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Keyword: minoans

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  • Ancient monkey painting suggests Bronze Age Greeks travelled widely

    02/04/2020 1:46:16 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    New Scientist ^ | December 11, 2019 | Michael Marshall
    A Bronze Age painting on a Greek island shows a monkey from thousands of kilometres away in Asia. The finding suggests that ancient cultures separated by great distances were trading and exchanging ideas. The artwork is one of several wall paintings in a building at Akrotiri on the Greek island of Thera (Santorini) in the Aegean Sea. Akrotiri was a settlement of the Minoan civilisation in Bronze Age Greece that was buried by ash from a volcanic eruption in around 1600 BC. Many of the paintings show monkeys, yet there were no monkeys in Greece at the time. Most of...
  • Lost "Atlantean": Treasures Found in Crete

    11/12/2019 7:36:50 PM PST · by wildbill · 18 replies
    Ancient Origens ^ | 9/11/19 | Alan Cowie
    Archaeologists have discovered large quantities of treasure, which may be called ‘Atlantean treasures,’ in ancient Minoan-era buildings in Crete. Excavations conducted this year by Lasithi Antiquities Ephorate on the western part of the islet Chryssi, a municipality of Ierapetra, eastern Crete, have unearthed an ancient Minoan settlement, which according to the Greek Ministry of Culture , supported a “flourishing economy” so advanced it had built stone tanks in which marine species were cultivated.
  • Ancient Tablets May Reveal What Destroyed Minoan Civilization

    09/16/2019 4:21:23 PM PDT · by Openurmind · 54 replies
    Haaretz ^ | Sep 10, 2019 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The Minoans and their capital Knossos weren’t incinerated by volcanic blast from Thera or flattened by quake as thought, but tellingly: their writing system changed. The mystery of what happened to the Minoan civilization has tormented archaeologists for over a century, and the tale has now taken a new twist. Nothing happened to them, say archaeologists who have been excavating the island of Crete for over thirty years. This extraordinary people, who produced palatial architecture unparalleled in the Aegean region at the time, were not immolated by the volcanic eruption of Thera as once thought, crushed by earthquake, or squashed...
  • Greek Farmer Accidentally Discovers 3,400-Year-Old Minoan Tomb Hidden Under Olive Grove

    08/10/2019 10:06:50 AM PDT · by Anoop · 55 replies
    archaeology-world ^ | AUGUST 7, 2019 | ARCHAEOLOGY WORLD TEAM
    Sometime between 1400 and 1200 B.C., two Minoan men were laid to rest in an underground enclosure carved out of the soft limestone native to southeast Crete. Both were entombed within larnakes—intricately embossed clay coffins popular in Bronze Age Minoan society—and surrounded by colorful funerary vases that hinted at their owners’ high status. Eventually, the burial site was sealed with stone masonry and forgotten, leaving the deceased undisturbed for roughly 3,400 years.
  • Scholars say Philistine genes help solve biblical mystery

    07/03/2019 1:16:54 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 108 replies
    www.wpri.com ^ | Posted: Jul 3, 2019 / 02:13 PM EDT / Updated: Jul 3, 2019 / 02:21 PM EDT | by: ILAN BEN ZION
    JERUSALEM — Goliath the Greek? Human remains from an ancient cemetery in southern Israel have yielded precious bits of DNA that a new study says help prove the European origin of the Philistines — the enigmatic nemeses of the biblical Israelites. The Philistines mostly resided in five cities along the southern coast of what is today Israel and the Gaza Strip during the early Iron Age, around 3,000 years ago. In the Bible, David fought the Philistine giant Goliath in a duel, and Samson slew a thousand of their warriors with the jawbone of an ass. Many archaeologists have proposed...
  • 3,600-yr-old Shipwreck Uncovered Could be Oldest Ever Found in the Mediterranean [Antalya, Turkey]

    05/17/2019 10:59:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    The Vintage News ^ | April 20, 2019 | Helen Flatley
    A team of marine archaeologists has uncovered a 3,600-year-old shipwreck in the Mediterranean, just off the coast of Antalya, Turkey. The ship, believed to have been a merchant vessel sailing from Cyprus, may be the oldest ever discovered, according to Haaretz... Based on its position and the large cargo of copper ingots found inside and around the wreck, it is likely to have been a trading ship, ferrying goods from Cyprus to the Aegean region. Although the ship is in very poor condition, and the hull has been almost completely destroyed, the bulk of the ship, together with its precious...
  • Archaeological evidence shows Minoans used violence and were prepared for war

    03/06/2019 11:22:10 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Tornos News ^ | Wednesday, 06 March 2019 | unattributed
    It is hard to explain why such a thing occurred. As well as why in Minoan culture there is no representation of or reference to a lord. "In Minoan culture we have no representation of a lord, neither has any name come down to us except for that of Minos and perhaps Radamanthes, about whom we do not have much information. Moreover, Homeric Idomeneas was a Mycenaean king of Crete", noted Mrs Tsipopoulou having already stressed the mystery of Minoan culture which continuously thickens, despite new finds and fresh interpretations. Here is an interesting piece of information from the archaeologist...
  • Is Global Warming a Hoax?

    01/06/2015 7:14:56 PM PST · by Coleus · 44 replies
    The New American ^ | 01.06.15 | Ed Hiserodt and Rebecca Terrell
    In our information age, we’re bombarded with statistics on every danger the number crunchers can conjure — people struck by lightning, airplane vs. automotive deaths, and even drownings in bathtubs. But one statistic is curiously missing from the list. Even though President Obama and other global-warming alarmists warn of a looming climate apocalypse, they avoid giving a metric to prove their claims. They blame man-made climate change for a vast array of ills, including floods, droughts, wildfires, and tornados. But they never quantify what they say is the driving force behind it all: temperature.They have a very good reason. Actual...
  • Listen To The World's Oldest-Known Melody (1400 BC)

    09/27/2016 10:12:31 AM PDT · by blam · 64 replies
    Fox News Science - Newser ^ | 9-27-2016 | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore
    Elizabeth Armstrong Moore September 27, 2016 In 1950, a collection of 29 tablets was discovered in the ruins of Ugarit, an ancient city in the northern region of present-day Syria, but only one had survived the intervening centuries well enough to be deciphered. Known as H6, the 3,500-year-old clay tablet revealed a simple hymn specifying the use of nine lyre strings and the intervals between them, much like an "ancient guitar tab," reports ClassicFM, which has recently picked up the story. The resulting melody, it says, isn't just the oldest discovered in the world, but "utterly enchanting." Musician and composer...
  • 3,200-Year-Old Cyclopean Masonry Fortress... Ancient Thrace Was Part of Mycenaean Civilization [tr]

    10/27/2018 5:43:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | October 24, 2018 | Ivan Dikov (ouch!)
    An ancient fortress which is 3,000 - 3,200 years old and was built with the so called Cyclopean masonry has been found by archaeologists in Bulgaria's Rhodope Mountains, near the town of Zlatograd and the border with Greece, and is taken as evidence that Ancient Thrace was part of the Mycenaean Civilization. The previously undetected fortress is roughly dated to 1,200 BC, i.e. to the time of Ancient Troy and the Trojan War. It is located near Zlatograd, Bulgaria's southernmost town, near the southern slopes of the Rhodope Mountains, in an area that is only about 20 kilometers away from...
  • Santorini volcano explosion dates changed: Piece of olive tree found on Thirasia changes everything

    10/22/2018 10:51:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Thema Newsroom ^ | October 22, 2018 | Kerry Kolasa-Sikiaridi/greekreporter
    The dating of a piece of olive tree found on Thirasia will move the dating of the eruption of Santorini's volcano a few decades later than current estimates, the Ministry of Culture and Sports said on Friday. The wood was found in the area "Kimissi Thirassias", the prehistoric settlement which lies on a hillside of the island once connected to Thira, or Santorini, at least up to the Middle Bronze Age, before the volcano exploded. The settlement is on top of a hill on the southern side of Thirasia, and on the edge of the caldera that existed before the...
  • Where Did the Philistines Come From?

    10/03/2018 2:50:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Society ^ | September 22, 2018 | Staff
    While uncovering an impressive destruction level dating to the second half of the ninth century B.C.E., when Gath was the largest of the five cities of the Philistines and perhaps the largest city in the Land of Israel during the Iron Age, excavators found an exceptionally well preserved horned altar reminiscent of the Israelite horned altars described in the Bible (Exodus 27:1–2; 1 Kings 1:50)... But why does this altar have only two horns, when we know from the Bible and excavated examples that the altars of both the Israelites and, later, the Philistines, typically had four horns? The fact...
  • Dating the Ancient Minoan Eruption of Thera Using Tree Rings

    08/16/2018 12:54:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies
    University of Arizona ^ | Wednesday, August15, 2018 | Mari N. Jensen
    ...by resolving discrepancies between archeological and radiocarbon methods of dating the eruption, according to new University of Arizona-led research... "It's about tying together a timeline of ancient Egypt, Greece, Turkey and the rest of the Mediterranean at this critical point in the ancient world -- that's what dating Thera can do," said lead author Charlotte Pearson, an assistant professor of dendrochronology at the UA Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research... Archeologists have estimated the eruption as occurring sometime between 1570 and 1500 BC by using human artifacts such as written records from Egypt and pottery retrieved from digs. Other researchers estimated the...
  • Minoan palace of Zominthos in Crete yields exciting Bronze Age finds

    09/30/2018 2:07:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    TornosNews.gr ^ | September 25, 2018 | unattributed
    The Minoan palace of Zominthos was a complex with three-story buildings grounded in the rock at 1,200 meters above sea level. As early as 2000 BC, worshippers began placing offerings in clefts in the rock, such as "egg cups" - simple cup-shaped vases with a disc-like base - both painted and plain. The honorary director of the Antiquities Department, Dr Efi Sapounas-Sakellarakis, spoke enthusiastically... The palace of Zominthos, she notes, had more than 150 rooms. "...The large limestone floor slabs, which look like marble... were brought there from a quarry 20 kilometers away." ...This section yielded bronze daggers, seals, stone...
  • Intact tomb of Bronze Age Minoan man discovered in Ierapetra, Crete

    08/25/2018 8:33:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 73 replies
    TornosNews.gr ^ | Wednesday, August 22, 2018 | unattributed, Daily Mail
    An initial inspection of the ceramics found in the tomb allowed it to be dated to the late Minoan period, or 1400 to 1200 BC Archaeologists in Crete have discovered an intact Minoan-era tomb containing a well-preserved adult skeleton along with funerary vessels. An initial inspection of the ceramics found in the tomb allowed it to be dated to the late Minoan period, or 1400 to 1200 BC, a statement from the Ministry of Culture noted. The tomb was discovered during an emergency excavation in an olive grove outside the village of Kentri, in the eastern prefecture of Ierapetra, the...
  • Farmer Discovers Rare Tombstone from Late Minoan III Period on Crete

    08/18/2018 9:38:35 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    GreekReporter ^ | August 8, 2018 | Kerry Kolasa-Sikiaridi
    A farmer in Kentri Ierapetra on Crete attempted to park his vehicle in the shade of an olive tree and by pure chance, the over-irrigated dirt under his vehicle revealed a carved tombstone of the Late Minoan III period... In the grave, that had not been ransacked, archaeologists discovered two large Larnaka Late Minoan period embossed depictions that are in excellent condition. In addition, there were two skeletons found in the graves and about 24 vases with colored embossings and depictions. "Soil retreat was a result of the watering of the olive trees in the area as well as a...
  • DNA clue to origins of early Greek civilization

    08/03/2017 9:21:11 AM PDT · by ek_hornbeck · 27 replies
    BBC ^ | 8/3/17 | BBC
    DNA is shedding light on the people who built Greece's earliest civilizations. Researchers analysed genetic data from skeletons dating to the Bronze Age, a period marked by the emergence of writing, complex urban planning and magnificent art and architecture. These ancient Aegean people were mostly descended from farmers who had settled the region thousands of years earlier. But they showed signs of genetic - and possibly cultural - contact with people to the north and to the east. Dr Iosif Lazaridis, from Harvard Medical School in Massachusetts, and colleagues focussed on burials from the Minoan civilization, which flourished on the...
  • Dynasty of Priestesses [ Iron Age necropolis of Orthi Petra at Eleutherna on Crete ]

    03/02/2010 7:16:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 18,903+ views
    Archaeology ^ | March 1, 2010 | Eti Bonn-Muller
    For a quarter century, Greek excavation director Nicholas Stampolidis and his dedicated team have been unearthing the untold stories of the people buried some 2,800 years ago in the necropolis of Orthi Petra at Eleutherna on Crete. Until now, the site has perhaps been best known for the tomb its excavators dubbed "A1K1," an assemblage of 141 cremated individuals, all but two of whom were aristocratic men who likely fell in battle in foreign lands. Excavated between 1992 and 1996, this elaborate rock-cut tomb was brimming with fantastic burial goods that date from the ninth to the seventh century B.C.,...
  • Cretan Excavation Sheds New Light On Dark Ages Of Greek History

    12/07/2004 1:44:53 PM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 920+ views
    Kathimerini (English Edition) ^ | 12-7-2004 | Nicholas Paphitis
    Cretan excavation sheds light on Dark Ages of Greek historyFinds from ancient Eleutherna at Cycladic Museum A marble statue of Aphrodite, from a second- to first-century-BC bathhouse in Eleutherna. By Nicholas Paphitis - Kathimerini English Edition On a narrow spur under the shadow of Mount Ida in central Crete, archaeologists for the past 20 years have been excavating a town that flourished from the Dark Ages of Greece’s early history until Medieval times. The Eleutherna project, a systematic dig carried out by a three-pronged team of top archaeologists from the University of Crete, is in itself unusual in a country...
  • Archaeologists On Crete Find Skeleton Covered With Gold Foil In 2,700-year-old Grave

    10/01/2010 2:54:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Canadian Press via Google News ^ | Tuesday, September 28, 2010 | Nicholas Paphitis
    Excavator Nicholas Stampolidis said his team discovered more than 3,000 pieces of gold foil in the 7th-century B.C. twin grave near the ancient town of Eleutherna... The tiny gold ornaments, from 1 to 4 centimetres (0.4 to 1.5 inches) long, had been sewn onto a lavish robe or shroud that initially wrapped the body of a woman and has almost completely rotted away but for a few off-white threads... The woman, who presumably had a high social or religious status, was buried with a second skeleton in a large jar sealed with a stone slab weighing more than half a...