HOME/ABOUT  Prayer  SCOTUS  ProLife  BangList  Aliens  StatesRights  ConventionOfStates  WOT  HomosexualAgenda  GlobalWarming  Corruption  Taxes  Congress  Fraud  MediaBias  GovtAbuse  Tyranny  Obama  ObamaCare  Elections  Polls  Debates  Trump  Carson  Cruz  Bush  OPSEC  Benghazi  InfoSec  BigBrother  IRS  Scandals  TalkRadio  TeaParty  FreeperBookClub  HTMLSandbox  FReeperEd  FReepathon  CopyrightList  Copyright/DMCA Notice 

Dear FRiends, Please keep those donations coming in. We need your loyal support now more than ever. Thank you for your support, James

Or by mail to: Free Republic, LLC - PO Box 9771 - Fresno, CA 93794
Free Republic 4th Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $74,012
Woo hoo!! And now less than $14k to go!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: impact

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Supervolcanoes likely triggered externally

    11/05/2015 9:03:26 AM PST · by JimSEA · 42 replies
    Science Daily ^ | November 4, 2015 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Supervolcanoes, massive eruptions with potential global consequences, appear not to follow the conventional volcano mechanics of internal pressure building until the volcano blows. Instead, a new study finds, such massive magma chambers might erupt when the roof above them cracks or collapses. Knowledge of triggering mechanisms is crucial for monitoring supervolcano systems, including ones that lie beneath Yellowstone National Park and Long Valley, California, according to the study led by Patricia Gregg, University of Illinois professor of geology, in collaboration with professor Eric Grosfils of Pomona College and professor Shan de Silva of Oregon State University. The study was published...
  • Double Whammy: 2 Meteors Hit Ancient Earth At The Same Time

    09/15/2015 9:53:39 AM PDT · by blam · 37 replies
    Fox News - Live Science ^ | 9-15-2015 | Elizabeth Palermo
    Elizabeth Palermo September 15, 2015An artist's depiction of the dual meteor strike. (Don Dixon/Erik Sturkell/University of Gothenburg) It's not altogether uncommon to hear about double rainbows, but what about a double meteor strike? It's a rare event, but researchers in Sweden recently found evidence that two meteors smacked into Earth at the same time, about 458 million years ago. Researchers from the University of Gothenburg uncovered two craters in the county of Jämtland in central Sweden. The meteors that formed the craters landed just a few miles from each other at the same moment, according to Erik Sturkell, a professor...
  • Asteroid threat in 2032? Don't panic, but don't brush it off

    02/09/2014 3:40:37 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    NBC News ^ | February 3rd 2014 | Alan Boyle
    A big asteroid sailed past Earth last month, and astronomers haven't yet totally excluded the possibility that it'll hit us when it comes around in 2032. If the past is any guide, we won't have to worry about asteroid 2013 TV135 — but it's a reminder that we'll have to fend off a killer space rock one of these days. Ukrainian astronomers discovered 2013 TV135 just 10 days ago, well after the asteroid had its close encounter with Earth on Sept. 16. Actually, it wasn't all that close: The distance was 4.2 million miles (6.7 million kilometers), or about 17...
  • Space news: Fireballs light up Jupiter

    09/13/2010 9:38:58 AM PDT · by granite · 22 replies · 1+ views
    Lake County News ^ | Sunday, 12 September 2010 | Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
    A color composite image of the June 3, 2010, Jupiter impact flash. Credit: Anthony Wesley observing from Broken Hill, Australia. In a paper published Thursday in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, a group of professional and amateur astronomers announced that Jupiter is getting hit surprisingly often by small asteroids, lighting up the giant planet's atmosphere with frequent fireballs. "Jupiter is a big gravitational vacuum cleaner," said co-author and JPL astronomer Glenn Orton. "It is clear now that relatively small objects left over from the formation of the solar system 4.5 billion years ago still hit Jupiter frequently." The impacts are...
  • Hubble Space Telescope Captures Rare Jupiter Collision

    06/06/2010 4:09:09 AM PDT · by jmcenanly · 16 replies · 1,672+ views
    NASA | 06.03.10
    Without warning, a mystery object struck Jupiter on July 19, 2009, leaving a dark bruise the size of the Pacific Ocean. The spot first caught the eye of an amateur astronomer in Australia, and soon, observatories around the world, including NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, were zeroing in on the unexpected blemish. Astronomers had witnessed this kind of cosmic event before. Similar scars had been left behind during the course of a week in July 1994, when more than 20 pieces of Comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) plunged into Jupiter’s atmosphere. The 2009 impact occurred during the same week, 15 years later....
  • Anthony Wesley records another impact on Jupiter!

    06/03/2010 7:11:22 PM PDT · by Yossarian · 19 replies · 761+ views
    Ice in Space (Australian Amateur Astronomy) ^ | 6/3/2010 | Anthony Wesley, by way of Mike Salway
    In breaking news, Anthony Wesley reports another impact on Jupiter, this morning. In his words: ".. at approximately 20:30utc this morning I recorded a large fireball on Jupiter, it lasted a couple of seconds and was very bright.This was a large fireball, but it doesn't seem to have left any mark, probably all gone in the upper atmosphere before it reached the clouds."His preliminary image (a raw frame from the video) is shown below. The fireball can be seen in the upper left of frame. A video and more details will follow soon.Stay tuned to IceInSpace for more, and for...
  • Third Jupiter Fireball Spotted——Sky-Watching Army Needed?

    08/25/2010 9:30:12 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 27 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 8/24/10 | Andrew Fazekas
    Amateur sightings prompt call for a network of backyard astronomers.On August 20, for the third time in about a year, amateur astronomers spotted a fireball above Jupiter's atmosphere. The discovery suggests the planet gets walloped more often than previously thought, say astronomers, some of whom are calling for a global "volunteer army" of backyard Jupiter watchers. The recent flash follows on the heels of July 2009 and June 2010 fireballs over the gas giant planet. (See "Bright Fireball Slams Into Jupiter" [June 2010] and "Jupiter Impact Creates Huge New Spot" [July 2009].) Astronomers speculate that the August 20 flash was...
  • "Asteroid Impacts are the Biggest Threat to Advanced Life in the Milky Way" -Stephen Hawking

    09/26/2009 9:43:01 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 24 replies · 1,597+ views
    Daily Galaxy ^ | 9/26/09 | Stephen Hawking
    Stephen Hawking believes that one of the major factors in the possible scarcity of intelligent life in our galaxy is the high probability of an asteroid or comet colliding with inhabited planets. We have observed, Hawking points out in Life in the Universe, the collision of a comet, Schumacher-Levi, with Jupiter (below), which produced a series of enormous fireballs, plumes many thousands of kilometers high, hot "bubbles" of gas in the atmosphere, and large dark "scars" on the atmosphere which had lifetimes on the order of weeks. It is thought the collision of a rather smaller body with the Earth,...
  • Craters on Vesta and Ceres could hold key to Jupiter’s age

    09/19/2009 4:03:05 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 15 replies · 772+ views
    SCIENCE CENTRIC ^ | 14 September 2009 00:02 GMT | by Anita Heward
    Crater patterns on Vesta and Ceres could help pinpoint when Jupiter began to form during the evolution of the early Solar System. A study modelling the cratering history of the largest two objects in the asteroid belt, which are believed to be among the oldest in the Solar System, indicates that the type and distribution of craters would show marked changes at different stages of Jupiter’s development. Results will be presented by Dr Diego Turrini at the European Planetary Science Congress in Potsdam, Germany, on Monday 14 September. The study, carried out by scientists at the Italian National Institute for...
  • Hubble pictures Jupiter's 'scar'

    07/26/2009 5:15:10 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 23 replies · 624+ views
    Hubble has trained its new camera on the atmospheric disturbance on Jupiter believed to have been caused by a comet or asteroid impact. The telescope used the Wide Field Camera 3 fitted on the recent shuttle servicing mission to capture ultra-sharp visible-light images of the scar. The dark spot near the gas giant's southern pole was noticed first by an amateur Australian astronomer.
  • Jupiter Struck by Object, NASA Images Confirm

    07/21/2009 6:07:43 AM PDT · by Red in Blue PA · 105 replies · 2,483+ views
    Foxnews ^ | 7/21/2009 | Staff
    PASADENA, California — A large comet or asteroid has slammed into Jupiter, creating an impact site the size of Earth, pictures by an Australian amateur astronomer show. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory confirmed the discovery using its large infrared telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii, said computer programer Anthony Wesley, 44, who discovered the impact zone while stargazing at home. News of Wesley's find on a backyard 14.5-inch reflecting telescope has stunned the astronomy world, with scientists saying the impact will last only days more. Wesley said it took him 30 minutes to realize a dark spot rotating...
  • Rethinking Jupiter

    11/12/2007 9:59:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 94+ views
    Astrobio.net ^ | Monday, November 12, 2007 | Lee Pullen
    Without Jupiter acting as a "cosmic vacuum cleaner" sucking up these dangerous objects, there would be so many catastrophic impacts that life probably wouldn't have evolved on the Earth and we wouldn't be here today... "This vacuum cleaner idea goes back to when the long-period comets coming in from the Oort Cloud were viewed as being the only significant impact risk," says Horner. "In the 1950s there were only one or two near-Earth asteroids known, so they were viewed as oddities." ...Since the 1950s, scientists have discovered more objects in the solar system, and they say many of them could...
  • Jupiter Increases Risk Of Comet Strike On Earth

    08/24/2007 1:21:38 PM PDT · by blam · 84 replies · 1,235+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 8-24-2007 | David Shiga
    Jupiter increases risk of comet strike on Earth 11:53 24 August 2007 NewScientist.com news service David Shiga Earth experienced an especially heavy bombardment of asteroids and comets early in the solar system's history (Illustration: Julian Baum) Contrary to prevailing wisdom, Jupiter does not protect Earth from comet strikes. In fact, Earth would suffer fewer impacts without the influence of Jupiter's gravity, a new study says. It could have implications for determining which solar systems are most hospitable to life. A 1994 study showed that replacing Jupiter with a much smaller planet like Uranus or Neptune would lead to 1000 times...
  • Iran confirms meteor hit

    07/31/2015 8:21:24 PM PDT · by Jack Hydrazine · 31 replies
    Trend Magazine ^ | 31JUL2015 | Mehdi Sepahvand
    Iran has confirmed that a meteor has hit somewhere in the northern part of the country. The meteor landed in Avaj in the province of Qazvin, Mohammad Ali Ahani, director of Qazvin Crisis Management Staff said, Mehr news agency reported July 31. Also, there have been reports that some pieces of rock have hit areas in Eshtehard, Alborz Province, Arsalan Qasemi, governor of Boeen Zahra, county in Qazvin Province, said. Another local governor of Takestan County, Qazvin Province, said that the area witnessed the passing of the meteor, but nowhere in the district under his supervision had been hit.
  • 1014 AD impact event causes Atlantic tsunami and end of Aztec’s Fourth Sun?

    01/11/2012 12:29:51 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    2012Quest ^ | January 12th, 2011 | Gary C. Daniels
    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states that in England 1014 AD, on the eve of St. Michael’s day (September 28, 1014) “came the great sea-flood, which spread wide over this land, and ran so far up as it never did before, overwhelming many towns, and an innumerable multitude of people.” This is clearly a reference to a tsunami similar to the one that struck Indonesia in December 2004 which killed over 250,000 people. What could have caused this tsunami? Could a meteor or comet impact in the Atlantic Ocean have been the cause? Researcher Dallas Abbott of the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory...
  • Pics, Video From Alleged Noah's Ark Find

    04/27/2010 1:02:13 PM PDT · by Fennie · 76 replies · 4,194+ views
    Dakota Voice ^ | April 27, 2010 | By Bob Ellis
    The Sun, Fox News and others are reporting that a group of Chinese and Turkish Christians claim to have found the remains of Noah's Ark on Mount Ararat about 13,000 ft up.
  • Giant Meteorites Slammed Earth Around A.D. 500?

    02/05/2010 7:31:57 AM PST · by Palter · 28 replies · 906+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 03 Feb 2010 | Richard A. Lovett
    Double impact may have caused tsunami, global cooling Pieces of a giant asteroid or comet that broke apart over Earth may have crashed off Australia about 1,500 years ago, says a scientist who has found evidence of the possible impact craters. Satellite measurements of the Gulf of Carpentaria (see map) revealed tiny changes in sea level that are signs of impact craters on the seabed below, according to new research by marine geophysicist Dallas Abbott. Based on the satellite data, one crater should be about 11 miles (18 kilometers) wide, while the other should be 7.4 miles (12 kilometers) wide....
  • Comet smashes triggered ancient famine [ March 536 AD ]

    01/08/2009 9:54:17 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies · 1,221+ views
    New Scientist ^ | January 7, 2009 | Ker Than
    Multiple comet impacts around 1500 years ago triggered a "dry fog" that plunged half the world into famine. Historical records tell us that from the beginning of March 536 AD, a fog of dust blanketed the atmosphere for 18 months. During this time, "the sun gave no more light than the moon", global temperatures plummeted and crops failed, says Dallas Abbott of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in New York... Now Abbott and her team have found the first direct evidence that multiple impacts caused the haze. They found tiny balls of condensed rock vapour or "spherules" in debris inside...
  • Meteorite Triggered Ancient New York Tsunami?

    01/02/2009 1:09:38 PM PST · by Red Badger · 14 replies · 718+ views
    nationalgeographic.com ^ | December 31, 2008 | Ker Than in New York City
    A meteorite impact off Long Island 2,300 years ago may have set off a huge tsunami that flooded the New York City region, a new study says (New York City and Long Island map). It's not known whether any ancient settlements were in the path of the proposed killer waves, but "any significant tsunami today would be devastating and likely to flood places like lower Manhattan," Vanderbilt University geologist Steven Goodbred said. Tsunamis are typically triggered by seismic events. An undersea earthquake, for example, caused the catastrophic 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. But meteorite strikes have also been known to spark...
  • Did A Comet Cause The Great Flood?

    11/21/2007 2:17:23 PM PST · by blam · 120 replies · 895+ views
    Discover Magazine ^ | 11-15-2007 | Scott Carney
    Did a Comet Cause the Great Flood?The universal human myth may be the first example of disaster reporting. by Scott Carney11-15-2007 The Fenambosy chevrons at the tip of Madagascar. Image courtesy of Dallas Abbott The serpent’s tails coil together menacingly. A horn juts sharply from its head. The creature looks as if it might be swimming through a sea of stars. Or is it making its way up a sheer basalt cliff? For Bruce Masse, an environmental archaeologist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, there is no confusion as he looks at this ancient petroglyph, scratched into a rock by a...
  • Ancient Crash, Epic Wave

    11/14/2006 4:07:33 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 68 replies · 4,321+ views
    NY Times ^ | November 14, 2006 | SANDRA BLAKESLEE
    Dallas Abbott The Fenambosy chevron, one of four near the tip of Madagascar, is 600 feet high and three miles from the ocean. At the southern end of Madagascar lie four enormous wedge-shaped sediment deposits, called chevrons, that are composed of material from the ocean floor. Each covers twice the area of Manhattan with sediment as deep as the Chrysler Building is high. On close inspection, the chevron deposits contain deep ocean microfossils that are fused with a medley of metals typically formed by cosmic impacts. snip... The explanation is obvious to some scientists. A large asteroid or comet,...
  • Catastrophism

    04/02/2006 2:13:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 244 replies · 18,519+ views
    Various ^ | Various
    Did a planetary wobble kill the dinosaurs? by Nicola JonesNew ScientistJune 27 2001Bruce Runnegar from the University of California at Los Angeles' Center for Astrobiology... and his colleagues used computer models to map out the Solar System for the past 250 million years. In particular, they looked at the perihelion of each planet - the point in its orbit where it is closest to the Sun. The perihelion of Earth rotates around the Sun with a period of hundreds of thousands of years. Because of subtle tugs and pulls between the planets, this period changes slightly with time... Their...
  • Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

    07/16/2004 11:27:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1,526 replies · 55,589+ views
    Gods, Graves, Glyphs ^ | 7/17/2004 | various
    14 Warring States (464-222BC) Tombs Discovered In Sichuan  ^ 6 posted on 07/15/2004 7:20:44 PM PDT by FairOpinion [#6]Achaemenid, Worldís First Empire to Respect Cultural Diversity  ^ 3 posted on 07/05/2004 6:45:53 PM PDT by FairOpinion [#3]Ancient European Remains Discovered In Qinghai (China)  ^ 27 posted on 07/06/2004 7:23:57 PM PDT by FairOpinion [#27]Archaeologists Dig Up World War II Plane  ^ 21 posted on 05/31/2004 9:46:55 AM PDT by farmfriend [#21]Archaeologists Reveal Utah Canyon Filled With Ancient Settlements  ^ 22 posted on 07/01/2004 9:37:46 PM PDT by FairOpinion [#22]Archaeologists Startled To Discover Neolithic Ritual Site (Scotland)  ^ 3 posted...
  • Cosmic Collision May Have Created Hawaii

    02/20/2004 7:50:03 PM PST · by Mike Darancette · 32 replies · 228+ views
    SPACE.com ^ | 01 August 2001 | Michael Paine
    It's bad enough when, every few million years, an asteroid rocks our planet. It's worse if the impact triggers regional or global volcanic activity, which is not only hazardous to nearby plants and animals but can choke Earth's atmosphere with deadly gases for months or years. But there's also a possible bright side, like the birth of nice places like Hawaii. For more than three decades, scientists have explored the question of whether an asteroid impact could cause significant volcanic eruptions, hot spots that spring up out of nowhere and create new landforms or rearrange old ones. The process might...
  • Expedition Hunts Giant Meteor (1500AD - NZ)

    02/07/2004 11:28:42 AM PST · by blam · 11 replies · 1,091+ views
    The New Zealand Herald ^ | 2-7-2004 | Simon Collins
    Expedition hunts giant meteor 07.02.2004 By SIMON COLLINS, science reporter An international scientific expedition will fly to Stewart Island next week on a quest to track down a meteor that may have sparked a tsunami that possibly wiped out a legendary Chinese fleet 500 years ago.Expedition leader New York oceanographer Dallas Abbott has found survey evidence of a huge undersea crater caused by a meteor impact 20km wide and more than 153m deep just south of the Snares Islands, 120km southwest of Stewart Island. The expedition is going to remote Mason Bay on the west coast of Stewart Island to...

    12/05/2003 6:43:33 PM PST · by Mike Darancette · 34 replies · 1,781+ views
    USNews.com ^ | 8 December 2003 edition | Charles W. Petit
    In 1989, Edward Bryant climbed a point on the southeast coast of his native Australia with a colleague and found an odd jumble of boulders well above the surf. A big wave, he thought, maybe a tsunami from an earthquake, must have tossed them up there. Over the next few years, however, the University of Wollongong geologist explored hundreds of miles of coast and found more signs of wave action, hundreds of feet above the water--too high for any quake-spawned surge. An astonishing hypothesis of devastation from outer space formed in his mind. It gathered some praise, along with many...
  • Maine Crater Related to Dino-Killer Asteroid?

    04/05/2003 9:39:18 PM PST · by SteveH · 19 replies · 493+ views
    Discovery News ^ | April 3, 2003 | Larry O'Hanlon
    Maine Crater Related to Dino-Killer Asteroid? By Larry O'Hanlon, Discovery News April 3, 2003 — The evidence is still skimpy, but there is a chance that the dino killer asteroid was not alone when it walloped the Earth 65 million years ago. A possible second crater, at least as big or bigger than the famous Chicxulub crater off Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, may have been created by a second hit moments after Chicxulub and off the coast of Maine. "It probably is a crater, but we really don't have age data," said marine geologist Dallas Abbott Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia...

    02/04/2003 9:54:17 PM PST · by Mike Darancette · 5 replies · 517+ views
    Space.com ^ | 4 February 2003 | Robert Roy Britt
    HOW IMPACTS CAN TRIGGER VOLCANOS Large asteroid impacts have nasty side effects, as any dinosaur could have told you were she not obliterated by one of these calamity combos 65 million years ago. The ground shakes. Fire arcs across the sky and beyond the horizon. Clouds of debris race around the planet and blot the Sun out for months. At least that's what theory tells us. he scenario has never played out in modern times, scientists don't really know exactly what will happen when the next space rock slams into Earth. One long-supposed incendiary side-effect is enhanced volcanic activity, which...
  • Earth's Volcanism Linked To Meteorite Impacts

    12/13/2002 8:36:39 AM PST · by blam · 34 replies · 1,459+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 12-13-2002 | Kate Ravilious
    Earth's volcanism linked to meteorite impacts 14:31 13 December 02 Exclusive from New Scientist Print EditionSpace rocks are blamed for violent eruptions (Image: GETTY) Large meteorite impacts may not just throw up huge dust clouds but also punch right through the Earth's crust, triggering gigantic volcanic eruptions. The idea is controversial, but evidence is mounting that the Earth's geology has largely been driven by such events. This would also explain why our planet has so few impact crater remnants. Counting the number of asteroids we see in the sky suggests that over the past 250 million years, Earth should have...
  • NASA May Use Nukes To Defend Earth From Asteroids

    06/22/2015 12:28:27 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    Popular Science ^ | 06-22-2015 | By Sarah Fecht
    Illustration Of A Planetoid Crashing Into Earth In 2013, a 60-foot-wide meteor exploded over Russia, and no one saw it coming. The Chelyabinsk impactor was relatively small by interplanetary standards, but the blast injured about 1,500 people and damaged 7,000 buildings. If a larger rock were headed for Earth, how would we defend ourselves? The short answer is, scientists aren’t really sure, but one solution sounds a lot like the plot from a 1998 Michael Bay movie: just nuke ‘em. In hopes of averting a space rock calamity, The New York Times reports that NASA has just sealed a deal...
  • How NASA Will Save the World from Giant, Killer Asteroids

    06/19/2015 5:00:23 AM PDT · by lbryce · 27 replies
    CNN ^ | June 18, 2015 | Matthew Hoye
    It may sound like a science fiction movie, but in a small conference room at the Goddard Space Flight Center, a tight-knit group of top NASA scientists is coming up with new ways to protect our planet from killer asteroids. The idea is to repurpose and build on technologies being developed for other space missions. How big is the threat from asteroids? Well, Jason Kessler, NASA's director of the Grand Challenge, says that as of Wednesday morning asteroid hunters around the world have identified and are tracking 12,706 Near Earth Objects (NEOs) -- or asteroids - that could come close...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Messier Craters in Stereo

    05/30/2015 3:06:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | May 30, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Many bright nebulae and star clusters in planet Earth's sky are associated with the name of astronomer Charles Messier, from his famous 18th century catalog. His name is also given to these two large and remarkable craters on the Moon. Standouts in the dark, smooth lunar Sea of Fertility or Mare Fecunditatis, Messier (left) and Messier A have dimensions of 15 by 8 and 16 by 11 kilometers respectively. Their elongated shapes are explained by an extremely shallow-angle trajectory followed by the impactor, moving left to right, that gouged out the craters. The shallow impact also resulted in two...
  • An explosion on the Moon

    12/24/2005 8:11:55 AM PST · by jmcenanly · 132 replies · 3,858+ views
    NASA ^ | 12.23.2005
    December 23, 2005: NASA scientists have observed an explosion on the moon. The blast, equal in energy to about 70 kg of TNT, occurred near the edge of Mare Imbrium (the Sea of Rains) on Nov. 7, 2005, when a 12-centimeter-wide meteoroid slammed into the ground traveling 27 km/s. "What a surprise," says Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) researcher Rob Suggs, who recorded the impact's flash. He and colleague Wes Swift were testing a new telescope and video camera they assembled to monitor the moon for meteor strikes. On their first night out, "we caught one," says Suggs.
  • 'Cloud' over Mars leaves scientists baffled

    02/16/2015 5:29:57 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 63 replies
    Phys dot Org ^ | February 16, 2015 | unattributed
    Plumes seen reaching high above the surface of Mars are causing a stir among scientists studying the atmosphere on the Red Planet. On two separate occasions in March and April 2012, amateur astronomers reported definite plume-like features developing on the planet. The plumes were seen rising to altitudes of over 250 km above the same region of Mars on both occasions. By comparison, similar features seen in the past have not exceeded 100 km. "At about 250 km, the division between the atmosphere and outer space is very thin, so the reported plumes are extremely unexpected," says Agustin Sanchez-Lavega of...
  • Meteoric Evidence Suggests Mars May Have a Subsurface Reservoir [of water]

    12/22/2014 11:13:01 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | December 22, 2014 | Matt Williams
    Basically, there is a gap between what is thought to have existed in the past, and what is observed today in the form of water ice. The findings made by Tomohiro and the international research team help to account for this. “The total inventory of “observable” current surface water (that mostly occurs as polar ice, ~10E6 km3) is more than one order magnitude smaller than the estimated volume of ancient surface water (~10E7 to 10E8 km3) that is thought to have covered the northern lowlands,” said Tomohiro. “The lack of water at the surface today was problematic for advocates of...
  • Did a Pacific Ocean meteor trigger the Ice Age?

    09/20/2012 5:02:02 AM PDT · by Renfield · 37 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 9-19-2012
    (Phys.org)—When a huge meteor collided with Earth about 2.5 million years ago in the southern Pacific Ocean it not only likely generated a massive tsunami but also may have plunged the world into the Ice Ages, a new study suggests. A team of Australian researchers says that because the Eltanin meteor – which was up to two kilometres across - crashed into deep water, most scientists have not adequately considered either its potential for immediate catastrophic impacts on coastlines around the Pacific rim or its capacity to destabilise the entire planet's climate system. "This is the only known deep-ocean impact...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Potsdam Gravity Potato

    12/15/2014 3:22:41 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 50 replies
    NASA ^ | December 15, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why do some places on Earth have higher gravity than others? Sometimes the reason is unknown. To help better understand the Earth's surface, sensitive measurments by the orbiting satellites GRACE and CHAMP were used to create a map of Earth's gravitational field. Since a center for studying this data is in Potsdam, Germany, and since the result makes the Earth look somewhat like a potato, the resulting geoid has been referred to as the Potsdam Gravity Potato. High areas on this map, colored red, indicate areas where gravity is slightly stronger than usual, while in blue areas gravity is...
  • 'Meteorite' Smashes Into Nicaraguan Capital

    09/07/2014 10:25:59 PM PDT · by blam · 24 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 9-8-2014 | AF
    AFPASeptember 8, 2014 Managua (AFP) - A mysterious explosion that rocked Nicaragua's crowded capital Managua, creating a large crater, appears to have been caused by a small meteorite, officials said Sunday. Amazingly, in a sprawling city of 1.2 million people, the impact near the international airport did not cause any known injuries, but it did leave a crater measuring 12 meters (39 feet) across and was felt throughout the capital late on Saturday. Nicaraguan authorities believe it was a piece of the small asteroid dubbed "2014 RC," which passed very close to Earth on Sunday and was estimated by astronomers...

    10/19/2012 9:11:14 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    The Register ^ | 10/19/2012 | By Brid-Aine Parnell
    Boffins have discovered that "lethally hot" ocean temperatures kept the Earth devoid of life for millions of years after the mass extinction that occurred 250 million years ago. The global wipeout that ended the Permian era, before dinosaurs, wiped out nearly all of the world's species. Mass extinctions like these in Earth's history are usually followed by a "dead zone", a period of tens of thousands of years before new species crop up. But the early Triassic dead zone lasted millions of years, not thousands. Boffins now reckon that the extra-long five million year dead zone was caused by screaming...
  • Scientists Have Underestimated The Likelihood Of City-Killing Asteroids Hitting Earth

    04/28/2014 2:50:08 PM PDT · by blam · 49 replies
    BI - Reuters ^ | 4-28-2014 | Irene Klotz, Reuters
    Scientists Have Underestimated The Likelihood Of City-Killing Asteroids Hitting Earth Reuters Irene Klotz, Reuters Apr. 28, 2014, 2:59 PM The chance of a city-killing asteroid striking Earth is higher than scientists previously believed, a non-profit group building an asteroid-hunting telescope said on Tuesday. A global network that listens for nuclear weapons detonations detected 26 asteroids that exploded in Earth's atmosphere from 2000 to 2013, data collected by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization shows. The explosions include the Feb. 15, 2013, impact over Chelyabinsk, Russia, which left more than 1,000 people injured by flying glass and debris. "There is...
  • Mega-Tsunami Theory Disputed (Australia)

    02/03/2008 4:35:17 PM PST · by blam · 47 replies · 256+ views
    The Australian ^ | 2-3-2008
    Mega-tsunami theory disputed February 03, 2008 SUPPOSED evidence Australia has been subject to prehistoric tsunamis up to 20m in height over the past 10,000 years could just be the result of Aboriginal occupation, a major conference is set to hear tomorrow. Archaeologists from the Australian National University say the theory about the mega-tsunamis, which has influenced the development of emergency service plans in Western Australia, is not supported by evidence. In 2003 Australian geological researchers suggested prehistoric tsunamis over the past 10,000 years were much larger than those recorded since European settlement, including findings of surges up to 20m in...
  • The Intriguing Problem Of The Younger Dryas—What Does It Mean And What Caused It?

    06/21/2012 10:11:38 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 48 replies
    watts Up With That? ^ | June 19, 2012 | Guest post by Don J. Easterbrook
    This is a follow up posting to Younger Dryas -The Rest of the Story!Guest post by Don J. Easterbrook Dept. of Geology, Western Washington University.The Younger Dryas was a period of rapid cooling in the late Pleistocene 12,800 to 11,500 calendar years ago. It followed closely on the heels of a dramatically abrupt warming that brought the last Ice Age to a close (17,500 calendar years ago), lasted for about 1,300 years, then ended as abruptly as it started. The cause of these remarkably sudden climate changes has puzzled geologists and climatologists for decades and despite much effort to find...
  • Hour-long hailstorm may have caused 1,000-year freeze, say scientists

    04/02/2010 4:06:27 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 77 replies · 1,652+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 04/02/10
    Hour-long hailstorm may have caused 1,000-year freeze, say scientists An hour-long hailstorm from space may have changed the climate of the Earth in 11,000 BC, leading to a freeze lasting more than 1,000 years, scientists say. Published: 8:00AM BST 02 Apr 2010 An hour-long hailstorm from space may have changed the climate of the Earth in 11,000 BC, leading to a freeze lasting more than 1,000 years, scientists say. A comet may well have caused the earth to freeze for over 1,000 years Photo: GETTY The catastrophe, caused by a disintegrating comet, wiped out large numbers of animal species and...
  • The Dark Ages: Were They Darker Than We Imagined?

    06/08/2003 10:31:29 PM PDT · by blam · 110 replies · 6,406+ views
    The Universe ^ | 9-1999 | Greg Bryant
    The Dark Ages : Were They Darker Than We Imagined? By Greg Bryant Published in the September 1999 issue of Universe As we approach the end of the Second Millennium, a review of ancient history is not what you would normally expect to read in the pages of Universe. Indeed, except for reflecting on the AD 837 apparition of Halley's Comet (when it should have been as bright as Venus and would have moved through 60 degrees of sky in one day as it passed just 0.03 AU from Earth - three times closer than Hyakutake in 1996), you may...
  • Ancient Drought And Rapid Cooling Drastically Altered Climate

    06/24/2009 11:06:18 AM PDT · by tricky_k_1972 · 25 replies · 869+ views
    Space Daily - Terra Daily ^ | Jun 23, 2009 | Staff Writers (SPX)
    CLIMATE SCIENCEAncient Drought And Rapid Cooling Drastically Altered Climate File image. by Staff Writers Columbus OH (SPX) Jun 23, 2009 Two abrupt and drastic climate events, 700 years apart and more than 45 centuries ago, are teasing scientists who are now trying to use ancient records to predict future world climate. The events - one, a massive, long-lived drought believed to have dried large portions of Africa and Asia, and the other, a rapid cooling that accelerated the growth of tropical glaciers - left signals in ice cores and other geologic records from around the world. Lonnie Thompson, University Distinguished...
  • Asteroid Breakup May Have Doomed Dinosaurs

    09/05/2007 11:55:02 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies · 1,261+ views
    It’s a disaster scenario that Hollywood has picked up on (think Deep Impact). An incoming object menaces the Earth. Scientists try to destroy it with nuclear weapons, but the horrified populace soon discovers that the blast has simply broken the object into pieces, each with the potential to wreak havoc planet-wide. Now we learn that an impact between two asteroids causing a similar crack-up may have resulted in the cataclysmic event some 65 million years ago that destroyed the dinosaurs. Researchers from Southwest Research Institute and Charles University (Prague) have been studying the asteroid (298) Baptistina, combining their observations with...
  • First evidence of comet striking Earth found in Egypt

    10/10/2013 5:36:16 PM PDT · by workerbee · 32 replies
    Fox ^ | 10/10/13 | Mike Wall
    A team of scientists claims to have found the first-ever definitive evidence of a comet striking Earth. After conducting a series of analyses, the researchers determined that a mysterious black pebble discovered years ago in the Egyptian desert is a piece of a comet nucleus — the first ever discovered. "It’s a typical scientific euphoria when you eliminate all other options and come to the realization of what it must be," study lead author Jan Kramers, of the University of Johannesburg in South Africa, said in a statement. [Best Close Encounters of the Comet Kind] The pebble, which the team...
  • Climate Cycles in China as Revealed by a Stalagmite from Buddha Cave(Journal Review)

    07/08/2003 3:48:19 PM PDT · by PeaceBeWithYou · 58 replies · 1,131+ views
    CO2 Science Magazine ^ | July 08, 2003 | Staff
    Reference Paulsen, D.E., Li, H.-C. and Ku, T.-L. 2003. Climate variability in central China over the last 1270 years revealed by high-resolution stalagmite records. Quaternary Science Reviews 22: 691-701. What was done In the words of the authors, "high-resolution records of ð13C and ð18O in stalagmite SF-1 from Buddha Cave [33°40'N, 109°05'E] are used to infer changes in climate in central China for the last 1270 years in terms of warmer, colder, wetter and drier conditions." What was learned Among the climatic episodes evident in the authors' data were "those corresponding to the Medieval Warm Period, Little Ice Age and...
  • Mesopotamian Climate Change (8,000 Years Ago)

    02/15/2004 11:18:28 AM PST · by blam · 72 replies · 5,365+ views
    Geo Times ^ | 2-15-2004
    Mesopotamian climate change Geoscientists are increasingly exploring an interesting trend: Climate change has been affecting human society for thousands of years. At the American Geophysical Union annual meeting in December, one archaeologist presented research that suggests that climate change affected the way cultures developed and collapsed in the cradle of civilization — ancient Mesopotamia — more than 8,000 years ago. Archaeologists have found evidence for a mass migration from the more temperate northern Mesopotamia to the arid southern region around 6400 B.C. For the previous 1,000 years, people had been cultivating the arable land in northern Mesopotamia, using natural rainwater...
  • Remote Lake May Be Treasure Trove of Climate Data

    12/15/2007 3:43:24 PM PST · by neverdem · 44 replies · 138+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 13 December 2007 | Phil Berardelli
    Enlarge ImageThe vault. The sediments at the bottom of the lake in Northen Quebec's Pingualuit Crater hold unmatched clues to North America's climate record.Credit: Robert Fréchette / ARK; (inset) University of Arkansas SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA--A million years ago, a large meteorite smashed into what is now northern Quebec and created a crater that may become an unprecedented repository of data with which to study long-term climate change, researchers reported here this week at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union. Canada and the northern United States are dotted with tens of thousands of lakes, most of them formed by...