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Keyword: wwii

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  • Silly WWII Analogy...but Fun!

    11/26/2014 2:12:54 AM PST · by marktwain · 6 replies
    Gun Watch ^ | 24 November, 2014 | Dean Weingarten
    On freerepublic, people were discussing the recent legal victory, where a federal judge ruled that people who already had guns had no reason to wait through a 10 day California waiting period.  The law was first passed in 1923.  He ruled that the law infringed on second amendment rights.  The KG9 Kid wrote, from freerepublic.com: I'm sorry, but I read of these little 'victories' by the CalGuns Foundation in their thoroughly anti-gun state and cannot help but compare them to some WWII Japanese radio broadcast that exclaims that the Imperial Japanese Navy now has now deployed the first rocket-powered...
  • The Great October: A Revolution Financed By an Enemy Government

    Can it be true that Vladimir Lenin, the alleged “leader of the world Proletariat,” whose monuments adorned central squares in every Soviet town and who inspired generations of Soviet citizens, had been a mere agent provocateur working for the German government? In The World Crisis, Volume 5, Winston Churchill writes this about war-time Germany in 1917: “They turned upon Russia the most grisly of all weapons. They transported Lenin in a sealed truck like a plague bacillus from Switzerland into Russia.” The rest is history: Lenin staged a coup and withdrew Russia from World War One, conceding large swaths of...
  • How Paperbacks Helped the U.S. Win World War II

    11/21/2014 12:09:56 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    The Wall Street Journal ^ | November 20, 2014 | Jennifer Maloney
    Molly Guptill Manning, with her collection of Armed Services Edition books, discovered that soldiers liked nostalgic books and those with sex scenes. Armed Services Editions created a new audience of readers back home. A decade after the Nazis’ 1933 book burnings, the U.S. War Department and the publishing industry did the opposite, printing 120 million miniature, lightweight paperbacks for U.S. troops to carry in their pockets across Europe, North Africa and the Pacific. The books were Armed Services Editions, printed by a coalition of publishers with funding from the government and shipped by the Army and Navy. The largest of...
  • Patriotism Means Uncovering the Truth

    11/14/2014 5:15:16 PM PST · by Enza Ferreri · 7 replies
    Enza Ferreri Blog ^ | 15 November 2014 | Enza Ferreri
    Unfortunately I'll have to skip tomorrow's London Forum meeting. But I wish to write about the topic of one of the announced speeches, by Richard Edmonds: "Bad Nenndorf – a Nuremberg Trial for Allied War Criminals". The subject is described as "the tragedy of Bad Nenndorf where in the aftermath of WWII British torturers, many of them later emigrating to Israel, killed dozens of National Socialist sympathisers including girls belonging to the BDSM." Richard Edmonds is a British nationalist who is capable of criticising his country when necessary, who rightly doesn't believe that patriotism means defending the indefensible. I'd never...
  • WWII Vet, 98, dons uniform for final salute before dying the next day

    11/14/2014 1:34:46 PM PST · by DFG · 45 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 11/14/14 | AP
    On Veterans Day, Justus Belfield donned his Army uniform one more time, even though he was too weak to leave his bed at an upstate New York nursing home. The 98-year-old World War II veteran died the next day. The Daily Gazette of Schenectady reports that Belfield had worn his uniform every Veterans Day since he and his wife moved into Baptist Health Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Glenville, outside Albany, several years ago. On Tuesday, the former master sergeant wasn't able to get out of bed to participate in the facility's Veterans Day festivities, so he had the staff...
  • Veterens Day - WWII Bugs Bunny Cartoon dissing Axis

    11/11/2014 6:09:47 PM PST · by central_va · 18 replies
    Toon Tube ^ | 1943 | Warner Bros
    Rare Bugs Bunny Featuring Hitler.
  • The Magnificent Infantry of WW II

    11/11/2014 6:04:22 PM PST · by Retain Mike · 13 replies
    November 11, 2014 | Self
    The Army deployed 65 infantry divisions for the Second World War. Each was a small town with its own equivalents for community services plus eight categories of combat arms. Units such as artillery, engineering, and heavy weapons engaged the enemy directly. Yet of all categories, the foot soldier faced the greatest hazard with the least chance of reward. Except for the Purple Heart and the coveted Combat Infantryman’s Badge, recognition often eluded them because so few came through to testify to the valor of the many. The infantryman confronted the most dismal fate of all whose duty was uninterrupted by...
  • Last original WWII Navajo Code Talker, a Marine, dies on the birthday of the Corps

    11/11/2014 11:45:07 AM PST · by NYer · 23 replies
    WDTPRS ^ | November 11, 2014 | Fr. John Zuhlsdorf
    The last Navajo Code Talker, Chester Nez, USMC died on 10 November 2014, the 239th birthday of the Corps. They played a vital role during WWII.From Source Marine veteran Michael Smith wept Wednesday when he heard about the death of Chester Nez, the last of the original Navajo Code Talkers.Smith, from Window Rock, who had met Nez several times, described him as a “quiet, humble” Navajo Marine.Smith said that the passing of Nez — the last of the first 29 Navajo men who created a code from their language that stumped the Japanese in World War II — marked the...
  • The Magnificent Infantry of WW II

    11/11/2014 10:01:49 AM PST · by Retain Mike · 8 replies
    Self | November 11, 2014 | Self
    The Army deployed 65 infantry divisions for the Second World War. Each was a small town with its own equivalents for community services plus eight categories of combat arms. Units such as artillery, engineering, and heavy weapons engaged the enemy directly. Yet of all categories, the foot soldier faced the greatest hazard with the least chance of reward. Except for the Purple Heart and the coveted Combat Infantryman’s Badge, recognition often eluded them because so few came through to testify to the valor of the many. The infantryman confronted the most dismal fate of all whose duty was uninterrupted by...
  • The Magnificent Infantry of WW II

    11/10/2014 5:05:50 PM PST · by Retain Mike · 15 replies
    Self | November 10, 2014 | Self
    The Army deployed 65 infantry divisions for the Second World War. Each was a small town with its own equivalents for community services plus eight categories of combat arms. Units such as artillery, engineering, and heavy weapons engaged the enemy directly. Yet of all categories, the foot soldier faced the greatest hazard with the least chance of reward. Except for the Purple Heart and the coveted Combat Infantryman’s Badge, recognition often eluded them because so few came through to testify to the valor of the many. The infantryman confronted the most dismal fate of all whose duty was uninterrupted by...
  • The Magnificent Infantry of WW II

    11/10/2014 12:11:02 PM PST · by Retain Mike · 27 replies
    Self | November 10, 2014 | Self
    The Army deployed 65 infantry divisions for the Second World War. Each was a small town with its own equivalents for community services plus eight categories of combat arms. Units such as artillery, engineering, and heavy weapons engaged the enemy directly. Yet of all categories, the foot soldier faced the greatest hazard with the least chance of reward. Except for the Purple Heart and the coveted Combat Infantryman’s Badge, recognition often eluded them because so few came through to testify to the valor of the many. The infantryman confronted the most dismal fate of all whose duty was uninterrupted by...
  • Hitler's GI Death Camp (Excellent 45 minute video via You Tube)

    11/08/2014 1:56:55 PM PST · by beaversmom · 73 replies
    Nat Geo via You Tube ^ | January 2, 2014 | World History
    Hitler's GI Death Camp I came across this video on NetFlix a few weeks back. Shortly after, I then found someone had uploaded it to You Tube. I watched it for a third time last night with my mom on my little phone. I think it's well done and very emotional. Amazing what these men went through and survived. I have so much respect for these men. On the You Tube thread, one of the posters said that her father, Norman Fellman, who was one of the GI's featured in the documentary, passed away just this past August. God bless...
  • SGT. MIKE MCKOOL, American WWII Halyard Mission veteran, testifies before Commission of Inquiry

    11/07/2014 4:57:30 PM PST · by Ravnagora · 3 replies
    www.generalmihailovich.com ^ | Nov. 7, 2014 | Mike McKool / Aleksandra Rebic
    SGT. MIKE MCKOOL, rescued American WWII Halyard Mission Airman, testifies before Commission of Inquiry regarding "Fair Trial for General Mihailovich" May 1946 New YorkAleksandra's Note: On May 13, 1946, the Committee for a Fair Trial for General Mihailovich announced that a "Commission of Inquiry" had been established in New York for the purpose of taking the testimonies of American officers and airmen whose request to be heard as witnesses at the trial of General Draza Mihailovich in Belgrade, Yugoslavia had been refused by the Tito government. The following is the testimony of Sergeant Mike McKool from Dallas, Texas, one of...
  • Fury: The Mother of all Tank Movies

    11/03/2014 9:53:07 AM PST · by w1n1 · 71 replies
    wsj ^ | 10/2014 | Frank Jardim
    Fury: The Mother of all Tank Movies starring Brad Pitt, no I'm not a fan of his, but did enjoyed the movie. The authenticity of the tanks was the real thing, Sherman's and the German Tiger I. Pitt's character is a bit reminiscent of the role he played as a soldier in Inglorious Basterds, which also took place during WWII. He takes his five-man crew behind enemy lines, where they are outnumbered and outgunned. FURY is the first war film to feature a real life German Tiger I tank which actually came out of a museum collection. Tigers were the...
  • Tall Tale [That's True] Rare warbirds to depart Edwards Ranch

    10/29/2014 2:18:36 PM PDT · by SZonian · 23 replies
    Hang around aircraft restorers and you’ll inevitably hear tales of priceless historical relics hidden in barns, buried in shrink wrap, or otherwise stuck in time awaiting discovery. These stories are almost always wild exaggerations or outright fiction. But if you’ve ever heard of the cache of iconic warbirds at Wilson Connell “Connie” Edwards’ west Texas ranch, it’s absolutely real. The irascible former movie pilot who made a fortune in the oil business has added to his vast inventory of mostly World War II-era fighters, seaplanes, and surplus parts for more than a half century. Now, he’s decided to sell many...
  • WWII ‘Battle of the Atlantic’ Shipwrecks Discovered Off North Carolina

    10/28/2014 6:00:24 AM PDT · by artichokegrower · 15 replies
    gCaptain ^ | October 21, 2014
    A team of researchers led by NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered two significant shipwrecks from World War II’s legendary “Battle of the Atlantic” just off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. The German U-boat 576 and the freighter it sank, named Bluefields, were found just a few hundred yards apart from each other approximately 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina, according to NOAA.
  • Recovered Bay Area WWII airman’s remains to be buried (remains found in Germany)

    10/26/2014 10:33:05 AM PDT · by Fenhalls555 · 3 replies
    SFGate ^ | Sunday, October 19, 2014 | Kurtis Alexander
    A tidy English Tudor there had once been occupied by William “Billy” Parker Cook after he graduated from UC Berkeley and got married. That was before he set off to fight in World War II, and before the mission — on Dec. 23, 1944 — that ended with him and five crew mates shot down over Germany. The Allied forces never recovered the bomber or the crew, and so the Alameda home was a touchstone. “This man perished before I was born,” said Bruce Cook, 62, of Newport Beach (Orange County), whose middle name, William Parker, comes from his uncle....
  • Wings, Women, and War: Soviet Airwomen in World War II Combat

    10/25/2014 6:43:41 AM PDT · by wetphoenix · 12 replies
    Dr. Reina Pennington, Associate Professor of History Norwich University. The Soviet Union was the first nation to allow women pilots to fly combat missions. During World War II the Red Air Force formed three all-female units--grouped into separate fighter, dive bomber, and night bomber regiments--while also recruiting other women to fly with mostly male units. Their amazing story, fully recounted for the first time by Reina Pennington, honors a group of fearless and determined women whose exploits have not yet received the recognition they deserve. Pennington chronicles the creation, organization, and leadership of these regiments, as well as the experiences...
  • Massacre at Kragujevac [Nazi executions of Serbs in occupied Serbia]

    10/24/2014 3:10:54 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 5 replies
    www.berengarten.com ^ | Unknown | Richard Burns
    Between October 19th and 21st 1941, the most infamous Nazi massacre in Serbia during the Second World War took place at Šumarice, just outside the town of Kragujevac, and in local villages. The event had a marked effect on the course of the war in the Balkans. The Nazis decreed that 100 people should be shot for every German killed, and 50 for every German wounded. One of the most shocking aspects of the massacre was that more than 200 pupils from local schools were taken out of their classes and shot. There are several stories of extraordinary individual sacrifice...
  • SOCCER TIFOS FROM AROUND THE WORLD (Awesome ones commemorating Operation Market Garden)

    10/24/2014 9:03:57 AM PDT · by C19fan
    SI ^ | October 23, 2014 | Staff
    Here are some of the best fan banners and displays from around the world.
  • Car smashes Ten Commandments monument outside Capitol building

    10/24/2014 9:10:35 AM PDT · by GIdget2004 · 41 replies
    NewsOK.com ^ | 10/24/2014 | Staff
    Someone drove a car up on the lawn of the state Capitol building Thursday night and smashed into a controversial Ten Commandments monument, breaking the stone slab into several pieces, state officials said. The person who did it fled and has not been found, Oklahoma Highway Patrol spokesman George Brown said Friday. This wasn’t a case of a car taking a wrong turn, but a purposeful act, said John Estus, spokesman for the Oklahoma Office of Management and Enterprise Services. Whoever did it repositioned some ramp equipment that happened to be outside the building and used it to get access...
  • Anyone else seen Fury?

    10/16/2014 10:06:27 PM PDT · by 31R1O · 103 replies
    Has anyone else seen Fury? I just got back and it wasn't a bad movie at all. The character building scenes are a bit clumsy at times but the combat bits were top notch. It wasn't Blackhawk Down or Saving Private Ryan intense but there were tense moments. I recommend it.
  • David Greenglass, Spy Who Helped Seal the Rosenbergs’ Doom, Dies at 92

    10/14/2014 1:00:39 PM PDT · by Borges · 21 replies
    NYT ^ | 10/14/2014 | ROBERT D. McFADDEN
    It was the most notorious spy case of the Cold War — the conviction and execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg for passing atomic secrets to the Soviet Union — and it rested largely on the testimony of Ms. Rosenberg’s brother, David Greenglass, an Army sergeant who had stolen nuclear intelligence from Los Alamos, N.M. For his role in the conspiracy, Mr. Greenglass went to prison for almost a decade, then changed his name and lived quietly until a journalist tracked him down. He admitted then, nearly a half-century later, that he had lied on the witness stand to save...
  • The End of an Era that Ended Long Ago: Maria Von Trapp, RIP

    10/09/2014 3:46:52 AM PDT · by rhema · 19 replies
    MovieGuide.org ^ | Sept. 2014 | Jerry Newcombe
    Earlier this year, an event happened that did not receive wide notice. The last of the Von Trapp Family Singers, the last of the children—the real ones—died. Her name was Maria—not to be confused with the lady played by Julie Andrews, Maria Augusta Trapp, who died in 1987. Maria Von Trapp’s death in February 2014 marks the end of an era. The Sound of Music deserves its accolades as the Movie of the Year (1965) and one of the finest films ever made. Even my one-year-old granddaughter is mesmerized by the puppet scene. As a film it is an icon....
  • The evolution of the Ilyushin Il-2

    10/07/2014 10:59:14 AM PDT · by sukhoi-30mki · 4 replies
    Russia & India Report ^ | October 7, 2014 | Vadim Matveyev
    Designers competing to create an aircraft that could directly support troops on the battlefield were hampered by the weight of the ‘flying tank’, low air speed and flimsy protection. The Il-2 was the answer to these challenges. One of the key lessons of the First World War was that the airplane had a crucial role to play in effective military campaigns in the new era. With this in mind, in the 1920s and 1930s Europe’s leading nations expended significant efforts and resources on developing new aircraft that could be used to provide support for infantry and tanks. The Soviet Union...
  • A Bridge Too Far +70: An Airborne Vet Remembers (Video)

    10/05/2014 7:09:52 PM PDT · by Abakumov · 21 replies
    Radix News ^ | October 5, 2014 | 86th Airlift Wing
    Mario Patruno, a 93 year old World War Two veteran, formerly of the 101st Airborne Division, is featured in this documentary on Operation Market Garden. The short film, produced by the USAF 86th Airlift Wing at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, mixes rarely seen documentary footage with contemporary coverage of the 70th anniversary celebration and jump recreation by combined U.S. and Dutch airborne troops. Private Patruno jumped at Normandy and Eindhoven with the 101st, and was wounded in both operations. He fought in house to house battles with Nazi troops, and was shot in the face, but survived to tell his...
  • World War II vet, 93, visits Russia to thank soldiers who saved him

    09/29/2014 2:49:58 AM PDT · by wetphoenix · 49 replies
    Leroy Williamson, 93, has seen relations between the United States and Russia during good times and bad, and has some advice for the countries: "We have to get along," he told ABC News. "We don't need a patriotic war or a World War III." The Texan was in Russia this week to share his appreciation for the Soviet soldiers who liberated his Nazi prisoner-of-war camp on May 1, 1945. He met with a Russian general for lunch, visited with veterans, and placed a wreath at Moscow's memorial to the Great Patriotic War, as World War II is known in the...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon

    09/28/2014 12:07:57 PM PDT · by ReformationFan · 5 replies
    Internet Archive ^ | 1942 | Leo McCarey
  • Engineers found Teutonic axes in the Forest District Wipsowo

    09/21/2014 12:27:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | September 2014 | tr. RL
    Three Teutonic battle axes from the late Middle Ages have been found by engineers who remove World War II artillery shells left the forests in the Forest District Wipsowo (Warmia and Mazury). Historic weapons will be donated to the museum. Engineers stumbled upon the historic axes by chance, while searching the woods metal detectors. The weapons have been initially identified by an archaeologist as late-medieval Teutonic battle axes. Iron axes were close to each other, shallow underground, among the roots of trees. "It can be assumed that this is a deposit that someone left for better times. Perhaps the person...
  • Gas chambers at Sobibor death camp uncovered in archaeological dig

    09/17/2014 8:28:39 AM PDT · by DTA · 8 replies
    Gas chambers at Sobibor death camp uncovered in archaeological dig Some 250,000 Jews murdered at camp in Poland which Nazis bulldozed and covered up with trees to conceal their crimes; personal effects of victims, including wedding rings found near gas chambers. An archaeological dig in Poland has revealed the location of the gas chambers at the Sobibor death camp, Yad Vashem announced on Wednesday. Some 250,000 Jews were murdered at Sobibor, but on October 14, 1943, about 600 prisoners revolted and briefly escaped. Between 100 and 120 prisoners survived the revolt, and 60 of those survived the war. After the...
  • PBS is running a Ken Burns documentary on “The Roosevelts.” Here’s what he won’t show

    09/15/2014 11:42:18 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 83 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 9/15/14 | Kevin "Coach" Collins
    Ken Burns is at it again. The Left’s favorite propagandist has put together a 7 part series on the two Roosevelt presidents. Leaving aside what he is likely to show about Teddy Roosevelt, without seeing a minute of this presentation I’ll go out on a short strong limb and guess what will not be shown about Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Even a very superficial study of FDR shows he was a consummate phony. He preached “There is nothing to fear but fear itself,” but everything he did was presented as a fearful crisis that could only be handled by giving him...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "5 Fingers"(1952)

    09/14/2014 11:21:08 AM PDT · by ReformationFan · 11 replies
    You Tube ^ | 1952 | Joseph L Mankiewicz
  • Principalities and Powers: Spiritual Combat 1942-1943 (Fr. George Rutler)

    09/14/2014 5:27:47 AM PDT · by NYer · 6 replies
    Mercatornet ^ | September 12, 2014 | Francis Phillips |
    Fr Rutler, a parish priest in Manhattan, New York and a well-known essayist, has taken his title from the famous quotation in St Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians. This is in part because of he wishes to show the larger forces at work during WWII and also because an old friend and fellow priest had bequeathed to him a pile of newspapers, journals and radio transcripts for this particular year. Growing up after the war, Rutler sees his book as “a feeble act of thanks from my generation” for the previous one that had endured so many sacrifices on behalf...
  • 75 years ago today - World War II

    09/01/2014 1:18:01 PM PDT · by nesnah · 9 replies
    On this day, 75 years ago, World War II began. It was started by some European megalomaniac who was trying to regain some of the land areas that his country had previously lost, but he felt those lands should be part of his country permanently again. And, we have James Earl Obama and Neville Kerry in charge of foreign affairs. Food for thought....
  • FL: 89-Year-Old Wins Gunfight with Career Criminal

    08/28/2014 2:18:30 PM PDT · by marktwain · 35 replies
    Gun Watch ^ | 28 August, 2014 | Dean Weingarten
    A decorated WWII veteran, who never fired a shot while overseas, won a battle with a robber half his age on Saturday.   The hand to hand combat lasted until Arthur M. Lewis and the robber were both exhausted.   Lewis had shot the robber six times, four times in the chest, once in the arm and once in the wrist and leg.  Lewis himself was wounded with a graze to his left arm. Lewis' girlfriend says that people think of him as frail, but he is anything but frail. The alleged robber, Lennard Patrick Jervis, has been arrested...
  • Onward Christian Soliders? Not Likely

    08/27/2014 2:36:58 PM PDT · by NYer · 12 replies
    Standing on my head ^ | August 27, 2014 | Fr. Dwight Longenecker
    George Tate George Tate was in the US Army in World War II. He served in a unit that was establishing communication lines across the Himalayas.George’s son, Sid is a parishioner, he said about his Dad, “His plane was riddled with enemy gunfire going in, and as I understand it his job was conducted in an active combat zone. He received the Bronze Star, which was the military’s 4th highest award: Awarded to ‘any person whom while serving in with the United States military after 6 December 1941, that distinguished himself or herself apart from his or her comrades...
  • Wreck Of World War II-Era U.S. Ship Dubbed 'Galloping Ghost' Is Found

    08/19/2014 3:21:06 PM PDT · by Theoria · 16 replies
    NPR ^ | 19 Aug 2014 | Krishnadev Calamur
    The USS Houston sank during World War II after being hit by the Japanese, killing 700 sailors and Marines. Now, more than 70 years later, U.S. and Indonesian divers have confirmed that a sunken vessel in the Java Sea was the wreck of the ship dubbed "The Galloping Ghost of the Java Coast."The Houston was carrying 1,068 crewmen when it was hit on Feb. 28, 1942, during the Battle of Sunda Strait. Only 291 sailors and Marines survived the sinking and their later use as slave labor by the Japanese. The vessel's commanding officer, Capt. Albert H. Rooks, was posthumously...
  • Dropping Atomic Bombs on Japan Was Imperative

    08/14/2014 8:21:40 PM PDT · by Retain Mike · 25 replies
    Self | August 14, 2014 | Self
    We now mark the 69th anniversary of VJ-Day preceded by dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end WW II. The generations which made the decisions for World War II have passed away. The generation which faced the tragic violence required for carrying out those decisions is rapidly leaving us. As this personal knowledge becomes ever rarer, we must increasingly listen without response to revisionist contra-factual analyses expounding about what a needless, tragic and profoundly immoral decision the United States had made. The arguments advanced display a pleasing, deliberate ignorance which burnishes this peculiar new morality. However, these views...
  • WWII Vet, 89, Bids Tearful Goodbye to 3-Year-Old Best Friend

    08/13/2014 8:41:53 AM PDT · by stevie_d_64 · 7 replies
    GMA ^ | August 12, 2014 | YAZHOU SUN
    A World War II veteran cried today as he said good-bye to his buddy - a 3-year-old boy who became his pal, but is moving away with this family. “It’s going to be tough,” Erling Kindem, 89, said between tears while speaking to ABC News today. Kindem's friendship with his next door neighbor Emmett Rychner, 3, in Farmington, Minnesota, became a heartwarming story that went viral. But the boy is moving today to Northfield, Minnesota, and the veteran is moving with his ailing wife to a retirement center next month.
  • Hiroshima's Lessons for the War on Terror

    08/12/2014 5:22:25 AM PDT · by Bigg Red · 12 replies
    Sultan Knish blog ^ | August 10, 2014 | Daniel Greenfield
    In the summer of '45, the United States concluded a war that had come to be seen by some as unwinnable after the carnage at Iwo Jima with a bang. ~~snip~~ The two bombs stand in stark contrast to our endless nation-building exercises in which nothing is ever finished until we give up. Instead Truman cut the Gordian Knot and avoided a long campaign that would have depopulated Japan and destroyed the lives of a generation of American soldiers.
  • Marking 70th Anniversary of WWII Halyard Mission Rescue with Lt. Col. Milton Friend (USAF,Ret.)

    08/11/2014 3:06:37 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 7 replies
    www.generalmihailovich.com ^ | August 10, 2014 | Lt. Col. Milton Friend (USAF, Ret,) / Aleksandra Rebic
    Aleksandra's Note: ...Lt. Col. Milton Friend of the USAF, a Halyard Mission veteran that I met in person in Chicago in 1994 for the 50th anniversary celebration of the Halyard Mission Rescue Operation, got in touch with me in 2009. I had wondered if he was still living. Indeed he was, and he had a story to tell. When I searched for him on the internet, I discovered that he was not featured anywhere that I could find. I told him that his story needs to be made public and be given wide exposure, and it is my absolute pleasure...
  • Why was the Zollverein Coal Mine, in Germany NOT bombed by the Allies during WWII?

    08/10/2014 12:50:30 PM PDT · by not2be4gotten.com · 48 replies
    Today
    I have lived near by, for the last 2 weeks: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zollverein_Coal_Mine_Industrial_Complex This is an extraordinary museum, that you need to visit, one of the best in Europe, IMHO. The Zollverein Coal Mine Industrial Complex (German Zeche Zollverein) is a large former industrial site in the city of Essen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Zollverein survived the Second World War with only minor damages and by 1953 again placed on top of all German mines with an output of 2.4 million tons. Why was this extraordinary place not bombed out out of existence during WW2? From coal to coke to pig iron to...
  • Britain's oldest WWII prisoner of war dies just days after his 100th birthday

    08/10/2014 10:46:14 AM PDT · by DFG · 7 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 08/10/2014 | Steph Cockroft
    The man believed to be Britain's oldest surviving prisoner of war, who was held captive at the camp immortalized in The Great Escape, has died five days after turning 100. Sergeant Reginald Drake was one of the few remaining British survivors of the infamous Stalag Luft III camp in Zagan, Poland, where 76 men attempted to escape to their freedom in 1944. The airman was based there for 11 months, during the four years he was held captive by Germans during the Second World War. Sgt Drake was captured in August 1941, after his bomber was shot down and crash-landed...
  • Dropping Atomic Bombs on Japan Was Imperative

    08/09/2014 6:48:04 PM PDT · by Retain Mike · 21 replies
    Self | August 9, 2014 | Self
    We now mark the 69th anniversary of dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end WW II. The generations which made the decisions for World War II have passed away. The generation which faced the tragic violence required for carrying out those decisions is rapidly leaving us. As this personal knowledge becomes ever rarer, we must increasingly listen without response to revisionist contra-factual analyses expounding about what a needless, tragic and profoundly immoral decision the United States had made. The arguments advanced display a pleasing, deliberate ignorance which burnishes this peculiar new morality. However, these views can be countered...
  • Dropping Atomic Bombs on Japan Was Imperative

    08/06/2014 8:24:20 AM PDT · by Retain Mike · 63 replies
    Self | August 6, 2014 | Self
    We now mark the 69th anniversary of dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end WW II. The generations which made the decisions for World War II have passed away. The generation which faced the tragic violence required for carrying out those decisions is rapidly leaving us. As this personal knowledge becomes ever rarer, we must increasingly listen without response to revisionist contra-factual analyses expounding about what a needless, tragic and profoundly immoral decision the United States had made. The arguments advanced display a pleasing, deliberate ignorance which burnishes this peculiar new morality. However, these views can be countered...
  • Japanese War Criminal Confession Reveals Murder of 13 Chinese

    08/04/2014 2:03:17 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 27 replies
    Global Times ^ | 2014-8-4
    Japanese World War II officer Shigeta Kage's written confession, published on Monday, reveals the murder of at least 13 Chinese. According to the original document, available on the State Archives Administration (SAA) website, the Japanese garrison army killed at least five anti-Japanese armed guerrilla soldiers and staff in Liuhe County in May 1937. Kage admitted to killing one of them with a Japanese sword himself, according to the document. The criminal recalled that the Japanese army forced some 6,500 households in Liuhe to move out of their houses to create depopulated zones starting July 1936. During that period, Kage killed...
  • USS Indianapolis sunk on July 30, 1945. Newly revealed photos from the ship being digitized.

    07/30/2014 10:09:37 AM PDT · by Saint X · 45 replies
    U.S. Naval Institute ^ | July 30, 2014 | U.S. Naval Institute
    In the closing days of World War II, torpedoes from a Japanese submarine slammed into the side of USS Indianapolis and doomed the heavy cruiser. The sailors who didn’t drown were left adrift on the open ocean for four days during which they battled the elements, starvation and shark attacks. Fewer than 320 from the ship’s original crew of 1,196 survived.
  • Last surviving Enola Gay crewman dies in Stone Mountain

    07/29/2014 3:47:56 PM PDT · by iowamark · 41 replies
    Atlanta Journal-Constitution ^ | 7/29/2014 | Mike Morris and Steve Visser
    The last surviving crewman of the Enola Gay, the B-29 that dropped the atomic bomb over Hiroshima, died overnight at his Stone Mountain home. Theodore “Dutch” Van Kirk, 93, was the navigator on the Aug. 6, 1945 flight that dropped the “Little Boy” atomic bomb. With the 2010 death of Morris Jeppson, Van Kirk became the only one of the dozen crew members left. For a number of years, he lived at a retirement community in Stone Mountain where by chance he found himself sharing the place with James Starnes, an Atlantan who had a front-row seat at history. Starnes...
  • Why Didn't Anyone Kill Hitler?

    07/20/2014 10:25:50 AM PDT · by WXRGina · 98 replies
    History News Network ^ | July 19, 2014 | Daniel Mandel
    This week marks the 70th anniversary of a plot whose success might well have spared millions of lives, while claiming that of history’s most infamous mass-murderer, Adolf Hitler. The elaborate conspiracy centered on Claus von Stauffenberg was the most well-prepared and organized attempt to put an end to Hitler, but it was scarcely the first. The number of serious attempts on Hitler’s life would fill a book and indeed have; Roger Moorhouse’s Killing Hitler (2006), for example, covers the ground of several such attempts from the moment Hitler came to power in 1933, at which time his security detail...
  • WWII photographic database

    07/15/2014 6:33:56 AM PDT · by School of Rational Thought · 11 replies
    vanity
    looking for photographic collections of wwII and wwI There have been some good ones posted in the past, but my bookmarks have all been lost with computer crashes. Sorry for the personal use of the forum.