Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower: The Vegetables That May Prevent Cancer
The Guardian (UK) ^ | 2-8-2006 | Ian Sample

Posted on 02/08/2006 3:16:55 PM PST by blam

Broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower: the vegetables that may prevent cancer

· Foods contain chemicals that help repair DNA
· Study backs link between diet and disease

Ian Sample, science correspondent
Wednesday February 8, 2006
The Guardian (UK)

Natural chemicals found in soya beans and vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower boost the body's ability to repair damaged DNA and may prevent cells turning cancerous, scientists said yesterday. Studies have suggested that eating vegetables appears to provide some protection against certain cancers, but until now the reason why has been a mystery.

Researchers at Georgetown University in Washington DC believe the answer lies with two naturally occurring compounds. The first, indole-3-carbinol or I3C is abundant in vegetables including broccoli and cabbage, while the second, genistein, occurs naturally in soya beans.

The researchers found that when the chemicals were added to cells they boosted the activity of two genes, known as BRCA1 and BRCA2, both of which play a crucial role in detecting damaged DNA and marshalling a cell's response to fix it. Mutations in either of these genes often lead to breast, ovarian and prostate cancer because they are unable to prevent damaged DNA being passed on to the next generation of cells.

Writing in the British Journal of Cancer, the researchers said that since very low levels of BRCA proteins are seen in cancerous cells, higher levels might prevent cancer developing.

"We know that one of the functions of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes is to maintain genomic integrity, and to do that, they first have to be able to detect DNA damage and signal to the cell that it is there, and then become involved in repairing it," said Eliot Rosen, the lead author of the study.

(Excerpt) Read more at guardian.co.uk ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: broccoli; cabbage; cancer; cauliflowerthe; diet; health; indole3carbinol; may; nutraceuticals; nutrition; prevent; supplements; that; vegetable
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-121 next last
You can also add collards and Brussels sprouts to the list. All five of these vegetables were derived from a wild cabbage plant in England.

I eat at least one serving of these vegatables daily. Today I had three.

1 posted on 02/08/2006 3:16:58 PM PST by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: blam

Wild kale, actually.


2 posted on 02/08/2006 3:18:10 PM PST by MeanWestTexan (Many at FR would respond to Christ "Darn right, I'll cast the first stone!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam

I guess I'll have to die of cancer then, as I can't stand eating any of them.


3 posted on 02/08/2006 3:20:08 PM PST by Monitor (Gun control isn't about guns; it's about control.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam


Neuman, " FOUL WEED ! "


4 posted on 02/08/2006 3:21:52 PM PST by Para-Ord.45
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam
Yuck, I hate all three.

I am not worried though, I am sure next years study to expose that they are in fact toxic.

5 posted on 02/08/2006 3:22:07 PM PST by usurper (Spelling or grammatical errors in this post can be attributed to the LA City School System)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam
Ah, yes. Reminds me of the inimitable Mark Twain's take on this issue:

"The best way to keep your health is to eat what you don't want, drink what you don't like, and do what you'd druther not."

Or, as a physician told a friend of mine decades ago, "If it tastes good, it's bad for you."

Sigh... Mine will be a short but happy life :0)

6 posted on 02/08/2006 3:25:36 PM PST by Mugwump
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam

Well then, pass the Bean-O.


7 posted on 02/08/2006 3:25:58 PM PST by muleskinner
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam

These are, I believe, the cruciferous vegetables.

As far as I'm concerened, delicous one and all...


8 posted on 02/08/2006 3:27:26 PM PST by Pessimist
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Monitor
" I can't stand eating any of them."

All right... trust me on this...

Blanch cut some Brussels sprouts in half, blanch them for just a few minutes in salted water, and then saute' them in butter till their cute ends are slightly browned.

The reason I say this is that so far it seems even people who don't like Brussels sprouts end up liking these..
9 posted on 02/08/2006 3:30:25 PM PST by Pessimist
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: usurper
"I am sure next years study to expose that they are in fact toxic."

Low-fat diet may not reduce cancer and heart risks

17:22 08 February 2006
NewScientist.com news service
Shaoni Bhattacharya

Eating a low-fat diet with plenty of fibre does not reduce the risk of certain cancers and heart disease in postmenopausal women, suggest three major new studies.

But many experts are unconvinced by the research, asserting there are weaknesses in its design, and stressing the many studies which back the importance of a low-fat, healthy diet in preventing cancer and cardiovascular disease.

The three related studies followed 50,000 women from the Women’s Health Initiative trial over 8 years. No statistically significant difference was seen in the rates of breast cancer, colorectal cancer or cardiovascular disease between women on a reduced fat diet – eating five portions of fruit and vegetables and six portions of grains each day – compared with those who made no dietary changes.

“Evidence from this study, along with that from polyp prevention trials, strongly suggests that lowering dietary fat intake and increasing fruit, vegetable and fibre intake in mid-to-late life cannot be expected to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer in this length of time,” writes one research team led by Shirley Beresford at the University of Washington, Seattle, US.

Too short

The breast cancer study did find a reduced risk with a low-fat, high fibre diet, but this finding was not statistically significant. Its authors say this suggests that if the diet was eaten for longer than eight years the reduction in risk could become significant.

The length of the study was one of the study features criticised by others. "Eight years of follow-up is too short a time to show an effect," Michael Fine, from Rhode Island Hospital, told ABC News. "Let's wait for 15 to 30 years of follow-up before we judge significance."

Other experts say that the amount of fat cut in the diet was not enough. "It is easy to identify a number of important reasons why this study did not agree with previous research,” Judy O'Sullivan at the British Heart Foundation told the BBC. The diet "didn't reflect current advice for good heart health, such as salt reduction, increasing intake of good fats such as those in oily fish, and increasing exercise".

O'Sullivan added: "Most of the women in the study were overweight or obese, which increases your risk of developing diabetes – another risk factor for heart disease."

Journal reference: Journal of the American Medical Association (vol 295, p 629, p 643, p 655)

10 posted on 02/08/2006 3:32:49 PM PST by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: blam

BUMP


11 posted on 02/08/2006 3:33:10 PM PST by nickcarraway (I'm Only Alive, Because a Judge Hasn't Ruled I Should Die...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam

Broccoli only today.


12 posted on 02/08/2006 3:33:53 PM PST by TASMANIANRED (The Internet is the samizdat of liberty..".Liberty is the right and hope of all humanity"GW Bush)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pessimist
The reason I say this is that so far it seems even people who don't like Brussels sprouts end up liking these.

You're really an optimist!

13 posted on 02/08/2006 3:33:56 PM PST by jigsaw (God Bless Our Troops.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: blam

Don't forget kale.


14 posted on 02/08/2006 3:33:59 PM PST by nickcarraway (I'm Only Alive, Because a Judge Hasn't Ruled I Should Die...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam

"Broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower".......I like them all,but I could fill a tanker truck with gas if I get anywhere near this stuff!!


15 posted on 02/08/2006 3:34:11 PM PST by Gator113
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam
The first, indole-3-carbinol or I3C is abundant in vegetables including broccoli and cabbage

Phytochemical: Indole-3-Carbinol

Synonyms: I3C, 3-hydroxymethyl indole, 3-indole methanol

Description: Pure indole-3-Carbinol is an off-white solid belonging to the group of indoles. Indole-3-carbinol is only formed in these vegetable after crushing or during cooking.

Distribution: The phytochemical indole-3-carbinol is found in cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, kale and brussels sprouts. Indole-3-carbinol is made from indole-3-glucosinolate by the enzyme myrosinase. This enzyme is only activated after maceration of the vegetables. Action of Indole-3-Carbinol: Indole-3-carbinol is a strong antioxidants and stimulators of detoxifying enzymes. Indole-3-Carbinol seems to protect the structure of DNA. Indole-3-carbinol blocks estrogen receptor sites on the membranes of breast and other cells, thereby reducing the risk of breast and cervical cancer.

Indole-3-carbinol increases the ratio of 2-hydroxyestrone to 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone and inhibits the 4-hydroxylation of estradiol. This is a favourable action of indole-3-carbinol because 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone and 4-hydroxyestrone have carcinogenic action. The estrogen metabolite 2-hydroxyestrone has protective against several types of cancer. Studies with animals have demonstrated that indole-3-carbinol reduced the carcinogenic affects of aflatoxins.

The influence of indole-3-carbinol on the development of prostate cancer is less clear. Most studies report protective effects but a few studies indicate that indole-3-carbinol may promote prostate cancer formation. Indol-3-carbinol protects against carcinogenic effect of pesticides and other toxins.

Publications: Preventive Effects of Indole-3-Carbinol on Endometrial Carcinogenesis in Mice

Synergy among Phytochemicals within Crucifers: Does It Translate into Chemoprotection?

16 posted on 02/08/2006 3:36:51 PM PST by Freebird Forever (Extremism in the defense of Liberty is no vice.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pessimist

I like brussel sprouts and your cooking method sounds yummy!


17 posted on 02/08/2006 3:40:06 PM PST by bonfire
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Gator113

You'll just be an OFFENSIVE old man :)


18 posted on 02/08/2006 3:40:54 PM PST by bonfire
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: blam

Not Fair!!!!!!! Why can't it be green beens, corn and mashed potatoes? Not fair that it has to be yukky stuff.


19 posted on 02/08/2006 3:43:02 PM PST by Turtleman (Very conservative IBEW member)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Monitor
I guess I'll have to die of cancer then, as I can't stand eating any of them.

I don't particularly like them either so what I do is dice them up raw into really small pieces and put either Italian dressing or cole slaw dressing on them. It's pretty tasty that way.

20 posted on 02/08/2006 3:44:09 PM PST by Lizavetta
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Gator113

>>I like them all,but I could fill a tanker truck with gas if I get anywhere near this stuff

I think we might have solved our foreign oil crisis then.

"More broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower please. No gas-x for me, I'm doing it for the children ..."


21 posted on 02/08/2006 3:48:01 PM PST by Betis70 (Brass Bonanza Forever)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Freebird Forever
while the second, genistein, occurs naturally in soya beans.

  Phytochemical: Genistein

Synonyms: 5, 7-dihydroxy-3- (4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one, 4', 5, 7-trihydroxyisoflavone

Description: Genistein is an isoflavone belonging to the group of flavonoids. Because of this similarity of the structure of genistein to that of estrogen genistein is also a phytoestrogens, together with daidzein. Genistein is the aglycone (without sugar component) of the glycoside genistin.

Distribution: The main source of genistein are soybeans. Other legumes, such as chickpeas, contain small amounts of genistein.

Action of Genistein: Genistein works on several fronts: it acts as a phytoestrogens and as an antioxidant.

The estrogenic activity of genistein has been confirmed in many studies. Of all the isoflavones, genistein has the strongest estrogenic activity.

Genistein is a strong antioxidant. Genistein removed damaging free radicals and reduces lipid peroxidation. Only oxidized LDL cholesterol is absorbed by the arterial cells. Prevention of the oxidation of LDL cholesterol will reduce the risk for arteriosclerosis. Gensistein prevents the formation of hearth attacks and strokes by acting as anticlotting agent. Genistein increases the activity of other antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase. Studies have shown that genistein can also influence the growth of cells which are not hormone-dependent. Genistein seems to inhibit the activity of tyrosine kinase, which plays an important role in cell growth. Reduction of tyrosine activity will result in a reduced cancer risk.

Genistein seems to reduce the risk for some hormone related cancers, principally breast cancer and prostate cancer. Epidemiological studies show that consumption of isoflavones may protect against breast and prostate cancer. High dietary intake of soy products China and Japan are linked with low incidence of these cancers. There are lots of theories to explain the anti-cancer action of genistein: inhibition of angiogenesis, inhibition of tyrosine kinases, antioxidant property, and anti-estrogen action (it is known that estrogen increases risk for certain cancers). Genistein binds with estrogen receptors, preventing the estrogen from binding and initiating cancer growth.

The estrogenic effect of genistein may also explain its protective action against osteoporosis.

Genistein is also used to ease menopause symptoms, such as hot flushes.

Facts about Genistein: The main source of genistein is the glucoside genistin. Before genistein can act it first needs to be released from genistin. This normally happens in the stomach (acid hydrolysis) and intestine (action of bacterial enzymes). Some genistein supplements contain genistein which has been hydrolysed in a chemical process.

Publications: Abstracts about Genistein

22 posted on 02/08/2006 3:48:09 PM PST by Freebird Forever (Extremism in the defense of Liberty is no vice.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: bonfire

"You'll just be an OFFENSIVE old man :)"


Some would argue that I already am. ;)


23 posted on 02/08/2006 3:49:24 PM PST by Gator113
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: blam

I hate brussels sprouts, cauliflower and kale are OK though.


24 posted on 02/08/2006 3:52:20 PM PST by darkangel82
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pessimist
Blanch cut some Brussels sprouts in half, blanch them for just a few minutes in salted water, and then saute' them in butter till their cute ends are slightly browned.

You left the last two steps off of the recipe:
Pour cooked sprouts into the dispos-all and order a pizza.

25 posted on 02/08/2006 3:52:27 PM PST by LexBaird ("I'm not questioning your patriotism, I'm answering your treason."--JennysCool)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: blam
These delicious veggies have gotten a bad rap because for years people cooked them to death, resulting in a mushy consistency, and an unpleasant odor.

Mr. Inspectorette and I love them all, and cook them by steaming for 6-7 minutes, then saute with olive oil and garlic. Great for Brussels sprouts too! Magnifico!

26 posted on 02/08/2006 3:54:12 PM PST by Inspectorette
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam

KAPUSTA PING!!


27 posted on 02/08/2006 3:54:32 PM PST by MomwithHope
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pessimist
Blanch cut some Brussels sprouts in half, blanch them for just a few minutes in salted water, and then saute' them in butter till their cute ends are slightly browned.

Ah-ha the key word here is butter! I agree, but then again I'm of the frame of mind you can put butter on a (insert word of choice here). and it'd probably taste wonderful.

28 posted on 02/08/2006 3:59:32 PM PST by mupcat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: blam

From this, one could conclude that breaking wind will prevent cancer. In particular, cabbage gives me the wind something fierce, and a foul wind it is.


29 posted on 02/08/2006 4:00:17 PM PST by IamConservative (Who does not trust a man of principle? A man who has none.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pessimist

Also, sprinkling a good amount of bread crumbs sauteed in butter on top of them (brussel sprouts) helps.


30 posted on 02/08/2006 4:03:13 PM PST by Revolting cat! ("In the end, nothing explains anything.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: usurper

Broccoli and cauliflower in small quantities, chopped up, add a lot to the taste of minestrone soup.


31 posted on 02/08/2006 4:12:27 PM PST by Steve_Seattle
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Steve_Seattle
Broccoli and cauliflower in small quantities, chopped up, add a lot to the taste of minestrone soup.

The only way I will eat them is if they are in tempura and I drink copious amounts of sake. That seems to take the edge off.

32 posted on 02/08/2006 4:38:08 PM PST by usurper (Spelling or grammatical errors in this post can be attributed to the LA City School System)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: MomwithHope

You must be Polish.Pierogi with kapusta...is there a better food in this world? I don't think so.


33 posted on 02/08/2006 5:40:31 PM PST by surrey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: surrey

yep, 1/2 polish 1/2 serbian. Kapusta is the best especially in the winter. My grandfather and dad made their own, I did a few times but it's easier to buy the bagged stuff. Ever have it fried with pork chops and onion?


34 posted on 02/08/2006 6:12:30 PM PST by MomwithHope
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: blam
I eat at least one serving of these vegatables daily. Today I had three.

Talk about greenhouse gasses!

35 posted on 02/08/2006 7:42:02 PM PST by Mike Darancette (Condimaniac)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam

Bump for later.


36 posted on 02/08/2006 7:45:52 PM PST by jamaly (I evacuate early and often!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam

Not to be eaten if you are on coumadin.


37 posted on 02/08/2006 7:47:45 PM PST by FOG724 (http://nationalgrange.org/legislation/phpBB2/index.php)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam
Supposedly the South Beach Diet has a cauliflower dish that tastes like mashed potatoes.
38 posted on 02/08/2006 7:49:07 PM PST by ladyjane
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam

Mmmmm, broccoli . . . with butter and something from the spice rack, maybe a little lemon pepper or basil . . . or cheese . . .


39 posted on 02/08/2006 7:49:58 PM PST by Xenalyte (Can you count, suckas? I say the future is ours . . . if you can count.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pessimist

Ditto what I just said for Brussels sprouts. Butter those bad boys and pass 'em my way!


40 posted on 02/08/2006 7:50:38 PM PST by Xenalyte (Can you count, suckas? I say the future is ours . . . if you can count.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: blam

And I bet "blam" is a good description of the effect on your digestive tract.....(;-)


41 posted on 02/08/2006 7:53:01 PM PST by Kozak (Anti Shahada: " There is no God named Allah, and Muhammed is his False Prophet")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: neverdem

ping


42 posted on 02/08/2006 7:54:10 PM PST by technochick99 (Firearm of choice: Sig Sauer....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Monitor

LOL, my sister insisted that we start juicing carrots and the juice tastes great. One morning I was listening to the news and they reported about the broccoli and I got the great idea of juicing it. OMG! It tasted awful and I said basically the same thing.


43 posted on 02/08/2006 7:57:09 PM PST by tiki
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: blam

None of you have ever had an egg roll? I've never seen one that wasn't stuffed with cabbage.

And if you take sauerkraut on your hot dog, you have just had another serving of cabbage.


44 posted on 02/08/2006 7:58:35 PM PST by denydenydeny ("Osama... made the mistake of confusing media conventional wisdom with reality" (Mark Steyn))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam
You can also add collards and Brussels sprouts to the list. All five of these vegetables were derived from a wild cabbage plant in England.

I've been lovin' broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, collards and Brussels sprouts since I was a kid. Like 'em raw, boiled or sauteed. Have eaten more than my share of each, eat 'em all the time.

Damn near died of cancer in '89...

Go figger...

45 posted on 02/08/2006 7:58:40 PM PST by okie01 (The Mainstream Media: IGNORANCE ON PARADE)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Xenalyte
Mmmmm, broccoli . . . with butter and something from the spice rack, maybe a little lemon pepper or basil . . . or cheese . . .

... with fresh lemon juice and lemon pepper ... butter optional ... mmmmmm.
46 posted on 02/08/2006 8:04:00 PM PST by maggief (and the dessert cart rolls on ...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: ladyjane

Tastes like mashed cauliflower ... but still good.


47 posted on 02/08/2006 8:05:45 PM PST by maggief (and the dessert cart rolls on ...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: ladyjane

http://sidedish.allrecipes.com/az/SrprisSthBchMshdPtts.asp


48 posted on 02/08/2006 8:05:50 PM PST by Ladysmith ((NRA, SAS))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: blam
Broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower...

Anything about methane poisoning?

49 posted on 02/08/2006 8:06:12 PM PST by F16Fighter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: F16Fighter

We have a Boston terrier who takes care of that for us.


50 posted on 02/08/2006 8:11:35 PM PST by Xenalyte (Can you count, suckas? I say the future is ours . . . if you can count.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-121 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson