Keyword: medicine

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  • The Odd Math of Medical Tests: One Scan, Two Prices, Both High

    12/20/2014 5:23:54 PM PST · by Lorianne · 11 replies
    New York Times ^ | 15 December 2015 | Elixabeth Rosenthal
    Testing has become to the United States’ medical system what liquor is to the hospitality industry: a profit center with large and often arbitrary markups. From a medical perspective, blood work, tests and scans are tools to help physicians diagnose and monitor disease. But from a business perspective, they are opportunities to bring in revenue — especially because the equipment to perform them has generally become far cheaper, smaller and more highly mechanized in the past two decades. And echocardiograms, ultrasound pictures of the heart, are enticing because they are painless and have no side effects — unlike CT scans,...
  • What's behind the huge price jump for some generic drugs? [from $20 to $1,849]

    12/17/2014 7:48:23 PM PST · by grundle · 62 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | October 20, 2014 | David Lazarus
    They cited the example of the asthma drug albuterol sulfate. The average cost for a bottle of 100 pills was $11 last October, the pair said. The average charge by this April was up to $434. The antibiotic doxycycline hyclate cost $20 last October for a bottle of 500 tablets, the congressmen observed. By April, the price was $1,849. Experts say generics are growing more expensive because of reduced competition among manufacturers and shortages of raw materials. However, that might not explain triple-digit price hikes for some drugs. "Most generics are increasing in price by an average 10% a year,"...
  • The World Is Facing A Health Crisis It Doesn't Have The Weapons To Attack

    12/10/2014 11:24:12 PM PST · by blam · 12 replies
    BI _ Reuters ^ | 12-11-2014 | Kate Kelland, Reuters
    Kate Kelland, Reuters December 10, 2014LONDON, Dec 11 (Reuters) - Drug-resistant superbugs could kill an extra 10 million people a year and cost up to $100 trillion by 2050 if their rampant global spread is not halted, according to a British government-commissioned review. Such infections already kill hundreds of thousands of people a year and the trend is growing, the review said, adding: "The importance of effective antimicrobial drugs cannot be overplayed." Former Goldman Sachs chief economist Jim O'Neill, who led the work, noted that in Europe and the United States alone around 50,000 people currently die each year from...
  • We may be able to reverse signs of early Alzheimer's disease

    12/08/2014 3:59:08 PM PST · by ConservativeMind · 31 replies
    CNN ^ | Mon December 8, 2014 | Stephanie Smith
    ...Yet a very small study out of UCLA is offering a glimmer of hope for those with what is often a hopeless diagnosis. Nine out of the 10 patients involved in the study, who were in various stages of dementia, say their symptoms were reversed after they participated in a rigorous program. The program included things like optimizing Vitamin D levels in the blood, using DHA supplements to bridge broken connections in the brain, optimizing gut health, and strategic fasting to normalize insulin levels. A few months after starting the extreme program, patients in the study, aged 55 to 75,...
  • Cancer's Super-Survivors: How the Promise of Immunotherapy Is Transforming Oncology

    12/05/2014 9:43:02 PM PST · by Tired of Taxes · 30 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | Dec. 4, 2014 | Ron Winslow
    Tom Telford ’s stomach ached. The New York City teacher had been drinking cup after cup of coffee as he labored to finish year-end grading and coach his high-school baseball team through the playoffs. He worried he might have an ulcer. When school let out, though, Mr. Telford looked forward to relaxing on a 25th anniversary cruise with his wife. But once in the Caribbean, he struggled to swim and climbing from one deck to another exhausted him. Back at home, he collapsed while running a TV cable in his bedroom. His family doctor told him he had lost two...
  • Brains of People with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Offer Clues About Disorder

    12/03/2014 11:08:37 AM PST · by Seizethecarp · 55 replies
    New York Times ^ | November 24, 2014 | David Tuller
    Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome are accustomed to disappointment. The cause of the disorder remains unknown; it can be difficult to diagnose, and treatment options are few. Many patients are still told to seek psychiatric help. But two recent studies — one from investigators at Stanford a few weeks ago and another from a Japanese research team published earlier this year — have found that the brains of people with chronic fatigue syndrome differ from those of healthy people, strengthening the argument that serious physiological dysfunctions are at the root of the condition. Both studies were small, however, and their...
  • Ending AIDS Requires Strategy, Funding

    12/01/2014 5:42:30 AM PST · by SoFloFreeper · 18 replies
    Voice of America ^ | 12/1/14 | Joe DeCapua
    December 1st, is World AIDS Day. In the 35-years of the epidemic, about 80-million people have become infected with HIV and nearly 40-million have died. But great progress has been made in recent years in preventing and treating the disease. UNAIDS – the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS – has set a goal of ending the epidemic by 2030. An advocacy group says a strategic plan and much funding are needed to achieve that goal.
  • Lab-grown spinal cords grown in petri dishes for the first time

    11/26/2014 11:12:33 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    The Guardian & Observer ^ | November 26, 2014 | Mo Costandi
    Researchers in Germany have grown complete spinal cords – partly thanks to a gene called sonic hedgehog.As regenerative medicine and stem cell technologies continue to progress, so the list of tissues and organs that can be grown from scratch – and potentially replaced – continues to grow. In the past few years, researchers have used stem cells to grow windpipes, bladders, urethras and vaginas in the lab, and, in some cases, successfully transplanted them into patients. Others are making progress in growing liver and heart tissue; one team in London is busy growing blood vessels, noses and ears; and some...
  • APNewsBreak: Vascular Solutions subsidy scrapped (Minnesota)

    11/19/2014 11:56:39 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 1 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Nov 19, 2014 1:56 PM EST | Brian Bakst
    A medical-device company lost out on a hefty Minnesota subsidy on Wednesday after the firm and its leader were criminally charged. The Department of Employment and Economic Development scrapped a potential $800,000 package tied to an expansion and hiring proposal put forth by Vascular Solutions. The decision came Wednesday, a day after The Associated Press reported the deal was cast into doubt by last week’s federal indictment. A hearing to consider approval of the Minnesota Job Creation Fund award had been set for Friday. […] Vascular Solutions and CEO Howard Root were federally indicted last week on charges of conspiring...
  • AIDS – French scientists find mechanism for spontaneous HIV cure

    11/04/2014 6:45:00 AM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    www.biznews.com ^ | 11-04-2014 | Staff
    t’s the holy grail of HIV and AIDS research: the search for a cure for the virus that attacks the immune system, allowing life-threatening opportunistic infections and cancers to thrive. Significant strides have been made with pharmaceutical drugs – antiretrovirals – that help those diagnosed as HIV positive to manage their condition, and live longer, healthier lives. But so far, a cure has proved elusive. Now French scientists believe they have uncovered the genetic path by which two men were spontaneously cured of the HI virus. They believe it’s an exciting discovery which could offer a new strategy in the...
  • The ambulance drone that could save your life: Flying defibrillator of the future

    10/30/2014 2:53:45 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies
    Nerdoholic ^ | October 29, 2014
    A Dutch student has revealed a prototype ‘ambulance drone’, a flying defibrillator able to reach heart attack victims within precious life-saving minutes. Developed by engineering graduate Alec Momont, it can fly at speeds of up to 100 kilometres per hour (60 miles per hour). Painted in emergency services yellow and driven by six propellers, the drone can carry a four kilogramme load – in this case a defibrillator. ‘Around 800,000 people suffer a cardiac arrest in the European Union every year and only 8.0 percent survive,’ Momont, 23, said at the TU Delft University. ‘The main reason for this is...
  • SOON YOU'LL BE ABLE TO DETECT CANCER USING YOUR SMARTPHONE

    10/24/2014 2:57:30 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies
    VICE ^ | 10/24/2014 | Tom Breakwell
    The thing about cancer is that you need to catch it early. Once it spreads, it becomes harder and harder to treat. But part of the problem is making yourself go to the doctor in the first place; a lot of people would rather avoid finding out really depressing news, in some cases via invasive poking. But what if you could detect cancerous cells and various other diseases in 60 minutes using your phone? A new start-up named Miroculus has made a device, "Miriam," that hopes to allow you to do just that. In hugely simplified terms, cancer happens when a cell...
  • The Left-Wing Hipster Democrat Couple That Exposed NYC to #Ebola

    10/24/2014 1:44:29 PM PDT · by KeyLargo · 41 replies
    Got News.com ^ | Oct 24, 2014
    The Left-Wing Hipster Democrat Couple That Exposed NYC to #Ebola October 24, 2014 by Charles C. Johnson 19 Comments Dr. Craig Spencer and his live-in girlfriend Morgan Dixon exposed New Yorkers in two different boroughs to ebola during their night out on the town. While authorities are saying that Spencer followed protocol, the CDC’s own documents show that isn’t the case. Spencer is now being treated for ebola while Dixon is in quarantine. They are both registered Democrats with a history of working in public health. Both Spencer and Dixon are professional do gooders according to their LinkedIn and professional...
  • Finalists named for $10m Star Trek 'tricorder' X Prize

    10/21/2014 7:53:34 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    BBC News Technology blog ^ | August 27, 2014 | Edwin Lane, technology reporter
    The Star Trek tricorder diagnosed any illness at once.Ten finalists have been chosen in a $10m (Ł6m) competition to develop a real-life "tricorder" - the medical scanner used in the Star Trek series.The Qualcomm Tricorder X Prize, launched last year, challenges anyone to develop a wireless device capable of detecting a range of diseases. The technology employs sensors and imaging to measure vital signs and diagnose conditions non-invasively. X Prize officials said the technology was now "fact, not science fiction". The 10 finalists come from a range of backgrounds, including universities, medical device manufacturers and tech start-ups. One research team...
  • The Worst Of The Ebola Outbreak Is Yet To Come

    The Economist October 18, 2014 On March 25th the World Health Organisation (WHO) reported a rash of cases of Ebola in Guinea, the first such ever seen in west Africa. As of then there had been 86 suspected cases, and there were reports of suspected cases in the neighbouring countries of Sierra Leone and Liberia as well. The death toll was 60. On October 15th the WHO released its latest update. The outbreak has now seen 8,997 confirmed, probable and suspected cases of Ebola. All but 24 of those have been in Guinea (16% of the total), Sierra Leone (36%)...
  • Scientists have found “hidden” brain activity that can indicate if a vegetative patient is aware

    10/17/2014 1:23:47 PM PDT · by Scoutmaster · 31 replies
    The new research could help doctors to quickly identify patients who are aware despite appearing unresponsive and unable to communicate. Researchers from University of Cambridge in the UK have identified hidden networks in vegetative patients that could support consciousness, even when a patient appear to be unresponsive. There’s been a lot of interest lately into how much patients in vegetative states, such as comas, are aware of their surroundings. Recently, research involving functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning has shown that even patients who are unable to respond or move are able to carry out mental tasks, such as imagining...
  • Cancer cure found? Compound from Blushwood tree breaks down tumors in 70 percent of cases

    10/09/2014 1:55:22 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 51 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 10/09/2014 | Jan Dizon
    Researchers from QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute have made an exciting discovery for cancer patients everywhere. A chemical found in a rare plant from Australia has the ability to "eat" cancerous tumors and completely eradicate them within days. The tumor-eating chemical is found in the seeds of berries of the Blushwood plant. The chemical, which is being called EBC-46, takes three weeks to extract and the process is quite difficult. Experts are even saying that they still don't completely understand why the chemical is in the seed of the Blushwood berry in the first place. Farming Blushwood in large quantities...
  • Male Ebola survivors told: Use a condom

    10/07/2014 10:10:45 AM PDT · by GonzoII · 98 replies
    Reuters ^ | Tue Oct 7, 2014 1:01pm EDT
    (Reuters) - Sex could keep the Ebola epidemic alive even after the World Health Organization (WHO) declares an area free of the disease, one of the discoverers of the deadly virus said on Tuesday. The WHO is hoping to announce later this week that Nigeria and Senegal are free of Ebola after 42 days with no infections -- the standard period for declaring an outbreak over, twice the maximum 21-day incubation period of the virus. However, it appears the disease can last much longer in semen. "In a convalescent male, the virus can persist in semen for at least 70...
  • preventive medicine expert: obama 'underplaying' ebola risk

    10/03/2014 6:03:23 AM PDT · by Whenifhow · 17 replies
    http://www.breitbart.com/ ^ | Oct 2, 2014 | BREITBART TV
    Dr. Elizabeth Vliet, [snip] accused the government of “underplaying the risk” of the Ebola virus, and seemed to argue that flights from countries with large Ebola outbreaks should not be allowed into the US on Thursday’s [snip] “The Laura Ingraham Show.” snip Speaking on the prospect of a flight ban and the contention that only individuals who are showing symptoms of the virus can transmit it, she said “viruses mutate and change, and so to say anything with 100% certainty when you are dealing with viruses that change is medically irresponsible.” And that “no one can say with 100% certainty”...
  • Doctor Refuses to Treat Child With Trisomy 18, Tells Mom “She’s Lived Longer Than Expected”

    09/30/2014 9:42:41 AM PDT · by Morgana · 15 replies
    life news ^ | Brad Smith
    We have a friend, Kayse, here in Michigan who has a beautiful little 2 year old girl named Lila. Kayse sent us an update the other day (Saturday September 27th) because Lila has been sick for the last couple of weeks. Most people have read about the viruses making their way around the country and get a little nervous about their children getting one of these viruses that have put so many children in the hospital. Well, we pay close attention to these updates that we receive because Lila has Trisomy 18 (Edwards Syndrome) which is the same chromosome abnormality...
  • State Farm dumps pitchman Rob Schneider over anti-vaccine views

    09/26/2014 10:05:23 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 42 replies
    www.latimes.com ^ | By Meredith Blake
    ob Schneider has learned the hard way that there's no way to inoculate yourself against an Internet backlash. State Farm Insurance has dropped an ad campaign featuring the "Deuce Bigalow" star in a reprisal of his "Richmeister" character -- a.k.a. the "making copies" guy -- from "Saturday Night Live." The decision stems not from an objection to rehashed humor from the mid-'90s, but to Schneider's outspoken stance against childhood vaccines. Along with former "View" co-host Jenny McCarthy, Schneider, who has lately been busy trying to revive his career with a spec sitcom, has been one of the most vocal celebrity...
  • Gov. Scott Presents UM With $1M For AIDS Research

    09/22/2014 5:17:43 PM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 5 replies
    CBS Miami ^ | 9/22/14
    Gov. Rick Scott and Sen. Rene Garcia presented the University of Miami with a check for $1 million for HIV/AIDS research Monday morning. Scott stopped by the university’s Miller School of Medicine to highlight funding in the “It’s Your Money Tax Cut Budget” for HIV/AIDS research.
  • PrintAlive 3D Bioprinter Creates Skin-like “Living Bandages” to Advance Burn Treatment

    09/18/2014 5:47:10 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies
    3D Print.com blog ^ | September 18, 2014 | Debra Thimmesch
    Health professionals who treat burn victims are acutely aware of the necessity to treat burn injuries, particularly severe ones, as rapidly as possible. As one journal article explains it, “In severe burn injuries where both the epidermal and dermal layers of skin are destroyed, prompt wound closure is critical for favourable [sic] patient outcomes and reduced mortality rates.” A team of biomedical and mechanical engineering graduate students at the University of Toronto have developed what may at the least be considered a preliminary–but certainly extremely technologically advanced–solution to the problem of critical, temporal health intervention for burn patients. For their...
  • Death Panel Recommends Death

    09/18/2014 4:47:14 AM PDT · by moneyrunner · 13 replies
    The Virginian ^ | 9/18/2014 | Moneyrunner
    So it begins: Panel Urges Overhauling Health Care at End of Life Taking care to make sure that Republicans are implicated, the NY Times hails death of the elderly. “The current system is geared towards doing more, more, more, and that system by definition is not necessarily consistent with what patients want, and is also more costly.” The operative word here is "costly."I have no problem with any old person expressing the wish to be left to die in peace. I have a big problem with Death Panels deciding that death is cheaper than life and making that the national...
  • Italian army moves to produce cannabis drugs

    09/05/2014 5:50:52 AM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 8 replies
    The Local (Italy) ^ | 05 Sep 2014 12:08 GMT+02:00
    The Italian government has plans to produce medical marijuana in a military factory in Florence, national media reported on Friday. Roberta Pinotti, defence minister, and Health Minister Beatrice Lorenzin have given their backing to the plans to see the army produce drugs using cannabis, La Stampa said. If approved the medical marijuana will be cultivated at a chemical plant run by the army, originally used to produce medicines for the military. The plans could see cannabis drugs available in Italian pharmacies as early as next year, the newspaper said. But although the defence and health ministries have been drawing up...
  • When Feces Is the Best Medicine

    09/04/2014 7:28:59 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 37 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | 09/04/2014 | AMANDA SCHAFFER
    Mark Smith was a microbiology graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology when, in 2011, a family friend became infected with the notorious superbug clostridium difficile. C. diff can cause severe diarrhea, disability, and malnutrition and is responsible for roughly 14,000 deaths in the United States each year. In 2012, after taking seven rounds of the antibiotic vancomycin and failing to improve, Smith’s friend received a DIY fecal transplant from his roommate—in their apartment, using an over-the-counter enema kit. The friend recovered within days, but “the whole thing was absurd, not at all how it should be done,” Smith...
  • Obama to Africans: Don’t touch Ebola corpses

    09/03/2014 6:13:11 AM PDT · by Zakeet · 70 replies
    The Hill ^ | September 3, 2014 | Justin Sink
    President Obama urged West Africans in areas affected by the Ebola virus not to touch the corpses of loved ones who had succumbed to the deadly disease in a public service announcement released by the State Department on Tuesday. "When burying someone who has died from this terrible disease, it's important to not directly touch their body," Obama says. "You can respect your traditions and honor your loved ones without risking the lives of the living." [Snip] "If you feel sick with a high fever, you should get help right away," Obama said.
  • Why Doctors Are Sick of Their Profession

    09/01/2014 7:15:17 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 90 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 08/31/2014 | By SANDEEP JAUHAR
    All too often these days, I find myself fidgeting by the doorway to my exam room, trying to conclude an office visit with one of my patients. When I look at my career at midlife, I realize that in many ways I have become the kind of doctor I never thought I'd be: impatient, occasionally indifferent, at times dismissive or paternalistic. Many of my colleagues are similarly struggling with the loss of their professional ideals. It could be just a midlife crisis, but it occurs to me that my profession is in a sort of midlife crisis of its own....
  • Scientist transmits message into the mind of a colleague 5,000 miles away using brain waves

    08/29/2014 9:15:55 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 33 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | August 29, 2014 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    Brain-wave sensing machines have been used to ‘telepathically’ control everything from real-life helicopters to characters in a computer game. Now the technology has gone a step further by allowing someone in India to send an email to his colleague in France using nothing but the power of his mind. The researchers used electroencephalography (EEG) headsets to record electrical activity from neurons firing in the brain, and convert the words ‘hola’ and ‘ciao’ into binary. In EEG, electrical currents in the brain are linked with different thoughts that are then fed into a computer interface. This computer analyses the signal and...
  • 'Promising' Ebola vaccine to go into trials - and it could be available by the end of the year

    08/28/2014 11:07:23 AM PDT · by CorporateStepsister · 17 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 28 August 2014 | Jenny Hope for the Daily Mail
    Britons are to be the first in the world to test a new vaccine against the deadly ebola virus. Altogether 60 healthy volunteers will be given the vaccine next month in a trial led by Oxford University scientists. If the vaccine performs as well in humans as in monkeys, the trial will be extended to 80 people in The Gambia and in Mali. The entire trial programme is being fast-tracked – subject to ethical approval – with the intention of using the vaccine in people at high risk in West Africa early next year. Latest figures show that more than...
  • Scientists find secret of reversing bad memories

    08/28/2014 10:14:21 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 54 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 6:00PM BST 27 Aug 2014 | By Sarah Knapton, Science Correspondent
    Bad memories could be reversed after scientists discovered the part of the brain which links emotions to past events Bad memories of past trauma can leave people emotionally scarred for life. But now neuroscientists believe they can erase feelings of fear or anxiety attached to stressful events, in a breakthrough which could help treat depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. Researchers at MIT, US, have discovered which brain circuits attach emotions to memories, and crucially, how to reverse the link. They managed to ‘switch off’ feelings of fear in mice which had been conditioned to feel anxious. It is likely the...
  • Knee replacement may go poorly for people who think life isn’t fair

    08/24/2014 5:32:17 AM PDT · by RoosterRedux · 28 replies
    People who tend to blame others for their suffering and think setbacks in their lives are irreparable tend to report more pain after knee replacement surgery, according to a new study. This is not the first time feelings of personal injustice have been tied to longer recovery times and increased disability after injury, the authors write. “Pain is a complex phenomenon that is influenced by biological, social, and psychological factors,” said lead author Esther Yakobov, a doctoral student in clinical psychology at McGill University in Montreal. “Studies conducted with patients who suffer from chronic pain because of an injury demonstrated...
  • Type 1, Type 2 Diabetes Share Underlying Mechanism

    08/20/2014 8:42:35 PM PDT · by Pining_4_TX · 27 replies
    BioscienceTechnology.com ^ | 08/20/14 | University of Manchester
    Work by scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Auckland suggest that both major forms of diabetes, type 1 and type 2, are the result of the same mechanism. The findings, published in the FASEB Journal, provide compelling evidence that juvenile-onset or type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are both caused by the formation of toxic clumps of a hormone called amylin. The results, based on 20 years’ work in New Zealand, suggest that type 1 and type 2 diabetes could both be slowed down and potentially reversed by medicines that stop amylin forming these toxic clumps.
  • Frankenstein Science: Head Transplants Are Now Possible?

    08/18/2014 3:25:03 PM PDT · by NYer · 33 replies
    Seasons of Grace ^ | August 18, 2014 | Kathy Schiffer
    “Potentially unethical.” That’s how one expert described an Italian scientist’s plan to perform a “head transplant” by severing two heads at the same time, then cooling and flushing out the ‘recipient’ head before attaching it to its new body with polymer glue.That is “POTENTIALLY unethical?” Making one person out of two, and throwing away the unused halves, is only “potentially” unethical?Shock and awe.* * * * *Neuroscientist Sergio Canavero is undeterred by criticism, however. Canavero now reports that it’s possible to merge bone marrow, surgically cut with an ultra-sharp knife, when fusing one person’s head onto another person’s spine. The...
  • Ground-breaking medical research millions choose to reject [Because it was developed by Israelis]

    08/19/2014 9:04:34 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 10 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 08/19/2014 | Carol Brown
    Dr. Leslie Lobel is an Israeli virologist conducting cutting edge research on a cure for Ebola -- a cure he believes is three to five years away. As reported in the Times of Israel: Unlike many people, Dr. Leslie Lobel has not been shocked to hear about the current Ebola epidemic in West Africa, the largest ever recorded since the virus’s discovery in 1976 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (then Zaire). A Ben-Gurion University of the Negev virologist and a leader in the search for a cure for the devastating disease, Lobel had been predicting such an outbreak. (snip)...
  • Cancer Screening in Seniors Yields Few Benefits

    08/18/2014 6:42:51 PM PDT · by Innovative · 63 replies
    Medpage Today ^ | Aug 18, 2014 | Charles Bankhead
    Screening older patients for cancer provided minimal benefit at considerable cost and increased use of invasive procedures, reported investigators in two separate studies. "It is particularly important to question screening strategies for older persons," Gross continued. "Patients with a shorter life expectancy have less time to develop clinically significant cancers after a screening test and are more likely to die from noncancer health problems after a cancer diagnosis."
  • “I was in a coma for four days”

    08/17/2014 10:42:05 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 5 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 08/17/14 | Patrick D Hahn
    Part 1: “IT’S A NIGHTMARE” After the Avandia debacle, is history about to repeat itself? Amy Lynn Evans remembers the onset of the illness that left her with seven hundred thousand dollars in medical bills. The morning began like any other. “My son was getting ready for work, and he said to me ‘Mom, you don’t look too well.’ When I went to the emergency room, they found a blood clot on my lung.
  • A bacterium that destroys tumors' dark heart shows promise

    08/16/2014 7:50:12 PM PDT · by Innovative · 14 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | Aug 16, 2014 | Melissa Healy
    When scientists injected spores of a weakened form of the bacterium Clostridium novyi directly into the soft-tissue tumors of dogs and that of a single human subject, the results were not only abscesses, fever and pain at the site--all inflammatory responses that showed the immune system had been drawn to the area. In a matter of hours, the bacterial spores quickly found their way into these tumors' necrotic cores and began replicating madly, in several cases killing the malignant tissue. In three of 16 dogs treated with the C. novyi, tumors disappeared altogether and the animals were cured. In three...
  • Boston Researchers Train Bees To Detect Diabetes

    08/16/2014 7:30:12 PM PDT · by Innovative · 18 replies
    CBS Boston ^ | Aug 14, 2014 | Dr. Mallika Marshall
    “Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions, not only in the U.S. but worldwide,” says Dr. Allison Goldfine, a diabetes specialist at the Joslin Diabetes Center. She is helping foreign graduate students Tobias Horstmann and Juliet Phillips with their research project. They’re trying to use bees to sniff out diabetes. In collaboration with the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, they are using a device to house the bees and observe the bees’ reaction. If a patient breathes into the device and acetone is detected, the bees stick out their tongues in response.
  • Low-Salt Diets Shown to Pose Health Risks

    08/13/2014 6:26:20 PM PDT · by Innovative · 35 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | Aug 13, 2014 | Ron Winslow
    The new study, which tracked more than 100,000 people from 17 countries over an average of more than three years, found that those who consumed fewer than 3,000 milligrams of sodium a day had a 27% higher risk of death or a serious event such as a heart attack or stroke in that period than those whose intake was estimated at 3,000 to 6,000 milligrams. Risk of death or other major events increased with intake above 6,000 milligrams. Last year, a report from the Institute of Medicine, which advises Congress on health issues, didn't find evidence that cutting sodium intake...
  • Pioneering new injection to cure heart failure without need for major surgery

    08/11/2014 11:13:46 PM PDT · by Innovative · 12 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | Aug 11, 2014 | Sarah Knapton
    The technique, which involves a simple injection, could aid the recovery of hundreds of thousands of heart failure patients - and could even consign heart transplants to history. Researchers hope to increase levels of SERCA2a, a protein in heart muscle cells that plays an important role in heart muscle contraction The technique, which involves a simple injection, could aid the recovery of hundreds of thousands of heart failure patients. Heart transplants could even be consigned to history thanks to a trial by Imperial College, London, which aims to show for the first time that gene therapy could repair failing organs....
  • The Merry Old Land Of Oz

    08/06/2014 10:09:38 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 4 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 8/6/14 | Michael D. Shaw
    The career path of Dr. Mehmet Oz is most puzzling. Boasting a fine education (Tower Hill prep; Harvard undergrad; Penn med school; and Wharton), Oz did his residency at New York’s Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, and is now an attending surgeon at the same hospital. He also holds various academic appointments at Columbia’s med school. His name appears on more than 150 research papers, and he has published over 20 books—most of which have “You” in the title. Oprah called him “America’s doctor” in 2004, and following more appearances on her program, the TV Queen gave him his own show on...
  • Meet the Tiny Company Behind the Experimental Antibodies for Ebola

    08/05/2014 8:24:52 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 12 replies
    WPRO 630 ^ | 08/05/2014
    (SAN DIEGO) -- The companies manufacturing an experimental drug treating two American Ebola patients aren't among the largest multinational pharmaceuticals in the world. In fact, leading the effort is a small nine-employee firm in San Diego. Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., founded in 2003, says on its website that it develops, "novel pharmaceuticals for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases, focusing on unmet needs in global health and biodefense." Mapp's commercialization arm is LeafBio Inc., which has no employees and just two owners, Mapp President Larry Zeitlin tells ABC News. Mapp, along with LeafBio and Defyrus Inc. in Toronto, Canada, collaborated...
  • US government, military research program helped identify experimental Ebola treatment

    08/05/2014 7:05:15 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 13 replies
    Fox News ^ | 08/05/2014
    The experimental drug used to treat two American aid workers who have been infected with the Ebola virus has never been tested on humans before and was only identified earlier this year as part of an ongoing research program backed by the U.S. government and military. Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol have each received doses of the drug, known as ZMapp, aimed at boosting the immune system's efforts to fight off Ebola and is made from antibodies produced by lab animals exposed to parts of the virus. The Associated Press reported that Writebol, 59, had received two doses of...
  • Ebola Comes to the United States: Deadly Virus Crosses U.S. Border

    08/03/2014 6:00:55 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    Decoded Science ^ | August 3, 2014 | Janelle Vaesa, MPH
    Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia are going through the worst Ebola outbreak in history and health officials believe that it has killed more than 700 people there. Now, for the first time, Ebola has entered the United Sates via two health aid workers that contracted the disease while working in Africa where the Ebola outbreak continues. Ebola in the U.S. The first patient landed in the United States on Saturday, August 2, 2014. Dr. Kent Brantly was then flown from Africa to the United States and then transported via ambulance to Emory University Hospital. The second person, Nancy Whitebol, will...
  • Barney Frank on Obamacare rollout: ‘They just lied to people’

    08/03/2014 8:56:52 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 47 replies
    Washington Times ^ | 8-3-14 | Kellan Howell
    the mishandling of the new health care law. “The rollout was so bad, and I was appalled—I don’t understand how the president could have sat there and not been checking on that on a weekly basis,” the former Democratic congressman told the website. “But frankly, he should never have said as much as he did, that if you like your current health care plan, you can keep it. That wasn’t true. And you shouldn’t lie to people. And they just lied to people,” he added. Mr. Frank told The Huffington Post that Mr. Obama should have better explained the situation...
  • Blood test predicts suicide risk, study suggests

    08/02/2014 9:43:39 PM PDT · by Innovative · 15 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 31, 2014 | Rachael Rettner
    A new gene linked to suicide risk has been discovered, and researchers say the finding could lead to a blood test that predicts a person's risk of attempting suicide. The model correctly identified 80 percent to 96 percent of people who experienced suicidal thoughts or attempted suicide. It was more accurate among people at severe risk for suicide. If the findings are confirmed and lead to a blood test for suicide risk, such a test might be used to screen people in psychiatric emergency rooms or to determine how closely a person needs to be monitored for suicide risk, the...
  • Chili peppers can decrease colorectal cancer risk, claims new research

    08/02/2014 6:16:12 AM PDT · by Innovative · 50 replies
    Tech Times ^ | Aug 2, 2014 | Judy Mottl
    If you don't eat chili peppers or hot curry much you may want to reassess that given new research that claims the peppers and curry can play a role in reducing the risk of colorectal and bowel tumors, as well as extend a person's lifespan by 30 percent. The study claims the active ingredient in chili peppers, called dietary capsaicin, decreases the cancer risk as it triggers chronic activation of an ion channel called TRPV1, which is a sensory neuron that protects the intestine against acidity and spicy chemicals. In essence adding chili peppers and hot curries to the diet...
  • A Response to the "Open Letter for the People in Gaza"

    07/31/2014 9:57:46 AM PDT · by Piranha · 6 replies
    Israeli Medical Association ^ | July 27, 2014 | Eidelman, Leonid, MD and Afek, Arnon, MD
    .... The assertion that Israel has no regard for the lives of Gazan citizens is utterly false. Israel continues to supply electricity and water to Gaza even during this unfortunate conflict. Since the beginning of the current conflict, 1248 trucks entered Gaza from Israel, 4.44 million liters of diesel were delivered for the power station, and 48 infrastructural repairs were carried out. On July 27, 170 trucks were scheduled to enter but the crossing was forced to close at 14:00 because of Hamas activity in the area. The 94 trucks that entered delivered, among other thing, 1165 tons of food,...
  • 11th Circuit: Constitutional to Bar Doctors from Asking Patients About Firearm Ownership

    07/29/2014 2:15:40 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 57 replies
    Breitbart's Big Government ^ | July 28, 2014 | AWR Hawkins
    On July 25 the United States Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit "eliminated the injunction" against the enforcement of Florida's "gun gag" law, which restricts doctors from asking patients if they own a firearm unless asking is necessary to a patient's treatment. According to Law360.com, the 11th Circuit ruled that barring doctors from asking about firearms "doesn't violate the First Amendment." Florida Governor Rick Scott (R) signed the NRA-backed "gun gag" legislation in 2011. Suit was brought against the State of Florida over the law by "the Florida chapters of the American Academies of Pediatrics and American College of...