the region who have contracted the deadly disease, which has now killed nearly 700 people in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization. The father of two had been treating Ebola victims in Monrovia, Liberia, when he began to notice symptoms related to the virus, CBS reports. ďIím praying fervently that God will help me survive this disease,Ē he said...
  • The Corruption of Peer Review Is Harming Scientific Credibility

    07/26/2014 12:31:00 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 07/14/2014 | Hank Campbell
    Academic publishing was rocked by the news on July 8 that a company called Sage Publications is retracting 60 papers from its Journal of Vibration and Control, about the science of acoustics. The company said a researcher in Taiwan and others had exploited peer review so that certain papers were sure to get a positive review for placement in the journal. In one case, a paper's author gave glowing reviews to his own work using phony names. Acoustics is an important field. But in biomedicine faulty research and a dubious peer-review process can have life-or-death consequences. In June, Dr. Francis...
  • Doctors respond to parents of Down syndrome newborns with cruelty and callousness

    07/24/2014 1:20:20 PM PDT · by Morgana · 137 replies
    Live Action ^ | Sarah Terzo
    LifeNews recently published an article by Mark Leach about what happened when his baby was born with Down syndrome. Leach describes how he and his wife felt abandoned by the medical establishment and how the hospital gave them outdated and scant information about Down syndrome. In response to his experience, and the experiences of many other Down syndrome parents, he has become the bioethics specialist at the National Center for Prenatal & Postnatal Down Syndrome Resources, and works to get positive, life-affirming information into the hands of new Down syndrome parents and those who go through prenatal testing for Down...
  • Top Ebola Doctor in Sierra Leone Contracts Virus

    07/23/2014 5:09:34 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 44 replies
    CBS News ^ | July 23, 2014 | JESSICA FIRGER
    A physician at the helm of Sierra Leone's efforts to contain and control the Ebola epidemic has just been diagnosed with the virus, according to reports from Reuters and the BBC. Sheik Umar Khan, a virologist, has treated more than 100 patients with the deadly disease and was admitted earlier this week to a high containment treatment facility, according to a statement released on Tuesday by the government. A source inside the ward told Reuters that the doctor is receiving treatment, though no details were given on his current state of health. Health Minister Miatta Kargbo called Khan a "national...
  • Johns Hopkins Hospital to pay $190 million to settle suits over pelvic exam photos

    07/21/2014 11:43:54 AM PDT · by jalisco555 · 8 replies
    Modern Healthcare ^ | July 21, 2014 | AP
    Johns Hopkins Hospital has agreed to a $190 million settlement with more than 8,000 patients of a gynecologist who secretly photographed and videotaped women's bodies in the examining room with a pen-like camera he wore around his neck, lawyers said Monday. Dr. Nikita Levy was fired in February 2013, days after an employee alerted hospital authorities about her suspicions. Levy committed suicide 10 days later. Investigators discovered roughly 1,200 videos and 140 images in his home. "All of these women were brutalized by this," said the women's lead attorney, Jonathan Schochor. "Some of these women needed counseling, they were sleepless,...
  • Docs say Medicare's proposed rates for heart procedure would limit access

    07/19/2014 6:43:27 AM PDT · by Innovative · 12 replies
    Modern Healthcare ^ | July 18, 2014 | Virgil Dickson
    Cardiac surgeons and medical societies are asking the CMS to reconsider proposed payment rates for implanting Abbott's MitraClip, a device that treats a debilitating heart condition. Because the device itself costs more than $30,000, the proposed reimbursement rate would make it ďprohibitive for hospitals to be able to offer this significant care so badly needed for a large majority of our patients,Ē Dr. Gregory Helmer, a cardiologist at the University of Minnesota, said in comments submitted to the CMS.
  • Three more cases of rare human plague found in Colorado

    07/18/2014 5:07:53 PM PDT · by RummyChick · 28 replies
    reuters ^ | 7/18 | coffman
    Three more people in Colorado have been diagnosed with the plague after coming in contact with an infected dog whose owner contracted a life-threatening form of the disease, state health officials said on Friday. In all, four people were infected with the disease from the same source, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment said in a statement.
  • UKRAINE: Russian terrorists destroyed the top world research scientists with cure for AIDS

    Russian terrorists destroyed the top world research scientists. On board of the downed Boeing was actually a potential cure for HIV. As a result of the loss of the aircraft at Donetsk mankind has lost about 100 AIDS specialists. In addition, the Board might be a cure for HIV. The downed over Donbass Malaysian Boeing flew the world's leading experts in the field of AIDS scientists, physicians and community leaders. All of them were to assemble at the beginning on Sunday in Melbourne (Australia) International Conference. As reported by the International AIDS society, on board the aircraft, via Kuala Lumpur,...
  • Why Doctors in Italy Refuse to Give Abortions

    07/18/2014 1:56:54 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 9 replies
    Abortion may be legal in Catholic Italy but more and more doctors are refusing to terminate pregnancies, with many women now having to resort to procedures carried out in secret, The Local's Angela Giuffrida discovers. Ever since a Benito Mussolini-era ban on abortions as a ďcrime against the purity of the Italian raceĒ was wiped out in 1978, thanks to a group of determined women, including the former foreign minister Emma Bonino, women in Italy are, by law, entitled to terminate a pregnancy within the first three months. After 90 days, abortions are only allowed if the foetus is badly...
  • Study: Single injection of protein could reverse symptoms of Type 2 diabetes

    07/17/2014 6:13:02 AM PDT · by Innovative · 65 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 17, 2014 | FoxNews
    When mice with the human equivalent of Type 2 diabetes were injected with the protein FGF1, their blood sugar levels returned to normal over two days. Just one injection of the protein both regulated these levels and even helped reverse insulin insensitivity Ė the underlying cause of diabetes. Published in the journal Nature, the research on FGF1 could revolutionize diabetes treatment. In addition to being effective against diabetes, the protein has several advantages over current diabetes drugs. It does not result in dangerous side effects seen with other diabetes drugs, such as heart problems, weight gain, or hypoglycemia. Additionally, FGF1...
  • Can heart attack damage be reversed?

    07/12/2014 8:51:48 PM PDT · by Innovative · 31 replies
    CNN ^ | July 12, 2014 | Caleb Hellerman
    An hour's drive to the southeast, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, Dr. Eduardo Marban has recently launched an experiment to help patients like Karpman. Marban led one of the earlier stem cell trials, using cells taken by biopsy from the patient's own heart. The cells were multiplied in a laboratory for two to three weeks and then reinfused through a catheter. At the time, says Marban, it was thought that the stem cells themselves turned into new heart muscle and blood vessels. "In fact, the more we learned, the more we realized that that's not what these cells...
  • Alzheimer's disease could be prevented after new blood test breakthrough

    07/08/2014 11:00:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 12:01AM BST 08 Jul 2014 | By Sarah Knapton, Science Correspondent
    Scientists at Oxford University and Kings College London develop blood test which can predict the onset of Alzheimer's so that drugs could target the disease before symptoms appear A blood test has been developed to predict if someone will develop Alzheimerís within a year, raising hopes that the disease could become preventable. After a decade of research, scientists at Oxford University and Kingís College London are confident they have found 10 proteins which show the disease is imminent. Clinical trials will start on people who have not yet developed Alzheimerís to find out which drugs halt its onset. The blood...
  • Obesity is Inflammatory Disease, Rat Study Shows

    07/07/2014 5:38:08 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 42 replies
    Sci-News ^ | 2013 December 05 | Sci-News
    Scientists led by Dr David Fairlie from the University of Queensland, Australia, have found abnormal amounts of an inflammatory protein called PAR2 in the fat tissues of overweight and obese rats and humans. PAR2 is also increased on the surfaces of human immune cells by common fatty acids in the diet. When obese rats on a diet high in sugar and fat were given a new oral drug that binds to PAR2, the inflammation-causing properties of this protein were blocked, as were other effects of the high-fat and high-sugar diet, including obesity itself. "This important new finding links obesity and...
  • New Weapon in Fight Against 'Superbugs'

    07/02/2014 9:48:19 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 12 replies
    WSJ ^ | June 30, 2014 8:47 p.m. ET | By Ann Lukits
    Some harmful bacteria are increasingly resistant to treatment with antibiotics. A discovery might be able to help the antibiotics treat the disease. A soil sample from a national park in eastern Canada has produced a compound that appears to reverse antibiotic resistance in dangerous bacteria. Scientists at McMaster University in Ontario discovered that the compound almost instantly turned off a gene in several harmful bacteria that makes them highly resistant to treatment with a class of antibiotics used to fight so-called superbug infections. The compound, called aspergillomarasmine A, or AMA, was extracted from a common fungus found in soil and...
  • 15 Ways The World Will Be Awesome In 2050

    06/28/2014 7:20:22 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 50 replies
    Business Insider Indonesia ^ | June 24, 2014 | Christina Sterbenz
    The future scares a lot of people. Climate change, a growing population, and fewer natural resources will certainly pose new challenges for the human race in the next few decades. But when you consider ongoing social and economic progress and all of the coming innovations in science and technology, thereís plenty of room for optimism. Weíve pulled out some of our favorite ideas about the future of our world. Child mortality rates will be vastly lower. During the 20th century, the sharpest declined in mortality involved deaths of children under 5 years old, according to the assessment on human health...
  • CNN reporter: VA canít be fixed without a total gutting

    06/23/2014 5:40:13 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    Hot Air ^ | June 23, 2014 | Noah Rothman
    CNN reporter Drew Griffin has owned the revelations surrounding the Department of Veterans Affairs and their scandalous treatment of military veterans. After a year of investigation, he broke the story involving the creation of secret waiting lists at a Phoenix VA hospital where 40 vets died awaiting care. Griffinís reporting led to the uncovering of several more secret waiting lists Ė a revelation that forced President Barack Obama to accept the resignation of his VA secretary, Gen. Eric Shinseki. On Monday, Griffin discussed a new report from an independent government oversight agency which found that VA has been ignoring whistleblowers...
  • Poll-Tested Pee in a Cup

    06/22/2014 4:14:03 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 17 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | June 22, 2014 | Debra J. Saunders
    "Pee in a cup" is a phrase you should prepare to hear frequently this election season. A requirement that doctors be subject to random drug and alcohol testing is the curb-appeal provision in a measure that will be on the California ballot in November. The brains behind the initiative titled the Troy and Alana Pack Patient Safety Act -- named after two Danville children killed by a substance-abusing driver in 2003 -- clearly figured out that voters are more likely warm to the part that promises drug tests for doctors than the measure's more important provision, which would lift the...
  • Flesh-eating bacteria killed Maine teenager after oral surgery

    06/20/2014 4:27:45 PM PDT · by george76 · 33 replies
    Portland Press Herald ^ | June 20, 2014 | Matt Byrne
    Benjamin LaMontagne, who died at his home in February four days after wisdom tooth extraction, was killed by a tissue infection of his gums, neck and jaw... after routine oral surgery, was killed by a rare, aggressive bacterial infection that caused swelling of his jaw and neck, according to the state Medical Examinerís Office. The medical examinerís report, released Thursday to the Portland Press Herald in response to a public records request, lists the cause of death as cervical necrotizing fasciitis, commonly called ďflesh-eating bacteria.Ē The infection is caused by a powerful strain of streptococcus A, a group of pathogens...
  • UEA researchers discover Achillesí heel in antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    06/18/2014 6:27:26 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    University of East Anglia ^ | June 18, 2014 | Press Release
    Scientists at the University of East Anglia have made a breakthrough in the race to solve antibiotic resistance. New research published today in the journal Nature reveals an Achillesí heel in the defensive barrier which surrounds drug-resistant bacterial cells. The findings pave the way for a new wave of drugs that kill superbugs by bringing down their defensive walls rather than attacking the bacteria itself. It means that in future, bacteria may not develop drug-resistance at all. The discovery doesnít come a moment too soon. The World Health Organization has warned that antibiotic-resistance in bacteria is spreading globally, causing severe...
  • Scientists Find The 'Achilles Heel' Of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria

    06/18/2014 5:56:17 PM PDT · by blam · 13 replies
    BI ^ | 6-18-2014 | Sarah Knapton - The Telegraph
    Sarah Knapton, The TelegraphJune. 18, 2014 The global threat of antibiotic resistance could finally be tackled after British scientists discovered a chink in the armour of deadly bacteria. Health experts have warned that within 20 years even routine operations like hip replacements and organ transplants could be deadly because of the risk of infection. But now scientists at the University of East Anglia have discovered how the bug responsible for E-coli and salmonella builds an impenetrable wall to keep out antibiotics. They believe that within a few years they could develop a drug which switches off the wall-building mechanism, making...
  • Scientist Makes Mutant, Infectious Flu Virus in Lab

    06/11/2014 6:27:03 PM PDT · by CorporateStepsister · 22 replies
    NBC News ^ | June11, 2014 | By Maggie Fox
    Flu experts have made a mutant version of the 1918 ďSpanish fluĒ virus that killed tens of millions of people, sparking a new debate over whether such work is too dangerous. Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin says the experiments are important for helping scientists understand how new pandemics start, and for designing better flu vaccines.
  • Veterans Could Get $50 Billion a Year in New Health Care

    06/11/2014 5:34:01 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    Roll Call ^ | June 11, 2014 | Niels Lesniewski
    As the Senate voted overwhelmingly to pass legislation designed to fix problems at the Department of Veterans Affairs, the amount of new spending in the measure began to clarify. And the price tag could be a gut-check when it comes to understanding what it really costs to fulfill sacred obligations to Americaís veterans. The cost of the measure could be astronomical. Thatís according to preliminary numbers circulated by the Congressional Budget Office Wednesday afternoon. The bill would give veterans new opportunities to seek care outside of the health care system provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs. CBO said in...
  • Dubai Doctor Cures Man of ĎHairy Tongueí

    06/11/2014 1:40:59 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 25 replies
    Gulf News ^ | June 11, 2014 | Sheva Pathak
    American developed hairy tongue 10 years ago and tried several treatments but could not be curedAn American who suffered for 10 years from a Ďhairy tongueí has finally found a cure for his condition in Dubai. Clay Irwin visited several doctors in several countries, including his home country, to treat his embarrassing condition which impacted his social life as he suffered from constant bad breath due to food and saliva getting stuck in the hair on his tongue. ďI developed a rare medical condition some time back. I went to several places in the US, but none could help. I...
  • Big Laborís VA Choke Hold

    06/01/2014 2:42:57 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 11 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | June 1, 2014 | Nick Sorrentino
    Public sector unions are out of control. They are extracting wealth from the productive economy and playing taxpayers for chumps. Simple as that. Whether the itís the teachers unions, the municipal unions, the SEIU, the workers at the myriad of of alphabet soup agencies, the assumption is that somehow taxpayers work for government employees, for the low level cronies. Our money is supposed to fund their pensions and above market salaries. We owe it to them. The average federal worker makes over $120,000 in total compensation. A comparable private sector worker? About $50,000. This should not be. To some degree...
  • Medicine on the verge of drastically reducing and preventing HIV for the second sexual revolution

    05/26/2014 3:51:03 PM PDT · by aimhigh · 31 replies
    NextBigFuture ^ | 05/26/2014 | NextBigFuture
    Federal health officials recommended two weeks ago that hundreds of thousands of Americans at risk for AIDS take a daily pill that has been shown to prevent infection with the virus that causes it. If broadly followed, the advice could transform AIDS prevention in the United States ó from reliance on condoms, which are effective but unpopular with many men, to a regimen that relies on an antiretroviral drug. . . . . . The first is psychological. Doctors and policy makers need to admit that 30 years of the ABC mantra ó abstain, be faithful, use condoms ó has...
  • Dr. Campbell: Printing 3D organs for transplant

    05/22/2014 1:52:01 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    WNCN-TV ^ | May 21, 2014 | Dr. Kevin Campbell
    (VIDEO-AT-LINK)RALEIGH, N.C. - The emerging process of 3D printing, which uses computer-created digital models to create real-world objects, has produced everything from toys to jewelry to food. Soon, however, 3D printers may be spitting out something far more complex, and controversial: human organs. Researchers are working diligently to create human organs and body parts through the use of a 3D printer. The 3D printer works in much the same way an inkjet printer does - with a needle that squirts material in a predetermined pattern. Instead of ink, the printer uses cells or human tissue. The cells would be purified...
  • This Christian Ministry Went Galt: Beating healthcare zeitgeist by resurrecting mutual aid society

    05/22/2014 12:01:36 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    PJ Lifestyle ^ | May 18, 2014 | Walter Hudson
    (VIDEO-AT-LINK)Recently, my wife approached me with the unwelcome news that our health insurance plan ó which we like ó will likely be cancelled next year. Her employer, a healthcare provider, generously provides benefits even for those working part-time. Due to the devastation wrecked upon the industry by Obamacare, they anticipate the need to drop coverage for all employees working less than 60 hours per pay period. My wife works 56. Since my employerís offering proves virtually worthless, far too expensive for far too little coverage, we will be left effectively uninsured. We may consider Samaritan Ministries as an alternative to...
  • Sarah Palin accuses media of double standard with Hillary Clinton

    05/19/2014 5:21:49 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 45 replies
    MSNBC ^ | May 19, 2014 | Clare Kim
    Another Republican is now weighing in on Hillary Clintonís health. Sarah Palin slammed the mainstream media for treating Clinton with a double standard after Republican strategist Karl Rove raised controversial concerns about the likely presidential candidateís health. ďThank goodness liberals are consistent in refusing to apply double standards, thanks to their disdain for hypocrisy Ė so theyíll come through once again,Ē the former vice presidential candidate wrote sarcastically on her Facebook page Monday evening. ĒRest assured these self-designated protectors of what they obviously believe is the Ďweaker sexí needing protection in the political arena will elevate political discourse.Ē Palin doubled...
  • Debate between Plant based and Paleo Diets

    05/17/2014 10:49:04 AM PDT · by RichardMoore · 117 replies
    youtube.com ^ | Colin Campbell MD
    Debate between plant based diet and Paleo diet.
  • Measles used to put cancer into remission [Game Changer in medicine?]

    05/16/2014 5:38:41 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 20 replies
    CNN ^ | 5/15/14 | Jacque Wilson and William Hudson
    A woman with an incurable cancer is now in remission, thanks, doctors say, to a highly concentrated dose of the measles virus. For 10 years, Stacy Erholtz, 49, battled multiple myeloma, a deadly cancer of the blood. Doctors at the Mayo Clinic say she had received every type of chemotherapy drug available.... Then researchers gave her and five other multiple myeloma patients a dose of a highly concentrated, lab-engineered measles virus similar to the measles vaccine. In fact, the dose Erholtz received contained enough of the virus to vaccinate approximately 10 million people.
  • Hope Comes to RHOB 2123--Fred Upton Leads a Cure Strategy for the 21st Century

    05/11/2014 11:22:34 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 3 replies
    Breitbart.com ^ | May 9, 2014 | James A. Pinkerton
    The white-marble Rayburn House Office Building, in Washington DC, looks like a giant courts building or a central bank, fully intimidating and imposing in its hulking stony blockiness. And the US Congress, of course, is an institution best known for its tedium, albeit a tedium that is regularly punctuated by fiery partisan combat. On a typical day, the Rayburn building--acronymed as RHOB--is a place where politicos and bureaucrats struggle for and against some special interest, yea or nay, on regulation or appropriation. And the biggest single activity in RHOB, or in any of the other five office edifices on Capitol...