Free Republic 4th Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $5,419
Woo hoo!! And the first 6% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: medicine

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • 2015 Nobel Prize in medicine goes to 3 scientists for work on parasite-fighting therapies

    10/05/2015 11:01:22 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 10/05/2015 | Melissa Healy
    Three scientists whose discoveries have driven scourges of the developing world to the brink of eradication have been awarded the Nobel Prize for physiology and medicine. The Nobel Committee announced Monday it had awarded the 2015 prize to 85-year old William C. Campbell, 80-year-old Satoshi Omura and 85-year-old Youyou Tu of China for their discoveries leading to the development of antimicrobial treatments for such tropical diseases as river blindness, lymphatic filariasis (also known as elephantiasis) and malaria. Campbell, an Irish biochemist and parasitologist at Drew University in New Jersey, and Omura, a bioorganic chemist at Kitasato University in Japan and...
  • This new 3D printer creates structures with gel, could help build living organs

    10/02/2015 10:28:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | October 1, 2015 | A.J. Dellinger
    3D printing is proving to be a potential game changer for a wide variety of fields. One group in particular that could benefit is the medical community, thanks to a recent development by scientists that could make it easier to print organs from living tissue. How? By printing structures inside of special gel that provides support during the build process. New Scientist reports that researchers from the University of Florida in Gainesville came to the breakthrough method while searching for a way to enable the printing of items that cannot support their own weight. The technique prints objects inside a...
  • Doctors astonished after ViroCap test detects all viruses lurking in a human body

    10/01/2015 9:26:57 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    World Tech Today ^ | October 1, 2015 | Dan Taylor
    Researchers have successfully created a new test that could eliminate the need for needles in testing for viruses — and dramatically increase the success rate of doctors trying to diagnose an illness. It’s called ViroCap, and while the test is not ready for use in patients just yet, it has passed a big clinical trial that is paving the way for its eventual entry into the market, according to a UPI report. ViroCap supposedly can detect any virus known to man — and animals — and it could help doctors who don’t know what they’re looking for spot a virus...
  • It’s Time to Get Rid of the VA

    09/25/2015 3:12:40 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    The National Review ^ | September 25, 2015 | Jonah Goldberg, Senior editor
    There is only one guaranteed way to get fired from the Department of Veterans’ Affairs. Falsifying records won’t do it. Prescribing obsolete drugs won’t do it. Cutting all manner of corners on health and safety is, at worst, going to get you a reprimand. No, the only sure-fire way to get canned at the VA is to report any of these matters to authorities who might do something about it. That, at least, is what the U.S. Office of Special Counsel recently reported to the president of the United States. The Special Counsel’s office is the agency to which government...
  • The Answer Is Quite Simple, But Nobody Will Pick Up The Ball

    09/23/2015 8:59:46 AM PDT · by SatinDoll · 49 replies
    The Market-Ticker ^ | Sept. 23, 2015 | Karl Denninger
    C'mon folks, this isn't complicated. Hill used Indian government data on the cost of pharmaceutical ingredients and allowed for a 50-percent profit margin - but no money for investment in research - to work out the costs of producing certain drugs. On this basis, he found that Novartis' leukaemia drug Glivec actually cost $159 for a year's treatment, against the $106,000 charged in the United States. Roche's Tarceva for lung cancer cost $236, against a U.S. price of $79,000, and Novartis' Tykerb cost $4,000 against a price of $74,000. In all these cases the U.S. cost was far above that...
  • Researchers grow functional kidneys from stem cells that work in live animals

    09/24/2015 2:17:17 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    Futurism ^ | Hashem AL-ghaili
    In Brief Japanese researchers have successfully grown kidneys from stem cells that worked as they were supposed to after being transplanted into rats and pigs. The Breakthrough With all the parts, grown, the kidney was placed inside a rat, then the pathway was added, followed by the bladder they’d grown—the new bladder was then connected to the rat’s native bladder. After sewing up the rat, they found the whole system worked. The team then repeated what they had done with a much larger animal, one much closer in size to humans—a pig—and found the same results. The paper was published...
  • The Danger of the ObamaCare Agenda Exposed

    09/22/2015 5:23:03 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 14 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 9/22/15 | Suzanne Eovaldi
    The glaring unfairness of ObamaCare can be seen in the anonymous analysis done by a well salaried California engineer and his very low paid girlfriend, a part time mail clerk. The lady friend earns $18,000 per year to his yearly income of $60,000 to $ 125,000. “For me, making $60,000 a year, under ObamaCare, the cheapest, lowest grade policy I can buy, with a $5,000 deductible, costs $482 a month. His gal friend, holding the exact same policy with the same deductible, pays $1.00 a month! “That’s right, $1.00 per month. I’m not making this up,” he said. Can you...
  • First-of-its-kind, 3D printed guide helps regrow complex nerves after injury

    09/18/2015 8:35:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies ^ | September 18, 2015 | Benedict
    As the vital relationship between 3D printing and medical science continues to flourish, potentially life-altering developments continue to be made. A national team of researchers has developed a first-of-its-kind, 3D-printed guide that helps regrow both the sensory and motor functions of complex nerves after injury. The groundbreaking research, undertaken in Minnesota, has the potential to help more than 200,000 people annually who experience nerve injuries or disease. Nerve regeneration is a complex process. Because of this complexity, regrowth of nerves after injury or disease is very rare, according to the Mayo Clinic. Nerve damage is often permanent. While the peripheral...
  • Could This Discovery End Alcoholism?

    09/05/2015 3:11:58 PM PDT · by UnwashedPeasant · 75 replies
    Newser ^ | Sept. 3, 2015 | Arden Dier, Newser Staff
    Blocking D1 receptors in brain blocks alcohol cravings: study. Scientists say a cure for alcoholism could be on the horizon thanks to the remarkable discovery of neurons in the brain that play a role in whether one glass of wine turns into a bottle. Texas A&M researchers explain the part of your brain known as the dorsomedial striatum contains neurons with spiny protrusions, each with two types of dopamine receptors. One type, called D1, encourages action but is structurally altered when large amounts of alcohol are consumed. The alteration causes the neurons to activate with less stimulation and the result...
  • Doctor fired for 'anti-gay' remarks: no regrets

    08/30/2015 4:42:16 PM PDT · by NetAddicted · 18 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 082515 | Elihan Aharon
    Dr. Sudi Namir, who was fired from the Israel Medical Association Ethics Committee for controversial comments he made about homosexuals on an internet forum, has defended his comments in an exclusive interview with Arutz Sheva.
  • University of Massachusetts Caught Buying Aborted Baby Body Parts for Research

    08/18/2015 8:27:54 AM PDT · by Hombre Malevo · 17 replies
    LifeNews ^ | 08/17/2015 | Steven Ertelt
    UMass is the latest publicly-funded university to have been found to have purchased aborted baby body arts — following expose’ stories about Colorado State University, University of Wisconsin and Oregon Health & Science University.
  • Genetically engineered pigs: Advance looks promising [For Transplants]

    08/14/2015 9:17:26 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 8 replies ^ | August 14, 2015 | by Nancy Owano
    A domestic pig on an organic farm in Solothurn, Switzerland. Image: Wikimedia Commons --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Stories of people waiting for organ transplants that could save their lives are well known. The numbers, though, are not encouraging. The US Department of Health and Human Services has some data: 122,407 people need a lifesaving organ transplant (total waiting list of candidates). The agency said that the gap between supply and demand continues to widen. The total number of donors from January through May this year was 5,975. On average, 22 people die each day while waiting for a transplant. Here is another statistic:...
  • In a first, drug using 3D printing technology gets FDA nod

    08/03/2015 4:32:23 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    Reuters ^ | August 3, 2015 | Arathy S. Nair in Bengaluru
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has, for the first time, approved a drug that uses 3D printing technology, paving the way for potential customization of drugs to suit patients' needs. The drug, made by privately held Aprecia Pharmaceuticals Co, was approved for oral use as a prescription adjunctive therapy in the treatment of epilepsy, the company said on Monday. Spritam uses Aprecia's "ZipDose" technology, a delivery system that creates premeasured doses which disintegrate in the mouth with a sip of liquid. 3D printing could help companies make products "to the specifications of an individual patient rather than (take a)...
  • Angel's Glow: The Bacterium that Saved Civil War Soldiers

    08/01/2015 5:39:54 PM PDT · by Talisker · 33 replies
    Kids Discover ^ | August 19, 2013
    As the sun went down after the 1862 Battle of Shiloh during the Civil War, some soldiers noticed that their wounds were glowing a faint blue. Many men waited on the rainy, muddy Tennessee battlefield for two days that April, until medics could treat them. Once they were taken to field hospitals, the troops with glowing wounds were more likely to survive their injuries — and to get better faster. Thus the mysterious blue light was dubbed “Angel’s Glow.” In 2001, 17-year-old Civil War buff Bill Martin visited the Shiloh battlefield with his family and heard the legend of Angel’s...
  • Obamacare and the Road to Communism

    07/30/2015 2:14:59 PM PDT · by Art in Idaho · 17 replies ^ | July 30, 2015 | Jen Kuznicki
    The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) recently called attention to an IRS ruling that would penalize small businesses up to $500,000 for daring to compensate their employees for health insurance premiums. The NFIB reports, “On July 1, 2015, employers will be penalized $100 per day per employee if they try to make health insurance more affordable by reimbursing their employees for individual market health insurance premiums. The penalty affects businesses that provide reimbursement for more than one employee. The healthcare reimbursement prohibition regulation decreases an employer’s ability to assist employees with health insurance costs.” The ruling would fine the...
  • What Does Uber Medicine Look Like?

    07/27/2015 7:12:58 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 25 replies
    Forbes ^ | 07/26/2015 | John C. Goodman
    Uber is completely revolutionizing the market for urban transportation. Could a similar revolution occur in other fields, including the market for medical care? That’s what University of Chicago economist John Cochrane wondered the other day. But we no longer have to speculate. Uber medicine has already arrived. There are a number of firms that will bring a doctor to your doorstep at the flick of a cell phone app, including Doctors Making House Calls (North Carolina), Pager (New York City), Heal (Los Angeles) and Medicast (Seattle). Insurance rarely pays for the service. Like so many other innovations in meeting the...
  • US-Cuba handshake brings smiles at Biocon

    07/24/2015 11:16:17 PM PDT · by Jyotishi · 1 replies
    Daily News & Analysis ^ | Saturday, July 25, 2015 | Soumonty Kanungo
    Drug maker says better poised to licence and position its novel molecule Itolizumab, which has a Cuban origin Mumbai - Bangalore-based Biocon hopes that the thaw in bilateral relations between the US and Cuba offers the company a "better opportunity" to licence and partner its novel molecule Itolizumab, used for the treatment of psoriasis. The molecule, which has a Cuban origin, is the world's first novel anti CD-6 monoclonal antibody to treat multiple autoimmune diseases. The drug was launched in India in 2013 under the brand name Alzumab. "Itolizumab is advancing well. With relations restored between Cuba and the...
  • Study shows relief for tinnitus, debilitating ringing in ears

    07/17/2015 12:11:24 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 23 replies ^ | 07/16/2015 | By Lynne Terry
    Robert Folmer of the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center gave people with chronic tinnitus transcranial magnetic stimulation as part of a study. Participants found their symptoms decreased by about a third. (Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center ) ================================================================================================= Imagine dealing with stresses of every day, juggling the demands of family life and deadlines at work, with a constant ringing in your ears? That's just what millions of Americans who suffer from tinnitus face. Hope could be on the way. New research by the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University found that a noninvasive technique involving...
  • Graedons' Pharmacy | Could biotin tame tinnitus?

    07/17/2015 12:20:45 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies ^ | July 14, 2015 | By JOE and TERESA GRAEDON
    Q: I wanted to share my experience with tinnitus. It's not incapacitating, but it is annoying. I found something that helps by serendipity. My wife has hair loss. She takes levothyroxine (Synthroid) and liothyronine (Cytomel) because her thyroid was removed via radiation. She also takes biotin to lessen her hair loss. I'm bald on top, but I thought I'd see if biotin would help grow new hair. It didn't. What DID happen with the very first dose was total elimination of my tinnitus! A few hours after I take the biotin, the tinnitus returns, but at a much lower intensity....
  • Quiet that ringing in the brain: New drug promises relief from epilepsy and tinnitus...

    07/17/2015 12:47:46 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 57 replies ^ | 23-Jun-2015 | University of Connecticut
    FULL TITLE: Quiet that ringing in the brain: New drug promises relief from epilepsy and tinnitus with fewer side effects =================================================================================================== A new drug may treat epilepsy and prevent tinnitus by selectively affecting potassium channels in the brain, UConn neurophysiologist Anastasios Tzingounis and colleagues report in the 10 June Journal of Neuroscience. Epilepsy and tinnitus are both caused by overly excitable nerve cells. Healthy nerves have a built-in system that slams on the brakes when they get too excited. But in some people this braking system doesn't work, and the nerves run amok, signaling so much that the brain gets...
  • Children's Mysterious Paralysis Tied To New Virus

    07/07/2015 9:15:56 AM PDT · by edpc · 25 replies
    Yahoo Health ^ | 7 July 2015 | Live Science
    Mysterious cases of paralysis in U.S. children over the last year have researchers searching for the cause of the illness. Now, a new study suggests that a new strain of a poliolike virus may be responsible for some of the cases. So far, more than 100 children in 34 states have suddenly developed muscle weakness or paralysis in their arms or legs, a condition known as acute flaccid myelitis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Previously, researchers linked a virus called enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), which can cause respiratory illness similar to the common cold, with some of...
  • Dubai Doctors Revive 62-Year-Old Man After His Heart Stopped for 17 Minutes

    07/01/2015 1:41:13 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 8 replies
    Emirates 24/7 ^ | Wednesday, July 01, 2015
    Indian national was not charged for the treatmentAn elderly Indian national whose heart stopped for 17 minutes and was considered dead got second life when doctors at a Dubai hospital managed to revive him. Khalifa bin Darai, Executive Director for Dubai Corporation for Ambulance Services, told Emarat Al Youm newspaper that his team received information that the man, 62, was in critical condition because he heart had failed and he was dead. Though it was necessary to transfer him to Rashid Hospital, but due to long distance the Dubai ambulance team contacted a nearby private hospital which agreed to receive...
  • What Will LBGT-Friendly Laws Mean for Medicine?

    06/29/2015 2:12:09 PM PDT · by NYer · 11 replies
    Aletelia ^ | June 22, 2015 | MICHAEL COOK
    With same-sex marriage and the transformation of Bruce Jenner into Caitlyn Jenner in the world headlines, it’s time to ask what LGBT bioethics would look like. Timothy Murphy, of the University of Illinois College of Medicine, foreshadows some of the major themes in the journal Bioethics. Bioethics benefits. “Bioethics is better than it would otherwise have been, because people queer in their sexual interests and identities have challenged misconceived concepts of health and disease, challenged obstacles to access and equity in healthcare, and forced attention to professional standards in clinical care, among other things.” Defending LGBT parenting. To show that the battle...
  • Anesthesiologist trashes sedated patient … too bad he was recording everything (with audio)

    06/24/2015 1:39:32 PM PDT · by canuck_conservative · 63 replies
    National Post [Canada] / WashPost ^ | Wednesday, June 24, 2015 | Tom Jackman
    ... But as soon as he pressed play on his way home, he was shocked out of his anesthesia-induced stupor: He found that he had recorded the entire examination, and that the surgical team had mocked and insulted him as soon as he drifted off to sleep. And in addition to their vicious commentary, the doctors discussed avoiding the man after the colonoscopy, instructing an assistant to lie to him, and then placed a false diagnosis on his chart. “After five minutes of talking to you in pre-op,” the anesthesiologist told the sedated patient, “I wanted to punch you in...
  • A 17-year-old invented an ingenious way to instantly stop bleeding

    06/22/2015 8:07:27 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 76 replies
    Business Insider ^ | June 22, 2015 | Chris Weller
    Imagine this: you're gushing blood. Nothing seems to make it stop. Then you apply a gel to your wound, and within seconds, the bleeding stops. In minutes, you're healed. This is the premise of VetiGel, an algae-based polymer created by Joe Landolina — a 22 year-old who invented the product when he was just 17. Landolina is now the co-founder and CEO of Suneris, a biotech company that manufactures the gel. Last week, Suneris announced that it will begin shipping VetiGel to veterinarians later this summer. Humans won't be far behind. When injected into a wound site, the gel can...
  • Kim Jong-un Claims to Have Cured Aids, Ebola, Sars and Mers With Single 'Miracle Drug'

    06/19/2015 11:55:23 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 42 replies
    Mirror ^ | 19 JUNE 2015 | STEVE WHITE
    North Korean officials said scientists had developed Kumdang-2 from ginseng and other ingredients - which they chose not to revealKim Jong-un claims to have succeeded where the greatest minds in science have failed... by producing a single drug which can prevent and cure Aids, Ebola, Sars and Mers. North Korea is currently suffering from one of the worst droughts in its history while still pursuing a nuclear programme. The official Korean Central News Agency said the portly despot's scientists developed miracle drug Kumdang-2 from ginseng and other ingredients - without saying which. North Korea claimed the same drug cured deadly...
  • How LGBT-friendly laws could change medicine

    06/19/2015 8:10:34 AM PDT · by wagglebee · 32 replies
    Mercatornet ^ | 6/18/15 | Michael Cook
    With same-sex marriage and the transformation of Bruce Jenner into Caitlyn Jenner in the world headlines, it’s time to ask what LGBT bioethics would look like. Timothy Murphy, of the University of Illinois College of Medicine,  foreshadows some of the major themes in the journal Bioethics.Bioethics benefits. “Bioethics is better than it would otherwise have been, because people queer in their sexual interests and identities have challenged misconceived concepts of health and disease, challenged obstacles to access and equity in healthcare, and forced attention to professional standards in clinical care, among other things.”Defending LGBT parenting. To show that the battle...
  • Are You Done Yet? (Obamacare)

    06/16/2015 11:00:45 AM PDT · by SatinDoll · 9 replies
    The Market-Ticker ^ | June 16, 2015 | Karl Denninger
    I'm serious. Are you done yet? Are you ready to grab the wood, the nails, the hammer and the rope? Are you ready to demand that this crap -- all of it in the medical system -- be stopped? All of it -- not some of it, all of it. Monopolist practices, refusal to disclose prices before services are rendered, billing $157 worth of a nutritional supplement out for more than $44,000 and more? WHEN IS YOUR TOLERANCE LIMIT REACHED AMERICA? WHEN? Is it before or after you're financially and personally decimated? Why do you tolerate "Obamacare" or "Medicare" when...
  • Medical Expert: ‘The Power Of The Doctor Is Becoming Subsumed By The Government’

    06/15/2015 8:53:25 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 33 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | June 14, 2015 | Ginni Thomas
    As America hears of more doctors leaving the profession, the head of a patient-centered national health care organization based in St. Paul, Minnesota, sees both political parties in Washington making matters worse. “Huge things are happening under the surface that people don’t understand,” says Twila Brase, a public health nurse and the founder of the Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom in this 33 minute video interview with The Daily Caller. “The power of the doctor is becoming subsumed by the government.” America is moving, from Brase’s perspective, from the charitable human “mission of medicine” to a cold, sterile “business of...
  • Major Medical Journal Retracts Numerous Scientific Papers After Fake Peer-Review Scandal

    06/09/2015 6:56:57 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies
    Zero Hedge ^ | 06/09/2015 | Tyler Durden
    A major publisher of scholarly medical and science articles has retracted 43 papers because of “fabricated” peer reviews amid signs of a broader fake peer review racket affecting many more publications. As The Washington Post reports, BioMed Central - a well-known publication of peer-reviewed journals - shows a partial list of the retracted articles suggests most of them were written by scholars at universities in China. The Committee on Publication Ethics stated, it "has become aware of systematic, inappropriate attempts to manipulate the peer review processes of several journals... that need to be retracted."Peer review is the vetting process...
  • How Virtual Reality May Change Medical Education And Save Lives

    06/04/2015 11:32:24 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    Forbes ^ | May 22, 2015 | Robert Glatter, MD
    Practice makes perfect.The old adage applies to many aspects of our life in a variety of ways. Practicing your backhand, learning a dance move, or rehearsing your speech. But where it may matter the most is for medical professionals who perform lifesaving interventions or procedures for patients in emergency departments or in the operating room. The reality is that there are some lifesaving procedures in emergency medicine that you rarely perform–but must always be ready to perform in a split second. One such a procedure–known as cricothyrotomy–which involves making an incision into a specific area of patient’s neck and inserting...
  • 6 Toxic Chinese Products found in the US (VIDEO)

    06/02/2015 3:54:20 PM PDT · by Mount Athos · 15 replies
    China Uncensored ^ | June 2nd, 2015
    The United States is being flooded with potentially dangerous, toxic imports from China. Between 2006 and 2010, the FDA blocked 9,000 unsafe Chinese products from entering American borders. But the FDA also inspects less than 1% of all goods seeking entry into the US. So how much is getting through? From tainted milk to toxic pet food, the answer is costing American lives. Think twice about made in China.
  • Medicine's Hidden Roots in an Ancient Manuscript

    06/02/2015 10:45:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    New York Times ^ | June 1, 2015 | Mark Schrope
    A Syriac scholar at Philipps University in Marburg, Germany, Dr. Kessel was sitting in the library of the manuscript's owner, a wealthy collector of rare scientific material in Baltimore. At that moment, Dr. Kessel realized that just three weeks earlier, in a library at Harvard University, he had seen a single orphaned page that was too similar to these pages to be coincidence. The manuscript he held contained a hidden translation of an ancient, influential medical text by Galen of Pergamon, a Greco-Roman physician and philosopher who died in 200 A.D. It was missing pages and Dr. Kessel was suddenly...
  • The Hottest 'New' Health Remedy That's Been Around Forever: Chili Pepper

    06/01/2015 10:00:02 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    NewsOK ^ | 6/1/15
    Do you love the snap that chili peppers give to your food? Are you a fan of the heat they impart to a variety of dishes? Even if you’re not, you may want to take another look at the humble chili pepper. From migraine relief to weight control, researchers are verifying what some cultures have known for centuries: the chili pepper and its key constituents, like capsaicin, deliver a host of health benefits. Here are just some of the ways chili peppers are helping to fight some of the country’s most common health conditions: Migraine relief The World Health Organization...
  • Researchers hail new cancer treatment: Unlocking the body's immune system

    06/01/2015 6:35:41 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    cnn ^ | Don Melvin
    Nell Barrie, a spokeswoman for Cancer Research UK, while calling the results "encouraging" and "promising," told CNN that much remains to be learned and the new drugs would not replace any of the existing cancer treatments. ... But Dr. James Larkin, the lead author of the melanoma study, called the results a game changer. "We've seen these drugs working in a wide range of cancers, and I think we are at the beginning of a new era in treating cancer," Barrie said immunotherapy could offer hope to people with cancers that are otherwise difficult to treat, such as melanoma, advanced...
  • More Trouble in the Fantasyland of Medical Tourism

    05/28/2015 10:17:00 AM PDT · by Rona Badger · 11 replies
    The American Medical Money Machine ^ | May 28, 2015 | James R. Goldberg
    There is a strange expectation that Medical Tourism holds the answer to what is wrong with American medicine: long waits, shortages of doctors, costs that are completely out of control, poor treatment and a sharp decline in the number of doctors who are willing to go into medicine. It’s true. Doctors are leaving medicine in droves while the corporations make more money than ever at the expense of both the patient and the doctor. We have written about this extensively. There is plenty wrong with healthcare in America. Hardly surprising, the overhead costs under Obamacare are expected to explode by...
  • Study Breaks Down Aging Process, May Lead to Solutions to Age-Related Diseases

    04/30/2015 2:49:45 PM PDT · by John W · 12 replies ^ | April 30, 2015 | Roberta Alexander
    Salk Institute researchers studied a mutation in Werner syndrome to get a better understanding of aging as well as age-related diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s. Nobody likes the idea of aging. But the alternative — which is to die young — doesn’t have too many fans either. That’s why a study that offers possible new ways to prevent and treat age-related diseases such as cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer's disease has attracted attention. The study was published today in the journal Science. But don’t throw out that bottle of Gray Be Gone just yet. The scientists at the Salk...
  • Telemedicine Controversy in Texas

    04/20/2015 2:03:10 PM PDT · by ThethoughtsofGreg · 6 replies
    American Legislator ^ | 4-20-15 | Sean Riley
    The Texas Medical Board views rules it adopted April 10 as “expanding telemedicine opportunities,” but business and industry groups insist they’ll instead serve to “drive a stake through the heart” of telemedicine in the Lone Star State. At the center of the issue is whether a video consultation is enough to establish the requisite doctor-patient relationship for physicians to prescribe medication or provide a diagnosis. That convenience is critical if an overarching goal of telemedicine is to deliver care to the underserved, particularly in rural areas where geography and provider shortages create access issues. The board’s rules, however, require either...
  • Scientists find key to 'turbo-charging' immune system to kill all cancers

    04/17/2015 8:11:03 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 42 replies ^ | 7:00PM BST 16 Apr 2015 | By Sarah Knapton, Science Editor
    A protein which ‘turbo-charges’ the immune system so that it can fight off any cancer or virus has been discovered by scientists. In a breakthrough described as a ‘game-changer’ for cancer treatment, researchers at Imperial College found a previously unknown molecule which boosts the body’s ability to fight off chronic illnesses. Scientists at Imperial College London, who led the study, are now developing a gene therapy based on the protein and hope to begin human trials in three years. “This is exciting because we have found a completely different way to use the immune system to fight cancer,” said Professor...
  • Medical-College Entrance Exam Gets an Overhaul (class consciousness, racial and ethnic identity)

    04/16/2015 5:43:33 AM PDT · by reaganaut1 · 10 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | April 15, 2015 | MELINDA BECK
    The essay section is out and sociology is in, and test-takers will need to be as familiar with psychology terms, such as “reciprocal determinism,” as they are with organic chemistry. ... [A] large new section—one quarter of the test—covers psychology, sociology and the biological foundations of behavior. Official review material includes concepts such as social inequality, class consciousness, racial and ethnic identity, “institutionalized racism and discrimination” and “power, privilege and prestige.” ... The committee considered making the test pass/fail. “There was some sentiment that a person’s future shouldn’t rest on a mathematical score,” said Dr. Lucey. But it was ultimately...
  • Gov. Scott Walker heads to Europe on trade mission as he ramps up likely White House bid

    04/10/2015 9:10:30 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 13 replies
    Gov. Scott Walker heads to Europe this week on a trade mission featuring private meetings with business and government representatives in Germany, France and Spain, as he ramps up for a likely bid for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016. The most high-profile event on Walker's itinerary comes Tuesday when he's slated to deliver a 15-minute speech titled "Opportunities for bilateral trade and investment" at the Hannover Messe trade show in Germany. That is the world's largest industrial fair, Walker's office said in the documents detailing the trip provided to The Associated Press. Walker's only other event that's open to...
  • Thousand-year-old Anglo-Saxon recipe kills MRSA superbug

    03/31/2015 5:42:06 PM PDT · by MinorityRepublican · 50 replies
    CNN ^ | March 31st, 2015 | Nick Thompson and Laura Smith-Spark
    It might sound like a really old wives' tale, but a thousand-year-old Anglo-Saxon potion for eye infections may hold the key to wiping out the modern-day superbug MRSA, according to new research. The 10th-century "eyesalve" remedy was discovered at the British Library in a leather-bound volume of Bald's Leechbook, widely considered to be one of the earliest known medical textbooks. Christina Lee, an expert on Anglo-Saxon society from the School of English at the University of Nottingham, translated the ancient manuscript despite some ambiguities in the text. "We chose this recipe in Bald's Leechbook because it contains ingredients such as...
  • Suicide risk advisory for ADHD drugs comes ‘out of the blue’ and has terrified families, doctor says

    03/31/2015 11:28:56 AM PDT · by rickmichaels · 31 replies
    National Post ^ | March 31, 2015 | Tom Blackwell
    Health Canada may have unduly “terrified” families Monday with a surprise warning that an array of widely used ADHD drugs could boost the risk of suicidal thoughts or actions in patients, says a prominent psychiatrist. With more than four million prescriptions for the medications dispensed yearly in Canada, the regulator said new and stronger warnings will soon be included in the products’ labelling to reflect the possible suicide-related risk. It also advised patients and their families to keep an eye out for the side effect, while stressing that the drugs’ benefits continue to outweigh their potential risks. Still, one specialist...
  • You Have a Voice Regarding 3-Parent Embryos

    03/24/2015 3:20:04 PM PDT · by NYer · 5 replies
    Catholic Stand ^ | March 24, 2015
    Our health, a precise equilibrium, may be disrupted by any disease at any given time. Scientific progress has moved beyond the realm of diagnoses and care of disease, and has now entered the new arena of prediction and prevention while still in the embryonic stage of life, in spite of unknown factors and risks. With the advancing technology comes challenges of safety and efficacy, along with ethical and social considerations. The 3-parent embryo or mitochondrial transfer technology ultimately raises one of the greatest questions we will perhaps ever face as voting Catholics. Are we willing to genetically modify humans on...
  • American Doctors Are Killing Themselves and No One Is Talking About It

    03/23/2015 8:00:53 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 44 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | 03/23/2015 | Gabrielle Glaser
    It’s estimated that at least 400 U.S. doctors kill themselves every year. Many are struggling with depression, anxiety, or addiction. Greg Miday was a promising young doctor with a prestigious oncology fellowship in St. Louis. He spoke conversational Spanish, volunteered with the homeless, and played the piano as if he’d been born to it. He had rugged good looks, with dark wavy hair and a tall, athletic build. Everybody—siblings, patients, friends, nurses, professors, fellow doctors, and above all, his physician-parents—adored him. On the evening of June 21, 2012, Greg drew a bath, lit candles, and put his iPod on speaker....
  • Scientists Confirm IOM Recommendation for Vitamin D Intake Was Miscalculated and Is Far Too Low

    03/21/2015 2:39:51 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 82 replies
    Newswise ^ | March 16, 2015 | Creighton University
    Newswise — SAN DIEGO, CA (March 16, 2015) - Researchers at UC San Diego and Creighton University have challenged the intake of vitamin D recommended by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Institute of Medicine (IOM), stating that their Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for vitamin D underestimates the need by a factor of ten. In a letter1 published last week in the journal Nutrients the scientists confirmed a calculation error noted by other investigators, by using a data set from a different population. Dr. Cedric F. Garland, Dr.P.H., adjunct professor at UC San Diego’s Department of Family Medicine and Public...
  • Answers to Some of the Biggest 3D Printing Skeptics

    03/16/2015 8:48:22 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 16, 2015 | Brian Krassenstein
    If you’ve been reading our site for longer than a couple of weeks, then you likely have figured out that we are obsessed with 3D printing. Why are we so obsessed with this technology? Because we truly believe that 3D printing will change the world we all live in, mostly for the better, and the quicker this happens the better off we all will be. Although I, personally, became aware of 3D printing about half a decade ago, I didn’t really understand it or venture to explore the various applications of the technology until only about two years ago. Soon...
  • Is America in Decline? Twenty signs America is not in decline.

    03/15/2015 9:21:09 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 44 replies
    The Nolan Chart ^ | March 6, 2015 | James Luko
    It’s very fashionable to declare or pronounce, America is in decline- using such absurd anecdotal examples as the troubles in Syria (we didn’t do anything when Assad crossed the red line), Ukraine (we did not protect the Ukraine as promised in the Budapest Memorandum) gun shootings at shopping malls, troubled economy (when was our economy not troubled?- It’s troubled according to a developed countries standards- but compared to most of the world, it’s an exemplary example of market economics- giving the highest standard of living to the most people in the world). The other standard measurement used to support the...
  • Breakthrough Molecular 3D Printer Can Print Billions of Possible Compounds

    03/14/2015 9:58:12 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 13, 2015 | Brian Krassenstein
    What will 3D printers ultimately evolve into? No one has a functioning crystal ball in front of them I assume, but a good guess would be a machine which can practically build anything its user desire, all on the molecular, and eventually atomic levels. Sure we are likely multiple decades away from widespread molecular manufacturing, but a group of chemists led by medical doctor Martin D. Burke at the University of Illinois may have already taken a major step in that direction. Burke, who joined the Department of Chemistry at the university in 2005, heads up Burke Laboratories where he...
  • This Chemistry 3D Printer Can Synthesize Molecules From Scratch

    03/13/2015 5:55:35 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | March 12, 2015 | William Herkewitz
    Need an obscure medicinal compound found only in a jungle plant? Just print it.Say you're a medical researcher interested in a rare chemical produced in the roots of a little-known Peruvian flower. It's called ratanhine, and it's valuable because it has some fascinating anti-fungal properties that might make for great medicines. Getting your hands on the rare plant is hard, and no chemical supplier is or has ever sold it. But maybe, thanks to the work of University of Illinois chemist Martin Burke, you could print it right in the lab. In a new study published in the journal Science...