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Keyword: searchwarrant

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  • Your phone is your castle Cops need a warrant.

    09/04/2019 7:14:54 PM PDT · by Talkwire · 27 replies
    Some lawyer ^ | 9/4/2019 | Joseph Tully
    It is your Constitutional right to refuse to grant Law Enforcement access to see what’s on your phone. Technology often outpaces the law, but in this case, our tried and true Constitution has your back regarding police access to your cell phone. Courts have decided that TWO Constitutional amendments protect you from being incriminated by your phone. The Fourth Amendment protects your privacy, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruling Riley v. California in 2014... https://tully-weiss.com/remain-silent-dont-unlock-your-phone-for-police/
  • Comey’s FBI Agent Peter Strzok Manipulated Search Warrant For Weiner’s Laptop To PROTECT HILLARY

    06/24/2019 11:26:53 AM PDT · by bitt · 114 replies
    Big League Politics ^ | 6/24/2019 | PATRICK HOWLEY
    FBI agent Peter Strzok secretly manipulated the warrant to search Anthony Weiner’s laptop in order to protect Hillary Clinton from prosecution. This is just one of the shocking details that have emerged about how James Comey’s FBI and Democrats covered for Anthony Weiner’s sex crimes in order to protect Hillary Clinton from exposure and prosecution during the presidential election. Weiner was even getting paid to work for a firm inside a known Democratic National Committee satellite office alongside a DNC official. (RELATED: Woman Found Dead, Stuffed Inside Garbage Chute At Anthony Weiner’s Apartment Building). Meanwhile, James Comey incredulously claimed that...
  • Video - Cops Toss Hospital Room of Stage 4 Pancreatic Cancer Patient's Room (Looking for THC Pills)

    03/09/2019 12:53:26 PM PST · by gaijin · 96 replies
    YouTube ^ | March 10th, 2019 | me
    I've never smoked pot and I don't like potheads. But THIS made even me angry. Nolan Sousley from Bolivar, Missouri has Stage 4 Pancreatic Cancer --he's on his way to check out for good. Yet the cops barge in and toss his whole hospital room anyway. And the circumstances didn't prevent the police from humiliating him, either. You'd think he was maybe a dealer in a pimp outfit. Sousley ad a yuge bong, right? Nope. He playing some Hendrix and seen rolling some joints, right? Nope. He has some **pills that contain THC**. Yeah, for his PAIN. Cuz they're less...
  • Justice Dept. charges Minnesota FBI agent for leaking secret document to news outlet

    03/28/2018 2:36:43 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 48 replies
    Minneapolis Star-Tribune ^ | March 28, 2018 | By Stephen Montemayor
    A former Minneapolis FBI agent has been charged after allegedly leaking secret documents to a national news reporter, according to federal criminal charges filed in Minnesota this week. The charges, filed by prosecutors for the Justice Department’s National Security Division, are the first to come in Minnesota since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a broad crackdown on government leaks last year. A two-page felony information, a charging document that typically signals an imminent guilty plea, outlines two counts filed against Terry J. Albury of unlawfully disclosing and retaining national defense information. Albury is accused of sharing a document on assessing...
  • Texas Ranger serves Apple with a search warrant for iPhone in Texas shooting

    11/20/2017 2:55:01 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 57 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | Posted on November 19, 2017 2:34 pm | By Steven Winkelman
    Apple has officially been served with a warrant in the case of the Texas shooting perpetrator Devin Patrick Kelley and his iPhone. The case hearkens back to the San Bernardino tragedy of 2015, and the ensuing legal dispute with repercussions that are still being felt today.As per court records obtained by the San Antonio Express-News, Texas Ranger Kevin Wright has produced search warrants for photos, messages, documents, and other data that might be stored on Kelley’s iPhone and his iCloud account. Access to this information, authorities say, could help shed light on the worst mass shooting in the state’s...
  • Federal Judge Orders Release of Anthony Weiner Search Warrant

    12/19/2016 3:23:53 PM PST · by DeathBeforeDishonor1 · 15 replies
    NbcNewYork ^ | 12/18/16
    A federal judge in New York has ordered the public release of the search warrant that FBI agents used to reopen their investigation of Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server just weeks before the presidential election. U.S. District Judge P. Kevin Castel ruled Monday that the public had a right to see the warrant, which was secretly filed with the court on Oct. 20. Trump's Cabinet Picks In Their Own Words Agents used the warrant to get access to emails stored on a computer belonging to Anthony Weiner, the estranged husband of top Clinton aide Huma Abedin. The...
  • Warrant: Indiana workers submitted bogus voter registrations

    11/15/2016 10:05:35 PM PST · by NImerc · 15 replies
    WTAE ^ | Nov. 15, 2016 | BRIAN SLODYSKO
    Employees of an Indiana voter mobilization group with deep ties to the Democratic Party submitted several hundred voter registrations that included false, incomplete or fraudulent information, according to a search warrant unsealed Monday.
  • Feds Walk Into A Building, Demand Everyone's Fingerprints To Open Phones (video)

    10/19/2016 12:29:32 AM PDT · by Swordmaker · 18 replies
    Forbes ^ | October 16, 2016 | By Thomas Fox-Brewster
    In what’s believed to be an unprecedented attempt to bypass the security of Apple iPhones, or any smartphone that uses fingerprints to unlock, California’s top cops asked to enter a residence and force anyone inside to use their biometric information to open their mobile devices. FORBES found a court filing, dated May 9 2016, in which the Department of Justice sought to search a Lancaster, California, property. But there was a more remarkable aspect of the search, as pointed out in the memorandum: “authorization to depress the fingerprints and thumbprints of every person who is located at the SUBJECT PREMISES...
  • FBI wasn't able to unlock iPhone, even with a 'fingerprint unlock warrant' (video at Link)

    05/12/2016 1:58:44 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 40 replies
    CNN Money ^ | May 12, 2016: 10:24 AM ET | by Jose Pagliery
    A judge recently took the controversial step of letting the FBI force a woman to unlock an iPhone with her fingerprints. But it didn't work. CNNMoney has learned that the FBI was unable to open an iPhone in Los Angeles. It's an important detail when debating how new technology -- and new police methods -- affect Americans' Fifth Amendment right to avoid self-incrimination. And it shows that while the FBI unlocked the San Bernardino terrorist's iPhone 5C, law enforcement still has trouble getting into most iPhones. The present case sparked nationwide attention when it was highlighted by the Los Angeles...
  • US Supreme Court approves expanded hacking powers

    05/01/2016 10:15:00 AM PDT · by Swordmaker · 19 replies
    BBC ^ | April 29, 2016 | BBC Staff
    Snooping on a tablet computerImage copyrightThinkstock The US Supreme Court has approved a rule change that could allow law enforcement to remotely search computers around the world. Previously, magistrate judges could order searches only within the jurisdiction of their court, often limited to a few counties. The US Department of Justice (DoJ) said the change was necessary to modernise the law for the digital age. But digital rights groups say the move expands the FBI's hacking authority. The DoJ wants judges to be able to issue remote search warrants for computers located anywhere that the United States claims jurisdiction, which...
  • FBI not sure it can help Arkansas, after all

    03/31/2016 10:14:44 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 10 replies
    Cnet ^ | March 31, 2016 | by Rochelle Garner
    FBI tells Arkansas prosecutor it doesn't know enough to say if it really can unlock that iPhone and iPod. James Martin/CNET The FBI is distancing itself from an Arkansas prosecutor's statement that said the agency will help unlock an iPhone and iPod belonging to two teenagers accused of murder. The agency's office in Little Rock told the Associated Press Thursday that it doesn't have enough information about either Apple device to say if it can help the state's investigation. "On March 28, 2016, FBI Little Rock received a request for investigative assistance in unlocking Apple devices," the agency said in...
  • Who's come to fix your broadband? It may be a Fed in disguise. Without a search warrant

    02/05/2015 8:08:24 PM PST · by Dallas59 · 50 replies
    theregister.co.uk ^ | 4 Feb 2015 at 02:36 | theregister.co.uk
    A Nevada court has ruled FBI agents can dress up as ISP repairmen to blag their way into a suspect's home without a search warrant – but must tell the courts about it when they do. The ruling stems from a case brought by the Feds against Malaysian poker player Wei Seng Phua and his son, whom the agency accused of running an illegal betting syndicate from a luxury Las Vegas villa during last year's FIFA World Cup. The duo hired the house in the grounds of Caesars Palace casino on the famous Strip, and asked for large-screen monitors, laptops,...
  • FBI Seeks To Legally Hack You If You're Connected To TOR Or a VPN

    01/25/2015 11:15:40 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 56 replies
    Slashdot.org ^ | 1/20/15
    The investigative arm of the Department of Justice is attempting to short-circuit the legal checks of the Fourth Amendment by requesting a change in the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure. These procedural rules dictate how law enforcement agencies must conduct criminal prosecutions, from investigation to trial. Any deviations from the rules can have serious consequences, including dismissal of a case. The specific rule the FBI is targeting outlines the terms for obtaining a search warrant. It's called Federal Rule 41(b), and the requested change would allow law enforcement to obtain a warrant to search electronic data without providing any specific...
  • Stop and seize

    09/07/2014 8:38:49 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 11 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 7 September, 2014 | Not listed
    The Post found: •There have been 61,998 cash seizures made on highways and elsewhere since 9/11 without search warrants or indictments through the Equitable Sharing Program, totaling more than $2.5 billion. State and local authorities kept more than $1.7 billion of that while Justice, Homeland Security and other federal agencies received $800 million. Half of the seizures were below $8,800. •Only a sixth of the seizures were legally challenged, in part because of the costs of legal action against the government.
  • 4 Things You Need to Know If the Police Try To Search Your Phone

    06/30/2014 3:38:15 PM PDT · by Kid Shelleen · 45 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 06/30/2014 | Ashley Feinberg
    In a rare unanimous Supreme Court decision yesterday, all nine Justices agreed that, yep, searching your phone without a warrant is indeed illegal. So if a police officer ever does try to dig through your digital dirt unlawfully, this is what you need to do. The often controversial Chief Justice John Roberts summed the whole thing up with a few delightfully biting lines in the court's decision:
  • The Supreme Court Just Struck a Huge Blow Against the Government's Invasion of Your Privacy

    06/26/2014 8:14:09 AM PDT · by Marie · 19 replies
    Policy Mic ^ | 6/25/2014 | Jenna Kagel
    (Regarding Cellphones) The Supreme Court has handed down a unanimous decision in Riley v. California, and it's good news for digital privacy advocates. The Court decided that once someone is arrested, the police may not search the person's phone without a warrant. The ruling stated that "the term 'cell phone' is often misleading in shorthand; many of these devices are in fact miniature computers that also happen to have the capacity to be used as a telephone. They could just as easily be called cameras, video players, rolodexes, calendars, tape recorders, libraries, diaries, albums, televisions, maps, or newspapers." Before just...
  • Supreme Court: Pennsylvania cops no longer need a warrant to search citizens’ vehicles

    04/30/2014 2:36:59 PM PDT · by doc390 · 44 replies
    LancasterOnline.com ^ | 04/30/2014 | Brett Hambright
    Pennsylvania police officers no longer need a warrant to search a citizen’s vehicle, according to a recent state Supreme Court opinion. The high court’s opinion, released Tuesday, is being called a drastic change in citizens’ rights and police powers.
  • Pa. high court rules police no longer need warrant to search vehicles

    04/30/2014 3:09:09 PM PDT · by PaulCruz2016 · 52 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | 04-30-2014 | Jessica Chasmar
    Pennsylvania police officers no longer need a warrant to search a citizen’s vehicle, the state’s Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. Drivers in the state used to be able to refuse a warrantless search, but now their vehicles can be subject to search when a police officer determines there is “reasonable probable cause” to do so, the Intelligencer Journal reported. The high court’s ruling, passed on a 4-2 vote, is being called a drastic change in citizens’ rights and police authority, the paper said. “This is a significant change in long-standing Pennsylvania criminal law, and it is a good one,” said Lancaster...
  • Justices split on whether police can search cellphones during arrests

    04/30/2014 8:10:20 AM PDT · by BuckeyeTexan · 32 replies
    LAT ^ | 04/29/2014 | David Savage
    WASHINGTON — Confronting a right-to-privacy question in the new world of smartphones, the Supreme Court justices sounded closely split Tuesday on whether police officers should be free to search through the phone of any person who is arrested. Justice Elena Kagan, the newest and youngest member of the high court, urged her colleagues to insist on protecting privacy. “People carry their entire lives on their cellphone,” she said during the argument involving a San Diego case. If there are no limits, a police officer could stop a motorist for not having seat belt buckled and download a huge amount of...
  • Supreme Court ruling eases police search of suspect's home

    02/25/2014 12:39:08 PM PST · by Theoria · 58 replies
    Reuters ^ | 25 Feb 2014 | Lawrence Hurley
    The Supreme Court on Tuesday handed a victory to law enforcement agencies by making it easier for police to search a dwelling without a warrant. The court held on a 6-3 vote that police can search a home without a warrant, even if the suspect has objected, as long as he is no longer on the scene and a co-tenant gives consent. It made no difference that the suspect, Walter Fernandez, had earlier objected to the police entering the apartment before police took him outside, the court concluded. The ruling was a loss for Fernandez, who had wanted evidence found...