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Remembering Thanksgiving, Family, FRiends, and FReedom..
Cooking With Chef Carlo ^ | 11/18/12 | Carlo3b, Dad, Chef, Author

Posted on 11/18/2012 8:28:40 AM PST by carlo3b

Remembering Thanksgiving Day The Mayflower 1620- 2002

The voyage of the Mayflower in 1620 from Plymouth England, to Plymouth Rock started as a journey to find peace and justice in a new world. It began as a fervent prayer to give freedom a chance, and remains today as the promise each year for a new beginning. Thanksgiving Day is a celebration of hope, and remembrance.

Today, we bring our families and friends together to share our tables and our hearts, and give thanks for all that we have to be grateful for in our new and glorious country. From this grand experiment and it's courageous settlers, to the greatest nation of the world, we have a lot to be thankful for, indeed.

Remembering Thanksgiving

My earliest memory of Thanksgiving was the fuss of preparation of the wonderful food being prepared in advance of our holiday feast. Being a traditional Italian American, midwestern home, a full cornucopia of cookies of every ethnicity was in abundance. Thanksgiving morning was a special treat with a home filled with the scent of baking bread, and roasted turkey which transformed our tiny cold water flat in "Little Italy" on the lower East side of Chicago into a 3 room palace. Everyone was involved, family and friends, young and old, with 4 generations of our own majestic women.

An unspoken but respected hierarchy prevailed, with the eldest women in control, and a dance like rhythm appeared to take charge of this traditional and noble endeavor. It didn't take long before our small kitchen and dinning room filled, and every flat surface was covered. People scurried into the hallway, where neighbors shuffled pans and pots in and out of their homes to their own kitchens to make room for more, always more so everyone could share in the abundance.

The Preparations

Preparation started days earlier, with the making of the pasta. I recall my great aunt bringing in the clothesline from our back porch, the one that strung across the small yard to the adjacent porch and back. She washed and bleached this cord to string across our living and dining rooms, from sconces to chandelier, and doorjambs to windowsills. It was strung as tight as possible to hold the pounds of lasagna noodle, and spaghetti needed to hang dry, to satisfy the hearty Italian appetites. I recall as if it were yesterday listening to our nightly radio programs with the shadows of stringing pasta on the faded floral wallpaper, lending an eerie overtone to the Green hornet, or Gangbusters.

How could I ever forget opening my eyes in the morning with the sight of hanging pasta overhead, but then, why in the world would I want to forget that magical moment after all, and what it meant to a young boy that a wonderful and glorious holiday was just around the corner?

The Family and Friends

Each family was represented in the choice of menu items. Every wonderful cook in each branch of the family offered to prepare their own special version of the chosen food. This made for a memorable feast indeed, there were at least 4 successful individual restaurant owners in our family. The competition was playful and fun filled, with chunks of bread, ladles, and spoons dipping into everything, testing, tasting, and teasing.

The Cooks

It should not be construed that the food preparation was the exclusive province of our family women, to do so would be to underestimate the culinary contributions of some of the finest cooks in the clan. A few of my uncles, cousins and grandpa were cooks in the Army, Navy, and Marines, as well as in their own restaurants.

My great uncle served as a cook in the Italian army, then captured and recruited to cook in the prisoner-of-war camp, when upon his release, served 2 tours as a cook in the US Marines during The Korean War. However, whatever greatness the men may have achieved in the outside world, the kitchen was ruled by those formidable, yet diminutive, strikingly gorgeous, black clad matriarchs of the family. Great grandmothers from both sides of the lineage, grandmothers, great grandmother-in-laws, and great great aunts. Man I'll tell ya, it was a sight to behold at best, and an Italian culinary rivalry at least. Although sharing an Italian heritage, the 6 uncles married outside the Calabrian niche, creating a scrumptious provincial food fight.

The Kids

Children weren't immune from the holiday chores. Chairs were pulled up to the stove for short perpetual stirrers. The teens were given the sink, for the neverending pots and pans, and preteens were runners for last minute fetches and food deliveries. I was honored almost exclusively with the delivery of food for the church and hospital shut-ins because I had the bike with a giant basket.

Trying to describe my cousins and most of the local kids wasn't hard, the first thing I recall was, hair, lots of black hair, big doe eyes, dozens of beautiful children with wide grins. At least one kid, sometimes more, was forced to bring his or her accordion, and at every holiday gathering some poor child was browbeaten into playing "Lady Of Spain"!

The Holiday Table

Serving 30-40 people, in a one bedroom apartment on the 3rd floor, rear, walkup, was a challenge, but doable. It took the coordination of most of our wonderful neighbors, and the cooperation of all of the residence, which were always invited anyway. Everyone brought pots, pans, dishes, and utensils, at least a chair, and some brought their kitchen tables.

Everyone brought something eatable, most were prearranged as in bread, but some were heirloom dessert recipes, enough for at least a good spoonful, for everyone to get a taste. Older adults, always got a chair at the table, all adults got a seat, and kids sat at the card tables, on the stairs or on a carpet in front of the radio in one of the neighbors homes.

The Prayer

All kids had to be within earshot of the saying of the formal Grace before dinner. Then everyone recited their own prayer in various languages of their native tongue. Our family and friends were of many faiths and nationalities, the overwhelming majority of coarse were Italian. Most remembered a loved one not present, and the names of every absent serviceman and woman were individually read aloud. With all heads bowed, everyone gave thanks for the wonderful gifts of food and health, and each and every person present, gave a special thanks and how grateful they were for being in the United States of America.

The Family

Any good excuse to gather the clan in our family was and still is, paramount. Weddings, holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, births, baptisms and unfortunately funerals are used as good excuses to get together and, you guessed it.... eat. This is usually done at the familial home of eldest member of the family. The Italian family circle is close and tight, and many families still living within their hometown, even today, live within walking distance of one another.

In our family, as in many, brothers, sisters, grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins grow as one family unit. The elders live within the homes of their offspring or siblings. The hierarchy is established by the ability of the surviving parents to have living arrangements central to the greatest number of kids and kin. Love of family is the reason, and love of food is the cement. Thanksgiving is one of the most popular days of the year, and has been since my earliest memory. Even today as I did with my parents in my youth, I talk to each of my 5 children and grandchildren, almost everyday, and have even when we lived thousands of miles away... I am truly blessed.

The Food

Food for an Italian holiday is second to only to the family. Present at every holiday feast were several types of entree, lasagna, ham, veal, and one or more specialty pasta and of course the giant stuffed Turkeys. There were Kosher dishes aplenty for our many Jewish friends. Our next door neighbor kept a Kosher kitchen and always shared their wonderful food with us as we did in return.

Not counted as entrees were homemade sausages, meatballs, and grilled peppers. A strange calzone, one I recall with nuts and octopus was always somewhere on the table as was braciole (Italian beef rolls, and great cannoli desserts were always compliments of our Sicilian side of the family).

Salads and antipasto were a mainstay, with favorites cellentani con Insalata di Peperoni (cellentani with pepper salad), and the ever popular soups, usually a bean, as in minestrone. Breads, rolls, pizza and a mixed variety of biscotti, were always in abundance. Side dishes were a meal in themselves.

A vast array of vegetables prepared as specialty items, like artichoke and bacon frittata rounded out every holiday meal. Even our popular lasagne, the recipe that created a chain of famous restaurants, has broccoli or spinach as a principle ingredient to the recipe. Desserts... oh my, great custards, and pastries, ice creams and cakes such as lemon berry tiramisu or frittelle di zucca (pumpkin fritters)

The Moment of Truth

My grandfather sat at the head of the table, and next to him sat a gallon jug of his homemade Italian red wine. Almost everyone seated for dinner were given a glass of his wine, if only for the many toasts that were posed, to the cooks and a milieu of other celebrations. The moment of truth came when he would call the name of the boys that he felt were to be worthy of manhood, a scholarship know only to him, usually by some unknown merit method.

If you attained that status in his trusted eye, he would invite you to accept a glass of wine and he would toast your new position and with everyone's applause you drank a glass and thanked him.

When my moment came, I had just turned 10, and having worked with him on his paper stand in downtown Chicago for 3 years and to my surprise he felt I was ready! Proudly I swallowed a huge gulp, and felt the heat go down my throat and explode at the core of my stomach and began to rush back up. I forced a smiled and swallowed again and hugged him as tight as I could, until my uncle secretly handed me a chunk of bread, which I bit into and forced down before I let my pa loose, perhaps in the nick of time because he slapped me on the back and everything went back down... I never drank another drop of his wine, but accepted his offer to take a glass, each time he offered it until he passed a year later. How I loved that man.

The Carving At each end of the long tables were placed huge turkeys. The head of the households were given the honor of carving these beautifully prepared, golden trophies. It was a ritual and with surgical skills each bird was sliced and distributed to all in attendance until nothing remained but the bare bones.

At the conclusion of this wonderful occasion, the men stood and with glasses raised toasted the blushing ladies as we sang... in our best voice, and in Italian, a song dedicated to our wonderful women, .. "Mamma"


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KEYWORDS: america; bloggersandpersonal; freedom; holidays; thanksgiving; vanity
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A Happy Thanksgiving to one and all!

1 posted on 11/18/2012 8:28:46 AM PST by carlo3b
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To: Jim Robinson; Bob J; christie; stanz; jellybean; Angelique; Howie; TwoStep; piasa; Exit148; ...

Holiday Roast Turkey with Herbal Rub

1 13 pound whole turkey, fresh or thawed
1 medium onion, quartered
1 lemon, quartered
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried tarragon
1 tablespoon dried rosemary
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1. Preheat the oven to 325°F.
2. Remove the giblets and neck from the turkey and reserve for the broth.
3. Rinse the turkey with cold running water and pat dry with paper towels.
4. Place onion and lemon quarters in the neck and body cavities.
5. In a small bowl, mix the oil with the herbs, salt and pepper.
6. With your finger tips, gently loosen the skin from the breast without pulling off the skin.
7. Place 1 tablespoon of the herb mixture under the skin; and replace the skin.
8. Rub the cavities and outside of turkey with the remaining herb mixture.
9. Secure the neck skin to the back of the turkey with skewers. Fold the wings under the back of turkey. Place the legs in tucked position.

Note: May be prepared to this point, covered, and refrigerated for several hours.

10. Place turkey, breast side up, on a rack in a large shallow (no more than 2-1/2 inches) deep roasting pan.
11. Insert an oven-safe thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh, being careful it does not touch the bone.
12. Cover bird with a loose tent of foil. Roast turkey in the preheated oven for about 2-1/2 hours.
13. Remove the foil and baste bird with pan juices.
14. Continue to roast for about another hour, until meat thermometer registers 180°F in the thigh.
15. Remove the turkey from the oven and allow to rest for 15-20 minutes before carving.
16. Transfer to a large platter and serve with gravy.
Yields 18 servings at 6 ounces per portion

Good Old Fashioned Bread Dressing

3 to 4 loaves of white bread (or 5 if you like leftovers)
2 cups water
insides of the turkey
1 or 2 onions
2 bunches of celery
2 to 3 tablespoons butter
1/2 teaspoons sage
oysters (optional)
mushrooms (option)
chicken broth

The night before
1. The night before you want to eat the stuffing, break the bread into small pieces (about 1 inch squares) into 2 huge bowls or pots. Let the bread sit overnight to dry out.

The next day
2. The next day, remove the insides of turkey and boil them in water in
2/3 quart sauce pan until cooked (about 20 to 30 minutes).
3. Remove the insides from the saucepan for later use or discard. Keep the broth and set aside.
4. Preheat the oven to 350°F.
5. Chop the onion and celery and place into food processor until minced.
6. Melt the butter in a large saucepan.
7. Sauté the onion and celery in butter until heated through. Do not brown! (Sauté the mushrooms also at this time, if wanted).
Note: Depending on how much stuffing you want and how much celery and onion you’ve chopped, you may have to sauté the onion and celery in two parts.
8. Once cooked, pour the onion mixture directly over the dried out bread.
9. Sprinkle the sage over bread mixture.
10. Take your turkey broth and pour slowly over the bread mixture. The bread will shrink as you do this. Be careful not to pour too much water in.
11. Mixture thoroughly.

Note: If you need more liquid, open a can of chicken broth and pour over bread. If you need more spice, add more sage.

13. If you are using oysters, add them now.
14. Once stuffing is of a consistency that it will stick together and does not look too dry, do not add more liquid.
16. Either stuff in turkey to be baked in oven, or put in 9 x 13 pan.
17. If using oysters, it is recommended that you bake the stuffing in a pan so as to ensure the oysters will be cooked through.
18. Bake in 350°F oven for 45 minutes to an hour. You want the stuffing to have a nice brown crust on top.

Note: If you are cooking the stuffing in a pan and not inside the turkey, try stuffing the turkey with small apples. It smells wonderful and the apples have a great flavor when you take them out.

Real Homemade Turkey Gravy

1 package neck, heart, gizzard from turkey giblets
1 medium carrot thickly sliced
1 medium onion thickly sliced
1 medium celery rib thickly sliced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 turkey liver
3 tablespoons fat from poultry drippings
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt

1. In a 3-quart saucepan, place neck, heart, gizzard, vegetables, and salt in enough water to cover, and cook over high heat.
2. Heat to boiling.
3. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer for 45 minutes.
4. Add the liver and cook for 15 minutes longer.
5. Strain broth into a large bowl; cover and reserve broth in the refrigerator.
6. To make gravy, remove the cooked turkey and roasting rack from the roasting pan. Pour the poultry drippings through a sieve into a quart size measuring cup.
7. Add 1 cup giblet broth to the roasting pan and stir until the crusty brown bits are loosened.
8. Pour the deglazed liquid/broth into the measuring cup.
9. Let the mixture stand a few minutes, until the fat rises to the top.
10. Over medium heat, spoon 3 tablespoons of fat from the poultry drippings into a 2-quart saucepan.
11. Whisk flour and salt into the heated fat and continue to cook and stir until the flour turns golden.
12. Meanwhile, skim and discard any fat that remains on top of the poultry drippings.
13. Add the remaining broth and enough water to the poultry drippings to equal 3-1/2 cups.
14. Gradually whisk in warm broth mixture.
15. Cook and stir, until the gravy boils and is slightly thick.
Makes 14 servings at 1/4 cup per serving

Home Sweet Home Potato Casserole

2 pounds sweet potatoes, boiled, peeled, and mashed
2 eggs, beaten
1 tablespoon margarine, melted
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 cup buttermilk
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 cup raisins (optional)

1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
2. Combine all of the ingredients and mix well. Mixture will be very soupy.
3. Bake for 1 hour.

Crackpot Crockpot Scalloped Potatoes

Cooking spray
6 to 8 potatoes, thinly sliced
1 can cheddar cheese soup
1 cup Velveeta cheese, chunked
1-1/2 cups grated Cheddar cheese, grated
1 (12 ounce) can evaporated milk
Salt and pepper

1. Spray the crockpot with the cooking spray.
2. Fill the crockpot with half of the sliced potatoes.
3. Layer half of the soup, velveeta cheese, Cheddar cheese, and milk.
4. Add salt and pepper to taste.
5. Layer remaining the remaining potatoes.
6. The layer the remaining soup, velveeta cheese, Cheddar cheese, and milk.
7. Cook on high for about 6 hours.
Note: You need to check to see if you need to add more milk. You can preboil the potatoes for quicker cooking.

Yummy Pineapple Cheese Salad

2 (16 ounce) cans pineapple chunks, drained; reserve the juice
1 1/2 cups to 2 cups miniature marshmallows
3 in. off of a 3 pound loaf of Velvetta cheese, cubed
2 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/4 cup water
l medium egg
l tablespoon sugar

1. In a large bowl, mix the pineapple chunks, marshmallows, and cheese.
2. In a medium saucepan, mix the cornstarch and water.
3. Beat the egg, pineapple juice, sugar into the cornstarch mixture to blend.
4. Cook over low heat until thick.
5. Cool slightly and pour over the pineapple mixture.
6. Mix well

Country Bumkin Pumpkin and Praline Pie

2 pie crust

Filling:

1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1 tablespoon flour
1 tablespoon bitters (optional)
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 egg, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons butter
1 (29 ounces) can pumpkin
1 (12 ounces) can evaporated milk
1/4 cup milk
1 cup water

Praline:

4 tablespoons butter, softened
2/3 cup light brown sugar
2/3 cup pecans, coarsely chopped
Whipped cream, for garnish (optional)

Filling:
1. In a large bowl, mix the sugars, flour, bitters, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves, and salt.
2. Stir in the egg in and set aside.
3. In a large skillet, melt butter over low heat.
4. Add the pumpkin and simmer, stirring occasionally until the purée thickens slightly, about 10 minutes.
5. Gradually stir hot pumpkin into sugar mix, stir in evaporated milk, milk and water.
Note: If desired, cover and refrigerate overnight.

Praline:
1. In a mixing bowl, mix the butter, sugar, and pecans.

Prepare crusts.
1. Preheat the oven to 450°F.
2. Spread half the praline mix in each crust.
3. Bake until the praline is golden brown and bubbly, around 10 minutes.
4. Cool slightly.
5. Reduce the oven temperature to 400°F.
6. Pour half of the pumpkin filling into each crust and smooth top with spatula.
7. Bake until pumpkin is firm and crusts are golden brown, about 1 hour.
8. Cool completely and serve.
9. Garnish with whipped cream or topping, if desired.

These recipes are excerpts from the cookbook “Chef Carlo Cooks with Teens”...Enjoy!


2 posted on 11/18/2012 8:36:31 AM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: Revolting cat!; Slings and Arrows

I get nostalgic for the good old days growing up in America when I had family and freedom.


3 posted on 11/18/2012 8:37:07 AM PST by a fool in paradise (America 2013 - STUCK ON STUPID)
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To: Jim Robinson; Bob J; christie; stanz; jellybean; Angelique; Howie; TwoStep; piasa; Exit148; ...

Holiday Roast Turkey with Herbal Rub

1 13 pound whole turkey, fresh or thawed
1 medium onion, quartered
1 lemon, quartered
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried tarragon
1 tablespoon dried rosemary
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1. Preheat the oven to 325°F.
2. Remove the giblets and neck from the turkey and reserve for the broth.
3. Rinse the turkey with cold running water and pat dry with paper towels.
4. Place onion and lemon quarters in the neck and body cavities.
5. In a small bowl, mix the oil with the herbs, salt and pepper.
6. With your finger tips, gently loosen the skin from the breast without pulling off the skin.
7. Place 1 tablespoon of the herb mixture under the skin; and replace the skin.
8. Rub the cavities and outside of turkey with the remaining herb mixture.
9. Secure the neck skin to the back of the turkey with skewers. Fold the wings under the back of turkey. Place the legs in tucked position.

Note: May be prepared to this point, covered, and refrigerated for several hours.

10. Place turkey, breast side up, on a rack in a large shallow (no more than 2-1/2 inches) deep roasting pan.
11. Insert an oven-safe thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh, being careful it does not touch the bone.
12. Cover bird with a loose tent of foil. Roast turkey in the preheated oven for about 2-1/2 hours.
13. Remove the foil and baste bird with pan juices.
14. Continue to roast for about another hour, until meat thermometer registers 180°F in the thigh.
15. Remove the turkey from the oven and allow to rest for 15-20 minutes before carving.
16. Transfer to a large platter and serve with gravy.
Yields 18 servings at 6 ounces per portion

Good Old Fashioned Bread Dressing

3 to 4 loaves of white bread (or 5 if you like leftovers)
2 cups water
insides of the turkey
1 or 2 onions
2 bunches of celery
2 to 3 tablespoons butter
1/2 teaspoons sage
oysters (optional)
mushrooms (option)
chicken broth

The night before
1. The night before you want to eat the stuffing, break the bread into small pieces (about 1 inch squares) into 2 huge bowls or pots. Let the bread sit overnight to dry out.

The next day
2. The next day, remove the insides of turkey and boil them in water in
2/3 quart sauce pan until cooked (about 20 to 30 minutes).
3. Remove the insides from the saucepan for later use or discard. Keep the broth and set aside.
4. Preheat the oven to 350°F.
5. Chop the onion and celery and place into food processor until minced.
6. Melt the butter in a large saucepan.
7. Sauté the onion and celery in butter until heated through. Do not brown! (Sauté the mushrooms also at this time, if wanted).
Note: Depending on how much stuffing you want and how much celery and onion you’ve chopped, you may have to sauté the onion and celery in two parts.
8. Once cooked, pour the onion mixture directly over the dried out bread.
9. Sprinkle the sage over bread mixture.
10. Take your turkey broth and pour slowly over the bread mixture. The bread will shrink as you do this. Be careful not to pour too much water in.
11. Mixture thoroughly.

Note: If you need more liquid, open a can of chicken broth and pour over bread. If you need more spice, add more sage.

13. If you are using oysters, add them now.
14. Once stuffing is of a consistency that it will stick together and does not look too dry, do not add more liquid.
16. Either stuff in turkey to be baked in oven, or put in 9 x 13 pan.
17. If using oysters, it is recommended that you bake the stuffing in a pan so as to ensure the oysters will be cooked through.
18. Bake in 350°F oven for 45 minutes to an hour. You want the stuffing to have a nice brown crust on top.

Note: If you are cooking the stuffing in a pan and not inside the turkey, try stuffing the turkey with small apples. It smells wonderful and the apples have a great flavor when you take them out.

Real Homemade Turkey Gravy

1 package neck, heart, gizzard from turkey giblets
1 medium carrot thickly sliced
1 medium onion thickly sliced
1 medium celery rib thickly sliced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 turkey liver
3 tablespoons fat from poultry drippings
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt

1. In a 3-quart saucepan, place neck, heart, gizzard, vegetables, and salt in enough water to cover, and cook over high heat.
2. Heat to boiling.
3. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer for 45 minutes.
4. Add the liver and cook for 15 minutes longer.
5. Strain broth into a large bowl; cover and reserve broth in the refrigerator.
6. To make gravy, remove the cooked turkey and roasting rack from the roasting pan. Pour the poultry drippings through a sieve into a quart size measuring cup.
7. Add 1 cup giblet broth to the roasting pan and stir until the crusty brown bits are loosened.
8. Pour the deglazed liquid/broth into the measuring cup.
9. Let the mixture stand a few minutes, until the fat rises to the top.
10. Over medium heat, spoon 3 tablespoons of fat from the poultry drippings into a 2-quart saucepan.
11. Whisk flour and salt into the heated fat and continue to cook and stir until the flour turns golden.
12. Meanwhile, skim and discard any fat that remains on top of the poultry drippings.
13. Add the remaining broth and enough water to the poultry drippings to equal 3-1/2 cups.
14. Gradually whisk in warm broth mixture.
15. Cook and stir, until the gravy boils and is slightly thick.
Makes 14 servings at 1/4 cup per serving

Home Sweet Home Potato Casserole

2 pounds sweet potatoes, boiled, peeled, and mashed
2 eggs, beaten
1 tablespoon margarine, melted
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 cup buttermilk
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 cup raisins (optional)

1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
2. Combine all of the ingredients and mix well. Mixture will be very soupy.
3. Bake for 1 hour.

Crackpot Crockpot Scalloped Potatoes

Cooking spray
6 to 8 potatoes, thinly sliced
1 can cheddar cheese soup
1 cup Velveeta cheese, chunked
1-1/2 cups grated Cheddar cheese, grated
1 (12 ounce) can evaporated milk
Salt and pepper

1. Spray the crockpot with the cooking spray.
2. Fill the crockpot with half of the sliced potatoes.
3. Layer half of the soup, velveeta cheese, Cheddar cheese, and milk.
4. Add salt and pepper to taste.
5. Layer remaining the remaining potatoes.
6. The layer the remaining soup, velveeta cheese, Cheddar cheese, and milk.
7. Cook on high for about 6 hours.
Note: You need to check to see if you need to add more milk. You can preboil the potatoes for quicker cooking.

Yummy Pineapple Cheese Salad

2 (16 ounce) cans pineapple chunks, drained; reserve the juice
1 1/2 cups to 2 cups miniature marshmallows
3 in. off of a 3 pound loaf of Velvetta cheese, cubed
2 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/4 cup water
l medium egg
l tablespoon sugar

1. In a large bowl, mix the pineapple chunks, marshmallows, and cheese.
2. In a medium saucepan, mix the cornstarch and water.
3. Beat the egg, pineapple juice, sugar into the cornstarch mixture to blend.
4. Cook over low heat until thick.
5. Cool slightly and pour over the pineapple mixture.
6. Mix well

Country Bumkin Pumpkin and Praline Pie

2 pie crust

Filling:

1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1 tablespoon flour
1 tablespoon bitters (optional)
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 egg, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons butter
1 (29 ounces) can pumpkin
1 (12 ounces) can evaporated milk
1/4 cup milk
1 cup water

Praline:

4 tablespoons butter, softened
2/3 cup light brown sugar
2/3 cup pecans, coarsely chopped
Whipped cream, for garnish (optional)

Filling:
1. In a large bowl, mix the sugars, flour, bitters, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves, and salt.
2. Stir in the egg in and set aside.
3. In a large skillet, melt butter over low heat.
4. Add the pumpkin and simmer, stirring occasionally until the purée thickens slightly, about 10 minutes.
5. Gradually stir hot pumpkin into sugar mix, stir in evaporated milk, milk and water.
Note: If desired, cover and refrigerate overnight.

Praline:
1. In a mixing bowl, mix the butter, sugar, and pecans.

Prepare crusts.
1. Preheat the oven to 450°F.
2. Spread half the praline mix in each crust.
3. Bake until the praline is golden brown and bubbly, around 10 minutes.
4. Cool slightly.
5. Reduce the oven temperature to 400°F.
6. Pour half of the pumpkin filling into each crust and smooth top with spatula.
7. Bake until pumpkin is firm and crusts are golden brown, about 1 hour.
8. Cool completely and serve.
9. Garnish with whipped cream or topping, if desired.

These recipes are excerpts from the cookbook “Chef Carlo Cooks with Teens”...Enjoy!


4 posted on 11/18/2012 8:37:32 AM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: carlo3b

Happy Thanksgiving, Chef Carlo! Wonderful description of your family’s meal ... it reminds me of Christmas with the Sicilians from my husband’s stepmother’s family. All yelling in Italian, sauce flying, and my father-in-law says, “Isn’t this fun? It’s like watching the fights on the Spanish channel!”


5 posted on 11/18/2012 8:51:35 AM PST by Tax-chick (Are you getting ready for the Advent Kitteh?)
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To: carlo3b

I am going to have to cook a turkey this year after many years of NOT having to. Thanks for the reminder. arrrrggggggg


6 posted on 11/18/2012 8:52:18 AM PST by Ditter
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To: carlo3b

Wow! I lived in a cold water flat (we called them tenements). My frail sister asked my parents for piano lessons, and they gave her an accordion. Poor kid struggled under the weight of it while she played “Lady of Spain”. Thank you for the wonderful recipes and the trip down memory lane! You are a total peach!


7 posted on 11/18/2012 9:24:41 AM PST by Silentgypsy (If you love your freedom, thank a vet.)
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To: Tax-chick

If anyone requests any of the original Italian recipes served at our table, just ask and I will post them;

Artichoke and Bacon Frittata

1 small onion, chopped
2 Tablespoons butter
Two 6-ounce jars marinated artichoke hearts, drained & chopped (reserve liquid from one jar)
8 eggs
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/3 cup bread crumbs
6 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled
1/2 cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese
Paprika for color

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. In a skillet, saute onion in butter until transparent; add artichokes and liquid from one jar. Heat for 2 minutes. In a bowl, lightly beat eggs; add cheese, bread crumbs, artichoke mixture, and bacon. Mix together and place in a greased 9-inch quiche pan. Back for 25 minutes, until set. Sprinkle frittata with jack cheese, if desired, and bake for 5 more minutes.
Note: All can be done the night before; keep the egg and artichoke mixture separate. Add together in morning and bake.
Serves: 8,

Triple Pepper Salad with Cellentani
Cellentani ( whirls, or large elbow macaroni) con Insalata di Peperoni

12 oz Cellantani ( whirls, or large elbow macaroni)
2 red peppers
2 green peppers
2 yellow peppers
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 tbsp fresh oregano, chopped
2 cloves garlic, crushed
3 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp white wine vinegar

Pre-heat oven to 190°C, 375°F, Gas Mark 5. Place the peppers on a baking tray and bake for 30-40 minutes until soft and browned. Meanwhile, cook the whirls in salted boiling water as directed on the packet. Drain and leave to cool. Deseed and skin the baked peppers and cut into strips. Mix with the remaining ingredients. Add the pasta and toss well. Serve chilled.


8 posted on 11/18/2012 9:25:31 AM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: Ditter

I really understand my Dear girl.. If you need any shortcuts, to getting it done ping me.. The older I get the more shortcuts I find.. LOLOL


9 posted on 11/18/2012 9:39:02 AM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: carlo3b
Thanks for the Thanksgiving message and wonderful recipes. Bookmarking for later baking/cooking :)

Many blessings to you, Carlo!

10 posted on 11/18/2012 9:51:31 AM PST by Jane Long ("Miss me yet?" - Mitt)
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To: carlo3b
My mother used to rub the outside of her turkey with prepared mustard before baking. She has been gone since 1984, wish I had asked her where she came up with that recipe. Nothing much in the way of other seasonings except salt and pepper.
11 posted on 11/18/2012 10:07:51 AM PST by Ditter
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To: carlo3b
If only you could see the smile on my face while I read your post. :-) I have to admit my eyes were a tad moist, as well.

Wonderful post, sweetie. Thank you.

If you don't mind, may I print it and give to family and friends? Of course, I will mention your name as the author of this wonderful piece.

12 posted on 11/18/2012 10:16:06 AM PST by lysie
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To: carlo3b

My dressing recipe is mainly made of cornbread-—about 2/3 cornbread to 1/3 white bread. I spice it up with poultry seasoning and ground sage, with a tad of oregano. It also has celery and onions chopped up in it.

I stuff the turkey’s cavities with it, put the rest in the pan and lay the turkey on top of it, and roast away-—

The giblets and other nasty parts get thrown away-—LOL!


13 posted on 11/18/2012 10:17:02 AM PST by basil (Second Amendment Sisters.org)
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To: carlo3b

Wow! Thank you, dear carlo3b!


14 posted on 11/18/2012 10:34:27 AM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: Jane Long

Happy Holidays..

Italian Stuffed Jerusalem Artichokes

4 - 6 artichokes, trimmed
1 cup (250 ml) bread crumbs
1/4 cup (60 ml) grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup (60 ml) chopped parsley
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 rib celery, finely chopped
2 Tbs. (30 ml) capers, chopped (optional)
1 Tbs. (15 ml) chopped anchovies or anchovy paste
(optional)
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Olive oil

1) Steam or boil the artichokes for 15 minutes.
2) Drain and cool. Scoop out and discard the central leaves and chokes.
3) Combine remaining ingredients except for the olive oil in a small bowl and fill the artichokes with the mixture, filling the center
and forcing the stuffing in between the leaves of the artichokes.
4) Place in a baking dish and add about 1 inch (2.5 cm) of water or chicken broth (I much prefer the broth) to the dish. Drizzle with olive oil, cover tightly and bake in a preheated 350F (180C) oven for 1 hour.
Serves 4 to 6.
buon appetito


15 posted on 11/18/2012 11:20:41 AM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: carlo3b

Awesome story, Carlo!


16 posted on 11/18/2012 11:22:17 AM PST by hattend (Firearms and ammunition...the only growing industries under the Obama regime.)
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To: lysie

Of course I mind, only if you didn’t want to share it.. Thank you my FRiend, Have a happy, healthy, and safe Holiday..

Please let us all remember others, as in our fellow Americans, who are giving their time, efforts, and lives, serving in the Military, and the poor folks in the storm shelters still suffering.. Huggggg. Carlo


17 posted on 11/18/2012 11:32:45 AM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: hattend

So happy to see you my Dear FRiend.. It’s good to be back..

American Patriot Bread Pudding

Ingredients:

Unsalted butter, softened
1 (1.5 lb.) loaf cinnamon egg bread *
2/3 cup golden raisins
1.5 cups sugar
4 cups milk
2 cups heavy whipping cream, yep, no substitutes
1/4 cup vanilla extract
8 eggs, beaten
1 tsp. cinnamon

Preparation:
Coat the bottom and side of a 2” deep baking dish heavily with butter.
Tear the bread into 1” pieces.
Mix with the raisins in a bowl.
Spread the bread mixture evenly in the prepared dish, turning crust side down as this tends to burn easily.
Whisk the sugar, milk, 2 cups whipping cream, vanilla, eggs & cinnamon in a bowl until blended.
Pour over the bread mixture.
Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.
Place the baking dish in a 4” deep baking pan.
Add water to reach halfway up side of the baking dish.
Bake for 1 hour.
Remove from water bath.
Let stand for 20 minutes.
Spoon into dessert bowls, and serve while still warm.

Heavenly Caramel Sauce

1 cup butter
1 cup sugar
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup cream
pinch of salt
2 teaspoons vanilla

Mix all the ingredients together and simmer for about 5 or 6 minutes.
Serve over Bread and butter pudding, apple pie and ice cream, warm
gingerbread, etc..

Cinnamon Swirl Egg Bread

* This Cinnamon Swirl bread is great in this recipe, but make extra for toast and butter for breakfast or anytime..

4 3/4 to 5 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 package active dry yeast
1 1/3 cups milk
3 tablespoons sugar
3 tablespoons margarine or butter
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 eggs

Combine 2 cups of the flour and the yeast. In a saucepan heat and stir milk, sugar, margarine or butter, and salt till warm (120 - 130 degrees Fahrenheit) and margarine almost melts. Add to flour mixture along with eggs. Beat with an electric mixer on low speed for 30 seconds, scraping bowl constantly. Beat on high speed for 3 minutes. Using a spoon, stir in as much of the remaining flour as you can.

Turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Knead in enough of the remaining flour to make a moderately stiff dough that is smooth and elastic (6 to 8 minutes total). Shape into a ball. Place in a lightly greased bowl; turn once to grease surface. Cover and let rise in a warm place till double (about 60 minutes).

Punch dough down. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Divide in half. Cover and let rest 10 minutes. Lightly grease two 8x4x2 inch loaf pans. Shape each half of the dough into a loaf. Place in pans.

Cover and let rise till almost double (about 30 minutes). Bake in a 375 degree Fahrenheit oven for 25 to 30 minutes or till done. Cover loosely the last 10 to 15 minutes of baking, if necessary. Remove from pans; cool.
Makes 2 loaves. (32 servings.)


18 posted on 11/18/2012 11:47:13 AM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: Alamo-Girl

Have a wonderful holiday dear girl.. Huggggg Carlo


19 posted on 11/18/2012 11:59:53 AM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: Silentgypsy; carlo3b

My boss, Dona Edra the Spanish Battleaxe, has a MFA from Vassar. She used to play the accordion, as well as the harp and a couple of other instruments, before she got too old and frail to lift it. My Pat (the weedy one) wanted to try it when we helped her move, but he couldn’t even lift it.


20 posted on 11/18/2012 11:59:53 AM PST by Tax-chick (Are you getting ready for the Advent Kitteh?)
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To: carlo3b
I'm not Jewish, but Catholic. When my brother made this, I thought it was the BEST sweet potato recipe I had ever tasted. I've always wondered about the meat and cheese that he omitted.

Tsimmes

40 minutes to assemble;                                                                                     4-6 servings

2 hours to bake                                                              (Depending on what else gets served)

 

 Tsimmes is a festive Jewish dish that combines vegetables and fruit, savory and sweet......all baked together.  This versions is 98% traditional; its 2 points of departure are the omissions of a few chunks of meat, and the optional addition of cheese in the topping.  Serve it with the Spinach Kugel(see opposite page), and a freshly-baked challah (p. 97) for a warming winter supper.

 I.

2 lbs. sweet potatoes

2 large carrots, sliced

1 large (3-4 inch diameter) tart apple, sliced

1 heaping cup chopped onion

20 large pitted prunes

juice of 1 large lemon

1 tsp. salt

1/4-1/2 tsp. cinnamon (to taste)

2/3 cup fresh-squeezed orange juice

II.

 2 eggs, beaten

1/4 cup wheat germ, matzo meal or fine crumbs

1/2 tsp. salt

(optional:  1/2 cup [packed] grated mild cheddar)

3 Tlbs. butter, cold, and in thin slices.

 1.)        Take half the sweet potatoes and grate them coarsely.  Set these aside.  With the other    half, cut bite-sized slices or small chunks.

 2.)        In a deep-dish casserole, combine the sweet potato chunks with all the other ingredients in            List I.  Toss until nicely mixed.

3.)        Mix together the grated sweet potato with the other ingredients from List II.  Pat this into place on top of the first mixture in the casserole.  Dot the top with the butter slices.

4.)        Cover tightly and bake for 1 hour.  Remove the cover, and bake another hour, until the top is brown and crisp.

 

 p. 204 Casseroles & Melanges


21 posted on 11/18/2012 12:12:01 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: carlo3b

Molte grazie!


22 posted on 11/18/2012 12:15:37 PM PST by Jane Long ("Miss me yet?" - Mitt)
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To: carlo3b

I absolutely LOVE Bread Pudding.

Thanks for the recipe!

Have a Happy Thanksgiving! You have given me enough recipes to last until Christmas! LOL!


23 posted on 11/18/2012 12:20:28 PM PST by hattend (Firearms and ammunition...the only growing industries under the Obama regime.)
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To: carlo3b

Both of those recipes look delicious, and they have reasonable Weight Watchers Points if the amounts of olive oil are cut back a little (and one doesn’t eat the whole thing instead of sharing ;-).


24 posted on 11/18/2012 12:22:00 PM PST by Tax-chick (Are you getting ready for the Advent Kitteh?)
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To: Silentgypsy

Thank you my FRiend.. I hope these fit your taste, if you would like a special recipe, Ping me.. LOL

Cinnamon Swirl Egg Bread, the sequel
.....shuffling away, kickin a can

2 1/4 ounce packages active dry yeast
1/3 cup warm water — (110 to 115 degrees)
1 cup warm milk — (110 to 115 degrees)
2 eggs — lightly beaten
1 cup sugar — divided
6 tablespoons butter or margarine, softened, (I hate to admit it, I really prefer margarine in this recipe)
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
6 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons ground cinnamon

1) In a mixing bowl, dissolve yeast in water.
2) Add milk, eggs, 1/2 cup sugar, butter, salt, and 2 1/2 cups flour; beat until smooth.
3) Stir in enough remaining flour to form a soft dough.
4) Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6 - 8 minutes.
5) Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease top.
6) Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour.
7) Punch dough down; divide in half. Roll each half into an 18 x 8-inch rectangle.
8) Combine cinnamon and remaining sugar; sprinkle over the dough.
9) Roll up each rectangle from a short side; pinch seam to seal. Place seam side down in 2 greased 9 x 5 x 3-inch loaf pans.
10) Cover and let rise until doubled, about 1 1/2 hours.
11) Bake at 350 degrees for 30 - 35 minutes or until golden brown.
12) Remove from pans and cool on wire racks.
Yield: 2 Loaves


25 posted on 11/18/2012 12:25:38 PM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: Tax-chick

Chocolate Torte with Buttercream Frosting

1/3 cup butter (do NOT substitute margarine)
1 cup sugar
1/2 t salt
5 eggs separated
1 whole egg
3 squares unsweetened chocolate, melted
3/4 cup ground almonds
3/4 cup apricot jam
2 cups whipped cream

Combine butter, sugar and salt and cream until light. Stir in 5 egg
yolks and 1 whole egg, mixing well. Melt chocolate and combine with
almonds. Add to egg mixture and beat well. Beat 7 (seven) egg whites
until stiff but not dry. Fold into chocolate mixture. Pour into 3 round
eight-inch layer pans lined on bottom with paper and greased. Bake at
350 degrees for about 20 minutes. Cool on rack for 25 minutes before
carefully removing from pans.
Filling: Fold apricot jam into whipped cream and spread between
layers and over top of torte.

Buttercream Frosting:

1/4 cup butter, softened
1/8 t. salt
1/2 cup confectioners sugar
2 egg yolks, unbeaten
2 squares unsweetened chocolate, melted & cooled
1/2 t. vanilla

Cream butter and salt . Gradually add sugar, beating well. Add
egg yolks, beating well after each. Add cooled chocolate, beating
well. Add vanilla. Spread on sides of torte.
Chill about 2 hours or overnight before serving. About 12 servings.


26 posted on 11/18/2012 12:35:06 PM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: Jane Long

Lasagna, House Of Carlo
Ingredients:

1 box lasagna noodles
1 ½ lbs of hamburger
16 oz ricotta cheese
8 oz Mozzarella cheese - grated
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese
14 oz of your favorite marinara sauce(* This is mine)
1 onion - diced
4 cloves garlic - chopped up very small
4 sliced fresh mushrooms
2 eggs
1 tablespoon parsley
dash pepper
dash basil

Instructions:
In a large pot, set water to boil. Meanwhile, brown burger, onion, mushrooms and garlic. Add marinara and set aside.
Mix cheeses and eggs in a separate bowl with parsley and spices. Save back about ¼ of the Mozzarella for the top.
When water in pot is boiling add the lasagna noodles. You typically do not need to wait until the noodles are edible because they will be cooked in the oven as well. When noodles are ready (8 minutes or so) begin layering the various mixtures in a 9X13 pan. Start with the burger mixture; then add the cheese, then the noodles. Keep layering until you run out of ingredients. Add the reserved Mozzarella last.
Cover dish with foil and pop into oven at 375 degrees for an hour or so. If you want to harden off the top, pull off the foil for the last 15 minutes.

*Quick MUSHROOM PASTA SAUCE
Ingredients:

1/2 a medium sized onion, chopped
1/3 cup dried porcini mushrooms that have been soaking in about 1/2 cup lukewarm water
1 cup regular white mushrooms, chopped but not too finely
1/2 cup cream
2 tblsp butter
1/4 cup tomato paste
salt to taste
Marsala to taste (optional)

Instructions:
Soak porcini mushrooms in water for about 1/2 hour until re-hydrated. Remove from water and chop them. SAVE the water they soaked in and run it through a filter to filter out dirt or other “foreign” object that may have been stuck on the porcinis. Melt butter in pan and saute onion until translucent. Add regular and porcini mushrooms and saute with onion. Add porcini water and cream and simmer until sauce begins to thicken a bit. Add salt. About 5 minutes before it’s done, add tomato
paste. Also, now’s the time to add the marsala if you want it, but the sauce will need to simmer a bit longer to boil away the extra liquid.

GREEN GODDESS SALAD DRESSING
(4 servings)
Rub the salad bowl with a garlic clove, then add

2 cups of freshly made mayonnaise
4 minced anchovy fillets
1 green onion, chopped
2 teaspoons chopped flat Italian parsley
2 teaspoons chopped chives
1 Tablespoon tarragon vinegar (or to taste)
1/4 teaspoon dried OR 1 teaspoon cut, fresh tarragon

Stir well and pour over salad greens, watercress, or seafood salad.


27 posted on 11/18/2012 1:08:51 PM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: carlo3b

Broccoli Lasagna
This is the home version of our family restaurant recipe... really creamy, and a wonderful change if you have never had a vegetarian lasagna.

12 oz lasagna noodles — (wide)
2 Tbls salad oil
1 1/2 ts salt
1/4 ts pepper
20 oz frozen broccoli, or spinach
2-3 c tomato sauce
16 oz ricotta cheese
1/2 Tbls fresh parsley, chopped, or 1/4 dry
1/4 c sour cream
12 oz mozzarella cheese, grated

Cook noodles according to directions on package. Drain, then toss with oil, salt and pepper until well coated. Cook broccoli according to package directions. Drain. Combine ricotta cheese, parsley and sour cream.

Arrange half of the noodles in a 12 x 8 baking dish. Cover with half of broccoli and sauce, then a layer of cheese.

Add another layer of noodles, topped with broccoli, sauce and cheese., then add all of the cottage cheese mixture. Top with remaining noodles and add sauce to cover.

Sprinkle with mozzarella cheese. Cover tightly with aluminum foil and refrigerate.

About 30 minutes before serving, heat oven to 350 F and bake for 30 minutes or until cheese melts and is golden on top.


28 posted on 11/18/2012 1:31:04 PM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: stanz

See post #28 for you.. Tell me if you can use this.. Happy Holiday to you, your daughter, and the entire family.. Smoooch .. Carlo


29 posted on 11/18/2012 1:34:20 PM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: Jane Long

Gnocchi alla Italiana

2 1/2 c. mashed potatoes (or use a ricer), I like using baked potatoes
2 eggs, slightly beaten
1/2 tsp. salt
2 1/2 c. flour
1 recipe tomato sauce
1/4 lb of butter
1 c. Parmesan cheese

Place potatoes, eggs, and salt in a mixing bowl and mix thoroughly. Add 1 1/2 c. flour. Place dough on floured board and add rest of flour.

Knead dough for 3 to 4 minutes until all flour is mixed in. If dough is too sticky, sprinkle with more flour.

Cut dough into 6 pieces. Roll dough into long sausage like strips and cut into pieces 2/3 to 1 inch long. Sprinkle dumplings lightly with flour. You can roll each dumpling across a floured dinner fork to make crinkle marks if desired.

Have ready a large pan with 4 qts of boiling water to which 1 T. salt has been added. Place gnocchi in water and remove with a strainer when they come to the top.

Place in a hot serving bowl. Add sauce to gnocchi and 2/3 of cheese, mix well. Sprinkle rest of cheese on top.
Serves 4 to 6.

Variation sauce: Heat butter to browning stage and add 1/2 cup of cream. Pour over gnocchi and add Parmesan cheese.


30 posted on 11/18/2012 3:18:40 PM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: lysie

I get asked quite often how can two people make the recipes that are often calibrated to sever 4-8 folks..
As a result I am finishing a cookbook that will feature Dining for two, but you girls might have a bit of a problem with the Title.. SOUP, SEX, and the SINGLE MAN.. Ha!

Living with a Gnocchi... for two..

Gnocchi are a potato and flour dumpling.. Gnocchi, is the Italian name for a dumpling from the northern areas of Italy. They are often listed as a pasta, and although not a classic pasta, they are perfectly matched with all of the typical Italian pasta sauces..

INGREDIENTS

2 large russet potatoes (about 1 pound)
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt

Bake the potatoes in a 350°F oven for about 1 hour, until tender.

While the potatoes are still warm, peel them and put them through a food mill or a ricer. (Do not process in a food processor; they will get gummy.) Place the potatoes in a large bowl and gradually stir in the flour until a sticky dough forms. Add the salt.

Knead the dough for about 3 minutes. It may require a bit more flour if it is too wet. The finished dough will be a bit sticky.

Flour your hands and divide the dough into 2 equal balls. Roll out the balls into long snake-shaped lengths about as thick as your finger. Cut the “snakes” into 1-inch pieces.

Press each gnocchi with the tines of a fork to put ridges into the dumplings. (These will help capture any sauce you pair them with.)

Bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Add the gnocchi and cook until they rise to the surface.

Toss the gnocchi with your favorite sauce, and enjoy your hard work!


31 posted on 11/18/2012 3:44:58 PM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: carlo3b

Wow! One to have and one to share, and we have all the ingredients! (((Hugs))) and thanks to you and yours!


32 posted on 11/18/2012 6:44:32 PM PST by Silentgypsy (If you love your freedom, thank a vet.)
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To: Tax-chick

Lol!


33 posted on 11/18/2012 6:53:59 PM PST by Silentgypsy (If you love your freedom, thank a vet.)
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To: carlo3b

We’re raising kale and collards in the greenhouse. I bet we could use those in the vegetarian lasagna dish. Yum!


34 posted on 11/18/2012 7:10:52 PM PST by Silentgypsy (If you love your freedom, thank a vet.)
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To: Silentgypsy

Delicious, Kale and Collards, Tomato Soup

A hearty soup that brings together the rich flavors of kale and collards and the sweetness of tomatoes
Ingredients

3 medium tomatoes (cut in half, seeded, and diced)
3 cloves fresh garlic (cloves peeled and thinly sliced)
1 red barrel onion (peeled and diced)
2 cups chopped kale (cut into bite-sized pieces)
2 cups chopped collards (cut into bite-sized pieces)
2 cups chopped mustard (cut into bite-sized pieces)
3 tablespoons grapeseed oil (optional, you may use any vegetable oil)
1 1/2 quarts vegetable stock (low boil 1/2 gal water, and all the trimming, an extra bunch of greens, and an onion, about an hour)
Sea or kosher salt
Fresh milled pepper

Directions

Heat grapeseed oil in a soup or sauce pot over medium heat.
Add sliced garlic and “fry” until golden.
Add onions to pot and cook until softened, about 5 minutes.
Add chopped greens and sauté until wilted.
Add vegetable stock, tomatoes, and season with salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook for about 10 to 15 minutes.


35 posted on 11/18/2012 7:50:06 PM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: carlo3b

Thank you! You are a great blessing!


36 posted on 11/18/2012 8:41:15 PM PST by Silentgypsy (If you love your freedom, thank a vet.)
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To: carlo3b
That recipe looks yummy. Thanks, carlo.

With great pride I remember holidays with my family. May you and your family and friends be blessed with a happy and memorable Thanksgiving..... because, that's what it is ALL about.

37 posted on 11/19/2012 8:03:08 AM PST by lysie
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To: carlo3b; Silentgypsy
My sweet mama played the accordian and often played "Lady of Spain". Oh, how I miss her and those moments.

Hubby's father played it and the organ, as well. When he passed I told hubby that mama and his dad are in heaven playing great music with the angels. They never met each other. My mama passed away many years before I knew hubby. Thinking that they now have met brings a huge smile on my face. They were fine people. Mighty fine.

38 posted on 11/19/2012 8:15:40 AM PST by lysie
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To: lysie; carlo3b

Chef Carlo brings more joy to more people than he could have anticipated!


39 posted on 11/19/2012 8:48:44 AM PST by Silentgypsy (If you love your freedom, thank a vet.)
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To: carlo3b
Happy Thanksgiving to der cook!


40 posted on 11/19/2012 9:10:03 AM PST by Howie
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To: Silentgypsy

Yes! He does. :-)


41 posted on 11/19/2012 9:34:03 AM PST by lysie
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To: carlo3b; All
Always look forward to your Thanksgiving Ping Carlo. Lady Bender suggested I post a link to this article...

Back in the Day

42 posted on 11/19/2012 1:43:42 PM PST by tubebender (Evening news is where they begin with "Good Evening," and then proceed to tell you why it isn't.)
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To: lysie
You Tube Lady of Spain
43 posted on 11/19/2012 1:56:36 PM PST by tubebender (Evening news is where they begin with "Good Evening," and then proceed to tell you why it isn't.)
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To: tubebender

Thank you. Your post made me smile. See?

:-)


44 posted on 11/19/2012 8:01:30 PM PST by lysie
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To: carlo3b

If I can find it, I have a poppie-seed receipe with creme sherry that’s easy to make and easier to eat. :^)


45 posted on 11/20/2012 5:44:42 PM PST by budwiesest (It's that girl from Alaska, again.)
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To: carlo3b

That is the most beautiful description of a family and Thanksgiving that I’ve ever read! Thank you so much for sharing it with us and may you and yours have a Happy blessed Thanksgiving!


46 posted on 11/20/2012 5:58:15 PM PST by MWestMom ("And those that cried appease, appease were hung by those they tried to please" - Horace Mann)
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To: carlo3b

bflr


47 posted on 11/20/2012 6:30:41 PM PST by MrIndi
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To: lysie; christie; stanz; jellybean; Angelique; Howie; TwoStep; piasa; Exit148; RJayneJ; ...

My dear lysie, reading about your mom, and how you miss her, reminds me about an interesting story about me and my little Mom.. Little, because she was tiny, as in 4’10” and skinny as a pencil when she was young..

Her birthday was Nov. 11, Veterans Day every year.. As such, I always associated the flying of the Flags with her birthday.. I just thought everyone was celebrating her when everyone put flags out.. LOL..

However, her apparent patriotism caused me some distress when I was a very young typical Italian, inner city hooligan.. We, my buddies and I were playing stick ball in the middle of the street, when a ball that I hit broke a window.. We were warned that this would happen if we persisted in playing ball so close to the buildings.. But as kids, who didn’t believe it would happen because we were too good at hitting.. LOL

Well we did what kids do, we ran away and hid.. However, it wasn’t long before there was a big Irish Cop at our front door, asking for my Mom, and I to come out to the stoop, and answer a few questions.. GULP

The policeman had a few of my friends with them.. They were starring down at their shoes, so I knew I was doomed.. When he asked if I was the one that hit the ball, I looked at the Cop, and at my Mom, and answered yes.. I did it, and I thought that was it, I was going to the Big House for Life, or maybe even the Electric Chair..

Here is were the Flags come in, this window that we.. “I”.. broke, had Flags all over the place and the window I broke, had a Red Banner with 3 Stars on it! (an indication that the home had 3 veterans) Also the Cop said this home was an old widow, that had little or no money to fix the window..

I felt horrible, and looked up at my Mom and a tear was running down her cheek.. That was it, I wanted to die! I put my hands out, as if asking for handcuffs, like I saw at the movies.. Ha!

After a few torturous moments, the Cop said that the VFW would pay for the window if I and my friends would agree to clean off the headstones, and clean around the graves at the Memorial Cemetery before Veterans Day??..

Thats it! Sure we would, and we would get off SCOTT FREE? Not so fast, my Mom said we should do it before every Holiday that year.. There were 500 headstones, and we ended up doing it every year until I/we, graduated from high School..

With the Korean War there were so many more new graves, some of which were cousins, brothers, friends, and fathers of ours, that it became a real tear-fest toward the end..

I never regretted doing it, and every family of ours brought the rest of their family with us to add flowers to the graves.. I bring small Flags for each grave to our little Memorial Cemetery, each and every year to this day..


48 posted on 11/20/2012 8:30:56 PM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: lysie; christie; stanz; jellybean; Angelique; Howie; TwoStep; piasa; Exit148; RJayneJ; ...

My dear lysie, reading about your mom, and how you miss her, reminds me about an interesting story about me and my little Mom.. Little, because she was tiny, as in 4’10” and skinny as a pencil when she was young..

Her birthday was Nov. 11, Veterans Day every year.. As such, I always associated the flying of the Flags with her birthday.. I just thought everyone was celebrating her when everyone put flags out.. LOL..

However, her apparent patriotism caused me some distress when I was a very young typical Italian, inner city hooligan.. We, my buddies and I were playing stick ball in the middle of the street, when a ball that I hit broke a window.. We were warned that this would happen if we persisted in playing ball so close to the buildings.. But as kids, who didn’t believe it would happen because we were too good at hitting.. LOL

Well we did what kids do, we ran away and hid.. However, it wasn’t long before there was a big Irish Cop at our front door, asking for my Mom, and I to come out to the stoop, and answer a few questions.. GULP

The policeman had a few of my friends with them.. They were starring down at their shoes, so I knew I was doomed.. When he asked if I was the one that hit the ball, I looked at the Cop, and at my Mom, and answered yes.. I did it, and I thought that was it, I was going to the Big House for Life, or maybe even the Electric Chair..

Here is were the Flags come in, this window that we.. “I”.. broke, had Flags all over the place and the window I broke, had a Red Banner with 3 Stars on it! (an indication that the home had 3 veterans) Also the Cop said this home was an old widow, that had little or no money to fix the window..

I felt horrible, and looked up at my Mom and a tear was running down her cheek.. That was it, I wanted to die! I put my hands out, as if asking for handcuffs, like I saw at the movies.. Ha!

After a few torturous moments, the Cop said that the VFW would pay for the window if I and my friends would agree to clean off the headstones, and clean around the graves at the Memorial Cemetery before Veterans Day??..

Thats it! Sure we would, and we would get off SCOTT FREE? Not so fast, my Mom said we should do it before every Holiday that year.. There were 500 headstones, and we ended up doing it every year until I/we, graduated from high School..

With the Korean War there were so many more new graves, some of which were cousins, brothers, friends, and fathers of ours, that it became a real tear-fest toward the end..

I never regretted doing it, and every family of ours brought the rest of their family with us to add flowers to the graves.. I bring small Flags for each grave to our little Memorial Cemetery, each and every year to this day..


49 posted on 11/20/2012 8:31:22 PM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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To: lysie; christie; stanz; jellybean; Angelique; Howie; TwoStep; piasa; Exit148; RJayneJ; ...

My dear lysie, reading about your mom, and how you miss her, reminds me about an interesting story about me and my little Mom.. Little, because she was tiny, as in 4’10” and skinny as a pencil when she was young..

Her birthday was Nov. 11, Veterans Day every year.. As such, I always associated the flying of the Flags with her birthday.. I just thought everyone was celebrating her when everyone put flags out.. LOL..

However, her apparent patriotism caused me some distress when I was a very young typical Italian, inner city hooligan.. We, my buddies and I were playing stick ball in the middle of the street, when a ball that I hit broke a window.. We were warned that this would happen if we persisted in playing ball so close to the buildings.. But as kids, who didn’t believe it would happen because we were too good at hitting.. LOL

Well we did what kids do, we ran away and hid.. However, it wasn’t long before there was a big Irish Cop at our front door, asking for my Mom, and I to come out to the stoop, and answer a few questions.. GULP

The policeman had a few of my friends with them.. They were starring down at their shoes, so I knew I was doomed.. When he asked if I was the one that hit the ball, I looked at the Cop, and at my Mom, and answered yes.. I did it, and I thought that was it, I was going to the Big House for Life, or maybe even the Electric Chair..

Here is were the Flags come in, this window that we.. “I”.. broke, had Flags all over the place and the window I broke, had a Red Banner with 3 Stars on it! (an indication that the home had 3 veterans) Also the Cop said this home was an old widow, that had little or no money to fix the window..

I felt horrible, and looked up at my Mom and a tear was running down her cheek.. That was it, I wanted to die! I put my hands out, as if asking for handcuffs, like I saw at the movies.. Ha!

After a few torturous moments, the Cop said that the VFW would pay for the window if I and my friends would agree to clean off the headstones, and clean around the graves at the Memorial Cemetery before Veterans Day??..

Thats it! Sure we would, and we would get off SCOTT FREE? Not so fast, my Mom said we should do it before every Holiday that year.. There were 500 headstones, and we ended up doing it every year until I/we, graduated from high School..

With the Korean War there were so many more new graves, some of which were cousins, brothers, friends, and fathers of ours, that it became a real tear-fest toward the end..

I never regretted doing it, and every family of ours brought the rest of their family with us to add flowers to the graves.. I bring small Flags for each grave to our little Memorial Cemetery, each and every year to this day..


50 posted on 11/20/2012 8:32:19 PM PST by carlo3b (Less Government, more Fiber..)
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