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Keyword: impact

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  • space Here's More Evidence That Earth Got Hit by Something Huge 12,800 Years Ago

    10/07/2019 9:42:49 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 113 replies
    gizmodo uk ^ | 06 Oct 2019 at 6:00AM | George Dvorsky on
    Along with locations in North and South America, Greenland, Western Europe, and the Middle East, we can now add southern Africa to the list of places where scientists have uncovered evidence of a calamitous event that happened 12,800 years ago. This evidence of a 12,800-year-old platinum spike in Africa is the first to be found on the continent, and it’s yet further evidence in support of the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis. According to this theory, either a comet or asteroid struck Earth during the Pleistocene, triggering an impact winter that saw temperatures plummet around the globe. The associated loss of...
  • Nobody knows what made the gargantuan crater on the dark side of the Moon

    09/26/2019 9:46:29 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 58 replies
    fox news ^ | 09/26/2019 | By Brandon Specktor - Senior Writer | LiveScience
    Billions of years ago, something slammed into the dark side of the moon and carved out a very, very large hole. Stretching 1,550 miles (2,500 kilometers) wide and 8 miles (13 km) deep, the South Pole-Aitken basin... For decades, researchers have suspected that the gargantuan basin was created by a head-on collision with a very large, very fast meteor. Such an impact would have ripped the moon's crust apart and scattered chunks of lunar mantle across the crater's surface, providing a rare glimpse at what the moon is really made of. ... Now, however... After analyzing the minerals in six...
  • Mysterious flashes of light observed on the moon’s surface

    06/01/2019 5:55:55 AM PDT · by Candor7 · 75 replies
    METRO News ^ | Friday 31 May 2019 5:41 pm | author imageJasper Hamill
    Scientists have launched a bid to observe and understand mysterious flashes of light on the surface of the moon. The ‘transient luminous lunar phenomena’ occur several times a week and illuminate parts of the moon’s landscape for a brief period of time before disappearing. Sometimes, a reverse effect which causes the lunar surface to darken has also been observed. Although there are several theories about the lunar mystery lights’ origins, they have not yet been fully explained. Now astronomers from Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (JMU) in Bavaria, Germany have set up a telescope which will use artificial intelligence to automatically detect the...
  • Flashes on the moon

    05/31/2019 5:12:10 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 41 replies
    phys.org ^ | May 31, 2019 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg
    Science does not know exactly how these phenomena occur on the moon. But it has attempted to explain them: the impact of a meteor, for example, should cause a brief glow. Such flashes could also occur when electrically charged particles of the solar wind react with moon dust. "Seismic activities...would explain the luminous phenomena, some of which last for hours," says Hakan Kayal, Professor of Space Technology...in Bavaria, Germany. Kayal's team built a lunar telescope and put it into operation in April 2019. It is located in a private observatory in Spain, about 100 kilometres north of Seville in a...
  • The moon may be made from a magma ocean that once covered Earth

    05/01/2019 11:20:29 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 27 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | 4/30/19 | Erin Winick
    There are a number of theories about where the moon came from. Our best guess is that it was formed when the Earth was hit by a large object known as Theia. The impact threw up huge amounts of debris into orbit, which eventually coalesced to form the moon. There’s a problem with this theory. The mathematical models show that most of the material that makes up the moon should come from Theia. But samples from the Apollo missions show that most of the material on the moon came from Earth. A paper out earlier this week in Nature Geoscience...
  • Dinosaur fossils kept secret for years show the day of killer asteroid

    04/01/2019 7:03:20 AM PDT · by ETL · 65 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | April 1, 2019 | Chris Ciaccia | Fox News
    The researchers say they found evidence in North Dakota of the asteroid hit in Mexico, including fish with hot glass in their gills from flaming debris that showered back down on Earth. They also reported the discovery of charred trees, evidence of an inland tsunami and melted amber. Additionally, University of Amsterdam professor Jan Smit said he and his colleagues found footsteps from dinosaurs moments before they met their untimely death. Smit said the footprints — one from a plant-eating hadrosaur and the other of a meat eater, maybe a small Tyrannosaurus Rex — is "definite proof that the dinosaurs...
  • Evidence from Chile Supports Younger Dryas Extraterrestrial Impact Hypothesis

    03/29/2019 6:18:08 AM PDT · by vannrox · 21 replies
    science news ^ | 20mar19 | Editorial staff
    The Younger Dryas impact hypothesis, also known as Clovis comet hypothesis, posits that the hemisphere-wide debris field of a large, disintegrating asteroid (or comet) struck North America, South America, Europe, and western Asia approximately 12,800 years ago. This event triggered extensive biomass burning, brief impact winter, climate change, and contributed to extinctions of late Pleistocene megafauna. Controversial from the time it was proposed, this hypothesis continues to be contested by those who prefer to attribute the end-Pleistocene reversal in (global) warming entirely to terrestrial causes. Now, University of California, Santa Barbara’s Professor James Kennett and co-authors present further geologic and...
  • Amazing Images Capture Giant Fireball Exploding Over the Bering Sea

    03/21/2019 6:39:04 AM PDT · by CtBigPat · 17 replies
    Sky & Telescope ^ | March 20, 2019 | Bob King
    Had there been eyewitnesses, we'd have known about the Bering blast within minutes, but it happened beneath the cloud deck in a sparsely populated region off the east coast of Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula (58.6°N, 174.2°W). Military satellites designed to look for nuclear explosions picked up the blast, as did more than 16 infrasound detectors worldwide. Luckily for us, so did the Japanese Himawari 8 satellite, which took striking images of the sooty trail of dust ablated from the meteoroid during its atmospheric passage.
  • 173 Kiloton Explosion Over Bering Sea Was Asteroid Breaking Up

    03/19/2019 9:51:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    YouTube ^ | March 19, 2019 | Scott Manley
    Almost nobody noticed this, but back in December a chunk of space rock slammed into the Earth's atmosphere at 32km/sec over the Bering sea. The aerodynamic forces tore it apart and it released energy equivalent to a 170 kiloton weapon. And almost nobody noticed. Find out more about the asteroid hazard and how you can help at the B612 Foundation. | 173 Kiloton Explosion Over Bering Sea Was Asteroid Breaking Up | Scott Manley | Published on Mar 19, 2019
  • Glassy debris points to relatively recent asteroid impact in southeast Asia

    03/18/2019 10:49:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Science Magazine ^ | January 3, 2018 | Katherine Kornei
    A kilometer-size asteroid slammed into Earth about 800,000 years ago with so much force that it scattered debris across a 10th of our planet's surface. Yet its impact crater remains undiscovered. Now, glassy remains believed to have come from the strike suggest the asteroid hit southeast Asia as our close ancestors walked the Earth... Aaron Cavosie, an astrobiologist and geochemist at Curtin University in Perth, Australia, and his colleagues examined the chemical composition of three tektites from Thailand. They searched for evidence of reidite, a rare mineral formed only by extreme pressures and temperatures, like those of an asteroid impact....
  • Do volcanoes or an asteroid deserve blame for dinosaur extinction?

    02/22/2019 11:10:06 AM PST · by ETL · 38 replies
    Phys.org ^ | February 21, 2019 | University of California - Berkeley
    UC Berkeley scientists have obtained more precise dates for the Deccan Traps volcanic lava flows, linking peak activity more closely to the asteroid or comet impact 66 million years ago and the coincident mass extinction. But if greenhouse gases emitted before the impact created a hothouse climate that set life up for a fall when the impact cooled the planet, those gases did not coincide with the largest lava flows from the Deccan Traps. Based on new data published today in the journal Science, it seems increasingly likely that an asteroid or comet impact 66 million years ago reignited massive...
  • Scientists Find Possible Second Subglacial Impact Crater in Northwest Greenland

    02/12/2019 2:54:00 PM PST · by ETL · 22 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Feb 12, 2019 | News Staff / Source
    Following the discovery of the 19.2-mile wide Hiawatha impact crater beneath the northwest margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet, Dr. Joe MacGregor of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and colleagues explored satellite and aerogeophysical data in search of additional such craters and found a possible second impact crater that is 22.7 miles wide and 114 miles southeast of the Hiawatha crater. The discovery is described in a paper in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. ..." Following the finding of that first crater, Dr. MacGregor and co-authors checked topographic maps of the rock beneath Greenland’s ice for signs of other craters....
  • Following Impact: The Collapse of the Crater Alamo Impact Crater Formation

    01/30/2019 7:30:18 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Idaho Museum of Natural History ^ | prior to 2019 | some real brainiacs!
    Normal faults are generated throughout the crater from the impact force. Fault blocks form along the crater walls, breaking off and sliding back into the crater following impact. Rocks around the crater rim fill in much of the crater as it collapses. Furthermore, resurge waves deposit large amounts of rock fragments in and around the crater. It is common for the crater to almost completely refill and subsequently be buried[.]
  • AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS SPOT METEORITE IMPACT DURING LUNAR ECLIPSE

    01/24/2019 9:16:06 AM PST · by DUMBGRUNT · 20 replies
    Hackaday ^ | 23 Jan 2019 | Brian Benchoff
    Several telescopes livestreamed the entire eclipse, and multiple people caught a glimpse of a small flash of light, seeming to come from around Lagrange crater. Because this event was seen by multiple observers separated by thousands of miles, the only conclusion is that something hit the moon, and its impact event was recorded on video. ...Further investigation will be necessary to determine the size of the meteoroid and obtain pictures of its impact crater, but for a basis of comparison, the LCROSS mission plowed a Centaur upper stage (2.2 tons) into the lunar surface at 2.5 km/s. This should have...
  • Meteoroid Collides with Moon During Total Lunar Eclipse

    01/22/2019 11:15:57 AM PST · by messierhunter · 27 replies
    BGR ^ | January 22nd, 2019 | Mike Wehner
    "As it turns out, the eclipse was even more special than most observers had noticed, as the Moon was actually struck by a meteorite while everyone was gazing in wonder at its rusty appearance. The meteorite itself wasn’t terribly large, and is estimated to have only been around 22 pounds. Still, its impact was large enough to be spotted by observers as well as the automated MIDAS system, and that’s pretty cool." I caught it as well with my own equipment. The impact flash appears at 1:23:04 in my video at about the 8 o'clock position near the edge of...
  • How climate change caused the world's first empire to collapse

    01/07/2019 10:15:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Phys dot org (relying on non-science source for science article) ^ | January 3, 2019 | Vasile Ersek, The Conversation
    Gol-e-Zard Cave lies in the shadow of Mount Damavand, which at more than 5,000 metres dominates the landscape of northern Iran. In this cave, stalagmites and stalactites are growing slowly over millennia and preserve in them clues about past climate events. Changes in stalagmite chemistry from this cave have now linked the collapse of the Akkadian Empire to climate changes more than 4,000 years ago... It appears that the empire became increasingly dependent on the productivity of the northern lands and used the grains sourced from this region to feed the army and redistribute the food supplies to key supporters....
  • Northern Crater Shows Prehistoric Deep Impact

    08/28/2004 11:49:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 619+ views
    Alaska Science Forum ^ | July 7, 1998 | Ned Rozell
    To the rhinos and crocodiles of the far north, the day was like any other. They ate, swam and napped, unaware a celestial body was headed their way at 60,000 miles per hour. Suddenly, a wayward comet screamed into the atmosphere, struck Earth and created a bowl a mile deep and 15 miles in diameter.
  • 'Fried Egg' may be impact crater

    12/20/2009 9:37:16 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies · 1,143+ views
    BBC News ^ | Friday, December 18, 2009 | Jonathan Amos
    Portuguese scientists have found a depression on the Atlantic Ocean floor they think may be an impact crater. The roughly circular, 6km-wide hollow has a broad central dome and has been dubbed the "Fried Egg" because of its distinctive shape. It was detected to the south of the Azores Islands during a survey to map the continental shelf. If the Fried Egg was made by a space impactor, the collision probably took place within the past 17 million years... It lies under 2km of water about 150km from the Azores archipelago. The depressed ring sits roughly 110m below the...
  • Chinese-led team shows mass extinction happened in geological 'instant'

    09/24/2018 7:33:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | September 19, 2018 | Chinese Academy of Sciences
    It took less than 30,000 years and maybe only thousands, to kill more than 90% of sea creatures and most land species, according to the most precise study ever published about the mass extinction marking the end of the Permian Period. Earth's greatest mass extinction, also known as the "Great Dying," occurred about 252 million years ago. By some estimates, over 90% of sea creatures and most land-dwelling reptiles disappeared. Even usually resilient plants and insects suffered near annihilation... Scientists from China, the USA and Canada combined new high-resolution radiometric dating of seven closely spaced layers of volcanic material from...
  • Trump’s ‘Amazing’ Success in Signing More Bills Than Any President in 50 Years

    07/30/2017 5:51:24 PM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 34 replies
    Breitbart ^ | 07/29/17 | Penny Starr
    President Donald Trump’s outgoing chief of staff Reince Priebus told Breitbart News Satuday SiriusXM host Raheem Kassam that the president’s “amazing” work during his first few months in office includes signing a record number of bills into law. “I could tick of for an entire 10, 20 minutes that facts of what’s he’s accomplished and the amazing amount of work he’s done,” Priebus said. “The amount of bills he’s signed are more than any president in the last 50 years,” Priebus said. Priebus — whose departure from the White House was announced on Friday night — also said that Trump...