Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $35,735
40%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 40% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: medicine

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Scientists Take Big Step Toward Peanut Allergy Cure

    01/29/2015 10:20:18 AM PST · by Red Badger · 55 replies
    www.newser.com ^ | Posted Jan 28, 2015 1:08 PM CST | By Matt Cantor, Newser Staff
    (Newser) – As many as three million Americans may be allergic to peanuts, the Huffington Post has reported, with one study suggesting that the number of kids with the allergy doubled between 1997 and 2002. But those who are affected may have a reason to smile: A new study could point the way to a cure for the condition, the Australian Associated Press reports via the Guardian. For a year and a half, 30 kids with the allergy were given peanut protein plus a probiotic every day; another 30 received a placebo, researchers at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute report....
  • 3D printers to make human body parts? It's happening

    01/28/2015 6:54:27 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    The San Jose Mercury News Business ^ | January 28, 2015 | Steve Johnson
    It sounds like something from a science fiction plot: so-called three-dimensional printers are being used to fashion prosthetic arms and hands, jaw bones, spinal-cord implants -- and one day perhaps even living human body parts. While the parts printed for humans so far have been fashioned from plastic, metal and other inorganic materials, researchers in California and elsewhere also have begun printing living tissue, with the goal of eventually employing these "bioprinters" to create customized kidneys, livers and other organs for people needing transplants. What's particularly attractive about the technology, according to its proponents, is that 3D printers can produce...
  • Government confirms one of Dr. Oz's favored diet pills is a total hoax

    01/27/2015 10:56:56 PM PST · by Mount Athos · 21 replies
    vox ^ | January 26, 2015 | Julia Belluz
    The government is forcing one of Dr. Oz's favorite supplement peddlers to pay out $9 million to consumers after making deceptive and unsubstantiated claims about weight loss products. In December, researchers writing in the British Medical Journal examined the health claims showcased on 40 randomly selected episodes of the two most popular internationally syndicated health talk shows, The Dr Oz Show and The Doctors. What they found was disappointing but not exactly surprising: about half of the health recommendations had either no evidence behind them or they actually contradicted what the best-available science tells us.
  • Probe: Smuggled snails eaten for religion

    03/11/2010 2:13:15 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 15 replies · 480+ views
    upi ^ | March 11
    MIAMI, - Authorities in Florida said they are investigating the alleged illegal importing of giant African snails for use in a religious healing ritual. A search warrant filed in Miami-Dade Circuit Court said state and federal investigators raided the home of Charles Stewart, 48, in January after receiving information that he was keeping a large box full of the snails, which are only allowed in the United States with special permits for scientific research, the Miami Herald reported Thursday. Federal authorities said they began investigating Stewart in November after receiving complaints that he was feeding the juices from the snails...
  • White Coats For Black Lives: Toward Racial Equality In Health Care

    01/19/2015 11:50:18 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    WBUR-FM, Boston's National Public Radio Station ^ | January 19, 2015 | Rachel Zimmerman
    Acknowledging the public health impact of racism and deep disparities in the quality and accessibility of medical care for patients of color, a national organization, White Coats for Black Lives, says it’s launching a new effort today, in celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. Dorothy Charles, one of the group’s organizers and a first year medical student at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine, offers some context in an email: Racism profoundly impacts people of color: the black-white mortality gap in 2002, for example, accounted for 83,570 excess deaths. As future physicians, we are responsible for addressing the...
  • Radiology: Choose between change or trouble

    01/19/2015 9:39:03 AM PST · by struwwelpeter · 17 replies
    Diagnostic Imaging ^ | January 14th, 2015 | Liza Haar
    CHICAGO — “Some folks might think that I’m just a paranoid old guy who feels that the world is coming to an end and we had a great ride…but there are major disruptive changes in health care on the horizon, and unless we understand them and respond, I think, personally, the future of our profession is in jeopardy,” Paul Berger, MD, chairman, Partners in the Imaging Enterprise, and past founder and former chairman of NightHawk Radiology, said at RSNA 2014. The disruption Berger was referring to specifically is the trend of population health. Population health is an idea with varying...
  • Police: Juvenile posed as doctor at St. Mary's hospital

    01/16/2015 12:03:14 PM PST · by Daffynition · 21 replies
    SunSentinel ^ | Jan 15, 2015 | kate jacobson
    West Palm Beach police busted a juvenile who was posing as a doctor — with a white lab coat and all — for a month at St. Mary's Medical Center. Police said they got a call on Jan. 13 about a juvenile walking around in a white doctor's lab coat and carrying a stethoscope who was telling people he was a doctor
  • This Temporary Tattoo Can Monitor Diabetics' Glucose Levels as Accurately as a Finger Prick

    01/15/2015 2:25:51 PM PST · by Mellonkronos · 16 replies
    Science Alert ^ | January 15, 2015 | FIONA MACDONALD
    [I really think it is important to highlight all the great advances in technology and medicine, to show what is good in society and what we can accomplish if we put our minds to it! Even if you don’t have diabetes you should appreciate the advances that can be made—if government regulators and Obama don’t destroy the medical industry first.] This Temporary Tattoo Can Monitor Diabetics' Glucose Levels as Accurately as a Finger Prick “A flexible and easy-to-wear temporary tattoo could help diabetics manage their condition without daily finger pricks.” By FIONA MACDONALD January 15, 2015 Engineers from the University...
  • The ‘train wreck’ that only Ted Cruz can see

    01/13/2015 12:47:11 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 49 replies
    MSNBC ^ | January 13, 2015 | Steve Benen
    The recent successes of the Affordable Care Act pose a challenge for the right, at least in theory. The more “Obamacare” works effectively, and the more Republican predictions are discredited, the more difficult it should be for conservatives to deny what is plainly true. And yet, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) doesn’t seem to mind. The Texas Republican delivered some predictable red meat at the Heritage Action Conservative Policy Summit yesterday, taking aim at the health care law he loves to hate. Obamacare, he asserted, has wrought “devastation.” He called it a “train wreck” that has cost millions of Americans their...
  • GOD Economics

    01/11/2015 10:46:09 AM PST · by Jedediah · 4 replies
    Bible , the joshua chronicles ^ | 1-11-15 | Jedediah
    My Kingdom Economics are derived through "Thanksgiving"for it was in this manner the waters parted for Moses and the snakebites were of no consequence(I will lift my eyes to the hills) for as The Son Of God is lifted up doors open and miracles begin ! My endowment to Him( Jesus) is you( My children of Light ) and so it is as your love for Us is poured out ," Truly " it is returned flowing down upon your heads pressed down shaken together and flowing over into My very Will. So enter My Courts with Thanksgiving "YES" but...
  • 'Cyborg' spinal implant could help paralysed walk again

    01/09/2015 1:26:03 PM PST · by Mellonkronos · 7 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | January 8, 2015 | Sarah Knapton
    [For me, these kinds of stories are inspirational and show what human beings are capable of!] Paralysed patients have been given new hope of recovery after rats with severe spinal injuries walked again through a ‘groundbreaking’ new cyborg-style implant. In technology which could have come straight out of a science fiction novel or Hollwood movie, French scientists have created a thin prosthetic ribbon, embedded with electrodes, which lies along the spinal cord and delivers electrical impulses and drugs. The prosthetic, described by British experts as ‘quite remarkable’, is soft enough to bend with tissue surrounding the backbone to avoid discomfort....
  • 'Ingenious' Antibiotic Discovery 'Challenges Long-Held Scientific Beliefs'

    01/07/2015 9:10:36 PM PST · by blam · 19 replies
    BI - Reuters ^ | 1-7-2015 | Lauren F Friedman and Reuters
    Lauren F Friedman and Reuters January 7, 2015Scientists have discovered a new antibiotic, teixobactin, that can kill serious infections in mice without encountering any detectable resistance, offering a potential new way to get ahead of dangerous evolving superbugs. The new antibiotic was discovered in a sample of soil. The research is "ingenious," Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University, told The New York Times. Researchers said the antibiotic, which has yet to be tested in humans, could one day be used to treat drug-resistant infections caused by the superbug MSRA, as well as tuberculosis, which normally requires...
  • Lab-Grown Vaginas Implanted Successfully In 4 Teenagers

    01/02/2015 8:25:02 AM PST · by Jack Hydrazine · 141 replies
    Collective-Evolution.com ^ | 29DEC2014 | Staff Writer
    Ever since scientists grew a human bladder in a laboratory in 1996, researchers have continued to develop more complex organs. Beating human hearts have also been grown in the lab and infected with disease to test various drugs. As a result of these medical advancements, people have had their lives changed for the better. For example, there have been multiple windpipe replacements, tear duct replacements, artery transplants, bladder transplants and more. The development of lab-built body parts is on the rise as a result of a shortage of organ donors, and many of these organs are built with the recipients...
  • 3D Printing May Lead to the Creation of Superhuman Organs Providing Humans with New Abilities

    01/01/2015 4:00:29 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    3D Print ^ | December 5, 2014 | Eddie Krassenstein ·
    Evolution is what got us here today, if you accept the scientific approach to our creation. It was processes such as ‘survival of the fittest’ which led us, as well as other earthly creatures, to develop some of the traits, senses, and abilities that we possess today. For superhero fans, especially those who love the X-Men, you know that these superhuman characters acquired their powers through the process of evolution. Little mutations in genes led to them become the recipient of more than simple human-like abilities. Wouldn’t we all like to have the ability to see through objects, climb walls,...
  • ObamaCare Hits Small Business Hard in Gloomy '15

    12/30/2014 3:11:00 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 1 replies
    Investor's Business Daily ^ | December 29, 2014
    Red Tape: With businesses' one-year reprieve from financial penalties under ObamaCare ending, the horror stories of complying with the costly health care law already are trickling in. The worst is yet to come. ObamaCare Hits Small Business Hard in '15 Starting Jan. 1, employers with 100 or more full-time workers face hefty increases in their health insurance costs as they comply for the first time with the mandate. They must now offer the government's comprehensive coverage — including "free" preventive care — for all employees working 30 or more hours a week, or risk being fined $2,000 per employee per...
  • Discovery of Bourbon Virus Raises Many Questions

    12/26/2014 8:02:19 AM PST · by AdmSmith · 40 replies
    Medscape ^ | Dec 24, 2014 | Robert Lowes
    The discovery of a new virus implicated in the death of a Kansas farmer this past June raises many questions about its host, prevalence, spectrum of disease, and ultimately its treatment and prevention, according to an infectious disease expert who treated the patient. Yesterday, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment announced the first known case of the so-called Bourbon virus, named after the Kansas county where the unidentified patient had lived. His symptoms — fever, low red and white blood cell counts, elevated liver enzymes, and loss of appetite — suggested a tick-borne illness such as ehrlichiosis or the...
  • Doctors [in the U.K.] told to report patients who put on weight

    12/26/2014 12:33:35 AM PST · by Slings and Arrows · 51 replies
    The Telegraph [UK] ^ | 25 Dec 2014 | Laura Donnelly
    GPs will be asked to identify patients who are putting on weight under a new national programme to help fight obesity. Simon Stevens, the head of the NHS, said it was time for Britain to "get back in shape" in order to protect millions of people from a host of obesity-related diseases. Under the scheme, family doctors will be asked to identify anyone who has gained weight and is at risk of diabetes – particularly those aged below 40. They will then be offered tests for pre-diabetes, followed by healthy lifestyle advice and close monitoring to ensure they are eating...
  • Revolutionary lens restores complete vision to ageing eyes

    12/22/2014 4:06:33 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    The London Telegraph ^ | December 22, 2014 | Sarah Knapton, Science Editor
    New implant improves vision for older people struggling with cataracts, astigmatism, or long and short-sightedness. For many people getting older brings a catalogue of vision problems which make everyday tasks like reading and driving a major challenge. But a new lens implant which mimics the working of a youthful eye is giving sight back to people struggling with cataracts, astigmatism, or long and short-sightedness. It is the first lens that corrects for all types of vision problems at once and can be inserted in just a simple operation. It works at any distance and in any light condition, acting more...
  • The Odd Math of Medical Tests: One Scan, Two Prices, Both High

    12/20/2014 5:23:54 PM PST · by Lorianne · 12 replies
    New York Times ^ | 15 December 2015 | Elixabeth Rosenthal
    Testing has become to the United States’ medical system what liquor is to the hospitality industry: a profit center with large and often arbitrary markups. From a medical perspective, blood work, tests and scans are tools to help physicians diagnose and monitor disease. But from a business perspective, they are opportunities to bring in revenue — especially because the equipment to perform them has generally become far cheaper, smaller and more highly mechanized in the past two decades. And echocardiograms, ultrasound pictures of the heart, are enticing because they are painless and have no side effects — unlike CT scans,...
  • What's behind the huge price jump for some generic drugs? [from $20 to $1,849]

    12/17/2014 7:48:23 PM PST · by grundle · 62 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | October 20, 2014 | David Lazarus
    They cited the example of the asthma drug albuterol sulfate. The average cost for a bottle of 100 pills was $11 last October, the pair said. The average charge by this April was up to $434. The antibiotic doxycycline hyclate cost $20 last October for a bottle of 500 tablets, the congressmen observed. By April, the price was $1,849. Experts say generics are growing more expensive because of reduced competition among manufacturers and shortages of raw materials. However, that might not explain triple-digit price hikes for some drugs. "Most generics are increasing in price by an average 10% a year,"...
  • The World Is Facing A Health Crisis It Doesn't Have The Weapons To Attack

    12/10/2014 11:24:12 PM PST · by blam · 12 replies
    BI _ Reuters ^ | 12-11-2014 | Kate Kelland, Reuters
    Kate Kelland, Reuters December 10, 2014LONDON, Dec 11 (Reuters) - Drug-resistant superbugs could kill an extra 10 million people a year and cost up to $100 trillion by 2050 if their rampant global spread is not halted, according to a British government-commissioned review. Such infections already kill hundreds of thousands of people a year and the trend is growing, the review said, adding: "The importance of effective antimicrobial drugs cannot be overplayed." Former Goldman Sachs chief economist Jim O'Neill, who led the work, noted that in Europe and the United States alone around 50,000 people currently die each year from...
  • We may be able to reverse signs of early Alzheimer's disease

    12/08/2014 3:59:08 PM PST · by ConservativeMind · 32 replies
    CNN ^ | Mon December 8, 2014 | Stephanie Smith
    ...Yet a very small study out of UCLA is offering a glimmer of hope for those with what is often a hopeless diagnosis. Nine out of the 10 patients involved in the study, who were in various stages of dementia, say their symptoms were reversed after they participated in a rigorous program. The program included things like optimizing Vitamin D levels in the blood, using DHA supplements to bridge broken connections in the brain, optimizing gut health, and strategic fasting to normalize insulin levels. A few months after starting the extreme program, patients in the study, aged 55 to 75,...
  • Cancer's Super-Survivors: How the Promise of Immunotherapy Is Transforming Oncology

    12/05/2014 9:43:02 PM PST · by Tired of Taxes · 30 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | Dec. 4, 2014 | Ron Winslow
    Tom Telford ’s stomach ached. The New York City teacher had been drinking cup after cup of coffee as he labored to finish year-end grading and coach his high-school baseball team through the playoffs. He worried he might have an ulcer. When school let out, though, Mr. Telford looked forward to relaxing on a 25th anniversary cruise with his wife. But once in the Caribbean, he struggled to swim and climbing from one deck to another exhausted him. Back at home, he collapsed while running a TV cable in his bedroom. His family doctor told him he had lost two...
  • Brains of People with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Offer Clues About Disorder

    12/03/2014 11:08:37 AM PST · by Seizethecarp · 55 replies
    New York Times ^ | November 24, 2014 | David Tuller
    Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome are accustomed to disappointment. The cause of the disorder remains unknown; it can be difficult to diagnose, and treatment options are few. Many patients are still told to seek psychiatric help. But two recent studies — one from investigators at Stanford a few weeks ago and another from a Japanese research team published earlier this year — have found that the brains of people with chronic fatigue syndrome differ from those of healthy people, strengthening the argument that serious physiological dysfunctions are at the root of the condition. Both studies were small, however, and their...
  • Ending AIDS Requires Strategy, Funding

    12/01/2014 5:42:30 AM PST · by SoFloFreeper · 18 replies
    Voice of America ^ | 12/1/14 | Joe DeCapua
    December 1st, is World AIDS Day. In the 35-years of the epidemic, about 80-million people have become infected with HIV and nearly 40-million have died. But great progress has been made in recent years in preventing and treating the disease. UNAIDS – the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS – has set a goal of ending the epidemic by 2030. An advocacy group says a strategic plan and much funding are needed to achieve that goal.
  • Lab-grown spinal cords grown in petri dishes for the first time

    11/26/2014 11:12:33 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    The Guardian & Observer ^ | November 26, 2014 | Mo Costandi
    Researchers in Germany have grown complete spinal cords – partly thanks to a gene called sonic hedgehog.As regenerative medicine and stem cell technologies continue to progress, so the list of tissues and organs that can be grown from scratch – and potentially replaced – continues to grow. In the past few years, researchers have used stem cells to grow windpipes, bladders, urethras and vaginas in the lab, and, in some cases, successfully transplanted them into patients. Others are making progress in growing liver and heart tissue; one team in London is busy growing blood vessels, noses and ears; and some...
  • APNewsBreak: Vascular Solutions subsidy scrapped (Minnesota)

    11/19/2014 11:56:39 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 1 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Nov 19, 2014 1:56 PM EST | Brian Bakst
    A medical-device company lost out on a hefty Minnesota subsidy on Wednesday after the firm and its leader were criminally charged. The Department of Employment and Economic Development scrapped a potential $800,000 package tied to an expansion and hiring proposal put forth by Vascular Solutions. The decision came Wednesday, a day after The Associated Press reported the deal was cast into doubt by last week’s federal indictment. A hearing to consider approval of the Minnesota Job Creation Fund award had been set for Friday. […] Vascular Solutions and CEO Howard Root were federally indicted last week on charges of conspiring...
  • AIDS – French scientists find mechanism for spontaneous HIV cure

    11/04/2014 6:45:00 AM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    www.biznews.com ^ | 11-04-2014 | Staff
    t’s the holy grail of HIV and AIDS research: the search for a cure for the virus that attacks the immune system, allowing life-threatening opportunistic infections and cancers to thrive. Significant strides have been made with pharmaceutical drugs – antiretrovirals – that help those diagnosed as HIV positive to manage their condition, and live longer, healthier lives. But so far, a cure has proved elusive. Now French scientists believe they have uncovered the genetic path by which two men were spontaneously cured of the HI virus. They believe it’s an exciting discovery which could offer a new strategy in the...
  • The ambulance drone that could save your life: Flying defibrillator of the future

    10/30/2014 2:53:45 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies
    Nerdoholic ^ | October 29, 2014
    A Dutch student has revealed a prototype ‘ambulance drone’, a flying defibrillator able to reach heart attack victims within precious life-saving minutes. Developed by engineering graduate Alec Momont, it can fly at speeds of up to 100 kilometres per hour (60 miles per hour). Painted in emergency services yellow and driven by six propellers, the drone can carry a four kilogramme load – in this case a defibrillator. ‘Around 800,000 people suffer a cardiac arrest in the European Union every year and only 8.0 percent survive,’ Momont, 23, said at the TU Delft University. ‘The main reason for this is...
  • SOON YOU'LL BE ABLE TO DETECT CANCER USING YOUR SMARTPHONE

    10/24/2014 2:57:30 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies
    VICE ^ | 10/24/2014 | Tom Breakwell
    The thing about cancer is that you need to catch it early. Once it spreads, it becomes harder and harder to treat. But part of the problem is making yourself go to the doctor in the first place; a lot of people would rather avoid finding out really depressing news, in some cases via invasive poking. But what if you could detect cancerous cells and various other diseases in 60 minutes using your phone? A new start-up named Miroculus has made a device, "Miriam," that hopes to allow you to do just that. In hugely simplified terms, cancer happens when a cell...
  • The Left-Wing Hipster Democrat Couple That Exposed NYC to #Ebola

    10/24/2014 1:44:29 PM PDT · by KeyLargo · 41 replies
    Got News.com ^ | Oct 24, 2014
    The Left-Wing Hipster Democrat Couple That Exposed NYC to #Ebola October 24, 2014 by Charles C. Johnson 19 Comments Dr. Craig Spencer and his live-in girlfriend Morgan Dixon exposed New Yorkers in two different boroughs to ebola during their night out on the town. While authorities are saying that Spencer followed protocol, the CDC’s own documents show that isn’t the case. Spencer is now being treated for ebola while Dixon is in quarantine. They are both registered Democrats with a history of working in public health. Both Spencer and Dixon are professional do gooders according to their LinkedIn and professional...
  • Finalists named for $10m Star Trek 'tricorder' X Prize

    10/21/2014 7:53:34 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    BBC News Technology blog ^ | August 27, 2014 | Edwin Lane, technology reporter
    The Star Trek tricorder diagnosed any illness at once.Ten finalists have been chosen in a $10m (£6m) competition to develop a real-life "tricorder" - the medical scanner used in the Star Trek series.The Qualcomm Tricorder X Prize, launched last year, challenges anyone to develop a wireless device capable of detecting a range of diseases. The technology employs sensors and imaging to measure vital signs and diagnose conditions non-invasively. X Prize officials said the technology was now "fact, not science fiction". The 10 finalists come from a range of backgrounds, including universities, medical device manufacturers and tech start-ups. One research team...
  • The Worst Of The Ebola Outbreak Is Yet To Come

    The Economist October 18, 2014 On March 25th the World Health Organisation (WHO) reported a rash of cases of Ebola in Guinea, the first such ever seen in west Africa. As of then there had been 86 suspected cases, and there were reports of suspected cases in the neighbouring countries of Sierra Leone and Liberia as well. The death toll was 60. On October 15th the WHO released its latest update. The outbreak has now seen 8,997 confirmed, probable and suspected cases of Ebola. All but 24 of those have been in Guinea (16% of the total), Sierra Leone (36%)...
  • Scientists have found “hidden” brain activity that can indicate if a vegetative patient is aware

    10/17/2014 1:23:47 PM PDT · by Scoutmaster · 31 replies
    The new research could help doctors to quickly identify patients who are aware despite appearing unresponsive and unable to communicate. Researchers from University of Cambridge in the UK have identified hidden networks in vegetative patients that could support consciousness, even when a patient appear to be unresponsive. There’s been a lot of interest lately into how much patients in vegetative states, such as comas, are aware of their surroundings. Recently, research involving functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning has shown that even patients who are unable to respond or move are able to carry out mental tasks, such as imagining...
  • Cancer cure found? Compound from Blushwood tree breaks down tumors in 70 percent of cases

    10/09/2014 1:55:22 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 51 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 10/09/2014 | Jan Dizon
    Researchers from QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute have made an exciting discovery for cancer patients everywhere. A chemical found in a rare plant from Australia has the ability to "eat" cancerous tumors and completely eradicate them within days. The tumor-eating chemical is found in the seeds of berries of the Blushwood plant. The chemical, which is being called EBC-46, takes three weeks to extract and the process is quite difficult. Experts are even saying that they still don't completely understand why the chemical is in the seed of the Blushwood berry in the first place. Farming Blushwood in large quantities...
  • Male Ebola survivors told: Use a condom

    10/07/2014 10:10:45 AM PDT · by GonzoII · 98 replies
    Reuters ^ | Tue Oct 7, 2014 1:01pm EDT
    (Reuters) - Sex could keep the Ebola epidemic alive even after the World Health Organization (WHO) declares an area free of the disease, one of the discoverers of the deadly virus said on Tuesday. The WHO is hoping to announce later this week that Nigeria and Senegal are free of Ebola after 42 days with no infections -- the standard period for declaring an outbreak over, twice the maximum 21-day incubation period of the virus. However, it appears the disease can last much longer in semen. "In a convalescent male, the virus can persist in semen for at least 70...
  • preventive medicine expert: obama 'underplaying' ebola risk

    10/03/2014 6:03:23 AM PDT · by Whenifhow · 17 replies
    http://www.breitbart.com/ ^ | Oct 2, 2014 | BREITBART TV
    Dr. Elizabeth Vliet, [snip] accused the government of “underplaying the risk” of the Ebola virus, and seemed to argue that flights from countries with large Ebola outbreaks should not be allowed into the US on Thursday’s [snip] “The Laura Ingraham Show.” snip Speaking on the prospect of a flight ban and the contention that only individuals who are showing symptoms of the virus can transmit it, she said “viruses mutate and change, and so to say anything with 100% certainty when you are dealing with viruses that change is medically irresponsible.” And that “no one can say with 100% certainty”...
  • Doctor Refuses to Treat Child With Trisomy 18, Tells Mom “She’s Lived Longer Than Expected”

    09/30/2014 9:42:41 AM PDT · by Morgana · 15 replies
    life news ^ | Brad Smith
    We have a friend, Kayse, here in Michigan who has a beautiful little 2 year old girl named Lila. Kayse sent us an update the other day (Saturday September 27th) because Lila has been sick for the last couple of weeks. Most people have read about the viruses making their way around the country and get a little nervous about their children getting one of these viruses that have put so many children in the hospital. Well, we pay close attention to these updates that we receive because Lila has Trisomy 18 (Edwards Syndrome) which is the same chromosome abnormality...
  • State Farm dumps pitchman Rob Schneider over anti-vaccine views

    09/26/2014 10:05:23 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 42 replies
    www.latimes.com ^ | By Meredith Blake
    ob Schneider has learned the hard way that there's no way to inoculate yourself against an Internet backlash. State Farm Insurance has dropped an ad campaign featuring the "Deuce Bigalow" star in a reprisal of his "Richmeister" character -- a.k.a. the "making copies" guy -- from "Saturday Night Live." The decision stems not from an objection to rehashed humor from the mid-'90s, but to Schneider's outspoken stance against childhood vaccines. Along with former "View" co-host Jenny McCarthy, Schneider, who has lately been busy trying to revive his career with a spec sitcom, has been one of the most vocal celebrity...
  • Gov. Scott Presents UM With $1M For AIDS Research

    09/22/2014 5:17:43 PM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 5 replies
    CBS Miami ^ | 9/22/14
    Gov. Rick Scott and Sen. Rene Garcia presented the University of Miami with a check for $1 million for HIV/AIDS research Monday morning. Scott stopped by the university’s Miller School of Medicine to highlight funding in the “It’s Your Money Tax Cut Budget” for HIV/AIDS research.
  • PrintAlive 3D Bioprinter Creates Skin-like “Living Bandages” to Advance Burn Treatment

    09/18/2014 5:47:10 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies
    3D Print.com blog ^ | September 18, 2014 | Debra Thimmesch
    Health professionals who treat burn victims are acutely aware of the necessity to treat burn injuries, particularly severe ones, as rapidly as possible. As one journal article explains it, “In severe burn injuries where both the epidermal and dermal layers of skin are destroyed, prompt wound closure is critical for favourable [sic] patient outcomes and reduced mortality rates.” A team of biomedical and mechanical engineering graduate students at the University of Toronto have developed what may at the least be considered a preliminary–but certainly extremely technologically advanced–solution to the problem of critical, temporal health intervention for burn patients. For their...
  • Death Panel Recommends Death

    09/18/2014 4:47:14 AM PDT · by moneyrunner · 13 replies
    The Virginian ^ | 9/18/2014 | Moneyrunner
    So it begins: Panel Urges Overhauling Health Care at End of Life Taking care to make sure that Republicans are implicated, the NY Times hails death of the elderly. “The current system is geared towards doing more, more, more, and that system by definition is not necessarily consistent with what patients want, and is also more costly.” The operative word here is "costly."I have no problem with any old person expressing the wish to be left to die in peace. I have a big problem with Death Panels deciding that death is cheaper than life and making that the national...
  • Italian army moves to produce cannabis drugs

    09/05/2014 5:50:52 AM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 8 replies
    The Local (Italy) ^ | 05 Sep 2014 12:08 GMT+02:00
    The Italian government has plans to produce medical marijuana in a military factory in Florence, national media reported on Friday. Roberta Pinotti, defence minister, and Health Minister Beatrice Lorenzin have given their backing to the plans to see the army produce drugs using cannabis, La Stampa said. If approved the medical marijuana will be cultivated at a chemical plant run by the army, originally used to produce medicines for the military. The plans could see cannabis drugs available in Italian pharmacies as early as next year, the newspaper said. But although the defence and health ministries have been drawing up...
  • When Feces Is the Best Medicine

    09/04/2014 7:28:59 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 37 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | 09/04/2014 | AMANDA SCHAFFER
    Mark Smith was a microbiology graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology when, in 2011, a family friend became infected with the notorious superbug clostridium difficile. C. diff can cause severe diarrhea, disability, and malnutrition and is responsible for roughly 14,000 deaths in the United States each year. In 2012, after taking seven rounds of the antibiotic vancomycin and failing to improve, Smith’s friend received a DIY fecal transplant from his roommate—in their apartment, using an over-the-counter enema kit. The friend recovered within days, but “the whole thing was absurd, not at all how it should be done,” Smith...
  • Obama to Africans: Don’t touch Ebola corpses

    09/03/2014 6:13:11 AM PDT · by Zakeet · 70 replies
    The Hill ^ | September 3, 2014 | Justin Sink
    President Obama urged West Africans in areas affected by the Ebola virus not to touch the corpses of loved ones who had succumbed to the deadly disease in a public service announcement released by the State Department on Tuesday. "When burying someone who has died from this terrible disease, it's important to not directly touch their body," Obama says. "You can respect your traditions and honor your loved ones without risking the lives of the living." [Snip] "If you feel sick with a high fever, you should get help right away," Obama said.
  • Why Doctors Are Sick of Their Profession

    09/01/2014 7:15:17 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 90 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 08/31/2014 | By SANDEEP JAUHAR
    All too often these days, I find myself fidgeting by the doorway to my exam room, trying to conclude an office visit with one of my patients. When I look at my career at midlife, I realize that in many ways I have become the kind of doctor I never thought I'd be: impatient, occasionally indifferent, at times dismissive or paternalistic. Many of my colleagues are similarly struggling with the loss of their professional ideals. It could be just a midlife crisis, but it occurs to me that my profession is in a sort of midlife crisis of its own....
  • Scientist transmits message into the mind of a colleague 5,000 miles away using brain waves

    08/29/2014 9:15:55 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 33 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | August 29, 2014 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    Brain-wave sensing machines have been used to ‘telepathically’ control everything from real-life helicopters to characters in a computer game. Now the technology has gone a step further by allowing someone in India to send an email to his colleague in France using nothing but the power of his mind. The researchers used electroencephalography (EEG) headsets to record electrical activity from neurons firing in the brain, and convert the words ‘hola’ and ‘ciao’ into binary. In EEG, electrical currents in the brain are linked with different thoughts that are then fed into a computer interface. This computer analyses the signal and...
  • 'Promising' Ebola vaccine to go into trials - and it could be available by the end of the year

    08/28/2014 11:07:23 AM PDT · by CorporateStepsister · 17 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 28 August 2014 | Jenny Hope for the Daily Mail
    Britons are to be the first in the world to test a new vaccine against the deadly ebola virus. Altogether 60 healthy volunteers will be given the vaccine next month in a trial led by Oxford University scientists. If the vaccine performs as well in humans as in monkeys, the trial will be extended to 80 people in The Gambia and in Mali. The entire trial programme is being fast-tracked – subject to ethical approval – with the intention of using the vaccine in people at high risk in West Africa early next year. Latest figures show that more than...
  • Scientists find secret of reversing bad memories

    08/28/2014 10:14:21 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 54 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 6:00PM BST 27 Aug 2014 | By Sarah Knapton, Science Correspondent
    Bad memories could be reversed after scientists discovered the part of the brain which links emotions to past events Bad memories of past trauma can leave people emotionally scarred for life. But now neuroscientists believe they can erase feelings of fear or anxiety attached to stressful events, in a breakthrough which could help treat depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. Researchers at MIT, US, have discovered which brain circuits attach emotions to memories, and crucially, how to reverse the link. They managed to ‘switch off’ feelings of fear in mice which had been conditioned to feel anxious. It is likely the...
  • Knee replacement may go poorly for people who think life isn’t fair

    08/24/2014 5:32:17 AM PDT · by RoosterRedux · 28 replies
    People who tend to blame others for their suffering and think setbacks in their lives are irreparable tend to report more pain after knee replacement surgery, according to a new study. This is not the first time feelings of personal injustice have been tied to longer recovery times and increased disability after injury, the authors write. “Pain is a complex phenomenon that is influenced by biological, social, and psychological factors,” said lead author Esther Yakobov, a doctoral student in clinical psychology at McGill University in Montreal. “Studies conducted with patients who suffer from chronic pain because of an injury demonstrated...