Keyword: wwii

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  • Pearl Harbor: The Truth Preview

    12/04/2016 11:38:19 AM PST · by EveningStar · 9 replies
    History ^ | December 4, 2016
    Pearl Harbor: The Truth Preview TV-PG Watch a preview for “Pearl Harbor: The Truth,” premiering Sunday, December 4, at 10/9c. HISTORY Honors Pearl Harbor. Duration: 0m 30s
  • Pearl Harbor survivors and WWII veterans arrive in Honolulu

    12/03/2016 7:46:10 PM PST · by Jyotishi · 36 replies
    Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL ^ | Saturday, December 3, 2016 | Jobeth Devera, Reporter
    It was an emotional homecoming for dozens of Pearl Harbor survivors and WWII veterans at Honolulu International Airport Saturday afternoon. Live bands, hula dancers and other military servicemen and women gathered around Gate 18 to help welcome our nation's bravest. "I just want thank them for their time and what they've done to sacrifice for this nation," said Joshua Carmack, USN Chief Petty Officer. Each hero was escorted from the plane down an isle of hugs, handshakes and aloha. American Airlines sponsored the round-trip 75th Pearl Harbor Commemoration Flight, from Los Angeles to Honolulu, which hosted approximately 120 Pearl Harbor...
  • U.S. Marine Killed in WWII 73 Years Ago Returns Home

    11/30/2016 3:31:02 PM PST · by PROCON · 20 replies
    freebeacon.com ^ | Nov. 29, 2016 | Jack Heretik
    A young Marine killed in the bloody World War II Battle of Tarawa has finally been brought home and has been laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery. Pfc. Wilbur C. Mattern was 23 years old when he was killed on November 21, 1943, the second day of the three-day battle to take the atoll back from the Japanese. He was found earlier this year by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), whose function is to search for missing American servicemembers around the world, identify them and return them home for proper burial with honors. Mattern was buried on the...
  • Legendary Komets broadcaster Bob Chase passes

    11/25/2016 9:01:10 AM PST · by Buckeye McFrog · 3 replies
    Fort Wayne Komets ^ | 11/24/2016 | Press Release
    Fort Wayne, IN-- Legendary Fort Wayne Komets broadcaster Bob Chase passed away at 2:40am ET Thursday, Nov. 24, 2016, at the age of 90. Chase completed 63 seasons as the voice of the Komets radio-rinkside last year after first arriving in Fort Wayne in 1953. Chase hailed from Negaunee, Michigan, where he was born January 22, 1926. He grew up in Marquette, Michigan and after high school joined the U.S. Navy where he served from 1943-1947. Upon his discharge from the Navy, Bob entered Northern Michigan University at Marquette and graduated in 1952. While in college, Bob started his radio...
  • US commemorates Serbian support during WWII [Halyard Mission]

    11/23/2016 1:05:21 PM PST · by Ravnagora · 12 replies
    U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa ^ | November 21, 2016 | Tech. Sgt. Ryan Crane
    PRANJANI, Serbia -- The sky was black with the billowing smoke of the downed B-17 bombers and the canopies of Allied Airmen parachuting to an unknown fate behind Nazi lines in German-occupied Serbia. This is the sight the villagers of Pranjani remember from the late summer of 1944. Operation Halyard was an Office of Strategic Services mission to rescue more than 500 Allied Airmen who were scattered around a mountainous region in Serbia after their bombers were shot down by the Germans in WWII. It remains the largest rescue operation of American Airmen in history. The U.S. State Department, U.S....
  • Oldest Remaining Tuskegee Airman, a St. Petersburg Man, Dies at 101

    11/21/2016 3:38:05 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 36 replies
    Tampa Bay Times ^ | 11/21 | Paul Guzzo
    Willie N. Rogers was an American hero, and at age 101, he was a living example of the nation's history. He was a member of the "Greatest Generation," which defeated the Axis powers in World War II, doing his part as a master sergeant in the all-black Tuskegee Airmen during the era of racial segregation in the U.S. military. The longtime St. Petersburg resident died Friday from complications of a stroke. He was the oldest surviving member of that original legendary 100th Fighter Squadron. Mr. Rogers' nephew, Clinton Glover, said his uncle deserves to be celebrated for his contributions to...
  • Veteran’s Day: The Magnificent Infantry of WW II

    11/11/2016 6:54:09 PM PST · by Retain Mike · 19 replies
    Retain Mike | November 11, 2016 | Retain Mike
    The Army deployed 65 infantry divisions for the Second World War. Each was a small town with its own equivalents for community services plus eight categories of combat arms. Units such as artillery, engineering, and heavy weapons engaged the enemy directly. Yet of all categories, the foot soldier faced the greatest hazard with the least chance of reward. Except for the Purple Heart and the coveted Combat Infantryman’s Badge, recognition often eluded them because so few came through to testify to the valor of the many. The infantryman confronted the most dismal fate of all whose duty was uninterrupted by...
  • An open letter to America’s college cupcakes on Veterans Day

    11/11/2016 10:52:06 AM PST · by pboyington · 16 replies
    US Defense Watch ^ | November 11, 2016 | Ray Starmann
    Dear College Cupcakes: America has watched for the last year or so, as our nation’s universities have been consumed by a new strain of left wing totalitarianism that has all the traits of the haunting Marxist dictatorships of the past. Free thought and expression and discussion are disappearing from college campuses and being replaced by behavior and lexicons out of 1984. In the greatest arenas of free speech across this land, you shriek and howl and cry and stamp your feet like two year olds when someone disagrees with you. You have mental meltdowns when reading passages from the world’s...
  • Veteran’s Day: The Magnificent Infantry of WW II

    11/11/2016 8:52:37 AM PST · by Retain Mike · 27 replies
    Self | November 11, 2016 | Se;lf
    The Army deployed 65 infantry divisions for the Second World War. Each was a small town with its own equivalents for community services plus eight categories of combat arms. Units such as artillery, engineering, and heavy weapons engaged the enemy directly. Yet of all categories, the foot soldier faced the greatest hazard with the least chance of reward. Except for the Purple Heart and the coveted Combat Infantryman’s Badge, recognition often eluded them because so few came through to testify to the valor of the many. The infantryman confronted the most dismal fate of all whose duty was uninterrupted by...
  • Bob Hoover, one of history’s greatest pilots, dead at 94

    10/25/2016 10:03:09 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 70 replies
    Minnesota Public Radio ^ | October 25, 2016 | Bob Collins
    One of the greatest pilots in the history of aviation died this morning, according to reports. Bob Hoover, a World War II fighter pilot, a former Air Force test pilot, and the chase plane pilot for Chuck Yeager when he broke the sound barrier for the first time, was 94.
  • Nazis show no mercy to Serbian civilians / 70 years since THE KRAGUJEVAC MASSACRE of October 1941

    10/23/2016 1:35:44 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 17 replies
    www.generalmihailovich.com ^ | October 23, 2016 | Aleksandra Rebic
    70 YEARS SINCETHE KRAGUJEVAC MASSACRE of October 1941:A Legacy of 'Never Forget'German soldiers escorting Serbian civilians from Kragujevac and its surrounding area to be executed in October 1941. Photo: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.The policy was the Nazi response to the first successful organized uprising in occupied Europe. The Serbian resistance forces under the command of Serbia’s General Draza Mihailovich not only threatened Germany’s southern flank in Europe and her occupation of Serbia after Yugoslavia fell to Hitler in April of 1941, but critically delayed Hitler’s planned attack on the Soviet Union that summer. The Germans retaliated, but it wasn’t...
  • WWII pilot, 101, gets one last flight in his 'godsend' P-38

    10/23/2016 11:16:06 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 74 replies
    The Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colorado) ^ | October 19, 2016 | Tom Roeder
    Frank Royal's Air Force took off at 1:38 p.m. A vintage aircraft clawed through the air followed by two chase planes, one carrying the 101-year-old pilot. The last plane in the formation brought a tear to Royal's eye. Its sleek lines still raise his pulse. He can hear the thrum of its twin engines without his hearing aids - World War II ingrained the 24-cylinder symphony permanently in his mind. He has good reason to remember the details. That very plane, a fully restored P-38 Lightning named White-33, was Royal's first love. And he flew over Colorado Springs to tell...
  • McCormack receives France’s highest honor

    10/16/2016 6:13:06 AM PDT · by SandRat · 2 replies
    The Government of France is pleased to announce that an Arizona veteran from Sierra Vista, Captain Robert J. McCormack, was approved to receive the award of the National Order of the Legion of Honor in the rank of the Chevalier (Knight). The award is the highest honor that France bestows on its citizens and foreign nationals. The award was presented by Mr. Garret M. Steenblik, Honorary Consul of France for Arizona, at a private ceremony on Oct. 8 at the Pima County Public Library at 101 N. Stone Ave. in Tucson.
  • Today in 1939: Soviet troops marched into Poland

    09/17/2016 6:11:34 AM PDT · by AdmSmith · 23 replies
  • Woman kissed by sailor in famous V-J Day photo dies aged 92

    09/10/2016 5:45:47 PM PDT · by NRx · 15 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 09-10-2016 | Reuters
    Greta Friedman, the woman in white kissed by a sailor in New York’s Times Square in a photograph symbolising the end of the second world war, has died aged 92. Her son, Joshua Friedman, said she died on Thursday in Virginia after suffering a series of ailments, including pneumonia, NBC News reported. CBS News said she would be laid to rest with her late husband, Mischa Elliot Friedman, at Arlington national cemetery in Virginia. Friedman, then a dental assistant on a break, was the woman in one of the most famous pictures of the 20th century, the moment Americans learned...
  • Venice Film Review: Mel Gibson’s ‘Hacksaw Ridge’

    09/04/2016 10:29:39 AM PDT · by amorphous · 21 replies
    Variety ^ | 4 Sep 2016 | Owen Gleiberman
    Mel Gibson has made a move about a pacifist who served nobly during WWII. It's a testament to his filmmaking chops, and also an act of atonement that may succeed in bringing Gibson back. Mel Gibson’s “Hacksaw Ridge,” which premiered today at the 73rd International Venice Film Festival, is a brutally effective, bristlingly idiosyncratic combat saga — the true story of a man of peace caught up in the inferno of World War II. It’s the first movie Gibson has directed since “Apocalypto,” 10 years ago (a film he’d already shot before the scandals that engulfed him), and this November,...
  • The Inchon landing, 66 years ago next month, was brilliant. But what made it necessary?

    08/20/2016 9:57:10 PM PDT · by Mr. Mojo · 51 replies
    The American Spectator ^ | August 19, 2016 | Robert Zapesochny
    When back in June 2015 Donald Trump announced he was running for president, he said during his speech, “I will find the General Patton or I will find General MacArthur. I will find the right guy. I will find the guy that’s going to take that military and make it really work.” Since then, Trump has frequently mentioned Douglas MacArthur in his speeches. It is worth discussing his importance in American history, especially as we are approaching the 66th anniversary of Battle of Inchon. While MacArthur’s greatest achievement was the creation of modern Japan, the Inchon landing on September 15,...
  • WWII Airmen Get Their Memorial

    08/20/2016 1:45:06 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 37 replies
    American Thinker ^ | August 20, 2016 | Robert Zubrin
    On Saturday August 6, I was privileged to attend the unveiling of the memorial to American airmen who fought in World War II at the Wings Over the Rockies aviation museum in Denver, Colorado. Created by Major Frederic Arnold (ret.), an artist who flew P-38 Lightnings in the Mediterranean theater of the war, the monumental sculpture depicts a pre-flight briefing, with the squadron leader at the mapboard explaining the mission plan, while the men of the squadron and the pale ghosts of their fallen comrades listen on. American airmen suffered a horrific casualty rate during World War II, with over...
  • Biden: We wrote Japan’s Constitution

    08/17/2016 1:16:55 PM PDT · by chajin · 86 replies
    Yomiuri Shimbun ^ | August 16, 2016 | Jiji Press
    U.S. Vice President Joe Biden on Monday criticized Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s proposal to allow Japan to obtain nuclear weapons, stressing that Japan’s pacifist Constitution was written by the United States. “Does he not understand we wrote Japan’s constitution to say they could not be a nuclear power?” Biden said in a speech he delivered in Scranton, Pa., for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. “Where was he when in school?” Biden asked. “Someone who lacks this judgment cannot be trusted,” he said. “He’s not qualified to know the [nuclear] codes,” the U.S. vice president said. Trump has suggested that...
  • Watch students' touching tribute to fallen WWII soldier

    08/02/2016 11:49:49 AM PDT · by Leaning Right · 3 replies
    Fox News ^ | Aug. 2, 2016 | no author listed
    Raw video: Group of students from Wartburg College sing 'Battle Hymn of the Republic' after pilot announced remains of WWII soldier were being escorted off plane
  • WWII Lethal Dart Gun - Code name Bigot

    08/02/2016 7:15:37 AM PDT · by w1n1 · 9 replies
    AShooting Journal ^ | 8/2/2016 | J Hines
    Once upon a time during WWII a lethal dart gun code name “Bigot” was created to be used by commandos to covertly eliminate sentries, this dart gun was constructed from a M1911 .45 caliber pistol. The Office of Strategic Services predecessors of the CIA developed this clandestine weapon, its unknown as to what advantage this has over a silenced pistol. The weapon never made it out of the research and development department, but this didn't stop Ian McCollum from Forgotten Weapons to get his hands on one to check out, see the video and Ian's observation.
  • When A War Went Worldwide 75 Years Ago

    07/28/2016 5:51:02 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 25 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | July 28, 2016 | Victor Davis Hanson
    Seventy-five years ago, the world blew up in just six months. World War II ostensibly started two years earlier, when Germany invaded Poland. In truth, after the rapid German defeat of Poland in September 1939, the conflict was mostly confined to Western Europe for nearly the next two years. By summer of 1940, only Britain had survived Hitler's European victories. The dormant European war only went global on June 22, 1941, when Germany suddenly surprise-attacked the Soviet Union, its former partner. America and Asia were still not directly involved in the 1941 expansion of the war until the Japanese attacked...
  • Plans in place for former bombing site clean-up, funds lacking

    07/23/2016 6:55:59 AM PDT · by SandRat · 6 replies
    Sierra Vista Herald ^ | karen.schaffner@svherald.com
    SIERRA VISTA — A representative from the Army Corps of Engineers revealed the findings Wednesday of a four-year munitions study of more than 1,500 acres in the San Pedro Riparian Conservation Area (SPRNCA), southeast of the San Pedro House. The study was looking for live munitions or other environmental factors from World War II Army use that would impact the acreage. Two live explosives and fragments of explosives in the dense, thorny acreage were discovered. A third live explosive was carried out by a hiker and turned over to local authorities. “It is not a hospitable site,” said 1st Lt....
  • Valkyrie and the German Resistance: Remembering the July 20th plot

    07/20/2016 2:52:06 AM PDT · by iowamark · 16 replies
    Catholic World Report ^ | July 19, 2016 | Jerry Salyer
    We cannot understand the resistance unless we first accept “that German conservatives and nationalists might be moral and religious men who were appalled at the lawlessness, brutality, and inhumanity of the Nazis.” The vital point running through all these questions is the totalitarian claim of the state over the citizen to the exclusion of his religious and moral obligation towards God.— First Lieutenant Graf Yorck von Wartenburg, Valkyrie conspirator One of the most intriguing fields of World War II history deals with the German Resistance—a clandestine network of disillusioned military officers and civil servants who began actively plotting against Hitler’s...
  • Dying... Spitfire engineer, 95, gets last wish granted to be reunited with iconic plane....

    07/14/2016 1:49:40 PM PDT · by naturalman1975 · 59 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 15th July 2016 | Nick Enoch
    A terminally ill former World War Two Spitfire engineer's 'last wish' to be reunited with the iconic plane was granted after top brass saw him looking forlornly through a fence at one from his wheelchair. Ken Farlow, 95, was an electrical engineer during the war, carrying out vital work to keep Spitfires and Hurricanes in the air in Syria and Palestine. But after being diagnosed with terminal colon cancer, the father-of-three asked daughter Helen if he 'could see a Spitfire - one last time'. Helen, 52, took him to Gloucestershire Airport where the vintage planes were being maintained by the...
  • History's Badasses: Jack Churchill

    07/07/2016 6:09:02 AM PDT · by Louis Foxwell · 14 replies
    History Things ^ | June 15, 2016 | Elizabeth Lundin
    “Any officer who goes into action without his sword is improperly dressed.” – Mad Jack ChurchillPHOTO: Wikimedia World War II swept down onto Europe. The nights were filled with bomber fire, the days with the rata-tata of machine guns. The last thing any German soldier would have expected was to hear the call of a bagpipe and see an arrow whistling through the smoke-filled air to cut down one of his buddies. The last thing anyone would expect would be to see a British soldier charging through no-man’s land, slashing left and right through the fray with a sword.The British soldier’s name was...
  • Fooling the Nazis: How a Roman hospital invented ‘K Disease’ to save dozens of Jewish lives

    06/28/2016 3:56:33 AM PDT · by NYer · 6 replies
    Aletelial ^ | June 23, 2016 | Jesús Colina
    The name was terrible, but the “K Disease” was not a lethal virus. It was actually the clever invention of Professor Giovanni Borromeo and a religious of the Hospital of the Brothers Hospitallers of Saint John of God, to save the lives of dozens of Jews persecuted by the Nazis during World War II.When the SS entered the Fatebenefratelli hospital located on the Tiber Island in Rome, medical personnel and religious explained to the Germans that behind the doors of two special wards, there were patients suffering from this terrible K Disease, some of whom were terminally ill. The...
  • Pope Francis Says You’re NOT Christian if You Support Gun Manufactures

    06/27/2016 7:26:56 AM PDT · by E. Pluribus Unum · 191 replies
    Ammoland Shooting Sports News ^ | June 22, 2016 | Ammoland
    Italy (Ammoland.com) Pope Francis spoke with a group of young people at a rally of thousands at the end of the first day of his trip to the Italian city of Turin. Francis started by attacking the Right to Keep and Bear Arms as well as accusing the allies during World War Two of being complicit in the killing of Jews, Christians and homosexuals. Francis issued his toughest condemnation to date of the weapons industry, saying. “If you trust only men you have lost,” he told the young people in a long, rambling talk about war, trust and politics after...
  • Marine Corps admits it misidentified man in iconic Iwo Jima photo from World War II

    06/23/2016 7:53:45 AM PDT · by oh8eleven · 62 replies
    NY Daily News ^ | 23 June 2016 | Jason Silverstein
    The Marine Corps admitted Thursday that it misidentified one of the six men in the World War II photograph of a flag-raising in Iwo Jima — one of the most iconic images in American history. For more than 70 years, history said John Bradley, a Navy hospital corpsman, was one of the six men seen in the legendary photo from one of the war’s bloodiest battles. But the Marines now say Bradley is nowhere in the photo — and the man believed to be Bradley is in fact Harold Schultz, a private first class.
  • Legendary American Hero Steve “Spiro” Pisanos Passes Away at 96

    06/13/2016 3:55:39 AM PDT · by Purdue77 · 6 replies
    San Diego Air & Space Museum ^ | June 2016 | unknown
    Retired Col. Steve Pisanos, a World War II ace who was decorated by four nations, has died, his family confirmed through the San Diego Air and Space Museum on June 9. Pisanos was 96. Born in Athens, Greece, Pisanos [sometimes spelled Pissanos] came to the United States in 1938. He joined the British Royal Air Force in 1941 and served with an Eagle Squadron until American members were absorbed by the US Army Air Forces 4th Fighter Group. Pisanos was then commissioned a USAAF lieutenant. On May 3, 1942, Pisanos became an American citizen during a ceremony in London, England,...
  • Queens Marine who died on Pacific island during World War II battle gets heroic homecoming

    06/11/2016 8:44:01 AM PDT · by oh8eleven · 7 replies
    NY Daily News ^ | June 10, 2016 | Seth Bookey, Michael Cruz, Nancy Dillon
    More than 70 years after dying on a beach in World War II, Queens-bred Marine John F. Prince is finally coming home. His remains were excavated from a nondescript parking lot on Betio Island in the central Pacific, identified through dental records and due to arrive in New York next week for a burial with full military honors at Calverton National Cemetery, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Friday.
  • D-DAY: The Power of American Courage

    06/06/2016 12:15:46 PM PDT · by M. Thatcher · 20 replies
    The Limbaugh Letter ^ | June 1994 | Rush Limbaugh
    It is surely the last time, my friends, that the world will see this vast company of American vets assembled in Normandy on June 6. There are thousands still who dream dreams of those beaches, who, in silent moments, still see the faces of the fallen. They live among us, shoulder to shoulder, the old warriors of World War II. But these are quiet men. In dark corners of their closets, in boxes in attics, lay things they can touch to bring it all back. Battered boots. Khaki blankets. Medals in a velvet case. A frayed packet of letters. Handfuls...
  • THE LUCKY FEW - Survivors tell the tale of D-Day, 70 years later

    06/06/2016 7:40:57 AM PDT · by Alas Babylon! · 29 replies
    The Virginian-Pilot ^ | 1 June 2014 | Mike Hixenbaugh
    A 91-year-old man lifts off in a commercial airliner bound for France and for a moment can imagine himself in the cabin of a Douglas C-47, preparing to leap into moonlit darkness. Norwood Thomas was just a boy, really, the first time he arrived in Normandy. Now he is returning for the last time, once again mindful of his own mortality. More than 100,000 Americans were there at the start of the campaign to retake Europe from Hitler. Only a few hundred are expected to return this week. Thousands more, many too frail to travel, will mark the 70th anniversary...
  • The Strange Tanks That Helped Win D Day

    06/06/2016 6:46:09 AM PDT · by Iron Munro · 27 replies
    bbc.com ^ | June 6, 2016 | Stephen Dowling & Nigel Hawtin
    When allied forces landed on the Normandy beaches on D-Day, they did so alongside a fleet of bizarre tanks with very special roles – brought into life by an eccentric British commander. On 19 August 1942, Allied armies put their plan for an invasion of Occupied Europe to the ultimate test – by landing troops on the beaches and trying to capture a French port.
  • FReeper Canteen ~ D-Day, June 6, 1944 ~ 06 June 2016

    06/05/2016 5:01:26 PM PDT · by Kathy in Alaska · 117 replies
    Serving The Best Troops and Veterans In The World !! | StarCMC and The Canteen Crew
    ~ D-DAY, June 6, 1944 ~ NORMANDY INVASION May 1944 had been chosen at the conference in Washington in May 1943 as the time for the invasion. Difficulties in assembling landing craft forced a postponement until June, but June 5 was fixed as the unalterable date by Eisenhower on May 17. As the day approached and troops began to embark for the crossing, bad weather set in, threatening dangerous landing conditions. After tense debate, Eisenhower and his subordinates decided on a 24-hour delay, requiring the recall of some ships already at sea. Eventually, on the morning of June 5,...
  • How John Wayne saved the United States Marine Corps

    06/05/2016 8:36:05 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 57 replies
    The Coach's Team ^ | 6/5/16 | Susan Frickey
    With the conclusion of WW II the years of bloodshed and mind-numbing violence finally ended. But a massive demobilization of servicemen began, the purpose to slash military spending. Liberal Democrats supported an effort to completely abolish the Marine Corps, first established under Presidents John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. Language of Liberty This effort was supported by the Doolittle Board, created by the Truman Administration and headed by none other than Army General Jimmy Doolittle himself. The Board called for the Marine Corps to be disbanded as a separate military outfit and unified with Army units. As you can imagine, this...
  • Salon Editors: We Should Have Let The Axis Win

    06/04/2016 5:49:51 AM PDT · by rey · 41 replies
    The following is an Op-Ed by the Editors of Salon.com Following U.S. President Barack Obama’s inspiring visit to Hiroshima, it’s important to reconsider the most important lesson we’ve learned since the ending of WWII: we should have let the Axis win. Bigots will no doubt try to factsplain the notion that Japan attacked the United States at Pearl Harbor first. It’s simply more of their typical use of historical privilege, justifying a tradition of victim blaming and vilification of minorities. The only reason the aircraft that dropped the bomb on Hiroshima was named Enola Gay was so the military industrial...
  • Hayward Lectures Obama on the “War Crimes of Imperial Japan”

    06/01/2016 1:26:30 AM PDT · by hamilton_1800 · 18 replies
    President Obama’s Memorial Day trip to Japan to the World War II site of Hiroshima to presumably apologize for dropping the atom bomb has ignited furious criticism of the president. Among those critics is Breitbart’s John Hayward, who documents an extensive historical context for the education of those who have only had the opportunity to read progressive-approved textbooks, including apparently the President of the United States. Why is this important? Because the dropping of the atom bomb didn’t happen in a vacuum – it was used as a means to end a brutal war started by Imperial Japan. " 1)...
  • Bell of battlecruiser sunk 75 years ago in Royal Navy's biggest ever disaster retrieved from [tr]

    05/25/2016 5:47:32 AM PDT · by C19fan · 29 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 24, 2016 | Sam Tonkin
    The bell from HMS Hood has been unveiled by the Princess Royal to mark the 75th anniversary of the Royal Navy's largest loss of life from a single vessel. Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen - who funded the expedition to retrieve the bell from the seabed of the Denmark Strait between Iceland and Greenland - attended the event at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard where the bell has gone on display. Anne struck eight bells at midday during the ceremony, held with HMS Victory as a backdrop, watched by descendants of some of the 1,415 sailors who died when the battleship was hit...
  • REMEMBERING SERBIA'S GREAT GENERAL DRAZA MIHAILOVICH ON AMERICA'S MEMORIAL DAY.

    05/30/2016 5:29:42 AM PDT · by Ravnagora · 14 replies
    www.generalmihailovich.com ^ | May 29, 2016 | Aleksandra Rebic
    American Flag and the Flag of Serbia image courtesy of the Studenica Foundation. REMEMBERING SERBIA'S GREAT GENERAL DRAZA MIHAILOVICH ON AMERICA'S MEMORIAL DAY Taking to the Ravna Gora hills of Serbia 75 years ago in May of 1941 with only a handful of men to mount the first real resistance to Hitler's occupying forces in Europe was impressive. The guts it took and the resolve necessary for these men and their leader to initiate such a courageous act against the Nazi war machine that in 1941 appeared to be invincible seems almost inconceivable now. But it was real, and the...
  • Explaining the miracle at Midway (the great movie is on now_

    05/29/2016 7:24:33 PM PDT · by doug from upland · 102 replies
    naval aviation news ^ | MAY 3, 2012
    See story at link; we are celebrating freedom and honoring all those who gave their all. If you have never seen the film, you have no idea what you are missing. I would bet that not 10% of those in high school could even place the battle as being in WWII. We have raised a nation of idiots thanks to the leftists who have destroyed our education system and any sense of patriotism.
  • 2016 05 29 John Haller's Prophecy Update "As it was in the Days of"

    05/29/2016 3:55:07 PM PDT · by Lera · 18 replies
    Fellowship Bible Chapel ^ | May 29, 2016 | John Haller
    Noah and Lot. The Lord described the days that would herald His return by using these two examples. In Noah's Day, people were blissfully ignorant of the worldwide tragedy that would befall them and they continued on in their daily lives. They married. They gave in marriage. They fell victim to the "Normalcy Bias" to which John has frequently referred. You know the one. Dig hole in sand, insert head, repeat. Then there's Lot. Remember his struggles? He's the guy who lived in a city where not only were they stuck in the "normalcy bias", every form of sexual perversion...
  • Lost for 73 years, John Saini, Marine killed in World War II, coming home to Healdsburg

    05/28/2016 10:01:11 PM PDT · by rey · 23 replies
    Press Democrat ^ | 28 May 2016 | CHRIS SMITH
    At last, Marine private and son of Healdsburg John Saini is coming home. Born to an Alexander Valley grape-growing family in 1923, Saini (sigh-EE-knee) was 20 when he died early on in World War II’s deadly, three-day Battle of Tarawa. He was buried on the Pacific atoll along with more than 1,000 other Marines and sailors and more than 5,000 Japanese and Korean soldiers. Informed of his death, his shattered immigrant parents in Healdsburg, Mike and Mary Saini, awaited word of where he was interred and how they might return his earthly remains to Sonoma County for proper, Catholic burial....
  • World War II Vet Recovering After Oxygen Tank Beating

    05/28/2016 5:39:28 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 23 replies
    NBC Miami ^ | May 28, 2016
    A 91-year-old World War II veteran is recovering after police say his caretaker beat him with his oxygen tank. The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that 45-year-old Elena Erickson was charged Thursday with attempted murder for the May 15 beating of Michael Tristano. North Port police say Erickson hit him in the head multiple times with the tank before leaving him on the floor to die. They say she returned to the home the next day, found him still alive and called paramedics. She denied any connection to the beating.
  • Theologian: World War II Was "Undoubtedly A Just War"

    05/28/2016 3:10:39 PM PDT · by Biggirl · 31 replies
    Breitbart.com ^ | May 28, 2016 | Breitbart News
    Speaking with Breitbart’s Executive Chairman Stephen K. Bannon Friday, ethical expert and theologian Dr. Thomas D. Williams said that from the perspective of America’s involvement, World War II undoubtedly satisfied all the conditions to be considered a “just war.”
  • ACTUAL COLOR FILM OF PEARL HARBOR ATTACK

    05/28/2016 1:07:36 PM PDT · by knarf · 45 replies
    FB ^ | Conservative Post
    Long forgotten, private color film of the actual attack on Pearl Harbor
  • Brian Williams: U.S. Is ‘The Only Nation to Have Used’ Nuclear Weapons ‘In Anger’

    05/27/2016 7:15:12 PM PDT · by PROCON · 65 replies
    newsbusters.org ^ | May 27, 2016 | Curtis Houck
    MSNBC breaking news host and ex-NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams was allowed out on MSNBC’s airwaves early Friday afternoon to discuss President Obama’s visit to Hiroshima so he could resurrect a taped report that aired in 2005 on the 60th anniversary of the nuclear bomb’s dropping on the Japanese city. In the course of discussing the event afterward, though, Williams threw some shade in the direction of the U.S. military and then-President Harry Truman by complaining that “we’re the only nation to have used them in anger” against the horrifying Axis Powers member.
  • Obama uses Hiroshima visit as opportunity to urge no nukes

    05/27/2016 1:54:28 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 17 replies
    WHNS-TV ^ | May 27, 2016 | Nancy Benac and Foster Klug, The Associated Press
    HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) - With an unflinching look back at a painful history, President Barack Obama stood on the hallowed ground of Hiroshima on Friday and declared it a fitting place to summon people everywhere to embrace the vision of a world without nuclear weapons. As the first American president to visit the city where the U.S. dropped the first atomic bomb, Obama came to acknowledge - but not apologize for - an act many Americans see as a justified end to a brutal war that Japan started with a sneak attack at Pearl Harbor. Some 140,000 people died after...
  • Hiroshima: Dude, that was like 71 years ago!

    05/27/2016 6:34:36 AM PDT · by NOBO2012 · 12 replies
    Michelle Obama's Mirror ^ | 5-28-2016 | MOTUS
    Thankfully Barry didn’t quite apologize for dropping the bomb when he went to visit Hiroshima. He did take the opportunity to call for a nuclear-free world though - which is about as realistic as a gun-free America, another of Barry’s pipe dreams (literally).An efficient pipedream delivery systemButt reality has never entered the picture when Barry has a Dream. And a nuclear free world world has been a dream of his ever since he was a young pup and “researched” the topic for his debut journalism thesis at Columbia’s Sundial.  “It’s naďve for us to think…that we can grow our nuclear...
  • After 70 Years of Waiting, WWII ‘Memphis Belle’ Gunner, 94, Revisits Britain. And Dies Quietly There

    05/26/2016 3:53:50 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 44 replies
    Washington Post ^ | May 26 | Travis M. Andrews
    U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Melvin Rector long carried Britain in his heart after he helped defend it during World War II, but 70 years passed without him stepping foot in the country. The 94-year-old finally decided to leave his home in Barefoot Bay, Fla., to visit Britain earlier this month. The National World War II Museum in New Orleans conducts a travel program through which interested parties can visit certain sites of the war. He signed up for one, in hopes of visiting the Royal Air Force station Snetterton Heath, in Norfolk. He served there with the 96th Bomb...