Keyword: poultry

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  • Naked Men: The ManKind Project and Michael Scinto

    10/06/2007 5:53:22 AM PDT · by i_dont_chat · 21 replies · 1,969+ views
    The Houston Press ^ | 10-04-07 | Chris Vogel
    The organization was supposed to make him a better man. Instead, his parents say, it made him a dead one. The ManKind Project offers trainings which support men in developing lives of integrity, accountability and connection to feeling." — From The ManKind Project Web site "They had three naked men bring out two chickens that they hit with a ­hammer." — Michael Scinto in a letter to a ­Madison County sheriff's deputy. Michael Scinto was literally scared to death. On an isolated 11-acre compound down a winding, country dirt road 110 miles north of Houston, Scinto watched as the leader...
  • Startup to Serve Up Chicken Strips Cultivated From Cells in Lab

    03/15/2017 8:32:01 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 27 replies
    WSJ ^ | 03/15/2017 | Jacob Bunge
    And it pretty much tastes like chicken, according to people who were offered samples Tuesday in San Francisco, before a planned big reveal on Wednesday by Memphis Meats Inc. Scientists, startups and animal-welfare activists believe the new product could help to revolutionize the roughly $200 billion U.S. meat industry. Their goal: Replace billions of cattle, hogs and chickens with animal meat they say can be grown more efficiently and humanely in stainless steel bioreactor tanks. Startups including Memphis Meats and Mosa Meat, based in the Netherlands, have been pursuing the concept. They call it “clean meat,” a spin on “clean...
  • Why chickens are twice as big today as they were 60 years ago

    01/08/2017 10:37:13 AM PST · by Trump20162020 · 112 replies
    MarketWatch ^ | January 7, 2017 | Evie Liu
    American families are getting smaller and yet chickens are getting larger. As we begin 2017, Americans can look back at 2016 as yet another year with record-high chicken consumption—an average of 89.6 pounds per person. That’s more than three times as much as our grandparents ate. Chickens we eat today are twice as big as they were 60 years ago. In 1955, the average weight of chickens sold on market was 3.07 pounds, while the number for the first half of 2016 was 6.18 pounds, according to National Chicken Council, a nonprofit trade organization based in Washington, D.C.
  • It's time to stop hugging your chickens

    09/10/2016 9:26:15 AM PDT · by Diana in Wisconsin · 51 replies
    Mother Nature Network ^ | July, 2016 | Robin Shreeves
    If you’re an urban or suburban chicken farmer, there's a chance you may consider your egg-producing, feathered friends family. You may have even given your chickens names, and you certainly care about them deeply. But do you cuddle and kiss them? As of July 2016, there are 611 people in 45 states with salmonella poisoning from contact with backyard chickens, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). At least 138 people were hospitalized. “These outbreaks are expected to continue for the next several months since flock owners might be unaware of the risk of salmonella infection from...
  • Antibiotic resistant E.coli found in a quarter of supermarket-bought chicken [UK]

    09/04/2016 8:43:01 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 30 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 5 September 2016 • 12:41AM | (Telegraph Reporters)
    A quarter of supermarket chicken contains antibiotic-resistant E.coli, according to Cambridge University research. The bug can cause stomach pain and kidney failure, and in severe cases can lead to death. The study found that superbug strains of E.coli were present in 22 of 92 chicken pieces. The meat was purchased from seven major British supermarkets and included different cuts from whole chickens to packs of drumsticks, legs, thighs and diced breast. The bug was found in samples from all of the supermarkets. …
  • Million Pounds Of Rat Meat Being Sold As Boneless Chicken Wings In U.S

    08/12/2016 7:18:45 AM PDT · by massmike · 137 replies
    healthyadviceteam.com ^ | 08/12/2016 | n/a
    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) at the Port of San Francisco destroyed numerous illegal containers imported into the U.S from China. These containers contained rat meat! The strange thing about this is the plan this rat meat to be sold as chicken meat. The idea was the nasty meat to be shipped to different points in several states, and to be sold as chicken. The FDA states that there is a possibility of another 300,000 lbs. of this meat being offered in groceries and restaurants across the U.S. The FDA inspector, Ronal Jones, claims that if cooked completely, this...
  • Trivia Question: 44% of All the World's Eggs Come from Chicken Stock of Which VP?

    07/13/2016 11:18:12 AM PDT · by PJ-Comix · 72 replies
    Self | July 13, 2016 | PJ-Comix
    Trivia Question: 44% of All the World's Stock Come from Chicken Stock of Which VP? Not a trick question. And it is amazingly true. 44% of all eggs in the world come from the chicken stock developed by one of America's vice presidents. Can you guess who?
  • Tyson Recalls Over 52,000 Pounds of Cooked Chicken Wings

    11/17/2015 12:25:05 PM PST · by BlackFemaleArmyCaptain · 22 replies
    NBC New York ^ | 11/17/2015 | Aaron Montes
    Tyson Foods Inc. is recalling about 52,486 pounds of chicken wing products, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service announced on Tuesday. Consumers who contacted Tyson Foods Inc. complained that "Any'tizers Fully Cooked Hot Wings, Chicken Wing Sections Coated with Flavorful Hot, Tangy Sauce" had an "off-odor" scent. The USDA said the product may be adulterated because of having the scent. The problem was discovered when Tyson Foods Inc. received consumer complaints of odor as well as mild illness associated with consumption. The USDA has categorized the chicken recall as a class II recall, which indicates that...
  • Cruelty To Animals, Exposed

    08/09/2015 11:05:54 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 25 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | August 9, 2015 | Steve Chapman
    If you like eating meat, information is not always your friend. In recent years, practices at large facilities that turn livestock into food have been exposed to public view, and the public often doesn't like what it sees. The companies that confine pregnant sows in tiny stalls or scald chickens to death don't publicize these practices. Slaughterhouses where cattle are sometimes dismembered alive don't offer guided tours. To see what goes on in the worst operations, most of us have to rely on activists who covertly record inside and put videos online. Organizations like the Humane Society of the United...
  • Chicken Bones Suggest Polynesians Found Americas Before Columbus

    09/16/2009 1:07:41 PM PDT · by Nikas777 · 86 replies · 1,473+ views
    livescience.com ^ | 04 June 2007 | Heather Whipps
    Chicken Bones Suggest Polynesians Found Americas Before ColumbusBy Heather Whipps, Special to LiveScience Which came first–the chicken or the European? Popular history, and a familiar rhyme about Christopher Columbus, holds that Europeans made contact with the Americas in 1492, with some arguing that the explorer and his crew were the first outsiders to reach the New World. But chicken bones recently unearthed on the coast of Chile—dating prior to Columbus’ “discovery” of America and resembling the DNA of a fowl species native to Polynesia—may challenge that notion, researchers say. “Chickens could not have gotten to South America on their own—they...
  • 'Chicken and Chips' Theory of Pacific Migration

    07/31/2008 12:33:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 82+ views
    Newswise ^ | Tuesday, July 29, 2008 | University of Adelaide
    The study questions recent claims that chickens were first introduced into South America by Polynesians, before the arrival of Spanish chickens in the 15th century following Christopher Columbus. ...the University of Adelaide's Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD) Director Professor Alan Cooper says there has been considerable debate about the existence and degree of contact between Polynesians and South Americans, with the presence of the sweet potato throughout the Pacific often used as evidence of early trading contacts... A recent study claimed to have found the first direct evidence of a genetic link between ancient Polynesian and apparently pre-Columbian chickens...
  • 2007 - Year Of The Lapita? (Polynesian Breakthroughs)

    12/13/2007 1:03:09 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies · 208+ views
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | January/Febuary 2008 | Mark Rose
    2007—Year of the Lapita? Volume 61 Number 1, January/February 2008 by Mark Rose Polynesian Breakthroughs A Polynesian chicken (Anita Gould) and a Chilean chicken bone (Courtesy Alice Storey) There was no doubt about including in our 2007 Top Ten the discovery that chicken bones from ancient Polynesian sites in Tonga and Samoa and El Arenal, a Chilean site occupied between A.D. 700 and 1390, had identical DNA. The chicken was domesticated in Southeast Asia, but how it arrived in the New World before Europeans arrived was a mystery. Now it seems that Polynesian seafarers brought them, adding to the evidence...
  • Early Polynesians Sailed Thousands Of Miles For Trade

    09/27/2007 3:46:25 PM PDT · by blam · 48 replies · 509+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 9-27-2007 | Dave Hansford
    Early Polynesians Sailed Thousands of Miles for Trade Dave Hansford for National Geographic News September 27, 2007 Early Polynesians sailed thousands of miles for exploration and trade, suggests a new study of early stone woodworking tools. The analysis confirms traditional tales of vast ocean voyages and hints that a trading network existed between Hawaii and Tahiti as early as a thousand years ago. The work also bolsters research suggesting that the Polynesians were skillful sailors who rapidly expanded across the Pacific and journeyed as far as South America by the 1400s A.D. Kenneth Collerson and Marshall Weisler of the University...
  • First Chickens in Americas Were Brought From Polynesia (came before Columbus)

    06/04/2007 6:55:26 PM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 33 replies · 842+ views
    NYT ^ | 06/05/07 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    First Chickens in Americas Were Brought From Polynesia By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD Why did the chicken cross the Pacific Ocean? To get to the other side, in South America. How? By Polynesian canoes, which apparently arrived at least 100 years before Europeans settled the continent. That is the conclusion of an international research team, which reported yesterday that it had found “the first unequivocal evidence for a pre-European introduction of chickens to South America,” or presumably anywhere in the New World. The researchers said that bones buried on the South American coast were from chickens that lived between 1304 and...
  • Did Ancient Drifters 'Discover' British Columbia?

    04/25/2012 4:58:58 PM PDT · by Theoria · 28 replies
    The Tyee ^ | 03 April 2012 | Daniel Wood
    Legends and bits of evidence tell a story of Asians arriving here long, long ago. Part one of two. "Even pale ink is better than memory." -- Chinese proverbAs the tide creeps over the sand flats of Pachena Bay south of Bamfield, it brings ashore the flotsam of the Pacific that -- on occasion -- hints at extraordinary travels and a mystery of historic proportions. Amid the kelp, in decades past, hundreds of green-glass fishing floats would arrive intact on the Vancouver Island coast, having ridden the powerful Japanese Current in year-long transits from Asia. But on rare occasions, entire...
  • Archaeologists Find Evidence Of Origin Of Pacific Islanders

    03/31/2008 1:56:50 PM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 1,238+ views
    VOA News ^ | 3-31-2008 | Heidi Chang
    Archaeologists Find Evidence of Origin of Pacific Islanders By Heidi Chang Honolulu, Hawaii 31 March 2008 The origin of Pacific Islanders has been a mystery for years. Now archaeologists believe they have the answer. As Heidi Chang reports, they found it in China. The excavation of the Zishan site (Zhejiang Province) in 1996, where many artifacts from the Hemudu culture have been found China had a sea-faring civilization as long as 7000 years ago. Archaeologist Tianlong Jiao says, one day, these mariners sailed their canoes into the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, and stayed. He points out, "Most scientists, archaeologists,...
  • Feathers fly in Israel over sacrificial chickens

    09/17/2010 5:38:00 AM PDT · by decimon · 44 replies
    Reuters ^ | September 17, 2010 | Writing by Allyn Fisher-Ilan; Editing by Paul Casciato
    JERUSALEM (Reuters Life!) – A ritual sacrifice of chickens that are also twirled about one's head to atone for sins ahead of the Yom Kippur holiday has come under fire in Israel where animal activists want it outlawed. The custom known in Hebrew as "kaparot" is commonly practiced by Ultra Orthodox Jews before the annual Day of Atonement, a 25-hour period of fasting and prayer observed by Jews the world over starting at sunset Friday. In Israel, where a majority of Jews view themselves as secular or non-observant, a small group of Ultra Orthodox has angered the wider public by...
  • Epic Voyage To Discover Origins And Migration Routes Of Ancestors Of Ancient Polynesians...

    11/06/2008 3:25:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 338+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Thursday, November 6, 2008 | Durham University
    Two Durham University scientists are to play a key part in a 6000km trip following the migration route of ancient Pacific cultures. Drs Keith Dobney and Greger Larson, both from the Department of Archaeology, will be joining the voyage, which will be the first ever expedition to sail in two traditional Polynesian boats -- ethnic double canoes -- which attempts to re-trace the genuine migration route of the ancient Austronesians. The main aim of the voyage is to find out where the ancestors of Polynesian culture originated but the Durham University researchers will also be examining the local wildlife. Dr...
  • Brace Yourself for a Thanksgiving Turkey Shortage

    06/18/2015 3:56:58 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 30 replies
    New York Magazine ^ | June 18, 2015 | Clint Rainey
    Bird flu has made the three-egg omelette a luxury item in parts of America, but the other fowl bearing the brunt of the highly pathogenic virus's outbreak is the poor turkey, whose flocks have been culled by 7.8 million so far. The USDA is now recognizing that this could have bad consequences in, say, five months, when a certain holiday occurs on the third Thursday of November. The federal agency's latest monthly hatchery report is a bit ominous: Reuters notes that it reports a "significant decline" in the May count for baby turkeys, or poults. That number (22.3 million) is...
  • Foster Farms Suspends 5 Workers Following Release Of Undercover Animal Cruelty Video

    06/17/2015 6:28:56 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    CBS News ^ | June 17, 2015
    Poultry producer Foster Farms suspended five employees Wednesday after an animal-rights group released undercover video showing live birds being slammed upside-down into shackles, punched and plucked. The suspended employees were either directly involved in the abuse or failed to report it to management, the California-based company said in a statement released through a public relations firm. “The behavior of the individuals in this video is inappropriate and counter to our stringent animal welfare standards, procedures and policies,” the statement said.