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Keyword: medicine

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  • 11th Circuit: Constitutional to Bar Doctors from Asking Patients About Firearm Ownership

    07/29/2014 2:15:40 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 54 replies
    Breitbart's Big Government ^ | July 28, 2014 | AWR Hawkins
    On July 25 the United States Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit "eliminated the injunction" against the enforcement of Florida's "gun gag" law, which restricts doctors from asking patients if they own a firearm unless asking is necessary to a patient's treatment. According to Law360.com, the 11th Circuit ruled that barring doctors from asking about firearms "doesn't violate the First Amendment." Florida Governor Rick Scott (R) signed the NRA-backed "gun gag" legislation in 2011. Suit was brought against the State of Florida over the law by "the Florida chapters of the American Academies of Pediatrics and American College of...
  • Doctor who contracted Ebola is in grave condition

    07/29/2014 12:13:32 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 80 replies
    NY Post ^ | 7-29-14 | Chris Perez
    A doctor from Texas is in grave condition and terrified for his life after he contracted the incurable Ebola virus he was treating in West Africa, colleagues said Monday. Dr. Kent Brantley, 33, is one of two Americans in the region who have contracted the deadly disease, which has now killed nearly 700 people in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization. The father of two had been treating Ebola victims in Monrovia, Liberia, when he began to notice symptoms related to the virus, CBS reports. “I’m praying fervently that God will help me survive this disease,” he said...
  • The Corruption of Peer Review Is Harming Scientific Credibility

    07/26/2014 12:31:00 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 07/14/2014 | Hank Campbell
    Academic publishing was rocked by the news on July 8 that a company called Sage Publications is retracting 60 papers from its Journal of Vibration and Control, about the science of acoustics. The company said a researcher in Taiwan and others had exploited peer review so that certain papers were sure to get a positive review for placement in the journal. In one case, a paper's author gave glowing reviews to his own work using phony names. Acoustics is an important field. But in biomedicine faulty research and a dubious peer-review process can have life-or-death consequences. In June, Dr. Francis...
  • Doctors respond to parents of Down syndrome newborns with cruelty and callousness

    07/24/2014 1:20:20 PM PDT · by Morgana · 137 replies
    Live Action ^ | Sarah Terzo
    LifeNews recently published an article by Mark Leach about what happened when his baby was born with Down syndrome. Leach describes how he and his wife felt abandoned by the medical establishment and how the hospital gave them outdated and scant information about Down syndrome. In response to his experience, and the experiences of many other Down syndrome parents, he has become the bioethics specialist at the National Center for Prenatal & Postnatal Down Syndrome Resources, and works to get positive, life-affirming information into the hands of new Down syndrome parents and those who go through prenatal testing for Down...
  • Top Ebola Doctor in Sierra Leone Contracts Virus

    07/23/2014 5:09:34 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 44 replies
    CBS News ^ | July 23, 2014 | JESSICA FIRGER
    A physician at the helm of Sierra Leone's efforts to contain and control the Ebola epidemic has just been diagnosed with the virus, according to reports from Reuters and the BBC. Sheik Umar Khan, a virologist, has treated more than 100 patients with the deadly disease and was admitted earlier this week to a high containment treatment facility, according to a statement released on Tuesday by the government. A source inside the ward told Reuters that the doctor is receiving treatment, though no details were given on his current state of health. Health Minister Miatta Kargbo called Khan a "national...
  • Johns Hopkins Hospital to pay $190 million to settle suits over pelvic exam photos

    07/21/2014 11:43:54 AM PDT · by jalisco555 · 8 replies
    Modern Healthcare ^ | July 21, 2014 | AP
    Johns Hopkins Hospital has agreed to a $190 million settlement with more than 8,000 patients of a gynecologist who secretly photographed and videotaped women's bodies in the examining room with a pen-like camera he wore around his neck, lawyers said Monday. Dr. Nikita Levy was fired in February 2013, days after an employee alerted hospital authorities about her suspicions. Levy committed suicide 10 days later. Investigators discovered roughly 1,200 videos and 140 images in his home. "All of these women were brutalized by this," said the women's lead attorney, Jonathan Schochor. "Some of these women needed counseling, they were sleepless,...
  • Docs say Medicare's proposed rates for heart procedure would limit access

    07/19/2014 6:43:27 AM PDT · by Innovative · 12 replies
    Modern Healthcare ^ | July 18, 2014 | Virgil Dickson
    Cardiac surgeons and medical societies are asking the CMS to reconsider proposed payment rates for implanting Abbott's MitraClip, a device that treats a debilitating heart condition. Because the device itself costs more than $30,000, the proposed reimbursement rate would make it “prohibitive for hospitals to be able to offer this significant care so badly needed for a large majority of our patients,” Dr. Gregory Helmer, a cardiologist at the University of Minnesota, said in comments submitted to the CMS.
  • Three more cases of rare human plague found in Colorado

    07/18/2014 5:07:53 PM PDT · by RummyChick · 28 replies
    reuters ^ | 7/18 | coffman
    Three more people in Colorado have been diagnosed with the plague after coming in contact with an infected dog whose owner contracted a life-threatening form of the disease, state health officials said on Friday. In all, four people were infected with the disease from the same source, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment said in a statement.
  • UKRAINE: Russian terrorists destroyed the top world research scientists with cure for AIDS

    Russian terrorists destroyed the top world research scientists. On board of the downed Boeing was actually a potential cure for HIV. As a result of the loss of the aircraft at Donetsk mankind has lost about 100 AIDS specialists. In addition, the Board might be a cure for HIV. The downed over Donbass Malaysian Boeing flew the world's leading experts in the field of AIDS scientists, physicians and community leaders. All of them were to assemble at the beginning on Sunday in Melbourne (Australia) International Conference. As reported by the International AIDS society, on board the aircraft, via Kuala Lumpur,...
  • Why Doctors in Italy Refuse to Give Abortions

    07/18/2014 1:56:54 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 9 replies
    Abortion may be legal in Catholic Italy but more and more doctors are refusing to terminate pregnancies, with many women now having to resort to procedures carried out in secret, The Local's Angela Giuffrida discovers. Ever since a Benito Mussolini-era ban on abortions as a “crime against the purity of the Italian race” was wiped out in 1978, thanks to a group of determined women, including the former foreign minister Emma Bonino, women in Italy are, by law, entitled to terminate a pregnancy within the first three months. After 90 days, abortions are only allowed if the foetus is badly...
  • Study: Single injection of protein could reverse symptoms of Type 2 diabetes

    07/17/2014 6:13:02 AM PDT · by Innovative · 65 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 17, 2014 | FoxNews
    When mice with the human equivalent of Type 2 diabetes were injected with the protein FGF1, their blood sugar levels returned to normal over two days. Just one injection of the protein both regulated these levels and even helped reverse insulin insensitivity – the underlying cause of diabetes. Published in the journal Nature, the research on FGF1 could revolutionize diabetes treatment. In addition to being effective against diabetes, the protein has several advantages over current diabetes drugs. It does not result in dangerous side effects seen with other diabetes drugs, such as heart problems, weight gain, or hypoglycemia. Additionally, FGF1...
  • Can heart attack damage be reversed?

    07/12/2014 8:51:48 PM PDT · by Innovative · 31 replies
    CNN ^ | July 12, 2014 | Caleb Hellerman
    An hour's drive to the southeast, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, Dr. Eduardo Marban has recently launched an experiment to help patients like Karpman. Marban led one of the earlier stem cell trials, using cells taken by biopsy from the patient's own heart. The cells were multiplied in a laboratory for two to three weeks and then reinfused through a catheter. At the time, says Marban, it was thought that the stem cells themselves turned into new heart muscle and blood vessels. "In fact, the more we learned, the more we realized that that's not what these cells...
  • Alzheimer's disease could be prevented after new blood test breakthrough

    07/08/2014 11:00:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 12:01AM BST 08 Jul 2014 | By Sarah Knapton, Science Correspondent
    Scientists at Oxford University and Kings College London develop blood test which can predict the onset of Alzheimer's so that drugs could target the disease before symptoms appear A blood test has been developed to predict if someone will develop Alzheimer’s within a year, raising hopes that the disease could become preventable. After a decade of research, scientists at Oxford University and King’s College London are confident they have found 10 proteins which show the disease is imminent. Clinical trials will start on people who have not yet developed Alzheimer’s to find out which drugs halt its onset. The blood...
  • Obesity is Inflammatory Disease, Rat Study Shows

    07/07/2014 5:38:08 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 42 replies
    Sci-News ^ | 2013 December 05 | Sci-News
    Scientists led by Dr David Fairlie from the University of Queensland, Australia, have found abnormal amounts of an inflammatory protein called PAR2 in the fat tissues of overweight and obese rats and humans. PAR2 is also increased on the surfaces of human immune cells by common fatty acids in the diet. When obese rats on a diet high in sugar and fat were given a new oral drug that binds to PAR2, the inflammation-causing properties of this protein were blocked, as were other effects of the high-fat and high-sugar diet, including obesity itself. "This important new finding links obesity and...
  • New Weapon in Fight Against 'Superbugs'

    07/02/2014 9:48:19 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 12 replies
    WSJ ^ | June 30, 2014 8:47 p.m. ET | By Ann Lukits
    Some harmful bacteria are increasingly resistant to treatment with antibiotics. A discovery might be able to help the antibiotics treat the disease. A soil sample from a national park in eastern Canada has produced a compound that appears to reverse antibiotic resistance in dangerous bacteria. Scientists at McMaster University in Ontario discovered that the compound almost instantly turned off a gene in several harmful bacteria that makes them highly resistant to treatment with a class of antibiotics used to fight so-called superbug infections. The compound, called aspergillomarasmine A, or AMA, was extracted from a common fungus found in soil and...
  • 15 Ways The World Will Be Awesome In 2050

    06/28/2014 7:20:22 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 50 replies
    Business Insider Indonesia ^ | June 24, 2014 | Christina Sterbenz
    The future scares a lot of people. Climate change, a growing population, and fewer natural resources will certainly pose new challenges for the human race in the next few decades. But when you consider ongoing social and economic progress and all of the coming innovations in science and technology, there’s plenty of room for optimism. We’ve pulled out some of our favorite ideas about the future of our world. Child mortality rates will be vastly lower. During the 20th century, the sharpest declined in mortality involved deaths of children under 5 years old, according to the assessment on human health...
  • CNN reporter: VA can’t be fixed without a total gutting

    06/23/2014 5:40:13 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    Hot Air ^ | June 23, 2014 | Noah Rothman
    CNN reporter Drew Griffin has owned the revelations surrounding the Department of Veterans Affairs and their scandalous treatment of military veterans. After a year of investigation, he broke the story involving the creation of secret waiting lists at a Phoenix VA hospital where 40 vets died awaiting care. Griffin’s reporting led to the uncovering of several more secret waiting lists – a revelation that forced President Barack Obama to accept the resignation of his VA secretary, Gen. Eric Shinseki. On Monday, Griffin discussed a new report from an independent government oversight agency which found that VA has been ignoring whistleblowers...
  • Poll-Tested Pee in a Cup

    06/22/2014 4:14:03 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 17 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | June 22, 2014 | Debra J. Saunders
    "Pee in a cup" is a phrase you should prepare to hear frequently this election season. A requirement that doctors be subject to random drug and alcohol testing is the curb-appeal provision in a measure that will be on the California ballot in November. The brains behind the initiative titled the Troy and Alana Pack Patient Safety Act -- named after two Danville children killed by a substance-abusing driver in 2003 -- clearly figured out that voters are more likely warm to the part that promises drug tests for doctors than the measure's more important provision, which would lift the...
  • Flesh-eating bacteria killed Maine teenager after oral surgery

    06/20/2014 4:27:45 PM PDT · by george76 · 33 replies
    Portland Press Herald ^ | June 20, 2014 | Matt Byrne
    Benjamin LaMontagne, who died at his home in February four days after wisdom tooth extraction, was killed by a tissue infection of his gums, neck and jaw... after routine oral surgery, was killed by a rare, aggressive bacterial infection that caused swelling of his jaw and neck, according to the state Medical Examiner’s Office. The medical examiner’s report, released Thursday to the Portland Press Herald in response to a public records request, lists the cause of death as cervical necrotizing fasciitis, commonly called “flesh-eating bacteria.” The infection is caused by a powerful strain of streptococcus A, a group of pathogens...
  • UEA researchers discover Achilles’ heel in antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    06/18/2014 6:27:26 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    University of East Anglia ^ | June 18, 2014 | Press Release
    Scientists at the University of East Anglia have made a breakthrough in the race to solve antibiotic resistance. New research published today in the journal Nature reveals an Achilles’ heel in the defensive barrier which surrounds drug-resistant bacterial cells. The findings pave the way for a new wave of drugs that kill superbugs by bringing down their defensive walls rather than attacking the bacteria itself. It means that in future, bacteria may not develop drug-resistance at all. The discovery doesn’t come a moment too soon. The World Health Organization has warned that antibiotic-resistance in bacteria is spreading globally, causing severe...
  • Scientists Find The 'Achilles Heel' Of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria

    06/18/2014 5:56:17 PM PDT · by blam · 13 replies
    BI ^ | 6-18-2014 | Sarah Knapton - The Telegraph
    Sarah Knapton, The TelegraphJune. 18, 2014 The global threat of antibiotic resistance could finally be tackled after British scientists discovered a chink in the armour of deadly bacteria. Health experts have warned that within 20 years even routine operations like hip replacements and organ transplants could be deadly because of the risk of infection. But now scientists at the University of East Anglia have discovered how the bug responsible for E-coli and salmonella builds an impenetrable wall to keep out antibiotics. They believe that within a few years they could develop a drug which switches off the wall-building mechanism, making...
  • Scientist Makes Mutant, Infectious Flu Virus in Lab

    06/11/2014 6:27:03 PM PDT · by CorporateStepsister · 22 replies
    NBC News ^ | June11, 2014 | By Maggie Fox
    Flu experts have made a mutant version of the 1918 “Spanish flu” virus that killed tens of millions of people, sparking a new debate over whether such work is too dangerous. Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin says the experiments are important for helping scientists understand how new pandemics start, and for designing better flu vaccines.
  • Veterans Could Get $50 Billion a Year in New Health Care

    06/11/2014 5:34:01 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    Roll Call ^ | June 11, 2014 | Niels Lesniewski
    As the Senate voted overwhelmingly to pass legislation designed to fix problems at the Department of Veterans Affairs, the amount of new spending in the measure began to clarify. And the price tag could be a gut-check when it comes to understanding what it really costs to fulfill sacred obligations to America’s veterans. The cost of the measure could be astronomical. That’s according to preliminary numbers circulated by the Congressional Budget Office Wednesday afternoon. The bill would give veterans new opportunities to seek care outside of the health care system provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs. CBO said in...
  • Dubai Doctor Cures Man of ‘Hairy Tongue’

    06/11/2014 1:40:59 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 25 replies
    Gulf News ^ | June 11, 2014 | Sheva Pathak
    American developed hairy tongue 10 years ago and tried several treatments but could not be curedAn American who suffered for 10 years from a ‘hairy tongue’ has finally found a cure for his condition in Dubai. Clay Irwin visited several doctors in several countries, including his home country, to treat his embarrassing condition which impacted his social life as he suffered from constant bad breath due to food and saliva getting stuck in the hair on his tongue. “I developed a rare medical condition some time back. I went to several places in the US, but none could help. I...
  • Big Labor’s VA Choke Hold

    06/01/2014 2:42:57 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 11 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | June 1, 2014 | Nick Sorrentino
    Public sector unions are out of control. They are extracting wealth from the productive economy and playing taxpayers for chumps. Simple as that. Whether the it’s the teachers unions, the municipal unions, the SEIU, the workers at the myriad of of alphabet soup agencies, the assumption is that somehow taxpayers work for government employees, for the low level cronies. Our money is supposed to fund their pensions and above market salaries. We owe it to them. The average federal worker makes over $120,000 in total compensation. A comparable private sector worker? About $50,000. This should not be. To some degree...
  • Medicine on the verge of drastically reducing and preventing HIV for the second sexual revolution

    05/26/2014 3:51:03 PM PDT · by aimhigh · 31 replies
    NextBigFuture ^ | 05/26/2014 | NextBigFuture
    Federal health officials recommended two weeks ago that hundreds of thousands of Americans at risk for AIDS take a daily pill that has been shown to prevent infection with the virus that causes it. If broadly followed, the advice could transform AIDS prevention in the United States — from reliance on condoms, which are effective but unpopular with many men, to a regimen that relies on an antiretroviral drug. . . . . . The first is psychological. Doctors and policy makers need to admit that 30 years of the ABC mantra — abstain, be faithful, use condoms — has...
  • Dr. Campbell: Printing 3D organs for transplant

    05/22/2014 1:52:01 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    WNCN-TV ^ | May 21, 2014 | Dr. Kevin Campbell
    (VIDEO-AT-LINK)RALEIGH, N.C. - The emerging process of 3D printing, which uses computer-created digital models to create real-world objects, has produced everything from toys to jewelry to food. Soon, however, 3D printers may be spitting out something far more complex, and controversial: human organs. Researchers are working diligently to create human organs and body parts through the use of a 3D printer. The 3D printer works in much the same way an inkjet printer does - with a needle that squirts material in a predetermined pattern. Instead of ink, the printer uses cells or human tissue. The cells would be purified...
  • This Christian Ministry Went Galt: Beating healthcare zeitgeist by resurrecting mutual aid society

    05/22/2014 12:01:36 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    PJ Lifestyle ^ | May 18, 2014 | Walter Hudson
    (VIDEO-AT-LINK)Recently, my wife approached me with the unwelcome news that our health insurance plan — which we like — will likely be cancelled next year. Her employer, a healthcare provider, generously provides benefits even for those working part-time. Due to the devastation wrecked upon the industry by Obamacare, they anticipate the need to drop coverage for all employees working less than 60 hours per pay period. My wife works 56. Since my employer’s offering proves virtually worthless, far too expensive for far too little coverage, we will be left effectively uninsured. We may consider Samaritan Ministries as an alternative to...
  • Sarah Palin accuses media of double standard with Hillary Clinton

    05/19/2014 5:21:49 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 45 replies
    MSNBC ^ | May 19, 2014 | Clare Kim
    Another Republican is now weighing in on Hillary Clinton’s health. Sarah Palin slammed the mainstream media for treating Clinton with a double standard after Republican strategist Karl Rove raised controversial concerns about the likely presidential candidate’s health. “Thank goodness liberals are consistent in refusing to apply double standards, thanks to their disdain for hypocrisy – so they’ll come through once again,” the former vice presidential candidate wrote sarcastically on her Facebook page Monday evening. ”Rest assured these self-designated protectors of what they obviously believe is the ‘weaker sex’ needing protection in the political arena will elevate political discourse.” Palin doubled...
  • Debate between Plant based and Paleo Diets

    05/17/2014 10:49:04 AM PDT · by RichardMoore · 117 replies
    youtube.com ^ | Colin Campbell MD
    Debate between plant based diet and Paleo diet.
  • Measles used to put cancer into remission [Game Changer in medicine?]

    05/16/2014 5:38:41 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 20 replies
    CNN ^ | 5/15/14 | Jacque Wilson and William Hudson
    A woman with an incurable cancer is now in remission, thanks, doctors say, to a highly concentrated dose of the measles virus. For 10 years, Stacy Erholtz, 49, battled multiple myeloma, a deadly cancer of the blood. Doctors at the Mayo Clinic say she had received every type of chemotherapy drug available.... Then researchers gave her and five other multiple myeloma patients a dose of a highly concentrated, lab-engineered measles virus similar to the measles vaccine. In fact, the dose Erholtz received contained enough of the virus to vaccinate approximately 10 million people.
  • Hope Comes to RHOB 2123--Fred Upton Leads a Cure Strategy for the 21st Century

    05/11/2014 11:22:34 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 3 replies
    Breitbart.com ^ | May 9, 2014 | James A. Pinkerton
    The white-marble Rayburn House Office Building, in Washington DC, looks like a giant courts building or a central bank, fully intimidating and imposing in its hulking stony blockiness. And the US Congress, of course, is an institution best known for its tedium, albeit a tedium that is regularly punctuated by fiery partisan combat. On a typical day, the Rayburn building--acronymed as RHOB--is a place where politicos and bureaucrats struggle for and against some special interest, yea or nay, on regulation or appropriation. And the biggest single activity in RHOB, or in any of the other five office edifices on Capitol...
  • Eating more fruit, veggies may cut stroke risk: Study

    05/09/2014 7:10:27 AM PDT · by Innovative · 13 replies
    Sun News Network ^ | May 9, 2014 | QMI Agendy
    Researchers at the Medical College of Qingdao University in Qingdao, China, saw a 32% decrease of stroke risk with every 200 grams of fruit consumed each day, and an 11% decrease for every 200 g of vegetables eaten daily. High fruit and vegetable intake can lower blood pressure and improve microvascular function, the researchers said in the study, which was published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke.
  • Colorado VA Hospital Falsified Wait Times

    05/05/2014 1:27:18 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    The Washington Free Beacon ^ | May 5, 2014 | Staff
    A Veterans Affairs hospital in Colorado falsified the wait times faced by thousands of its patients—the second VA facility to be found cooking its books in what has become a national scandal—USA Today reports: Clerks at the Department of Veterans Affairs clinic in Fort Collins were instructed last year how to falsify appointment records so it appeared the small staff of doctors was seeing patients within the agency’s goal of 14 days, according to the investigation. A copy of the findings by the VA’s Office of Medical Inspector was provided to USA TODAY. Many of the 6,300 veterans treated at...
  • Young Blood May Hold Key to Reversing Aging

    05/05/2014 1:16:50 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 42 replies
    New York Times ^ | 5/2/2014 | Carl Zimmerman
    Two teams of scientists published studies on Sunday showing that blood from young mice reverses aging in old mice, rejuvenating their muscles and brains. As ghoulish as the research may sound, experts said that it could lead to treatments for disorders like Alzheimer’s disease and heart disease. “I am extremely excited,” said Rudolph Tanzi, a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, who was not involved in the research. “These findings could be a game changer.” The research builds on centuries of speculation that the blood of young people contains substances that might rejuvenate older adults. In the 1950s, Clive...
  • Chronic Pain Linked To Vitamin D Deficiency In Men

    05/04/2014 6:17:42 PM PDT · by blam · 68 replies
    Medical News Today ^ | 4-29-2014 | Medical News Today
    Chronic Pain Linked To Vitamin D Deficiency In Men Tuesday 29 April 2014 - 8am PSTMedical News Today Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to a number of health issues. And now, a new study to be presented at a conference run by the British Society for Rheumatology suggests that low levels of vitamin D in the body are linked to chronic widespread pain. The researchers note that in the UK, chronic widespread pain is a major public health problem, affecting around 1 in 5 people, and it can be caused by rheumatic and neurological disorders. Also, around 50% of...
  • Young blood reverses effects of aging in mice

    05/04/2014 11:26:46 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 27 replies
    L A Times ^ | May 4, 2014, 10:15 a.m. | Monte Morin
    In a group of studies published Sunday in the journals Science and Nature Medicine, researchers say old mice who were infused with the blood of spry younger mice showed clear improvements in memory, sensory function, strength and endurance. Researchers say a specific protein, found in the blood of mice and humans, appears to be at the root of this rejuvenation. They say they hope to test the protein's effect on humans in clinical trials in the next few years.
  • Researchers Build New Off Switch to Shut Down Neural Activity

    04/27/2014 7:38:55 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    HHMI News ^ | April 24, 2014
    Much-Needed Tool for Neuroscience Emerges After Years of Work.Nearly a decade ago, the era of optogenetics was ushered in with the development of channelrhodopsins, light-activated ion channels that can, with the flick of a switch, instantaneously turn on neurons in which they are genetically expressed. What has lagged behind, however, is the ability to use light to inactivate neurons with an equal level of reliability and efficiency. Now, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) scientists have used an analysis of channelrhodopsin’s molecular structure to guide a series of genetic mutations to the ion channel that grant the power to silence neurons...
  • Paul: 'Difficult to turn the clock back' on O-Care

    04/25/2014 7:28:14 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 137 replies
    The Hill's Ballot Box ^ | April 25, 2014 | Alexandra Jaffe
    Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) admitted Friday it’s “difficult to turn the clock back” on ObamaCare, but proposed making the law voluntary as a possible fix for consumers. “I think it’s going to be difficult to turn the clock back. People get assumed and accustomed to receiving things, particularly things that they get for free,” he told a crowd of students at Harvard’s Institute of Politics on Friday. Paul’s comments echo those of other Republicans who have admitted it will be difficult to fully repeal the law after some of its more popular provisions took effect. The potential 2016 presidential candidate...
  • 3D-Printed Osteoid Cast With Built-In Ultrsound May Heal Bones 38% Faster

    04/22/2014 6:38:07 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    Medical Daily ^ | April 22, 2013 | Anthony Rivas
    As 3D-printing technology advances, researchers are finding new ways to apply it to health care. One of the latest advances includes a cast that uses ultrasound to stimulate bone healing. The future, it seems, will be filled with 3D printing. It's already been used to produce everything from food to organs, and there’s certainly more to come. In July last year, some of the first prototypes for 3D-printed casts were revealed. But now, researchers have taken the prototype a step forward, adding on a form of ultrasound known to hasten the healing process. Current casts, which are made of plaster,...
  • “If Obamacare Dies, Sarah Palin Killed It”

    04/22/2014 3:48:14 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 32 replies
    The National Review ^ | April 22, 2013 | Wesley J. Smith
    Several weeks ago the World Affairs Council of Philadelphia sponsored a debate–more a discussion–between me and Thaddeus Mason Pope about end of life care under the Affordable Care Act. He supports medical futility. I oppose it. We went from there. I began my presentation with the quote in the headline above–asserting that Palin’s term “death panels” may have put a spear through the heart of Obamacare. I then said: People are afraid of centralized bureaucrats dictating whether Craig’s [the moderator’s terminally ill babies) children can have medical care, whether my 96-year-old mother can have medical care, whether people with disabilities...
  • U.S. Congressman Compares Corruption in CDC's Vaccine Safety Studies of SEC to Bernie Madoff Scandal

    04/17/2014 4:14:41 PM PDT · by Beave Meister · 8 replies
    PR Newswire ^ | 4/16/2014
    WATCHUNG, N.J., April 16, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- In an April 8 interview on AutismOne's A Conversation of Hope radio show, Congressman Bill Posey's strong resolve and demands for transparency were evident as he discussed the Center for Disease Control (CDC)'s handling of vaccine safety studies which affect "our most precious resource in our nation – our children." The 30-minute interview, conducted by vaccine industry watchdog, PhD biochemist Brian Hooker, delves into what Posey called "the incestuous relationship between the public health community and the vaccine makers and public officials." The Florida legislator, known as "Mr. Accountabililty," did not mince words...
  • Breast Cancer, Mammograms, And The Fear Factor

    04/15/2014 10:09:52 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 16 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 4/15/14 | Michael D. Shaw
    Call them “breast-obsessed” if you like, but more than 3500 years ago, Egyptian physicians documented breast cancer on papyri that survive to this day. Some authorities claim that these documents could date back much earlier than that. A key entry describes “bulging tumors of the breast that have no cure.” From Hippocrates on, causes of the disease were proffered by the leading minds of the day. These would include excess of black bile; lack of sexual activity; overly vigorous sexual activity; depression; childlessness, and sedentary lifestyle. Famed French physician Henri Le Dran was among the first to advocate surgical removal...
  • Scientists Fully Regenerate Organ In Living Animal For The First Time

    04/08/2014 7:36:47 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 5 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 04/08/2014 | KATE KELLAND, REUTERS
    LONDON (Reuters) - British scientists have for the first time used regenerative medicine to fully restore an organ in a living animal, a discovery they say may pave the way for similar techniques to be used in humans in future. The University of Edinburgh team rebuilt the thymus - an organ central to the immune system and found in front of the heart - of very old mice by reactivating a natural mechanism that gets shut down with age. The regenerated thymus was not only similar in structure and genetic detail to one in a young mouse, the scientists said,...
  • A simple blood test to detect 'solid' cancers?

    04/07/2014 6:34:13 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 4 replies
    timesofindia ^ | Apr 7, 2014, 04.55 PM IST
    Researchers at Stanford University have designed a new technique that may soon make this a reality. Tumours are called 'solid' or 'liquid' based on where in the body they grow. More than 80 percent of all cancers are caused by solid tumours that grow as a mass of cells in particular organ, tissue or gland. The new technique called CAPP-Seq (cancer personalised profiling by deep sequencing) is sensitive enough to detect just one molecule of tumour DNA in a sea of 10,000 healthy DNA molecules in the blood.
  • Angry mob attacks Ebola treatment centre in Guinea

    04/05/2014 7:43:42 PM PDT · by grundle · 31 replies
    yahoo.com ^ | Reuters | April 4, 2014
    CONAKRY (Reuters) - An angry crowd attacked a treatment center in Guinea on Friday where staff from Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) were working to contain an outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus, forcing it to shut down, a spokesman for the medical charity said.
  • The next frontier in 3-D printing: Human organs

    04/03/2014 8:45:27 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    CNN's Tech ^ | April 3, 2014 | Brandon Griggs
    The emerging process of 3-D printing, which uses computer-created digital models to create real-world objects, has produced everything from toys to jewelry to food. Soon, however, 3-D printers may be spitting out something far more complex, and controversial: human organs. For years now, medical researchers have been reproducing human cells in laboratories by hand to create blood vessels, urine tubes, skin tissue and other living body parts. But engineering full organs, with their complicated cell structures, is much more difficult. Enter 3-D printers, which because of their precise process can reproduce the vascular systems required to make organs viable. Scientists...
  • RULES FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF IMPORTED MEDICINE TO BE RELEASED SOON

    04/03/2014 2:19:20 PM PDT · by SWAMPSNIPER · 8 replies
    rxrights ^ | april 03,2014 | rxrights
    There are a number of obstacles Americans will face this year related to access to affordable medicine. One of the most troublesome involves Section 708, a portion of the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (S. 3187) passed in 2012. Section 708 requires the Secretary of Health Human Services (HHS) to establish rules regarding the seizure and destruction of imported medicines valued at $2500 or less. The proposed rules are set to be released on April 18. A minimum of 60 days review and comment period will follow. During this time, RxRights intends to mobilize our 75,000 members to respond on...
  • Millions could go off blood pressure meds

    03/29/2014 6:57:54 PM PDT · by kingattax · 64 replies
    Yahoo/AFP ^ | March 29, 2014
    Washington (AFP) - One in four American adults over 60 being treated for high blood pressure could go off their medication under recent guidelines issued in the United States, a study said Saturday. The changes, which stirred controversy in the medical community, could mean nearly six million may no longer need drugs to control their blood pressure, Duke University researchers said in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The findings are the first to analyze the impact of 2014 guidelines that raised blood pressure targets to 150/90, instead of the previous goal of 140/90, in adults age 60 and...
  • North Adams hospital shutting down, 530 to lose jobs (Massachusetts)

    03/28/2014 5:56:45 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 46 replies
    WNYT-TV ^ | March 27, 2014 | Staff
    (VIDEO-AT-LINK)NORTH ADAMS, Mass. – After 129 years, North Adams Regional Hospital is shutting down. Hospital workers were informed of the decision on Tuesday. Around 530 people will lose their jobs. The decision to shut down comes as the hospital files for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. It also affects the VNA & Hospice, along with the Northern Berkshire Healthcare Physicians Group. Current patients will be transferred to other facilities through April 4. The emergency room will close on Friday. “In the six years that I have been on the board we have investigated every possible avenue and exhausted all options as we...