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Keyword: epigraphyandlanguage

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  • United States Files Civil Action to Forfeit Rare Cuneiform Tablet Bearing Portion of the Epic of Gilgamesh

    07/14/2020 7:00:41 PM PDT · by ransomnote · 21 replies
    justice.gov ^ | May 18, 2020 | U.S. Attorney’s Office Eastern District of New York
    The “Gilgamesh Dream Tablet” Was Sold to Hobby Lobby Using a False Provenance Earlier today, the United States filed a civil complaint to forfeit a rare cuneiform tablet bearing a portion of the epic of Gilgamesh, a Sumerian epic poem considered one the world’s oldest works of literature.  Known as the Gilgamesh Dream Tablet, it originated in the area of modern-day Iraq and entered the United States contrary to federal law.  The tablet was later sold by an international auction house (the “Auction House”) to Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. (“Hobby Lobby”), a prominent arts-and-crafts retailer based in Oklahoma City,...
  • Forced Resettlement and Immigration at Tel Hadid

    07/13/2020 7:26:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review 46:3 ^ | Summer 2020 | Ido Koch, Dan Warner, Eli Yannai, Lin Lawson Pruitt, Dennis Cole, James Parker
    Among the individuals mentioned in those texts, 12 had Mesopotamian names, five had probably Aramaic names, one bore an Egyptian name, and one had a name with the Yahwistic component Yhw -- Netanyahu. The appearance of the foreign names in the documents, coupled with the scarcity of Yahwistic elements in them, points to the policy of forced resettlement for which the Neo-Assyrian state was notorious. The refugees' displacement in times of war -- a phenomenon, unfortunately, so familiar to us today -- was coupled with forced movements of conquered populations. The kings of the Neo-Assyrian Empire formulated and used this...
  • Newly-discovered 1,600-year-old mosaic sheds light on ancient Judaism

    07/02/2019 1:13:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Monday, July 1, 2019 | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    First: Chapter 7 in the book of Daniel describes four beasts which represent the four kingdoms leading up to the end of days. This year our team discovered mosaics in the synagogue's north aisle depicting these four beasts, as indicated by a fragmentary Aramaic inscription referring to the first beast: a lion with eagle's wings. The lion itself is not preserved, nor is the third beast. However, the second beast from Daniel 7:4 - a bear with three ribs protruding from its mouth - is preserved. So is most of the fourth beast, which is described in Daniel 7:7 as...
  • Changing diets in Pictish Portmahomack

    07/07/2020 10:25:13 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Current Archaeology ^ | July 1, 2020 | Amy Brunskill
    Interestingly, there is no evidence that this community ate any marine or freshwater fish, despite the fact that it would have been readily available in their coastal location. Archaeological evidence of naval bases, depictions of boats and sea beasts on Pictish stones, and references in literature demonstrate that Pictish communities had a relationship with the sea and would have been able to fish. However, images of salmon in Pictish carvings could indicate that fish had some symbolic importance, and it has been suggested that the consumption of all fish was deliberately avoided, or reserved for a select few. The Picts...
  • Testing the DNA of cave art

    07/02/2020 10:40:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Bradshaw Foundation ^ | Friday, June 19, 2020 | Bridgette Watson (CBC News)
    The University of Victoria paleoanthropologist Genevieve von Petzinger explains that a DNA test, which would reveal genetic mutations due to evolution, could help pinpoint the time period a painting was made and may help determine if the art was actually the handiwork of humans or Neanderthals — who lived about 130,000 to 40,000 years ago. "It would just be so fascinating to see the identity. The million dollar question is, did Neanderthals paint?" There is already some indication, according to von Petzinger, that this extinct species was, in fact, artistic. Von Petzinger said that a few years ago, some of...
  • Biology in art: Genetic detectives ID microbes suspected of slowly ruining humanity's treasures

    07/02/2020 9:57:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | June 18, 2020 | editors
    A new study of the microbial settlers on old paintings, sculptures, and other forms of art charts a potential path for preserving, restoring, and confirming the geographic origin of some of humanity's greatest treasures. Genetics scientists with the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI), collaborating with the Leonardo da Vinci DNA Project and supported by the Richard Lounsbery Foundation, say identifying and managing communities of microbes on art may offer museums and collectors a new way to stem the deterioration of priceless possessions, and to unmask counterfeits in the $60 billion a year art market... The genetic detectives caution that additional...
  • Unique Rock Paintings Reveal Traces Of Prehistoric Human Settlement In Anatolia

    01/18/2007 1:56:25 PM PST · by blam · 19 replies · 721+ views
    Unique rock paintings reveal traces of prehistoric human settlement in Anatolia Thursday, January 18, 2007 ANKARA – Turkish Daily News On the shores of Lake Bafa in southwest Turkey, prehistoric rock paintings found on Mt. Latmos in the Five Fingers Mountains have been classified as unique anthropological works because of their use of language and social themes. Archaeologist Annelise Peschlow has been conducting a survey of the area, the ancient city of Miletusare, since 1974 as part of the Latmos Project to find early traces of human settlements in the area. The city's evolution extended from prehistoric times to the...
  • New Evidence Supports Modern Greeks Having DNA of Ancient Mycenaeans

    06/28/2020 3:18:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    GreekReporter.com ^ | June 22, 2020 | Stavros Anastasiou
    New emerging DNA evidence suggests that living Greeks are indeed descendants of the ancient Mycenaeans, who ruled mainland Greece and the Aegean Sea from 1,600 BC to 1,200 BC. The proof comes from a study in which scientists analyzed the genes from the teeth of 19 people across various archaeological sites within mainland Greece and Mycenae. A total of 1.2 million letters of genetic code were compared to those of 334 people across the world. Genetic information was also compiled from a group of thirty modern Greek individuals in order to compare it to the ancient genomes. This allowed researchers...
  • Ancient Egyptian Art to Ancient Music

    05/25/2018 11:37:19 AM PDT · by mairdie · 26 replies
    An art history look at Ancient Egyptian Art to 'Sumerians, Egyptians and Greeks' and 'Ankh, the Sound of Ancient Egypt'. From Pre-Dynastic Period to Late Period.
  • Stone Engravings Of Famous Warrior Pharaoh Found In Ancient Egyptian Temple

    10/09/2018 3:49:38 AM PDT · by blam · 12 replies
    Live Science ^ | 10-3-2018 | Owen Jarus
    Part of one of the inscriptions found at Kom Ombo, a temple in southern Egypt. The image at the top of the inscription appears to show the king Seti I with the gods Horus and Sobek.A giant stone engraving that fits together like a jigsaw puzzle, found in a temple in southern Egypt, may reveal new information about a pharaoh named Seti I, who launched a series of military campaigns in North Africa and the Middle East after he became pharaoh in about 1289 or 1288 B.C., several Egyptologists told Live Science. The engraving has both drawings and hieroglyphs...
  • Small works of art on a large canvas

    06/05/2020 8:11:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Cosmos Magazine ^ | 28 May 2020 | unattributed
    Australian researchers are exploring the backstory to the most detailed examples ever found of a rare form of rock art. The miniature stencils are too small to have been made by tracing articles or body parts, suggesting models first had to be created. Seventeen images were found in the Yilbilinji rockshelter at Limmen National Park in the southwest Gulf of Carpentaria region of northern Australia by a team of archaeologists, anthropologists, park rangers and representatives of the traditional Marra people. Only two other examples of such works have been uncovered anywhere in the world, the researchers say: one at Nielson's...
  • The Dead Sea Scrolls contain genetic clues to their origins

    06/04/2020 10:35:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Science News ^ | June 2, 2020 | Bruce Bower
    Rechavi's group obtained DNA from minuscule bits that either fell off or were removed from 26 Dead Sea Scroll fragments. Those samples contained no writing. After excluding DNA left by people who had handled the scrolls, the scientists identified DNA of animals used to make the ancient parchments. All fragments were made of sheepskin except for two made from cow skin... Four Qumran fragments from the Hebrew Bible's book of Jeremiah likely came from two different versions of that book, the investigators find. Two sheepskin fragments belonged to one book and two cow skin fragments belonged to another. Cows couldn't...
  • Deultum Roman colony near Burgas had port

    06/01/2020 7:35:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Bulgarian National Radio ^ | May 25, 2020 | Radio Bulgaria News
    Archaeologists from the Deultum-Debelt National Archaeological Reserve near Bulgaria's Burgas have discovered the first written evidence that the Roman colony Deultum had a port, BGNES reported. The inscription was found on limestone sarcophagus, dating from the II-III century AD. Experts say that the inscription, which is in Greek, proves that today's Debelt was a port town. Deultum is the oldest Roman colony in the Bulgarian lands. It was established in the 1st century AD, immediately after the Jewish-Roman War and is located at the mouth of today's river Sredetska, which flows into the Burgas Bay. The port town was of...
  • Japan was likely writing centuries earlier than record suggests

    05/28/2020 3:27:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    The Asahi Shimbun ^ | May 22, 2020 | Kenji Shimizu / Staff Writer
    Yasuo Yanagida, a visiting professor of archaeology at Kokugakuin University, argues in his latest paper that more than 150 stone artifacts dating from the Yayoi Pottery Culture Period (1000 B.C.-A.D. 250) and the Kofun Period (third to seventh century) he examined could, in fact, be writing tools... In 2016, an ink slab from the latter half of the Yayoi Period (first to second century) was unearthed at the Mikumo-Iwara archaeological site in Itoshima, Fukuoka Prefecture. That site is said to have been the capital of Itokoku, a community written about in the ancient Chinese historical document "Gishiwajinden," which recorded encounters...
  • When the Romans turned Jerusalem into a pagan city, Jews revolted and minted this coin

    05/24/2020 3:08:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 50 replies
    Live Science ^ | 18 May 2020 | Laura Geggel
    Archaeologists in Israel have discovered a rare coin minted about 1,900 years ago, when the Jewish people revolted against Roman occupation, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced (IAA) last week. The bronze coin is so rare, that out of 22,000 coins found in archaeological excavations in the Old City of Jerusalem, just four are from the revolt, known as the Bar Kokhba revolt, Donald Tzvi Ariel, head of the Coin Department at the IAA, said in a statement. A cluster of grapes and the inscription, "Year Two of the Freedom of Israel," appear on one side of the coin, and on...
  • Fake Dead Sea Scrolls Exposed: A new study sponsored by the Museum of the Bible reveals that the 16 fragments in their collection are fake

    05/21/2020 7:18:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | March 16, 2020 | Biblical Archaeology Society Staff
    The Museum of the Bible holds 16 fragments of reputed Dead Sea Scrolls in their collection. On Friday, March 13, 2020, a study revealed that all 16 of these are modern forgeries. Already in 2018, a different study had tested five of the 16 fragments and concluded that they were fakes. The new study -- which was conducted by Art Fraud Insights, led by the art fraud investigator Colette Loll, and funded by the Museum of the Bible -- analyzed all 16 fragments. Through a series of physical and chemical tests, Loll and her team determined that the fragments had...
  • Dead Sea Scroll fragments thought to be blank reveal text

    05/19/2020 9:27:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    University of Manchester ^ | May 15, 2020 | News & Media Relations Officer Joe Stafford
    Unlike the recent cases of forgeries assumed to be Dead Sea Scrolls fragments, all of these small pieces were unearthed in the official excavations of the Qumran caves, and were never passed through the antiquities market. In the 1950s, the fragments were gifted by the Jordanian government to Ronald Reed, leather expert at the University of Leeds, so he could study their physical and chemical composition. It was assumed that the pieces were ideal for scientific tests, as they were blank and relatively worthless. These were studied and published by Reed and his student John Poole, and then stored safely...
  • Passed By for Decades, Clarence Thomas Is a New Symbol of the Trump Era

    05/18/2020 1:19:17 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 6 replies
    DNYUZ ^ | 18 May 2020
    He was the subject of a recent book, “The Enigma of Clarence Thomas,” which led to a flurry of articles and book reviews on his life and legal thought. A new biographical documentary, made by the conservative filmmaker Michael Pack, airs Monday on PBS. For the project, the justice spoke to filmmakers for 30 hours — an astounding feat for a jurist who once went 10 years without asking a question from the bench. “He would have never said, ‘Gee whiz, I should be an icon,’” said Helgi Walker, a lawyer at the firm Gibson Dunn who clerked for Justice...
  • British Museum says metal detectorists found 1,311 treasures last year

    05/16/2020 10:30:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    The Guardian ^ | St Pat's Day, Tuesday, March 17, 2020 | Mark Brown
    Take the Roman Britain coin, known as a radiate, found in Headbourne Worthy, Hampshire. "On the face of it, it looks a grotty old coin, which it is, I guess," said Lewis. But it helps tell the story of Carausius who declared himself emperor of Britain and northern Gaul between AD286-93, breaking away from the Roman empire. He was assassinated by his treasurer Allectus. The newly found coin is just one from an astonishing variety of nearly 4,000 which were struck during Carausius' reign. Other finds include a pure gold arm ring weighing 300g and dating from the eighth century...
  • Mysterious inscribed cubes discovered in river

    05/15/2020 8:37:51 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 43 replies
    The cubes were tiny - small enough to hold between the finger and thumb - and weighed 125g each. The symbols on them appeared to be some form of Sanskrit. Curious to know more, Read posted photographs of his discovery up on social media. "There were all sorts of stories flying around at first, the cubes really captured people's imaginations," he said. "What I learned is that they are Indian in origin and they show incantations for prayers which take effect when they are thrown in running water." Exactly how old the cubes are, however, continues to remain a mystery.