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Agriculture (Bloggers & Personal)

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Marijuana Industry Hopes Promise of Jobs Will Keep Trump, Sessions Happy

    01/13/2017 6:09:55 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 17 replies
    TheStreet ^ | January 13, 2017 | Emily Stewart
    Marijuana legalization advocates and industry actors remain optimistic about the incoming Trump administration's attitude towards pot, despite some less-than-reassuring comments from the man who will soon be charged with enforcing drug laws in America. Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions, Donald Trump's nominee for U.S. Attorney General, in a confirmation hearing in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee this week said he could not commit to not enforcing federal marijuana laws when at the helm of the Department of Justice. He didn't say he would crack down on cannabis, either. "I won't commit to never enforcing federal law...but absolutely it's a problem...
  • Bunge to add plant in Indiana or Ohio

    01/10/2017 11:44:16 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    The St. Louis Business Journal ^ | January 10, 2017 | Angela Mueller
    Bunge North American is planning to build its first new U.S. processing plant in 15 years to meet growing demand for soy products. The company is considering locations in Ohio and Indiana for the plant, which is expected to go on line by the end of 2019. No cost estimates for the project were disclosed. Tim Gallagher, executive vice president, Oilseed Value Chain for Bunge, said the company saw a need to expand its footprint in the Eastern U.S. — a key market. "A state-of-the-art facility in the Eastern Corn Belt that incorporates the latest productivity, safety and sustainability features...
  • Trump’s deportation vow spurs California farmers into action

    01/05/2017 12:03:58 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    The Mercury News ^ | January 4, 2017 | The Associated Press
    FRESNO — Days after Donald Trump won the White House vowing to deport millions of people in the country illegally and fortify the Mexican border, California farmer Kevin Herman ordered nearly $600,000 in new equipment, cutting the number of workers he’ll need starting with the next harvest. Herman, who grows figs, persimmons and almonds in the nation’s most productive farming state, said Trump’s comments pushed him to make the purchase, larger than he would have otherwise. “No doubt about it,” Herman said. “I probably wouldn’t have spent as much or bought as much machinery as I did.”(continued)
  • The indoor harvest

    12/31/2016 12:48:22 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 41 replies
    The Western Producer ^ | December 29, 2016 | Robert Arnason
    For Randy King, the argument for indoor farming in Canada is just common sense. For one, Canada is a northern country with long winters. Two, during those long winters almost all fruit and vegetables in Canadian grocery stores are imported from Central America, Mexico or California. Three, wouldn’t it be better if Canadians grew their own fruits and veggies? “I think this is the way of the future for growing produce in northern regions,” said King, co-owner of West Grow Farms, a company with plans to build an indoor farm near Edmonton. “In order to gain food sovereignty, we need...
  • Crisis of Meaning = Crisis of Work

    12/26/2016 12:08:26 PM PST · by Lorianne · 11 replies
    Of Two Minds ^ | 22 December 2016 | Charles Hugh Smith
    People were poor by today's standards, so why do people remember the plantation life fondly? The answer is simple: community, purpose, sacrifice and meaning. Allow me to connect two apparently unconnected dots. Dot #1: The last sugar plantation in Hawaii is closing down, ending more than a century of plantation life in the 50th state. Dot #2: a new study found that Nearly 95% of all new jobs during Obama era were part-time, or contract. The research by economists Lawrence Katz of Harvard University and Alan Krueger at Princeton University shows that the proportion of workers throughout the U.S., during...
  • Asia digs deep to upgrade its agriculture

    12/11/2016 11:36:10 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    Financial Times ^ | December 11, 2016 | Tadanori Yoshida, Nikkei senior staff writer
    Consider it a wake-up call from nature. Asian crops were devastated by a severe drought this year, highlighting the urgent need to stabilise farm output and brace for the consequences of climate change. And with the region's population projected to continue growing over the long term, this is no easy task. The good news is that answers are starting to emerge. Agribusinesses are harnessing information technology. Organic farms and so-called plant factories are becoming hothouses for innovation. International investors are keen to water the seeds. This week, we head out into the fields — and some cutting-edge facilities — to...
  • Indoor Farms of America Delivers First Vertical Indoor Aeroponic Farms to Native Americans

    12/07/2016 1:26:26 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    PR Newswire ^ | December 6, 2016
    Indoor Farms of America is pleased to announce today the delivery of the first vertical aeroponic farms to two different Native American Communities in the U.S. Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161206/446104LOGO Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161206/446105LOGO "Our staff is very excited about these two farms, sold to Native American tribal interests and members, one in the western New York region of Salamanca, south of Buffalo, and one in Mayetta, Kansas, serving the people of the Prairie Band of the Potawatomi Nation," said Ron Evans, President of Indoor Farms of America. Evans noted, "We had the folks from the PB Nation visit our Las Vegas...
  • California’s Brave New World [semi-satire]

    12/04/2016 9:07:32 AM PST · by John Semmens · 3 replies
    Semi-News/Semi-Satire ^ | 4 Dec 2016 | John Semmens
    While the most of the country has voted to veer away from the transformation of America spearheaded by President Obama, California has vowed to stay the course, at least on the environmental front. In terms of air quality, the state has enacted new regulations to limit how much methane gas cows are allowed to emit while farting. California Air Resources Board science adviser Ryan McCarthy called the attempt “truly ambitious. No one really knows how we’re going to get this done. The State Assembly deserves credit for taking on a task that may well be impossible.” “The obvious first response...
  • A Tale of the Village Gun

    11/23/2016 2:29:14 PM PST · by marktwain · 17 replies
    Gun Watch ^ | 18 November, 2016 | Dean Weingarten
    My father did not spend a lot of time talking about the hard times in the Depression.  His father had been an avid hunter and trapper, and had passed those skills down to him.  Sometime in the 1930's he had obtained the Village Gun, my name for the old Springfield 84-C .22 bolt gun.  It had been nearly new, with a Weaver straight tube 2 3/4 power 3/4 inch scope when he purchased it for $7.50. Times were hard in the Depression.  Money was hard to come by. Wages for a boy picking rocks in farmer's fields were 50...
  • Thanksgiving Meal Drops to Lowest Level in 6 Years

    11/22/2016 9:32:49 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    Hoosier Ag Today ^ | November 20, 2016 | Andy Eubank
    Thanksgiving week is here, so let’s talk turkey, and the price of Thursday’s meal. Nationally the cost of a Thanksgiving dinner for 10 people this year is just under $50, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation’s annual survey. Hoosiers will pay even less than that and significantly less than a year ago. The national survey is made up of individual state surveys, and Indiana Farm Bureau’s annual Thanksgiving market basket survey is now at the lowest level since 2010. AFBF economist Dr. John Newton says the decline confirms the quality of the U.S. food supply. “I think this year’s...
  • Agri-Pulse Poll Shows Trump Leading in Farm Country

    10/27/2016 8:46:18 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    Wisconsin Ag Connection ^ | October 27, 2016 | USAgNet
    With mounting concerns about the farm - and the U.S. - economy, a new nationwide poll indicates how farmers and ranchers will vote in the 2016 presidential election. Agri-Pulse reports that 55 percent of those surveyed in its latest Farm and Ranch Poll say they'll support Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump while 18 percent are throwing their support behind Democratic Hillary Clinton. Only 2 percent plan to vote for Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson and just 1 percent for the Green Party's Jill Stein. However, in another sign of how fluid the race remains in farm country with less than two...
  • Right to Farm--eating emotion

    10/02/2016 8:31:34 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 8 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 10/02/16 | A. Dru Kristenev
    Environmentalists' desired result: Destruction of food production to the point that food is no longer affordable. How to lessen the "surplus population"...Make sustenance so expensive they die of starvation Increasingly, city-dwellers seeking view lots or large acreage have been fleeing the metropolitan areas to build larger and even luxurious homes in rural America, often opposite agricultural operations. Once they’d invested in constructing homes and settled into their new digs, they were awakened to the realities of country living, including the sights, smells and sounds of working farms… and they didn’t like it. The offshoot was a plethora of nuisance suits...
  • Put a tiny garden in your house with Wall Farm

    10/01/2016 4:02:31 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 17 replies
    Treehugger ^ | September 30, 2016 | Derek Markham
    Presenting YAUGU (yet another urban grow unit). We've highlighted many variations of indoor gardening systems over the years, some of them simple and low tech and some of them with decidedly 'smart' features, and all of them with the same goal: to help people grow some of their own food inside their homes. You don't necessarily need one of these purpose-built growing units to start an indoor garden, as DIY versions can be much cheaper to build (although perhaps lacking some of the automated features), but for those who aren't into making their own indoor planters, there are certainly many...
  • Vertical Farming Offers Solutions to Food Scarcity in Singapore

    09/11/2016 7:36:45 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    Green Builder Media ^ | September 8, 2016
    Back in May I was invited to Singapore to tour schools, IT hubs, hospitals and startups. The size of the country, as well as their government structure, allows them move towards their objectives more quickly than other countries. What I witnessed during my visit was a nation determined to be seen as a leader in the technology sector and to be recognized as a nucleus for some of the top innovators in the world. One aspect of the trip that really resonated with me was the country's use of vertical farming and other cutting edge agricultural techniques. Population Pressures The...
  • This Startup Wants to Make Cow's Milk—Without Cows

    09/04/2016 7:24:48 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    Fortune ^ | August 31, 2016 | Beth Kowitt
    For Perumal Gandhi and Ryan Pandya, the impetus to start their company in 2014 really came down to cheese. Gandhi, now 25, was trying to cut back on meat and dairy for sustainability and animal welfare reasons, but he desperately missed pizza. Pandya, 24, was experimenting with veganism but one incident in particular gave him pause: He bought a bagel slathered with dairy-free cream cheese that was so sad and soppy that it dripped all over his leg. “It’s asking a lot of someone to become vegan,” says Pandya. Cheese is only the beginning. As he puts it, “you have...
  • The Rising Impact of Water Costs on Energy Production

    09/04/2016 12:10:03 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 2 replies
    Green Tech Media ^ | September 2, 2016 | Katherine Tweed
    Three years ago, Wood Mackenzie reported on how water scarcity could impact global energy industries, from North American shale gas to Middle Eastern desalination. An updated report from Wood Mackenzie and Verisk Maplecroft finds the risks are greater in 2016, yet the market opportunity to address them remains largely untapped. In the U.S., for example, water costs for gas wells that use hydraulic fracturing doubled from 2012 to 2016, according to the latest report....
  • With Water In Short Supply, One California Farmer Grows Feed Indoors

    09/02/2016 7:04:44 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    National Public Radio's The Salt ^ | August 31, 2016 | Ezra David Romero
    The extended drought in California has farmers looking for ways to use less water. Among them: growing feed indoors using hydroponics. The new diet is making some Central Valley sheep very happy. On Golden Valley Farm an hour north of Fresno, Mario Daccarett's employees milk 500 sheep every day, in rounds of 12. This creamy milk eventually is turned into cheese and sold at places like Whole Foods. "They tell me that our Golden Ewe cheese is the best for grilled cheese sandwich ever," Daccarett says. (I bought some and it was really tasty.) He says he gets about 800...
  • Anyone for protein-rich insects and seaweed snacks?

    09/01/2016 7:10:15 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 32 replies
    The Irish Times ^ | September 1, 2016 | Jamie Ball
    “We are the only species that exhibit disgust in this way,” Mike Gibney, professor emeritus of food and health at University College Dublin (UCD), says about the odds of western consumers eating less-traditional protein sources through this resource-strained century. While our energy needs are largely served by carbohydrates, without protein, there would no growth, maintenance or repair of our body tissue. And, in the coming years, a global shift from resource-intensive, animal-sourced proteins to more sustainable marine and plant-based sources is on the cards, both for our health and that of the planet. But could seaweed and protein-packed insects prove...
  • Indoor farming will be integral to the world’s food security

    08/28/2016 1:48:11 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    Business Day ^ | August 23, 2016 | Staff
    FARMING will need to shift towards indoor vertical farms and precision techniques that could make use of drones. Just as important will be the planting of drought-resistant crops and even printing meat to secure food production globally. This is according to Ernst Janovsky, senior agricultural economist at Absa, who emphasised that technology will need to be incorporated into farming practices in order to keep up with costs and supply. Speaking at an Absa Agribusiness roundtable in Centurion on Tuesday, Janovsky said population growth would create more demand for food, water and land. By 2050, the global population is expected to...
  • The Latest: Trump says he will end 'war on American farmer'

    08/27/2016 5:55:28 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 68 replies
    Lancaster Farming ^ | August 27, 2016 | The Associated Press
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the 2016 presidential campaign (all times EDT): 4:20 p.m. Donald Trump is telling Iowans that one of his campaign goals is to "make America grow again." Speaking at a rally Saturday in Des Moines, Iowa, Trump touted his plans to boost economic growth and help American farmers, including his proposal to lower the tax rate on family farms to 15 percent....
  • FL: Man Shoots Large Gator near Horses; Gator Attacks, Shooter Charged

    08/27/2016 5:33:29 AM PDT · by marktwain · 33 replies
    Gun Watch ^ | 19 August 2016 | Dean Weingarten
    Photo from Sumter County Sheriff's Office About 6:30 p.m. on June 21, 2016, a 8.5-9 foot, 300 lb alligator was discovered near some agitated horses that belonged to Reginald Blanton, 74 years old. Blanton shot the reptile with a 9mm handgun, reportedly hitting it two or three times.  Where he hit it is not clear, but the shots would likely have been  mortal, because the alligator was still there, lying in the grass, when the authorities "euthanized it". While the story is two months old, there are important lessons to learn. After the shots, Blanton's stepson, Jack Hildreth, 58,...
  • Wanted: Fish Food That Isn’t Fish

    08/26/2016 4:52:35 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    UnDark ^ | August 25, 2016 | Nick Leiber
    Humans are eating more fish than ever. And since 2014, most of what we eat has come not from the wild, but from fish farms operated by the fast-growing aquaculture industry. But what do these farmed fish eat? The answer is just as unappetizing as it sounds — and just as worrisome to advocates of sustainable seafood. The typical fish-farm diet (“aquafeed,” in industry parlance) contains fish — specifically fish meal and fish oil, made largely from wild-caught “forage” fish. And because stocks of wild fish are declining, that poses a serious long-term problem for the world food supply. Wild...
  • LEED for vertical farms? Defining high-tech sustainable food

    08/20/2016 3:03:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 18 replies
    Business Green ^ | August 19, 2016 | Lauren Hepler
    The Association for Vertical Farming aims to create the first sustainability standard for towering indoor food systems From shipping containers-turned-micro farms to fruit-picking robots, the wide world of agriculture techis attracting attention and investor dollars as increasingly urgent concerns about food scarcity come into focus. Amid a wave of in-field technology, food data analytics and experimental urban agriculture, the particularly futuristic field of vertical farming is attracting entrants including industrial incumbents such as Fujitsu and upstarts such as AeroFarms, City Farm and Green Sense. As ag tech blooms, attracting a total $4.6 billion in investment during 2015, the nonprofit Association...
  • Recent high school grads represent the future of southeast Ohio farming

    08/14/2016 1:58:28 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    The Athens Messenger ^ | July 17, 2016 | Larry Di Giovanni
    Maryrose Littler, who is committed to organic farming and permaculture, picks fresh onions from her grandmother Barbara Keyes’ raised vegetable beds near McArthur.      ï€Ż  Two Class of 2016 graduates — organic farmer-in-the making Maryrose Littler, and Kayla Cline, raised on an historic farm in Albany — represent the future of farming in southeastern Ohio. Littler recently graduated from Athens High School and Cline from Alexander High School. Littler enjoys living an organic lifestyle on her parents’ five-acre homestead near Morrison-Gordon Elementary School, where she helps raise honeybees, homegrown vegetables, chickens and beef. She...
  • This Canadian Startup Wants to Be the ‘Plant Whisperer’ of Indoor Farming

    08/12/2016 3:05:59 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    Modern Farmer ^ | August 5, 2016 | Andrew Amelinckx
    Two guys from Canada have come up with a new way for everyone from small indoor growers to large-scale vertical farmers to easily automate their operations. Their system's called Motorleaf and it collects data about your plants and then instructs your existing grow equipment to adjust to the crop’s needs. Think of it as the Nest for your indoor farm. In the summer of 2015, Ramen Dutta began tinkering around with a way to more easily care for his small indoor hobby farm. Although he had a degree in agricultural engineering, he had been working in IT and created an...
  • Indoor farming gives former New Jersey arena new lease on life

    08/03/2016 7:39:42 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    Reuters ^ | June 28, 2016 | Gina Cherelus
    In an old warehouse in Newark, New Jersey, that once housed the state's biggest indoor paint ball arena, leafy green plants such as kale, arugula and watercress sprout from tall metal towers under bright lights. A local company named AeroFarms has built what it says is the world's largest indoor vertical farm, without the use of soil or sunlight. Its ambitious goal is to grow high-yielding crops via economical methods to provide locally sourced food to the community, protect the environment and ultimately even combat hunger worldwide. "We use about 95 percent less water to grow the plants, about 50...
  • Sanity May Prevail—After All!

    08/03/2016 10:16:08 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 4 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 08/03/16 | Dr. Klaus Kaiser
    As Corn Devours U.S. Prairies, Greens Reconsider Biofuel Mandate Bloomberg reports “As Corn Devours U.S. Prairies, Greens Reconsider Biofuel Mandate”. I can only say “What took you so long?” To wit: “Environmentalists who once championed biofuels as a way to cut pollution are now turning against a U.S. program that puts renewable fuels in cars, citing higher-than-expected carbon dioxide emissions and reduced wildlife habitat.”
  • Jamaica to install weed vending machines at airports

    07/30/2016 8:37:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 45 replies
    Green Rush Daily ^ | July 2, 2016 | A.B. Hanna
    Instead of landing and having to ask strangers where “the plug” is, you’ll find it conveniently plugged into the wall nearby. The Jamaican government is looking over a proposal to install cannabis kiosks in Jamaican airports. Only one year ago, the Jamaican House of Representatives passed a law that made possession of 2 ounces of marijuana legal. Now the proposal being looked over by the Cannabis Licensing Authority would allow a tourist to obtain 2 ounces from a kiosk before they even check into their hotel....
  • Venezuela’s socialist government adopts forced labor law

    07/29/2016 6:28:09 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 33 replies
    Hot Air ^ | July 29, 2016 | John Sexton
    Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro has a plan to “guarantee food supply, social justice, and democracy.” As with most of Maduro’s plans, it will accomplish none of those things. Vice News reports: “A new decree establishing that any employee in Venezuela can be effectively made to work in the country’s fields as a way to fight the current food crisis is unlawful and effectively amounts to forced labor,” Amnesty International said in a statement released on Thursday. President Nicolás Maduro signed a decree at the end of last week that gives powers to the labor ministry to order “all workers from...
  • Rapid, low-temperature process adds weeks to milk's shelf life

    07/25/2016 3:41:29 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    Purdue University Agricultural News ^ | July 19, 2016 | Brian Wallheimer
    WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - A rapid heating and cooling of milk significantly reduces the amount of harmful bacteria present, extending by several weeks the shelf life of one of the most common refrigerator staples in the world, according to a Purdue University study. Bruce Applegate, Purdue associate professor in the Department of Food Science, and collaborators from Purdue and the University of Tennessee published their findings in the journal SpringerPlus, where they show that increasing the temperature of milk by 10 degrees for less than a second eliminates more than 99 percent of the bacteria left behind after pasteurization. “It’s...
  • New USDA rules eliminate junk food in schools

    07/24/2016 6:11:37 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    WLNE-TV ^ | July 21, 2016 | Rebecca Turco and ABC News
    PROVIDENCE, R.I. – Students might notice some changes in the cafeteria when they go back to school in a few weeks. The USDA will announce rules today that require schools to get rid of unhealthy snacks and eliminate students’ exposure to junk food, ABC News has exclusively learned. Rhode Island already complies, having phased in these healthy guidelines about seven years ago, before they were official rules. "We're proud of what we're doing in Rhode Island,” said Elliot Krieger, spokesman for the state Department of Education. “We've been a leading state on this and it's great that our students have...
  • India Has Planted Nearly 50 Million Trees In 24 Hours

    07/15/2016 4:34:06 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 11 replies
    iflscience.com ^ | July 15, 2016 | iflscience
    The smoggy cities of India are suddenly looking a lot greener, with just under 50 million trees having been planted in India in a record-breaking attempt to raise awareness of conservation. The event took place on Monday in Uttar Pradesh, one of India’s most populous states found in the north of the country. More than 800,000 people from all walks of life, ranging from students and housewives to government officials, planted 49.3 million tree saplings in just 24 hours. The saplings included 80 different species of trees were from 950 different nurseries around the state.
  • Weekly [sort of] Prepper Thread

    06/24/2016 5:02:51 PM PDT · by TMSuchman · 118 replies
    Myself | June 24,2016 | Mike Suchman
    Greetings Everyone. Time for us once again to gather around the computers & speak of what we need to do & are going to do if & when our civilization falls down flat upon it's face. And before we begin, I know that I am kind of lax about putting this thread out. I/we have our priorities in place. and for me I have a wife & son both with special needs that come first & foremost in my life. Then comes our homestead, and stuff down the line from there. My garden is doin ok, since we are having...
  • Ten Million Ketchup Vanities

    06/01/2016 10:08:05 AM PDT · by lafroste · 89 replies
    lafroste ^ | 6/1/2016 | lafroste
    Man, sometimes I have had it with our society! I went to a lot of trouble to make some really beautiful cheeseburgers for lunch today. I toasted the buns, I sliced the onions and shredded the lettuce. I flavored the hamburger before and during cooking.But I also put ketchup on them. At my first tasty bite I was repelled by the overwhelming taste of sugar, an obscene amount of sugar. I was horrified. The burgers were ruined! I rushed, gagging and choking, to the fridge, grabbed the ketchup bottle and read the label. 4 GRAMS of sugar, per serving!? It's...
  • Legal Cannabis is Literally Transforming Cities — Funding Roads, Schools, Charities and More

    05/29/2016 1:06:16 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 97 replies
    The Free Thought Project ^ | May 29, 2016 | Justin Gardner
    Two years after Colorado began its first retail sales of cannabis, towns and cities across the state are enjoying the benefits in a number of ways. With sales this year expected to reach $1 billion, local governments are seeing windfalls of tax revenue, which is funding education, recreation, infrastructure improvements, and even aid to the homeless. The small town of Mountain View may be able to dispel its reputation for collecting revenue through speeding tickets, now that two pot shops reside there. “We have such a small tax base,” said Mayor Jeff Kiddie, who opposed pot stores. “Medical and retail...
  • North Dakota Spill Leaks 120,000 Gallons of Oil & Wastewater

    05/23/2016 10:00:22 AM PDT · by bananaman22 · 14 replies
    Oilprice.com ^ | 23-05-2016 | Farmer
    A site run by Denbury Onshore LLC in southwestern North Dakota has spilled more than 120,000 gallons of oil and wastewater into pastureland after a mechanical failure. Some estimated 17,000 gallons of oil and 105,000 gallons of drilling wastewater containing saltwater and chemicals leaked into pastureland near the city of Marmarth when a tank sensor failed, news agencies quoted state regulators as saying. The tank overflowed on Wednesday, and by Friday, workers were excavating the affected pastureland, which is being equated to the size of a football field.
  • Philadelphia Aims To Become International Hub For Indoor Farming

    05/18/2016 8:57:08 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 40 replies
    KYW-TV ^ | April 28, 2016 | Stephanie Stahl
    On the CBS3 health watch, its vertical farming. Philadelphia aims to become an international hub for indoor growing, according to a resolution passed today by city council. When growing produce we usually think of acres of farmland. Some say the next generation of farming will be in urban centers like Philadelphia, and you won’t need soil or the sun, just an old warehouse. Welcome to vertical farming, where produce is grown inside, in specialized shelves that are stacked up vertically....
  • Weekly Prepper Thread

    05/17/2016 11:05:42 AM PDT · by TMSuchman · 24 replies
    Myself | May 17, 2016 | Mike Suchman
    Hello Folks, this thread is either way late of very early [depending on how you look at it] . I have been getting notices from the State of Missouri Dept. of Conservation, about the deer population/s within our state. In one of our earlier discussions I brought up the subject of problems in prepping & food sourcing, like this. Here are a couple of the email I got; Arkansas deer disease findings prompt Missouri to increase sample collecting May 17, 2016 By Alisa Nelson The discovery this spring of 86 cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in northern Arkansas has...
  • Japan's Next Generation of Farmers Could Be Robots

    04/23/2016 5:03:07 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    Bloomberg | April 22, 2016 | Aya Takada
    Link only due to copyright issues: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-04-23/robots-replacing-japan-s-farmers-seen-preserving-food-security
  • Weekly [or biweekly] Prepper Thread

    04/22/2016 8:44:37 AM PDT · by TMSuchman · 100 replies
    Self | April 22,2016 | Mike Suchman
    Hello Everyone; Once again I have to apologize for not posting when I should. But life just gets in the way of me doing things like this. I do have a couple of different topics for discussion, [and please comment on BOTH of them] 1] How in shape are you? I ask this because I have been tilling in a brand new garden [about 1 1/2 acres] in an area that has never had a garden before. And am I feeling it too. [I have an older tiller ( I was lucky to get it for $20.00 at a yard...
  • This California Town Wants to be the Next Marijuana Mecca

    04/17/2016 11:53:01 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    NBC News ^ | April 16, 2016 | Heesun Wee, CNBC
    If California is the land of reinvention, the small desert city of Adelanto fits the bill. Roughly a two-hour drive east from Los Angeles, Adelanto was founded in 1915 by an inventor who wanted to sell land to World War I veterans. His dream never materialized and the region was taken over by orchard farms, then poultry ranches. The nearby George Air Force Base opened and eventually closed in the early 1990s. The city more recently made a solar play, but the energy market fizzled. City unemployment hovers at 14 percent, well above the national unemployment rate of under 5...
  • A farm deep inside a Brooklyn warehouse may lead the way to large-scale urban agriculture

    04/10/2016 6:57:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    Crain's New York Business ^ | April 10, 2016 | Cara Eisenpress
    Here’s one way to grow food in an urban environment: Raise a school of tilapia in a tank. Filter out the nitrogen-rich waste, and let naturally occurring bacteria transform it from ammonia into nitrate. Run that naturally derived fertilizer beneath the roots of greens, herbs and peppers. Let the veggies flourish beneath LED lights. Harvest the vegetables. Later, harvest the fish. Cook and serve. Known as aquaponics, this complicated but efficient ecosystem is the latest attempt at making agriculture commercially viable in New York City—even though it has a spotty history, a not-quite-proven track record and plenty of skeptics. “We...
  • Weekly Prepper Thread

    04/08/2016 1:37:59 PM PDT · by TMSuchman · 13 replies
    Myself | April 8,2016 | Mike Suchman
    Hello Everyone, it is time to once again to open our mind/s to the realms of saving our & families arse/s when things go from bad to worse. I would have posted up last week, but I & my family were under the weather, so I had to play nurse to the 3 of us. So now let us discuss property management. For me, we have 5 acres here in eastern central Mo. by the mighty Mississippi River [way above the flood plains too]. But about 1/3 of my property is over grown with trees & invasive plants. And in...
  • Why You Should Keep Backyard Chickens

    04/07/2016 12:11:07 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 155 replies
    The Federalist ^ | April 6, 2016 | Daniel Payne
    Many urban homeowners increasingly desire to keep small flocks of chickens in their backyards, and with good cause. There is no reason every family in this country that can run a flock of chickens in their backyard should not. This perfectly logical and reasonable habit—backyard chicken farming—has been buried under a great deal of hipster elitism (from many of the backyard chicken farmers themselves) and sneering derision (from their critics). Please try to ignore these detractors. If you can play host to backyard chickens, you should. It is, in many urban localities, easier said than done. This normal and praiseworthy...
  • Brett Bair Special Report: Rising Threats Shrinking Military

    04/01/2016 8:20:24 PM PDT · by ChinaGotTheGoodsOnClinton · 15 replies
    Fox News | self
    Any body watching the Fox News Special tonight? It is all old news but when it is put together like this it is a pretty devastating indictment of the 0bama administrations policies.
  • Cruz pushes mechanization as farm alternative to illegal labor

    03/30/2016 8:39:26 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 43 replies
    Agri-Pulse ^ | March 30, 2016 | Philip Brasher
    Texas Sen. Ted Cruz is suggesting that mechanization is the answer to the labor needs of farmers who lose their access to illegal immigrants. During a CNN town hall Tuesday night, a Wisconsin dairy farmer told the GOP presidential candidate that his industry can't find enough American-born workers and that the only people “willing to do this hard work are Latino immigrants.” Join Farm Bureau and make YOUR VOICE stand out. Cruz didn't answer the question as it pertained to dairy producers specifically but instead responded by citing a Wall Street Journal article about an Arizona pepper grower who was...
  • Hemp waste fibers form basis of supercapacitor more conductive than graphene

    03/15/2016 7:38:23 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 22 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | March 11, 2016 | Rick Stella
    Comprised of a lone hexagonal honeycomb lattice layer of tightly packed carbon atoms, graphene is one of the strongest, lightest, and most conductive compounds ever discovered. Bottom line, it's an extraordinary composite. However, a scientist from New York's Clarkson University says he's found a way to manufacture hemp waste into a material "better than graphene." Moreover, the scientist -- known to his peers as Dr. David Mitlin -- says creating this graphene-like hemp material costs but a minuscule fraction of what it takes to produce graphene. Presented at an American Chemical Society Meeting in San Francisco, Dr. Mitlin described how...
  • Weekly Prepper Thread

    03/11/2016 4:54:31 PM PST · by TMSuchman · 38 replies
    Myself | March 11,2016 | Mike Suchman
    Once again I must apologize for not posting anything last week. A lot of challenges came up & bit me in the backside at different times & I could not force myself to sit down & "write" this up. So with that being said, I have a couple of different topics for this week. The first one is, for those of us who have a bit of land/space what kind of poultry do you want to raise & for what reason/s. Do you want chickens for meat or the eggs, what about bug control in your garden/s. Someone on my...
  • Future of Desalination Industry Innovation May Rest on Conwed’s 3D Printed Feed Spacers

    03/10/2016 8:18:38 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 9, 2016 | Bridget Butler Millsaps
    Water: Without interference by humans, it's meant to be a pure substance that makes up around 70 percent of the Earth, with most of it contained in the oceans. We enjoy the beauty of water in many different states, from cascading waterfalls to the still pond that allows us to skip stones--to a fun family day at the beach or out fishing for flounder in a bay or on the ocean in our boat. While that may all seem fairly simple, sustenance is the biggest priority regarding our relationship with water, and that's a very complex subject. Water--and our need...
  • LEDs Clobber CFLs; Turn Indoor Farming Into New Growth Market

    02/21/2016 2:35:22 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 63 replies
    The Energy Collective ^ | February 16, 2016 | David Wamsted
    The two events had nothing to do with one another, and yet they are inextricably linked. I am an inveterate coupon clipper and in the latest mailer from BJ's Wholesale Club (my big box savings store of choice) I noticed an eye-popping deal on LEDs--8 60 watt-equivalent bulbs from Sylvania for $19.99, or roughly $2.50 apiece. The next day, GE announced that it planned to stop manufacturing compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and focus instead on LEDs. The market never really took to CFLs, for understandable reasons noted in my household as well: Most of them could not be used with...