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Keyword: engineering

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  • North Carolina: Licensing Raised In Red Light Camera Debate

    09/28/2019 8:27:52 AM PDT · by cutty · 8 replies
    The Newspaper ^ | 9/27/2019
    Wilmington, North Carolina renews deal with red light camera contractor that violated state engineering laws. The Wilmington, North Carolina City Council last week signed a red light camera contract renewal despite protests that the state had found the for-profit camera contractor in direct violation of the law. American Traffic Solutions (ATS, now known as Verra Mobility) was found to be practicing engineering without a license by the North Carolina Board of Examiners for Engineers and Surveyors last year. The company has yet to remedy the violation, according to the city traffic engineer. Todd Platzer, a local resident, raised the issue...
  • <April 22> Boeing’s 737 Max Debacle: The Result of a Dangerously Pro-Automation Design Philosophy?

    07/20/2019 5:35:42 AM PDT · by xxqqzz · 59 replies
    Naked Capitalism ^ | April 22, 2019 | Yves Smith
    The aftermath of two crashes of Boeing 737 Max jets shortly after takeoff has led to the global grounding of the airplane. Boeing has been forced to cut production, and even so, undelivered planes are piling up. Big buyers like Southwest American Airlines have been forced to cancel flights during their peak time of year as a result of taking their 737s off line. American lengthened its 737 grounding to June 5 and Southwest, to August 5 [Update: American sent a notice to American Aadvantage members that the grounding would last through August 19]. Even though Boeing is scrambling to...
  • Protecting the world from Chernobyl: The world's 'largest moveable land-based structure' [tr]

    07/11/2019 6:02:09 AM PDT · by C19fan · 24 replies
    Press Association ^ | July 11, 2019 | Staff
    A Ł2billion project to confine the leaking of radioactive debris at the Chernobyl nuclear plant has been unveiled. The structure – which took nine years to build – was constructed to secure the molten reactor core and 200 tons of radioactive material at the site. Officials have described the shelter as the largest moveable land-based structure ever built, with a span of 257 metres and a total weight of over 36,000 metric tons. Reactor Number 4 at the plant in what was then Soviet Ukraine exploded and burned on April 26, 1986, spewing radiation across Europe in the world's worst...
  • Federal government takes “preliminary step” to evaluate Strait of Belle Isle subsea tunnel (Canada)

    07/08/2019 12:45:29 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 14 replies
    The Packet ^ | June 25, 2019 | Stephen Roberts
    A subsea tunnel across the Strait of Belle Isle is back in conversation once again after a report was tabled this month in Ottawa. The federal government’s standing committee on transport, infrastructure, and communities is now calling on the federal government to work with the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador and Quebec, as well, as the private sector, to build a fixed link across the Strait of Belle Isle and complete Route 138 along the Quebec Lower North Shore. The tunnel would link Point Amour in Labrador to Yankee Point on the Great Northern Peninsula in Newfoundland. The project would...
  • SunTrax project moves toward phase two in Polk

    06/12/2019 4:29:36 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 3 replies
    The Ledger ^ | June 3, 2019 | Gary White
    AUBURNDALE — Florida has one of the world’s most famous asphalt ovals in the Daytona International Speedway. A slightly smaller track recently completed in Auburndale won’t draw massive crowds for races, but it’s part of a project that could hasten the day when self-driving vehicles take over the roads. Crews finished laying asphalt for the 2Ľ-mile oval — phase one of SunTrax — in early May, and construction will begin in the coming months on infield elements designed for the development and testing of connected and autonomous vehicles. The second phase of SunTrax, a project overseen by Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise...
  • Forget Merit: Get More Women into Engineering

    05/20/2019 12:10:08 AM PDT · by OddLane · 51 replies
    Studio Brule ^ | May 12, 2019 | No Joke Janice
    Are affirmative action and gender equality killing us?
  • Hummingbird Robots 1, Drones 0 Engineers just built a bird bot

    05/14/2019 1:25:47 AM PDT · by blueplum · 1 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | 13 May 2019 | David Grossman
    Full title: Hummingbird Robots 1, Drones 0 Engineers just built a bird bot that can fly better than unmanned aerial vehicles. Engineers at Purdue have built a flying robot to mimic one of the most expert flyers in the natural world: the hummingbird.... ... After going through the training, the robot has an understanding, so to speak, of when to pause and when to take flight. Even more impressive? The robot can't actually see. It senses by touching surfaces, with each touch altering an electrical current.
  • America’s STEM Crisis Threatens Our National Security

    03/20/2019 7:59:44 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 68 replies
    American Affairs Journal ^ | Feb 20, 2019 | Arthur Herman
    February 20, 2019 America’s STEM Crisis Threatens Our National Security By Arthur Herman On October 4, 1957, a steel sphere the size of a beach ball and bristling with four radio antennae circled the Earth in eight minutes. Dubbed “Satellite-1,” or “PS-1” (Prosteyshiy Sputnik-1) by its Soviet fabricators, it was the first artificial Earth satellite. The Soviets had launched it into an elliptical low Earth orbit, where it stayed for three weeks before its batteries died. Then it continued silently in a decaying orbit for another two months before burning up in the atmosphere. Its radio signal pulses were easily...
  • President Trump on overengineering/uneeded complexity (Boeing 737-8 related)

    03/12/2019 12:52:10 PM PDT · by Simon Foxx · 107 replies
    Twitter ^ | 03/12/2019 | President Donald J Trump
    Airplanes are becoming far too complex to fly. Pilots are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT. I see it all the time in many products. Always seeking to go one unnecessary step further, when often old and simpler is far better. Split second decisions are........needed, and the complexity creates danger. All of this for great cost yet very little gain. I don’t know about you, but I don’t want Albert Einstein to be my pilot. I want great flying professionals that are allowed to easily and quickly take control of a plane!
  • What caused the Genoa bridge collapse – and the end of an Italian national myth?

    02/26/2019 9:58:37 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 41 replies
    The Guardian ^ | February 26, 2019 | Guglielmo Mattioli
    On 14 August last year, the city of Genoa in northwest Italy woke to a strong summer storm. By 11.30am, the rain was so heavy that visibility had fallen dramatically. Videos captured by security cameras show vehicles slowing down as they crossed Morandi Bridge, which grew progressively more enveloped in a grey mist. A few minutes later, a 200-metre section of the bridge collapsed, including one of its three supporting towers. The tragedy killed 43 people and left 600 homeless. It also dealt a hammer blow to Italy’s once-proud engineering history – and the country’s confidence in its mastery of...
  • Can Norway build the world’s first submerged floating tube bridge?

    02/25/2019 1:13:52 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 14 replies
    Intelligent Transport ^ | February 19, 2019 | Arianna Minoretti
    The rugged west coast of Norway, home to thousands, is a challenge to travel along by car. It takes time. A long time. The harsh weather conditions make it an unpredictable route, with roads often closing and ferries often cancelling their departure due to snow, heavy winds or high waves. A continuous E39 highway that is accessible 24/7, with fixed links between islands and the mainland will make the western coast more accessible for people who inhabit the coast, but also for tourists and for the transportation of goods. Currently, 1,000km of road need to be improved The Norwegian parliament...
  • 5 Axis 3D Printing Brings New Possibilities

    01/12/2019 8:56:21 AM PST · by ProtectOurFreedom · 9 replies
    Make: / Makezine ^ | 1/3/18 | Caleb Kraft
    When you walk around a Maker Faire, you’re likely to see a wide variety of 3D printers, though if you look at the basic construction, you’ll find there are usually only two main types on people’s tables. There are cartesian (with a gantry at right angles) and delta (the ones with three arms holding the print head). Sure, there are a few others that appear from time to time, but these two dominate the landscape. Cel-Robox has teamed up with M-Solv to create a new entity called Q5D Technologies to push new manufacturing technologies, such as this one that caught...
  • Bridge beams made in West Valley City—more than 200 feet long

    12/26/2018 11:05:50 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 21 replies
    The Salt Lake Tribune ^ | December 12, 2018 | Lee Davidson
    Most newer concrete beams that hold up Utah highway bridges are around 145 feet long. But the Utah Department of Transportation is about to place six that are 40 percent longer — 203 feet — to help widen Interstate 15 in Lehi. They are longer than the iconic Cinderella’s castle in Walt Disney World (189 feet) is high, or the leaning tower of Pisa (185 feet). They also will be the third-longest single-component beams in the United States, slightly shorter than two in Orlando, Fla., and Seattle, said Lee Wegner, with Forterra Structural Precast, the West Valley City company that...
  • The Rise of Engineering’s Social Justice Warriors

    11/21/2018 5:29:24 AM PST · by reaganaut1 · 68 replies
    James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal ^ | November 21, 2018 | Ben Cohen
    In 2015, Colorado School of Mines writing instructor Dr. Jon Leydens delivered a TED talk titled “engineering and social justice.” According to Leydens, in the mid-2000s students started asking him about how they could combine their “passion for social justice” with their “interest in engineering.” Leydens is part of a growing movement that seeks to incorporate social justice into engineering, in both the professional code and the curriculum. Far from being a marginal movement, on the fringes of the profession, it enjoys support at the highest levels. The movement began during the Vietnam War era when left-wing engineers founded the...
  • Venus flytraps kill with chemicals like those from lightning bolts

    11/12/2018 9:00:45 AM PST · by ETL · 21 replies
    ScienceMag.com ^ | Nov 12, 2018 | Richard A. Lovett
    PORTLAND, OREGON—Venus flytraps have a well-known way of dispatching their victims: They snare inquisitive insects that brush up against trigger hairs in their fly-trapping pods (above). But now, physicists have discovered that the triggering process may involve the release of a cascade of exotic chemicals similar to the whiff of ozone that tingles your nose after a lightning bolt. To study this process, scientists used an electrical generator to ionize air into a “cold plasma,” which they then gently blew toward a flytrap in their lab. Normally, the flytrap’s closure is caused by an electrical signal created when two or...
  • Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge, world's longest sea-crossing, finally opens

    10/22/2018 3:43:46 AM PDT · by sodpoodle · 18 replies
    CNN ^ | 10/22/2018 | James Griffiths and Sarah Lazarus
    A $20-billion bridge connecting Hong Kong and Macau to the mainland Chinese city of Zhuhai is set to finally open this week, marking the completion of the longest sea-crossing bridge ever built, nine years after construction began. Chinese President Xi Jinping is expected to attend a ceremony in Zhuhai on Tuesday, along with top officials from Hong Kong and Macau, with the bridge opening to public traffic Wednesday. The 55-kilometer (34-mile) bridge was originally due to open in 2016, but repeated delays pushed that to this year.
  • 15 of The Coolest 3D Printed Things

    08/13/2018 9:37:04 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    Interesting Engineering ^ | August 11, 2018 | Christopher McFadden
    3D printing is fast becoming one of the most useful tools ever developed by humans. The technique can be used to print pretty much anything from food to new body parts. 3D printers can also be used to print novelty items, tools, weapons and even buildings. The technology has already had a huge impact on the modern world and is set to become ever more important in many industries of the future. In most cases, the only real limitation to what can be 3D printed is our imagination, as these 15 amazing 3D printed objects testify to. The following list...
  • Engineers Unveil, Test University's Innovative Bridge Girder System

    07/19/2018 10:59:51 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 26 replies
    Construction Equipment Guide ^ | July 19, 2018 | University of Maine
    The University of Maine unveiled an innovative, rapidly deployable bridge system July 12 at the Advanced Structures and Composites Center. Engineers, Maine Department of Transportation officials, business leaders, investors, researchers, members from Advanced Infrastructure Technologies (UMaine's licensee for the original “Bridge-in-a-Backpack”) and staff attended the event, at which a bridge span was strength-tested in the laboratory using computer-controlled hydraulic equipment that simulates the heaviest highway truck loads. The strength-test was conducted for the first time to prove the design modeling predictions, and demonstrate the bridge system can withstand the truck loading specified in the American Association of State Highway and...
  • Understanding Engineers

    06/27/2018 8:30:06 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 95 replies
    The Coach's Team ^ | 6/27/18 | Unk
    Hat Tip: Alan Cooperman Understanding Engineers #1 Two engineering students were biking across a university campus when one said, "Where did you get such a great bike?" Birth of an engineer The second engineer replied, "Well, I was walking along yesterday, minding my own business, when a beautiful woman rode up on this bike, threw it to the ground, took off all her clothes and said, "Take what you want." The first engineer nodded approvingly and said, "Good choice: The clothes probably wouldn't have fit you anyway." Understanding Engineers #2 To the optimist, the glass is half-full. To the pessimist,...
  • Profs warn that 'commitment to empirical science' hurts women

    03/29/2018 6:34:49 PM PDT · by Eurotwit · 93 replies
    Campus Reform ^ | Mar 23, 2018 at 9:45 AM EDT | Toni Airaksinen
    A recent academic journal article claims that "meritocratic ideology" and "depoliticized" classroom environments contribute to a sense of exclusion and isolation among female students. The professors argue that the emphasis on "meritocracy," "individualism," and "technical prowess" in engineering all contribute to a "masculine culture" that marginalizes women. Four professors are warning that the “hegemony of meritocratic ideology” and other manifestations of “masculine culture” in engineering courses are detrimental to women. Led by Carroll Serron, who teaches at the University of California-Irvine, the March 1 study contends that the sense of exclusion and isolation felt by female engineering students is exacerbated...