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Keyword: 3dprinters

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  • 3D printed houses are coming and you could live in one from next year

    06/08/2018 6:14:27 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    The Evening Standard ^ | June 6, 2018 | Amelia Heathmana
    The housing crisis is a multi-faceted issue, based on problems such as the lack of land space, rising housing costs, and the fact not enough houses are being built. Yet, there could be a solution to the last one in the form of 3D printed homes. A city in the Netherlands, Einhoven, will be the first place in the world to have houses made by a 3D printer. Developed by the Dutch construction company Van Wijnen, in collaboration with Eindhoven University of Technology, Project Milestone as it is called will see five homes built in total. These will be a...
  • Miniature Human Organs Are Being Made In A Lab At Cincinnati Children's

    06/05/2018 7:00:01 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    WVXU-TV ^ | June 5, 2018 | Ann Thompson
    Clinical trials are tentatively scheduled for 2020 at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center's new Center for Stem Cell and Organoid Medicine, where researchers are making miniature livers and pancreases, called organoids. Associate Director Takanori Takebe, MD, calls organoids a "complex recipe" of proteins, small molecules, amino acids and nutrients that enable him and his staff in the U.S. and Japan to make the organs using pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), or so-called "master cells." Takebe sees two roles for the manmade organs: drug testing and transplantation. "It's pretty much like science fiction, but we are trying to create the miniature version...
  • New Powerhouse Emerges In Additive Manufacturing

    06/02/2018 3:04:41 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    Plastics Technology ^ | June 1, 2018 | Matthew H. Naitove
    Late April saw the entrance of a heavyweight amid the handful of much smaller companies staking out the new territory of industrial additive manufacturing. Jabil, a $19-billion global enterprise with around 180,000 employees and over 100 facilities in 29 countries, announced the launch of the Jabil Additive Manufacturing Network as a “digital thread” to connect its additive manufacturing operations around the world, including those at its subsidiaries Nypro and Jabil Green Point, while aligning with Jabil’s software and services for supply-chain management, product development, and engineering/design. Jabil, which operates 15,000 CNC mills along with thousands of injection machines and hundreds...
  • Company to build 3D-printed homes in Englewood (Florida)

    05/23/2018 5:55:39 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 26 replies
    WINK-TV ^ | May 23, 2018 | Katherine Viloria and Kristi Gross
    A 3D printing company is using technology to bring fast, flexible and affordable housing to Englewood. The company called 3D Build Systems plans to start printing homes by the summer of 2019. The printing process can assemble a home in a matter of hours. “It simplifies in many ways the way we construct a wall, but we can do it very quickly and with a pattern that can’t be done manually,” said Don Musilli, the CEO of 3D Build Systems. The building process would require a robot to sit in the center of the home and pour concrete or other...
  • Could 3D printing solve the organ transplant shortage?

    05/21/2018 10:25:43 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 23 replies
    The Manchester Guardian ^ | July 30, 2017 | Tim Lewis
    Erik Gatenholm first saw a 3D bioprinter in early 2015. His father, Paul, a professor in chemistry and biopolymer technology at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, had bought one for his department. It cost somewhere in the region of $200,000. “My father was like, ‘This thing can print human organs,’” Gatenholm recalls, still awestruck. “I said, ‘Bulls#*+!’ Then it printed a little piece of cartilage. It wasn’t cartilage, but it was like, this could be cartilage. That was the moment when it was like, ‘This is frickin’ cool!’” Gatenholm, who had long owned a regular 3D printer, decided then...
  • World's largest metal 3D-printer scales up additive manufacturing

    05/21/2018 10:34:39 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 18 replies
    New Atlas ^ | May 17, 2018 | Darren Quick
    Australian company Titomic has unveiled what it claims is the world's largest metal 3D printer at its fully automated Melbourne facility. Utilizing a patented process co-developed with Australian federal scientific research agency the CSIRO, the 3D metal printer boasts a build area 9 m long, 3 m wide and 1.5 m high (29.5 x 9.8 x 4.9 ft), however the printing process isn't constrained to this booth size, meaning it could be used to print even larger objects. The unit prints layer by layer like existing 3D printers, but rather than relying on metal powders that are fused using extreme...
  • FUTURE LIVING 3D printed homes built in less than 24 hours will ‘be mainstream by 2025’ in UK

    05/21/2018 8:25:39 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 46 replies
    The Sun ^ | May 21, 2018 | Sean Keach, Digital Technology and Science Editor
    EXPERTS say 3D-printed houses will be "mainstream by 2025", and could put an end to Britain's housing crisis. A new report details how Brits are less than a decade away from enjoying lower house prices thanks to a robot revolution in the construction of homes. 3D printing, or "additive manufacturing", is a process of layering up a material to build complicated structures. It works just like regular home printers – but instead of ink, a 3D printer will use materials like plastic or metal. Using giant 3D printers, it's been proven possible to quickly and cheaply build homes. Sadly the...
  • 3-D Printed Weapons Threaten Global Security, Think Tank Warns

    05/13/2018 4:27:30 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    Newsweek ^ | May 9, 2018 | Aristos Georgiou
    Imagine a world where anyone with access to a simple and affordable piece technology could produce their own deadly weapons on demand. This hypothetical future is the focus of a new report from the RAND Corporation think tank, which looks at the potential threats to personal, national and global security posed by the proliferation of 3D printing—also known as additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing is a term used to describe various technologies which produce three-dimensional objects by “printing” layer-upon-layer of a given material, while following a digital blueprint. Although the technology is currently fairly limited in some respects, it is...
  • How 3D printing is revolutionizing the housing industry

    05/09/2018 2:22:05 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    Tech Crunch ^ | May 8, 2018 | Avi Reichental
    If you build it, they will come. And if you 3D-print it, they will come faster, cheaper and more sustainably. We live in an era of overpopulation and mass housing shortages. Yet we also live in a time of phenomenal digital innovation. On the one hand we have major crises affecting the health, liberty and happiness of billions of people. But look at the other hand, where we have potential for life-changing technological breakthroughs at a rate never before seen on this planet. Our challenges are vast, but our capabilities to produce solutions are even greater. In the future, we...
  • Aether is developing a from-CT scan organ 3D printing AI system

    04/30/2018 3:37:41 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    3D Printing Industry ^ | April 11, 2018 | Beau Jackson
    Aether, the biotechnology company behind the multi-tool Aether 1 3D bioprinter, is developing an artificially intelligent (AI) program for 3D printing organ models. Described as the “missing piece” in the wider, 3D bioprinting puzzle, Aether’s Automatic Segmentation and Reconstruction (ASAR) process will be capable of identifying different tissues in CT Scan data and converting the results into a mutlimaterial, 3D printable file.(VIDEO-AT-LINK)According to Aether CEO Ryan Franks, “AI is the only way bioprinting can reach its full potential.” With AI, the file preparation process is automated, bringing 3D printing closer to the “click of a button” usability which is essential...
  • Researchers Turn to Multi-Material 3D Printing to Develop Responsive, Versatile Smart Composites

    10/24/2017 2:53:42 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 2 replies
    3D Print ^ | October 23, 2017 | Sarah Saunders
    3D printing technology has been used multiple times to help create drug delivery and release systems, from programmable release capsules and cancer drug-emitting implants to micro-rockets that deliver drugs inside the body and even a biomaterial sleeve that can reduce the risk of infection after a body piercing. Some researchers are working to develop 3D printed pills and vaccines that will combine multiple medications into one, and an Israeli drug delivery company will soon seek FDA approval for its 3D printed medical marijuana inhaler, which can control the doses a person inhales. But I would bet you $20 that none...
  • 3D printing could make Sen. Dianne Feinstein's proposed 'bump stock' ban obsolete

    10/07/2017 1:06:10 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    The Washington Examiner ^ | October 4, 2017 | Philip Wegmann
    On Wednesday morning, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., introduced legislation banning bump fire stocks — accessories that transform semi-automatic rifles into machine guns. Already 20 Senate Democrats have co-sponsored the bill and even some wayward Republicans have promised to consider it. If successful, the bill could land on President Trump's desk, and it could become the first new gun control law in decades. And, more than likely, it could be obsolete. Bump fire stocks are made from relatively cheap polymers that can be 3-D printed. Hobbyists have posted videos of their homemade stocks in action, at least one manufacturer has actually...
  • Markforged announces two 3D printers that produce items as strong as steel

    08/21/2017 4:41:09 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies
    Tech Crunch ^ | August 21, 2017 | John Biggs
    Markforged, a 3D printer manufacturer based in Boston, has just announced two new models — the X3 and the X5. Both of these printers are designed to create carbon fiber-infused objects using a standard filament printing system and both can produce items that can replace or are stronger than steel objects. Both printers have auto-leveling and scanning systems to ensure each printed object is exactly like every other. Further, the printers use Markforged’s special thermoplastic fiber filament, while the X5 can add a “strand of continuous fiberglass” to create objects “19X stronger and 10X stiffer than traditional plastics.” This means...
  • 100x faster, 10x cheaper: 3D metal printing is about to go mainstream

    07/27/2017 2:48:17 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 29 replies
    New Atlas ^ | July 26, 2017 | Loz Blain
    Desktop Metal – remember the name. This Massachussetts company is preparing to turn manufacturing on its head, with a 3D metal printing system that's so much faster, safer and cheaper than existing systems that it's going to compete with traditional mass manufacturing processes. We've been hearing for years now about 3D printing and how it's going to revolutionize manufacturing. As yet, though, it's still on the periphery. Plenty of design studios and even home users run desktop printers, but the only affordable printing materials are cheap ABS plastics. And at the other end of the market, while organizations like NASA...
  • Hampton Creek announces plan to offer lab-grown meat by 2018, 3D printing under consideration

    07/07/2017 10:04:53 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 26 replies
    3Ders ^ | July 6, 2017
    Hampton Creek, a plant-based food startup headquartered in San Francisco, recently announced that it will be moving into the lab-grown meat industry, and plans to have its clean meat products on shelves as soon as 2018. According to Spanish tech site ABC.es, Hampton Creek is considering using 3D printing to realize this goal. Since its founding in 2011 by Josh Balk and Joshua Tetrick (the company’s current CEO), Hampton Creek has gained a lot of attention for its plant-based food products—both good and bad. On the good side, the company has been recognized as a unicorn startup and has done...
  • A peek inside Norsk Titanium's high-tech, 3-D printing shop (400 jobs in New York)

    07/04/2017 5:47:44 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    North Country Public Radio ^ | July 4, 2017 | Zach Hirsch
    Norsk Titanium has become a huge source of pride for people in Plattsburgh. It's a Norwegian aerospace company that makes airplane parts using high-tech, industrial, 3-D printing machines. The plant opened last year, and recently Norsk delivered its first federally approved parts for Boeing commercial airplanes. The 3-D printing technology is at the cutting edge in the aerospace industry. Business leaders have called this the next industrial revolution. We visited the company's research and testing facility to see how it works. The 3-D printers looked like long, supersized computer towers. A mechanical arm with little torches on the end shot...
  • The future of 3D printing by medical consultant Dr. Thirumurugan S V Mahadhevan

    06/26/2017 11:15:06 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies
    3D Printing Industry ^ | June 23, 2017 | Dr. Thirumurugan S. V. Mahadhevan
    Innovations in the technology of 3D printing and scanning have been tremendous. The hype that was already being created in 3D printing is huge and the R&D is happening to fulfil the expectations in different parts of the world. Though the technology erupted in 1980’s, 3D printing for healthcare has been getting familiar in the last decade. Let us see how, across all areas, 3D printing of healthcare can have a bigger impact in coming years. Bio-printing Whenever the words “3D printing in healthcare” are uttered, most people will ask, “is it possible to 3D print an organ like heart...
  • Chemists create 3D printed graphene foam

    06/26/2017 1:38:56 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 1 replies
    Nanotechnologists from Rice University and China's Tianjin University have used 3-D laser printing to fabricate centimeter-sized objects of atomically thin graphene. The research could yield industrially useful quantities of bulk graphene and is described online in a new study in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano. "This study is a first of its kind," said Rice chemist James Tour, co-corresponding author of the paper. "We have shown how to make 3-D graphene foams from nongraphene starting materials, and the method lends itself to being scaled to graphene foams for additive manufacturing applications with pore-size control." Graphene, one of the...
  • Could the Future of Metal 3D Printing Be Print Farms?

    06/24/2017 2:01:32 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 23 replies
    Design News ^ | June 20, 2017 | Tracey Schelmetic
    One company sees 3D print technology evolving into a product lineup of affordable and scalable printers, with the “blade server” concept for volume manufacturing where printers on a rack will scale up or down to meet customers’ needs. Discussions of additive manufacturing invariably turn to prototyping for a good reason: economics. While it may make sense from a cost perspective to 3D print functional new parts with plastic or metal during the design process, additive manufacturing (AM) techniques cease where mass production begins. Few manufacturers are discussing replacing traditional production methods for parts with AM techniques, as it would simply...
  • 3D Bio-printing Approaches for Tissue Engineering Applications

    04/12/2017 1:35:58 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 4 replies
    AZO Materials ^ | April 12, 2017 | Liam Critchley
    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has gained traction in recent years and is now used across a wide range of industries for the quick and easy fabrication of complex materials. 3D printing is now set to revolutionise the medical industry, especially in regenerative medicine, as it enables cells, tissues and organs to be printed on demand. These biological components are traditionally cultured for long periods of time, using various gaseous and chemical environments so that they grow. Aside from the timescales, standard culturing methods can easily go awry if there is even a small, and often accidental or unavoidable change in the...