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Keyword: superbugs

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  • Life Expectancy In U.S. Drops For First Time In Decades, Report Finds

    03/13/2017 9:20:44 PM PDT · by Helicondelta · 74 replies
    npr.org ^ | December 8, 2016
    One of the fundamental ways scientists measure the well-being of a nation is tracking the rate at which its citizens die and how long they can be expected to live. So the news out of the federal government Thursday is disturbing: The overall U.S. death rate has increased for the first time in a decade, according to an analysis of the latest data. And that led to a drop in overall life expectancy for the first time since 1993 Most notably, the overall death rate for Americans increased because mortality from heart disease and stroke increased after declining for years....
  • China’s Seafood Is Seriously Plagued by Superbugs

    12/16/2016 2:32:18 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 7 replies
    New York Magazine ^ | December 15, 2016 | Clint Rainey
    The food supply has already shown itself to be alarmingly adept at vectoring superbugs into the human body, but a new report suggests maybe China really wants to see if it can push this to the next level. While the rest of the world finally understands antibiotics in meat are causing an epidemic of multidrug-resistant bacteria, China’s aquaculture industry apparently remains a place that, to quote Bloomberg’s story, “exposes the fish to almost the same doses of medicine the livestock get,” plus whatever drug cocktail gets tossed into the water to fight aquatic disease. This industry currently accounts for about...
  • Antibiotic resistant E.coli found in a quarter of supermarket-bought chicken [UK]

    09/04/2016 8:43:01 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 30 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 5 September 2016 • 12:41AM | (Telegraph Reporters)
    A quarter of supermarket chicken contains antibiotic-resistant E.coli, according to Cambridge University research. The bug can cause stomach pain and kidney failure, and in severe cases can lead to death. The study found that superbug strains of E.coli were present in 22 of 92 chicken pieces. The meat was purchased from seven major British supermarkets and included different cuts from whole chickens to packs of drumsticks, legs, thighs and diced breast. The bug was found in samples from all of the supermarkets. …
  • Surge in the number of cases of terrifying hospital superbug after NHS relaxes hygiene rules (UK)

    09/27/2015 2:50:47 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 11 replies
    Mail on Sunday (UK) ^ | 02:22 EST, 27 September 2015 | Stephen Adams
    The number of cases of a terrifying superbug in NHS hospitals has surged after the Government ignored warnings—and relaxed the rules on fighting infections. Hundreds more patients fell ill with deadly Clostridium difficile—known as C.diff—between April 2014 and March 2015 than in the previous year. The increase, from 13,361 to 14,165, came immediately after the system for fining hospitals with too many cases was dramatically weakened. …
  • Infected and undocumented: Thousands of Canadians dying from hospital-acquired bugs ( Canada)

    01/19/2015 6:01:48 AM PST · by george76 · 10 replies
    National Post ^ | January 19, 2015 | Tom Blackwell
    Ms. Smith’s tragic demise was more dramatic than many cases of hospital-acquired infection (HAI). Necrotizing fasciitis is a frightening, but rare, complication. Still, about 8,000 Canadians a year die from bugs they contract in facilities meant to make them better, while many more see their hospital stay prolonged by such illness. Yet after years of well-intentioned work and millions of dollars spent on combatting the scourge, the details and extent of the problem remain murky. No national statistics, for instance, document the number of surgical-wound infections like Ms. Smith’s, one of the most common types of hospital-acquired pathogens. A federal...
  • First new antibiotic in 30 years discovered in major breakthrough

    01/08/2015 8:10:35 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 27 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 01/08/2015 | Sarah Knapton,
    The first new antibiotic to be discovered in nearly 30 years has been hailed as a ‘paradigm shift’ in the fight against the growing resistance to drugs. Teixobactin has been found to treat many common bacterial infections such as tuberculosis, septicaemia and C. diff, and could be available within five years. But more importantly it could pave the way for a new generation of antibiotics because of the way it was discovered. Scientists have always believed that the soil was teeming with new and potent antibiotics because bacteria have developed novel ways to fight off other microbes. But 99 per...
  • 'Ingenious' Antibiotic Discovery 'Challenges Long-Held Scientific Beliefs'

    01/07/2015 9:10:36 PM PST · by blam · 19 replies
    BI - Reuters ^ | 1-7-2015 | Lauren F Friedman and Reuters
    Lauren F Friedman and Reuters January 7, 2015Scientists have discovered a new antibiotic, teixobactin, that can kill serious infections in mice without encountering any detectable resistance, offering a potential new way to get ahead of dangerous evolving superbugs. The new antibiotic was discovered in a sample of soil. The research is "ingenious," Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University, told The New York Times. Researchers said the antibiotic, which has yet to be tested in humans, could one day be used to treat drug-resistant infections caused by the superbug MSRA, as well as tuberculosis, which normally requires...
  • FEDERAL POLICY ENABLING 'DEADLY SUPERBUGS'

    05/12/2014 5:58:23 PM PDT · by DannyTN · 2 replies
    WND ^ | 5/11/2014 | GREG COROMBOS
    ... The good news, according to Goldberg, is that this isn’t a hard threat to combat, but he said there are unnecessary hurdles blocking an effective response and putting lives in danger. “We need to take the chains off companies that would otherwise develop antibiotics but aren’t because it’s too expensive or too complicated to do so,” said Goldberg, who then elaborated on the federally imposed hurdles facing drug makers. ... So what needs to happen to relax federal restraints on drug makers? ...
  • Potential for human superbugs in cow manure: study

    04/22/2014 5:37:04 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 31 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 4/22/14 | AFP
    Washington (AFP) - Cow manure, commonly used to fertilize vegetable crops, contains a high number of genes that can fuel resistance to antibiotics, a US study out Tuesday found. These genes come from the cows' gut bacteria, and while none have yet been found in superbugs that are infecting humans, researchers said the potential is real. The research was done by scientists at Yale University, who sampled manure from a handful of dairy cows at a farm in Connecticut. In those samples, they found 80 unique antibiotic resistance genes. About three quarters were unfamiliar. Genetic sequencing showed they were only...
  • ‘Superbug’ bacteria widespread in U.S. chicken: consumer group

    12/21/2013 1:04:22 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 9 replies
    Reuters ^ | Thu Dec 19, 2013 6:03am EST | Charles Abbott
    About half of the raw chicken breasts in a nationwide sampling carried antibiotic-resistant “superbug” bacteria, a U.S. consumer group said on Thursday, calling for stricter limits on use of the medicines on livestock. It could be more difficult to treat people if they became ill after eating chicken with the antibiotic-resistant bacteria, said Consumer Reports, which describes itself as the world’s largest independent product-testing organization. […] Consumers should cook poultry to 165 degrees F (73.8°C) to kill bacteria and take steps, such as using a separate cutting board for raw meat, to avoid cross-contamination of other foods, Consumer Reports said....
  • Most chicken sold in stores is contaminated, Consumer Reports says

    12/19/2013 12:04:43 PM PST · by chessplayer · 151 replies
    A report released Thursday indicates that just about all chicken sold in U.S. stores contains harmful bacteria, and nearly half are tainted with a so-called superbug that's resistant to antibiotics. The Consumer Reports study, its most comprehensive to date on poultry, tested raw chicken breasts purchased at retail outlets nationwide for six bacteria, then checked for antibiotic resistance. The results showed nearly half of the samples were contaminated with at least one bacterium resistant to three or more classes of antibiotics, what's known as a superbug. Slightly more than 10 percent were tainted with two superbugs. That finding is cause...
  • Germs Carried by Wounded Syrians ‘Endangering Israelis’

    11/26/2013 5:47:20 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    INN ^ | 11/26/2013, 11:03 AM | Gil Ronen
    About one third of the wounded Syrians who received treatment in recent months in hospitals in northern Israel carry an abnormally high number of bacteria, some of which are either uncommon or unknown in Israel. Some of these bacteria are resistant to all effective antibiotic treatments, reports Israel Hayom, based on statements by senior medical sources in the Health Ministry Directorate and internal documents. The Syrians are being treated for injuries suffered in the civil war that has been raging in their country for the past three years. …
  • A New Weapon in the Fight against Superbugs

    11/05/2013 7:26:41 AM PST · by null and void · 2 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | Fri, 11/01/2013 - 9:14am | American Institute of Physics
    The ever-increasing threat from "superbugs" — strains of pathogenic bacteria that are impervious to the antibiotics that subdued their predecessor generations — has forced the medical community to look for bactericidal weapons outside the realm of traditional drugs. One promising candidate is the antimicrobial peptide (AMP), one of Mother Nature's lesser-known defenses against infections, that kills a pathogen by creating, then expanding, nanometer-sized pores in the cell membrane until it bursts. However, before this phenomenon can be exploited as a medical therapy, researchers need a better understanding of how AMPs and membranes interact at the molecular level. Using a novel...
  • 'We've reached the end of antibiotics': Top CDC expert declares

    10/26/2013 10:13:54 AM PDT · by MinorityRepublican · 133 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | 26 October 2013 | SNEJANA FARBEROV
    A high-ranking official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has declared in an interview with PBS that the age of antibiotics has come to an end. 'For a long time, there have been newspaper stories and covers of magazines that talked about "The end of antibiotics, question mark?"' said Dr Arjun Srinivasan. 'Well, now I would say you can change the title to "The end of antibiotics, period.”' The associate director of the CDC sat down with Frontline over the summer for a lengthy interview about the growing problem of antibacterial resistance. Srinivasan, who is also featured in...
  • Bank of England’s plastic bank notes will be a “breeding ground” for superbugs, say researchers

    09/15/2013 10:00:36 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 5 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 09:01 EST, 14 September 2013 | Mia De Graaf
    Wipe-clean plastic bank notes earmarked to replace paper cash are a “breeding ground” for superbugs, scientists claim. More durable than the cotton currently used for £5-£50 notes, polymer provides a welcome home for diseases such as E.coli and the MRSA superbug. The findings completely contradict Bank of England claims that hygiene lies at the core of their proposal. In a bombshell study on currency and bacteria, Turkish and Dutch scientists lathered seven currencies with bacteria including the euro, US dollar, Croatian kuna, and Romania’s polymer leu. While the euro proved the cleanest, with no sign of passing bacteria, polymer leu...
  • How to Stop the Rise of Superbugs

    06/03/2013 7:35:31 PM PDT · by neverdem · 40 replies
    The American ^ | June 3, 2013 | Waldemar Ingdahl
    The rise of 'superbugs' is causing tens of thousands of deaths a year in the United States alone. A problem as complex as antibiotic resistance will require several solutions. Increasing antibiotic resistance is of great concern — the health of millions is dependent on our ability to defeat the threat of infectious diseases. The World Health Organization estimates that multi-drug resistance accounts for more than 150,000 deaths each year from tuberculosis alone.Without effective antibiotics in health care, humanity would be thrown back to the time when urinary tract infections and pneumonia were lethal. Infant and maternal mortality would rise and...
  • Hospitals see surge of superbug-fighting products

    04/29/2013 7:03:19 AM PDT · by bgill · 6 replies
    AP ^ | April 29, 2013 | Mike Stobbe
    In U.S. hospitals, an estimated 1 in 20 patients pick up infections they didn't have when they arrived, some caused by dangerous 'superbugs' that are hard to treat... Machines that resemble "Star Wars" robots and emit ultraviolet light or hydrogen peroxide vapors. Germ-resistant copper bed rails, call buttons and IV poles. Antimicrobial linens, curtains and wall paint. While these products can help get a room clean, their true impact is still debatable. There is no widely-accepted evidence that these inventions have prevented infections or deaths.
  • Vitamin B3 May Help Kill Superbugs

    10/07/2012 11:17:41 AM PDT · by CutePuppy · 43 replies
    Medical News Today (MNT) ^ | August 25, 2012 | Catharine Paddock, PhD
    Nicotinamide, commonly known as vitamin B3, may help the innate immune system kill antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria, the so-called "superbugs". In lab work done with mice and human blood, researchers found high doses of the vitamin increased the ability of immune cells to kill the bacteria by 1,000 times.The discovery opens the door to a new arsenal of tools for dealing with antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, such as those caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA, that have killed thousands of people around the world. They are increasing in hospitals and nursing homes, and also rising in prisons, among athletes, people in...
  • Finally, a smoking gun connecting livestock antibiotics and superbugs

    02/25/2012 9:48:16 AM PST · by JerseyHighlander · 19 replies
    Grist ^ | 24 Feb 2012 7:41 AM | Tom Laskawy
    How does the livestock industry talk about antibiotics? Well, it depends on who’s doing the talking, but they all say some version of the same thing. Take the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association; they say there is “no conclusive scientific evidence indicating the judicious use of antibiotics in cattle herds leads to antimicrobial resistance in humans [MRSA].” Or Ron Phillips of the Animal Health Institute (a drug-industry front group). In an interview on Grist last year, he said that before you can draw any conclusions: … You have to look at specific bug/drug combinations and figure out what are the potential...
  • Gonorrhea Could Join Growing List of Untreatable Diseases

    02/08/2012 9:11:41 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 21 replies
    Scientific American ^ | February 8, 2012 | Christine Gorman
    The arms race between humanity and disease-causing bacteria is drawing to a close—and the bacteria are winning. The latest evidence: gonorrhea is becoming resistant to all standard antibiotic treatment. Gonorrhea is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the world—with about 600,000 cases diagnosed in the U.S. each year. A few years ago, investigators started seeing cases of infection that did not easily respond to treatment with a group of drugs called cephalosporins, which are currently the last line of defense against this particular infection. Now, the number of drug-resistant cases has grown so much in the U.S....