Keyword: wwii

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  • We Could Not Have a General Patton Today

    12/20/2014 8:30:06 AM PST · by Davy Buck · 33 replies
    Old Virginia Blog ^ | 12/20/2014 | Richard G. Williams, Jr.
    "Patton's familial ties to Confederate veterans is quite fascinating (Chapter One is titled, "Ghosts of the Confederacy") and had a significant impact on his view of history, as well as his role it it. (An extremely important and influential factor, despite what some think.) Patton's great-grandmother once wrote, "I am crying because I have only seven sons left to fight the Yankees."
  • The Unbreakable Laura Hillenbrand

    12/18/2014 7:04:32 PM PST · by Seizethecarp · 21 replies
    New York Times ^ | December 18, 2014 | WIL S. HYLTON
    ...Bill Darron drove down the alley behind Laura Hillenbrand’s house (with) a Norden bombsight. Since 1987, Hillenbrand has been sick with chronic fatigue syndrome, which has mostly confined her indoors for the last quarter century. When she explained this to Darron, he agreed to bring the Norden from New Jersey on his next visit to Washington. Now, as he made the final calibrations, Hillenbrand returned to the room, and he offered her a brief tutorial. He showed her how to position herself above the monocular eyepiece, guide the cross hairs toward a target on the map, then lock the sight...
  • In 1944 Battle of the Bulge, Albert Darago, then 19, took on a German tank by himself

    12/16/2014 10:26:37 AM PST · by Berlin_Freeper · 24 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | December 15, 2014 | Michael E. Ruane
    Albert Darago had never fired a bazooka before. He was an “ack-ack” guy, a fuse-cutter on a 90mm antiaircraft gun. But on Dec. 19, 1944, the brass was looking for volunteers to go after some German tanks. And Darago said sure. He was a 19-year-old, color-blind draftee, a native of Baltimore’s Little Italy and a musician who played piano and clarinet. He was no hero, he said. But when Adolf Hitler launched the massive attack that began World War II’s bloody Battle of the Bulge, he had not reckoned on GIs like Darago.
  • Rand Paul: America Partly To Blame For Pearl Harbor, World War II

    03/31/2014 8:24:21 AM PDT · by thetallguy24 · 129 replies
    The Right Scoop ^ | 03/31/2014 | Caleb Howe
    At the Washington Post, Jennifer Rubin this weekend highlighted a video of Rand Paul speaking in 2012 about sanctions on Iran. In it, Paul disparages the notion of use of force, and for some reason claims the United States was partly to blame for World War II! “There are times when sanctions have made it worse. I mean, there are times .. leading up to World War II we cut off trade with Japan. That probably caused Japan to react angrily. We also had a blockade on Germany after World War I, which may have encouraged them … some of...
  • Czech home owners find Jewish belongings from WWII

    12/13/2014 5:17:28 PM PST · by george76 · 11 replies
    REUTERS - J Post ^ | 12/12/2014
    Amongst the findings were shoes and photos hidden by Jewish prisoners of the Holocaust. PRAGUE - House owners rebuilding their attic in the Czech town of Terezinhave found photos, shoes and other possessions of Jews forced into a ghetto there under Nazi rule, a heritage project said on Thursday. Terezin (Theresienstadt), a fortress and garrison town built at the end of the 18th century, was used by the Nazis as a transit camp for Jews rounded up in Czechoslovakia and deported from elsewhere in Europe. They were held in the ghetto until they could be transported to camps farther east....
  • A historic collection found in S. Phila. home (Band of Brothers)

    12/13/2014 2:26:42 PM PST · by llevrok · 18 replies
    Philly.com ^ | 12/13/2014
    In a bedroom lay a white silk pillow - yellowed with age and emblazoned with the screaming eagle emblem of the Army's 101st Airborne Division. On the walls were pictures and plaques telling the story of a World War II veteran; in another room was an adjustable hospital bed and, on a windowsill, a worn Bible. That October day, Jim Bennett was looking for an investment, a house to buy, rehab, then rent or resell, as he has done with about 500 others over more than 20 years. But Bennett found much more at the modest, two-story rowhouse on Winton...
  • Americans and Belgians mark 70th anniversary of Battle of the Bulge

    12/13/2014 12:15:44 PM PST · by DeaconBenjamin · 20 replies
    theguardian.com ^ | Saturday 13 December 2014 11.43 EST
    Belgium’s King Philippe, right, and Queen Mathilde throw nuts to the public, during the 70th anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge, in Bastogne, Belgium, on Saturday. The tradition dates from when the Germans asked for the US surrender in Bastogne, to which General Anthony McAuliffe answered: ‘Nuts!’ Photograph: Yves Logghe/AP Braving snowy weather, Americans and Belgians gathered in the Ardennes on Saturday to mark the 70th anniversary of one of the biggest and bloodiest US battles of the second world war, the Battle of the Bulge. Jean-Claude Klepper, 62, of Virton, Belgium, said “we must never forget what...
  • Angelina Jolie’s new movie ‘Unbroken’ provokes Japanese outrage

    12/13/2014 5:00:31 AM PST · by Hostage · 105 replies
    LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL ^ | December 12, 2014 | YURI KAGEYAMA ASSOCIATED PRESS
    TOKYO — Angelina Jolie’s new movie “Unbroken” has not been released in Japan yet, but it has already struck a nerve in a country still wrestling over its wartime past. The buzz on social networks and in online chatter is decidedly negative over the film, which depicts a U.S. Olympic runner who endures torture at a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp during World War II. Some people are calling for a boycott of the movie, although there is no release date in Japan yet. It hits theaters in the U.S. on Dec. 25. Others want the ban extended to Jolie, the director...
  • Pearl Harbor Reunion, 2014

    12/07/2014 2:33:08 PM PST · by Sean_Anthony · 7 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 12/07/14 | Douglas V. Gibbs
    The Greatest Generation With each passing year, the reunion number is dwindling. The Pearl Harbor survivors are over 90 years old, and the members of that group that got together today in Hawaii numbered a little more than a dozen. Today marks the 73rd Anniversary of the attack against Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, during which 2,400 sailors, Marines, and soldiers were killed. Some have called the reunion of the USS Arizona Reunion Association the last gathering of USS Arizona survivors, but the gathering doesn’t see this meeting as the last one, just yet. The USS Arizona was a battleship that was...
  • In memory of those who lost their lives in SS Cynthia Olson

    12/07/2014 2:54:32 PM PST · by WhiskeyX · 9 replies
    MaritimeQuest.com ^ | 2008 | Michael W. Pocock
    At dawn on Dec. 7, 1941 the I-26 surfaced and fired a warning shot at the Cynthia Olson, the radio officer sent out an SOS from position 33.42N-145.29W which was picked up on the mainland and Minoru reported seeing lifeboats being lowered, after which he began to shell the ship. Some time during the attack the Japanese commander received the signal "Tora, tora, tora!" indicating the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor had been a success. Compaired to what was going on at Pearl Harbor his attack would be easy. Since the Cynthia Olson was unarmed she would offer no resistance,...
  • Unforgettable Photos From The Attack On Pearl Harbor, 73 Years Ago Today

    12/07/2014 10:20:41 AM PST · by PROCON · 54 replies
    businessinsider.com ^ | Dec. 7, 2014 | Amanda Macias
    December 7, 1941 began as a perfect Sunday morning for the troops serving the US fleet at Pearl Harbor. Under a early morning South Pacific sun, softball teams were lining up on the beach. Pitchers warmed up their arms, while batting rosters were finalized and the wives and kids came over from seaside church services.
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "They Were Expendable"(1945)

    12/07/2014 12:12:55 PM PST · by ReformationFan · 11 replies
    Daily Motion ^ | 1945 | John Ford
  • Oft-forgotten battle at Guadalcanal was turning point in WWII

    08/07/2002 5:52:40 AM PDT · by Non-Sequitur · 34 replies · 1,706+ views
    Kansas City Star ^ | August 7, 2002 | Rick Montgomery
    Of all the memorable dates of World War II, this one somehow got lost in the jungle. Remember Aug. 7, 1942? Quiz your friends. Note the silence. To veterans who landed 60 years ago today on the Pacific island of Guadalcanal, it is a silence almost as eerie and inexplicable as the quiet of the early hours of their raid -- the first U.S. offensive of the war. "So many people today don't even know what Guadalcanal is," said Rudy Bock, 82, of Overland Park, who stormed in with fellow Marines and caught the Japanese with their guns down. "You...
  • WWII: Memories of fallen consecrate name of Solomons' airport (Henderson Field )

    06/23/2003 11:04:07 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 9 replies · 299+ views
    The Press Telegram (Long Beach California ) ^ | Saturday, June 21, 2003 - 8:00:32 PM PST | Tom Hennessy Staff columnist
    Memories of fallen consecrate name of Solomons' airportBy Tom HennessyStaff columnistHenderson Field is one of those place names that still resonates with most Americans who lived through World War II. And even with some of their descendants. U.S. Marines seized the airfield Aug. 7, 1942, when they invaded Guadalcanal in our first offensive of the Pacific War. They finished the construction the Japanese had started and named the airfield for Lofton Henderson, a Medal of Honor aviator killed in June at the battle of Midway. It was one of the war's most significant airfields. Whoever held Henderson pretty much...
  • In 1942, it came down to one Marine

    10/25/2009 4:49:12 AM PDT · by rellimpank · 92 replies · 4,992+ views
    Las Vegas Review-Journal ^ | 25 oct 09 | Vin Suprynowicz
    It's hard to envision -- or, for the dwindling few, to remember -- what the world looked like on Oct. 26, 1942, when a few thousand U.S. Marines stood essentially stranded on the God-forsaken jungle island of Guadalcanal, placed like a speed bump at the end of the long blue-water slot between New Guinea and the Bismarck Archipelago, the most likely route for the Japanese Navy to take if they hoped to reach Australia. On Guadalcanal, the Marines struggled to complete an airfield. Japanese Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto knew what that meant. No effort would be spared to dislodge these upstart...
  • Eisenhower, Zhukov: unconditional surrender off the table

    12/04/2014 10:43:49 PM PST · by wetphoenix · 7 replies
    What if the Allied war effort of World War II was directed by the current Republican leadership? Listen to the strumming harp music as we take an imaginary journey into the past... 24 November 1944 -- Emerging from a joint strategy meeting, Generals Eisenhower and Zhukov addressed a press meeting and outlined their plans for bringing about a peaceful resolution to what had snowballed into a massive world war. “My Russian counterpart and I realize the meaning of our spectacular victories at Stalingrad and Normandy," said Eisenhower. "It is that the message of the Allies must be one of willingness...
  • San Francisco airman’s remains recovered, 70 years later

    12/01/2014 4:13:45 PM PST · by artichokegrower · 16 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | December 1, 2014 | Kale Williams
    The remains of a World War II airman from San Francisco, who was missing for seven decades after his plane was shot down over New Guinea, will be returned to the United States and buried with full honors, the Department of Defense said Monday.
  • Silly WWII Analogy...but Fun!

    11/26/2014 2:12:54 AM PST · by marktwain · 6 replies
    Gun Watch ^ | 24 November, 2014 | Dean Weingarten
    On freerepublic, people were discussing the recent legal victory, where a federal judge ruled that people who already had guns had no reason to wait through a 10 day California waiting period.  The law was first passed in 1923.  He ruled that the law infringed on second amendment rights.  The KG9 Kid wrote, from freerepublic.com: I'm sorry, but I read of these little 'victories' by the CalGuns Foundation in their thoroughly anti-gun state and cannot help but compare them to some WWII Japanese radio broadcast that exclaims that the Imperial Japanese Navy now has now deployed the first rocket-powered...
  • The Great October: A Revolution Financed By an Enemy Government

    Can it be true that Vladimir Lenin, the alleged “leader of the world Proletariat,” whose monuments adorned central squares in every Soviet town and who inspired generations of Soviet citizens, had been a mere agent provocateur working for the German government? In The World Crisis, Volume 5, Winston Churchill writes this about war-time Germany in 1917: “They turned upon Russia the most grisly of all weapons. They transported Lenin in a sealed truck like a plague bacillus from Switzerland into Russia.” The rest is history: Lenin staged a coup and withdrew Russia from World War One, conceding large swaths of...
  • How Paperbacks Helped the U.S. Win World War II

    11/21/2014 12:09:56 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    The Wall Street Journal ^ | November 20, 2014 | Jennifer Maloney
    Molly Guptill Manning, with her collection of Armed Services Edition books, discovered that soldiers liked nostalgic books and those with sex scenes. Armed Services Editions created a new audience of readers back home. A decade after the Nazis’ 1933 book burnings, the U.S. War Department and the publishing industry did the opposite, printing 120 million miniature, lightweight paperbacks for U.S. troops to carry in their pockets across Europe, North Africa and the Pacific. The books were Armed Services Editions, printed by a coalition of publishers with funding from the government and shipped by the Army and Navy. The largest of...
  • Patriotism Means Uncovering the Truth

    11/14/2014 5:15:16 PM PST · by Enza Ferreri · 7 replies
    Enza Ferreri Blog ^ | 15 November 2014 | Enza Ferreri
    Unfortunately I'll have to skip tomorrow's London Forum meeting. But I wish to write about the topic of one of the announced speeches, by Richard Edmonds: "Bad Nenndorf – a Nuremberg Trial for Allied War Criminals". The subject is described as "the tragedy of Bad Nenndorf where in the aftermath of WWII British torturers, many of them later emigrating to Israel, killed dozens of National Socialist sympathisers including girls belonging to the BDSM." Richard Edmonds is a British nationalist who is capable of criticising his country when necessary, who rightly doesn't believe that patriotism means defending the indefensible. I'd never...
  • WWII Vet, 98, dons uniform for final salute before dying the next day

    11/14/2014 1:34:46 PM PST · by DFG · 45 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 11/14/14 | AP
    On Veterans Day, Justus Belfield donned his Army uniform one more time, even though he was too weak to leave his bed at an upstate New York nursing home. The 98-year-old World War II veteran died the next day. The Daily Gazette of Schenectady reports that Belfield had worn his uniform every Veterans Day since he and his wife moved into Baptist Health Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Glenville, outside Albany, several years ago. On Tuesday, the former master sergeant wasn't able to get out of bed to participate in the facility's Veterans Day festivities, so he had the staff...
  • Veterens Day - WWII Bugs Bunny Cartoon dissing Axis

    11/11/2014 6:09:47 PM PST · by central_va · 18 replies
    Toon Tube ^ | 1943 | Warner Bros
    Rare Bugs Bunny Featuring Hitler.
  • The Magnificent Infantry of WW II

    11/11/2014 6:04:22 PM PST · by Retain Mike · 16 replies
    November 11, 2014 | Self
    The Army deployed 65 infantry divisions for the Second World War. Each was a small town with its own equivalents for community services plus eight categories of combat arms. Units such as artillery, engineering, and heavy weapons engaged the enemy directly. Yet of all categories, the foot soldier faced the greatest hazard with the least chance of reward. Except for the Purple Heart and the coveted Combat Infantryman’s Badge, recognition often eluded them because so few came through to testify to the valor of the many. The infantryman confronted the most dismal fate of all whose duty was uninterrupted by...
  • Last original WWII Navajo Code Talker, a Marine, dies on the birthday of the Corps

    11/11/2014 11:45:07 AM PST · by NYer · 23 replies
    WDTPRS ^ | November 11, 2014 | Fr. John Zuhlsdorf
    The last Navajo Code Talker, Chester Nez, USMC died on 10 November 2014, the 239th birthday of the Corps. They played a vital role during WWII.From Source Marine veteran Michael Smith wept Wednesday when he heard about the death of Chester Nez, the last of the original Navajo Code Talkers.Smith, from Window Rock, who had met Nez several times, described him as a “quiet, humble” Navajo Marine.Smith said that the passing of Nez — the last of the first 29 Navajo men who created a code from their language that stumped the Japanese in World War II — marked the...
  • The Magnificent Infantry of WW II

    11/11/2014 10:01:49 AM PST · by Retain Mike · 8 replies
    Self | November 11, 2014 | Self
    The Army deployed 65 infantry divisions for the Second World War. Each was a small town with its own equivalents for community services plus eight categories of combat arms. Units such as artillery, engineering, and heavy weapons engaged the enemy directly. Yet of all categories, the foot soldier faced the greatest hazard with the least chance of reward. Except for the Purple Heart and the coveted Combat Infantryman’s Badge, recognition often eluded them because so few came through to testify to the valor of the many. The infantryman confronted the most dismal fate of all whose duty was uninterrupted by...
  • The Magnificent Infantry of WW II

    11/10/2014 5:05:50 PM PST · by Retain Mike · 15 replies
    Self | November 10, 2014 | Self
    The Army deployed 65 infantry divisions for the Second World War. Each was a small town with its own equivalents for community services plus eight categories of combat arms. Units such as artillery, engineering, and heavy weapons engaged the enemy directly. Yet of all categories, the foot soldier faced the greatest hazard with the least chance of reward. Except for the Purple Heart and the coveted Combat Infantryman’s Badge, recognition often eluded them because so few came through to testify to the valor of the many. The infantryman confronted the most dismal fate of all whose duty was uninterrupted by...
  • The Magnificent Infantry of WW II

    11/10/2014 12:11:02 PM PST · by Retain Mike · 27 replies
    Self | November 10, 2014 | Self
    The Army deployed 65 infantry divisions for the Second World War. Each was a small town with its own equivalents for community services plus eight categories of combat arms. Units such as artillery, engineering, and heavy weapons engaged the enemy directly. Yet of all categories, the foot soldier faced the greatest hazard with the least chance of reward. Except for the Purple Heart and the coveted Combat Infantryman’s Badge, recognition often eluded them because so few came through to testify to the valor of the many. The infantryman confronted the most dismal fate of all whose duty was uninterrupted by...
  • Hitler's GI Death Camp (Excellent 45 minute video via You Tube)

    11/08/2014 1:56:55 PM PST · by beaversmom · 73 replies
    Nat Geo via You Tube ^ | January 2, 2014 | World History
    Hitler's GI Death Camp I came across this video on NetFlix a few weeks back. Shortly after, I then found someone had uploaded it to You Tube. I watched it for a third time last night with my mom on my little phone. I think it's well done and very emotional. Amazing what these men went through and survived. I have so much respect for these men. On the You Tube thread, one of the posters said that her father, Norman Fellman, who was one of the GI's featured in the documentary, passed away just this past August. God bless...
  • SGT. MIKE MCKOOL, American WWII Halyard Mission veteran, testifies before Commission of Inquiry

    11/07/2014 4:57:30 PM PST · by Ravnagora · 3 replies
    www.generalmihailovich.com ^ | Nov. 7, 2014 | Mike McKool / Aleksandra Rebic
    SGT. MIKE MCKOOL, rescued American WWII Halyard Mission Airman, testifies before Commission of Inquiry regarding "Fair Trial for General Mihailovich" May 1946 New YorkAleksandra's Note: On May 13, 1946, the Committee for a Fair Trial for General Mihailovich announced that a "Commission of Inquiry" had been established in New York for the purpose of taking the testimonies of American officers and airmen whose request to be heard as witnesses at the trial of General Draza Mihailovich in Belgrade, Yugoslavia had been refused by the Tito government. The following is the testimony of Sergeant Mike McKool from Dallas, Texas, one of...
  • Fury: The Mother of all Tank Movies

    11/03/2014 9:53:07 AM PST · by w1n1 · 72 replies
    wsj ^ | 10/2014 | Frank Jardim
    Fury: The Mother of all Tank Movies starring Brad Pitt, no I'm not a fan of his, but did enjoyed the movie. The authenticity of the tanks was the real thing, Sherman's and the German Tiger I. Pitt's character is a bit reminiscent of the role he played as a soldier in Inglorious Basterds, which also took place during WWII. He takes his five-man crew behind enemy lines, where they are outnumbered and outgunned. FURY is the first war film to feature a real life German Tiger I tank which actually came out of a museum collection. Tigers were the...
  • Tall Tale [That's True] Rare warbirds to depart Edwards Ranch

    10/29/2014 2:18:36 PM PDT · by SZonian · 23 replies
    Hang around aircraft restorers and you’ll inevitably hear tales of priceless historical relics hidden in barns, buried in shrink wrap, or otherwise stuck in time awaiting discovery. These stories are almost always wild exaggerations or outright fiction. But if you’ve ever heard of the cache of iconic warbirds at Wilson Connell “Connie” Edwards’ west Texas ranch, it’s absolutely real. The irascible former movie pilot who made a fortune in the oil business has added to his vast inventory of mostly World War II-era fighters, seaplanes, and surplus parts for more than a half century. Now, he’s decided to sell many...
  • WWII ‘Battle of the Atlantic’ Shipwrecks Discovered Off North Carolina

    10/28/2014 6:00:24 AM PDT · by artichokegrower · 15 replies
    gCaptain ^ | October 21, 2014
    A team of researchers led by NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered two significant shipwrecks from World War II’s legendary “Battle of the Atlantic” just off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. The German U-boat 576 and the freighter it sank, named Bluefields, were found just a few hundred yards apart from each other approximately 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina, according to NOAA.
  • Recovered Bay Area WWII airman’s remains to be buried (remains found in Germany)

    10/26/2014 10:33:05 AM PDT · by Fenhalls555 · 3 replies
    SFGate ^ | Sunday, October 19, 2014 | Kurtis Alexander
    A tidy English Tudor there had once been occupied by William “Billy” Parker Cook after he graduated from UC Berkeley and got married. That was before he set off to fight in World War II, and before the mission — on Dec. 23, 1944 — that ended with him and five crew mates shot down over Germany. The Allied forces never recovered the bomber or the crew, and so the Alameda home was a touchstone. “This man perished before I was born,” said Bruce Cook, 62, of Newport Beach (Orange County), whose middle name, William Parker, comes from his uncle....
  • Wings, Women, and War: Soviet Airwomen in World War II Combat

    10/25/2014 6:43:41 AM PDT · by wetphoenix · 12 replies
    Dr. Reina Pennington, Associate Professor of History Norwich University. The Soviet Union was the first nation to allow women pilots to fly combat missions. During World War II the Red Air Force formed three all-female units--grouped into separate fighter, dive bomber, and night bomber regiments--while also recruiting other women to fly with mostly male units. Their amazing story, fully recounted for the first time by Reina Pennington, honors a group of fearless and determined women whose exploits have not yet received the recognition they deserve. Pennington chronicles the creation, organization, and leadership of these regiments, as well as the experiences...
  • Massacre at Kragujevac [Nazi executions of Serbs in occupied Serbia]

    10/24/2014 3:10:54 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 5 replies
    www.berengarten.com ^ | Unknown | Richard Burns
    Between October 19th and 21st 1941, the most infamous Nazi massacre in Serbia during the Second World War took place at Šumarice, just outside the town of Kragujevac, and in local villages. The event had a marked effect on the course of the war in the Balkans. The Nazis decreed that 100 people should be shot for every German killed, and 50 for every German wounded. One of the most shocking aspects of the massacre was that more than 200 pupils from local schools were taken out of their classes and shot. There are several stories of extraordinary individual sacrifice...
  • SOCCER TIFOS FROM AROUND THE WORLD (Awesome ones commemorating Operation Market Garden)

    10/24/2014 9:03:57 AM PDT · by C19fan
    SI ^ | October 23, 2014 | Staff
    Here are some of the best fan banners and displays from around the world.
  • Car smashes Ten Commandments monument outside Capitol building

    10/24/2014 9:10:35 AM PDT · by GIdget2004 · 41 replies
    NewsOK.com ^ | 10/24/2014 | Staff
    Someone drove a car up on the lawn of the state Capitol building Thursday night and smashed into a controversial Ten Commandments monument, breaking the stone slab into several pieces, state officials said. The person who did it fled and has not been found, Oklahoma Highway Patrol spokesman George Brown said Friday. This wasn’t a case of a car taking a wrong turn, but a purposeful act, said John Estus, spokesman for the Oklahoma Office of Management and Enterprise Services. Whoever did it repositioned some ramp equipment that happened to be outside the building and used it to get access...
  • Anyone else seen Fury?

    10/16/2014 10:06:27 PM PDT · by 31R1O · 103 replies
    Has anyone else seen Fury? I just got back and it wasn't a bad movie at all. The character building scenes are a bit clumsy at times but the combat bits were top notch. It wasn't Blackhawk Down or Saving Private Ryan intense but there were tense moments. I recommend it.
  • David Greenglass, Spy Who Helped Seal the Rosenbergs’ Doom, Dies at 92

    10/14/2014 1:00:39 PM PDT · by Borges · 21 replies
    NYT ^ | 10/14/2014 | ROBERT D. McFADDEN
    It was the most notorious spy case of the Cold War — the conviction and execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg for passing atomic secrets to the Soviet Union — and it rested largely on the testimony of Ms. Rosenberg’s brother, David Greenglass, an Army sergeant who had stolen nuclear intelligence from Los Alamos, N.M. For his role in the conspiracy, Mr. Greenglass went to prison for almost a decade, then changed his name and lived quietly until a journalist tracked him down. He admitted then, nearly a half-century later, that he had lied on the witness stand to save...
  • The End of an Era that Ended Long Ago: Maria Von Trapp, RIP

    10/09/2014 3:46:52 AM PDT · by rhema · 19 replies
    MovieGuide.org ^ | Sept. 2014 | Jerry Newcombe
    Earlier this year, an event happened that did not receive wide notice. The last of the Von Trapp Family Singers, the last of the children—the real ones—died. Her name was Maria—not to be confused with the lady played by Julie Andrews, Maria Augusta Trapp, who died in 1987. Maria Von Trapp’s death in February 2014 marks the end of an era. The Sound of Music deserves its accolades as the Movie of the Year (1965) and one of the finest films ever made. Even my one-year-old granddaughter is mesmerized by the puppet scene. As a film it is an icon....
  • The evolution of the Ilyushin Il-2

    10/07/2014 10:59:14 AM PDT · by sukhoi-30mki · 4 replies
    Russia & India Report ^ | October 7, 2014 | Vadim Matveyev
    Designers competing to create an aircraft that could directly support troops on the battlefield were hampered by the weight of the ‘flying tank’, low air speed and flimsy protection. The Il-2 was the answer to these challenges. One of the key lessons of the First World War was that the airplane had a crucial role to play in effective military campaigns in the new era. With this in mind, in the 1920s and 1930s Europe’s leading nations expended significant efforts and resources on developing new aircraft that could be used to provide support for infantry and tanks. The Soviet Union...
  • A Bridge Too Far +70: An Airborne Vet Remembers (Video)

    10/05/2014 7:09:52 PM PDT · by Abakumov · 21 replies
    Radix News ^ | October 5, 2014 | 86th Airlift Wing
    Mario Patruno, a 93 year old World War Two veteran, formerly of the 101st Airborne Division, is featured in this documentary on Operation Market Garden. The short film, produced by the USAF 86th Airlift Wing at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, mixes rarely seen documentary footage with contemporary coverage of the 70th anniversary celebration and jump recreation by combined U.S. and Dutch airborne troops. Private Patruno jumped at Normandy and Eindhoven with the 101st, and was wounded in both operations. He fought in house to house battles with Nazi troops, and was shot in the face, but survived to tell his...
  • World War II vet, 93, visits Russia to thank soldiers who saved him

    09/29/2014 2:49:58 AM PDT · by wetphoenix · 49 replies
    Leroy Williamson, 93, has seen relations between the United States and Russia during good times and bad, and has some advice for the countries: "We have to get along," he told ABC News. "We don't need a patriotic war or a World War III." The Texan was in Russia this week to share his appreciation for the Soviet soldiers who liberated his Nazi prisoner-of-war camp on May 1, 1945. He met with a Russian general for lunch, visited with veterans, and placed a wreath at Moscow's memorial to the Great Patriotic War, as World War II is known in the...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon

    09/28/2014 12:07:57 PM PDT · by ReformationFan · 5 replies
    Internet Archive ^ | 1942 | Leo McCarey
  • Engineers found Teutonic axes in the Forest District Wipsowo

    09/21/2014 12:27:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | September 2014 | tr. RL
    Three Teutonic battle axes from the late Middle Ages have been found by engineers who remove World War II artillery shells left the forests in the Forest District Wipsowo (Warmia and Mazury). Historic weapons will be donated to the museum. Engineers stumbled upon the historic axes by chance, while searching the woods metal detectors. The weapons have been initially identified by an archaeologist as late-medieval Teutonic battle axes. Iron axes were close to each other, shallow underground, among the roots of trees. "It can be assumed that this is a deposit that someone left for better times. Perhaps the person...
  • Gas chambers at Sobibor death camp uncovered in archaeological dig

    09/17/2014 8:28:39 AM PDT · by DTA · 8 replies
    Gas chambers at Sobibor death camp uncovered in archaeological dig Some 250,000 Jews murdered at camp in Poland which Nazis bulldozed and covered up with trees to conceal their crimes; personal effects of victims, including wedding rings found near gas chambers. An archaeological dig in Poland has revealed the location of the gas chambers at the Sobibor death camp, Yad Vashem announced on Wednesday. Some 250,000 Jews were murdered at Sobibor, but on October 14, 1943, about 600 prisoners revolted and briefly escaped. Between 100 and 120 prisoners survived the revolt, and 60 of those survived the war. After the...
  • PBS is running a Ken Burns documentary on “The Roosevelts.” Here’s what he won’t show

    09/15/2014 11:42:18 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 83 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 9/15/14 | Kevin "Coach" Collins
    Ken Burns is at it again. The Left’s favorite propagandist has put together a 7 part series on the two Roosevelt presidents. Leaving aside what he is likely to show about Teddy Roosevelt, without seeing a minute of this presentation I’ll go out on a short strong limb and guess what will not be shown about Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Even a very superficial study of FDR shows he was a consummate phony. He preached “There is nothing to fear but fear itself,” but everything he did was presented as a fearful crisis that could only be handled by giving him...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "5 Fingers"(1952)

    09/14/2014 11:21:08 AM PDT · by ReformationFan · 11 replies
    You Tube ^ | 1952 | Joseph L Mankiewicz
  • Principalities and Powers: Spiritual Combat 1942-1943 (Fr. George Rutler)

    09/14/2014 5:27:47 AM PDT · by NYer · 6 replies
    Mercatornet ^ | September 12, 2014 | Francis Phillips |
    Fr Rutler, a parish priest in Manhattan, New York and a well-known essayist, has taken his title from the famous quotation in St Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians. This is in part because of he wishes to show the larger forces at work during WWII and also because an old friend and fellow priest had bequeathed to him a pile of newspapers, journals and radio transcripts for this particular year. Growing up after the war, Rutler sees his book as “a feeble act of thanks from my generation” for the previous one that had endured so many sacrifices on behalf...