Keyword: impact

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Potsdam Gravity Potato

    12/15/2014 3:22:41 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 50 replies
    NASA ^ | December 15, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why do some places on Earth have higher gravity than others? Sometimes the reason is unknown. To help better understand the Earth's surface, sensitive measurments by the orbiting satellites GRACE and CHAMP were used to create a map of Earth's gravitational field. Since a center for studying this data is in Potsdam, Germany, and since the result makes the Earth look somewhat like a potato, the resulting geoid has been referred to as the Potsdam Gravity Potato. High areas on this map, colored red, indicate areas where gravity is slightly stronger than usual, while in blue areas gravity is...
  • 'Meteorite' Smashes Into Nicaraguan Capital

    09/07/2014 10:25:59 PM PDT · by blam · 24 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 9-8-2014 | AF
    AFPASeptember 8, 2014 Managua (AFP) - A mysterious explosion that rocked Nicaragua's crowded capital Managua, creating a large crater, appears to have been caused by a small meteorite, officials said Sunday. Amazingly, in a sprawling city of 1.2 million people, the impact near the international airport did not cause any known injuries, but it did leave a crater measuring 12 meters (39 feet) across and was felt throughout the capital late on Saturday. Nicaraguan authorities believe it was a piece of the small asteroid dubbed "2014 RC," which passed very close to Earth on Sunday and was estimated by astronomers...
  • EARTH was a BAKING LIFELESS DESERT for 5 MILLION years

    10/19/2012 9:11:14 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    The Register ^ | 10/19/2012 | By Brid-Aine Parnell
    Boffins have discovered that "lethally hot" ocean temperatures kept the Earth devoid of life for millions of years after the mass extinction that occurred 250 million years ago. The global wipeout that ended the Permian era, before dinosaurs, wiped out nearly all of the world's species. Mass extinctions like these in Earth's history are usually followed by a "dead zone", a period of tens of thousands of years before new species crop up. But the early Triassic dead zone lasted millions of years, not thousands. Boffins now reckon that the extra-long five million year dead zone was caused by screaming...
  • Scientists Have Underestimated The Likelihood Of City-Killing Asteroids Hitting Earth

    04/28/2014 2:50:08 PM PDT · by blam · 48 replies
    BI - Reuters ^ | 4-28-2014 | Irene Klotz, Reuters
    Scientists Have Underestimated The Likelihood Of City-Killing Asteroids Hitting Earth Reuters Irene Klotz, Reuters Apr. 28, 2014, 2:59 PM The chance of a city-killing asteroid striking Earth is higher than scientists previously believed, a non-profit group building an asteroid-hunting telescope said on Tuesday. A global network that listens for nuclear weapons detonations detected 26 asteroids that exploded in Earth's atmosphere from 2000 to 2013, data collected by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization shows. The explosions include the Feb. 15, 2013, impact over Chelyabinsk, Russia, which left more than 1,000 people injured by flying glass and debris. "There is...
  • Mega-Tsunami Theory Disputed (Australia)

    02/03/2008 4:35:17 PM PST · by blam · 47 replies · 256+ views
    The Australian ^ | 2-3-2008
    Mega-tsunami theory disputed February 03, 2008 SUPPOSED evidence Australia has been subject to prehistoric tsunamis up to 20m in height over the past 10,000 years could just be the result of Aboriginal occupation, a major conference is set to hear tomorrow. Archaeologists from the Australian National University say the theory about the mega-tsunamis, which has influenced the development of emergency service plans in Western Australia, is not supported by evidence. In 2003 Australian geological researchers suggested prehistoric tsunamis over the past 10,000 years were much larger than those recorded since European settlement, including findings of surges up to 20m in...
  • The Intriguing Problem Of The Younger Dryas—What Does It Mean And What Caused It?

    06/21/2012 10:11:38 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 45 replies
    watts Up With That? ^ | June 19, 2012 | Guest post by Don J. Easterbrook
    This is a follow up posting to Younger Dryas -The Rest of the Story!Guest post by Don J. Easterbrook Dept. of Geology, Western Washington University.The Younger Dryas was a period of rapid cooling in the late Pleistocene 12,800 to 11,500 calendar years ago. It followed closely on the heels of a dramatically abrupt warming that brought the last Ice Age to a close (17,500 calendar years ago), lasted for about 1,300 years, then ended as abruptly as it started. The cause of these remarkably sudden climate changes has puzzled geologists and climatologists for decades and despite much effort to find...
  • Hour-long hailstorm may have caused 1,000-year freeze, say scientists

    04/02/2010 4:06:27 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 77 replies · 1,652+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 04/02/10
    Hour-long hailstorm may have caused 1,000-year freeze, say scientists An hour-long hailstorm from space may have changed the climate of the Earth in 11,000 BC, leading to a freeze lasting more than 1,000 years, scientists say. Published: 8:00AM BST 02 Apr 2010 An hour-long hailstorm from space may have changed the climate of the Earth in 11,000 BC, leading to a freeze lasting more than 1,000 years, scientists say. A comet may well have caused the earth to freeze for over 1,000 years Photo: GETTY The catastrophe, caused by a disintegrating comet, wiped out large numbers of animal species and...
  • The Dark Ages: Were They Darker Than We Imagined?

    06/08/2003 10:31:29 PM PDT · by blam · 109 replies · 6,406+ views
    The Universe ^ | 9-1999 | Greg Bryant
    The Dark Ages : Were They Darker Than We Imagined? By Greg Bryant Published in the September 1999 issue of Universe As we approach the end of the Second Millennium, a review of ancient history is not what you would normally expect to read in the pages of Universe. Indeed, except for reflecting on the AD 837 apparition of Halley's Comet (when it should have been as bright as Venus and would have moved through 60 degrees of sky in one day as it passed just 0.03 AU from Earth - three times closer than Hyakutake in 1996), you may...
  • Ancient Drought And Rapid Cooling Drastically Altered Climate

    06/24/2009 11:06:18 AM PDT · by tricky_k_1972 · 25 replies · 869+ views
    Space Daily - Terra Daily ^ | Jun 23, 2009 | Staff Writers (SPX)
    CLIMATE SCIENCEAncient Drought And Rapid Cooling Drastically Altered Climate File image. by Staff Writers Columbus OH (SPX) Jun 23, 2009 Two abrupt and drastic climate events, 700 years apart and more than 45 centuries ago, are teasing scientists who are now trying to use ancient records to predict future world climate. The events - one, a massive, long-lived drought believed to have dried large portions of Africa and Asia, and the other, a rapid cooling that accelerated the growth of tropical glaciers - left signals in ice cores and other geologic records from around the world. Lonnie Thompson, University Distinguished...
  • Asteroid Breakup May Have Doomed Dinosaurs

    09/05/2007 11:55:02 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies · 1,261+ views
    It’s a disaster scenario that Hollywood has picked up on (think Deep Impact). An incoming object menaces the Earth. Scientists try to destroy it with nuclear weapons, but the horrified populace soon discovers that the blast has simply broken the object into pieces, each with the potential to wreak havoc planet-wide. Now we learn that an impact between two asteroids causing a similar crack-up may have resulted in the cataclysmic event some 65 million years ago that destroyed the dinosaurs. Researchers from Southwest Research Institute and Charles University (Prague) have been studying the asteroid (298) Baptistina, combining their observations with...
  • First evidence of comet striking Earth found in Egypt

    10/10/2013 5:36:16 PM PDT · by workerbee · 32 replies
    Fox ^ | 10/10/13 | Mike Wall
    A team of scientists claims to have found the first-ever definitive evidence of a comet striking Earth. After conducting a series of analyses, the researchers determined that a mysterious black pebble discovered years ago in the Egyptian desert is a piece of a comet nucleus — the first ever discovered. "It’s a typical scientific euphoria when you eliminate all other options and come to the realization of what it must be," study lead author Jan Kramers, of the University of Johannesburg in South Africa, said in a statement. [Best Close Encounters of the Comet Kind] The pebble, which the team...
  • Climate Cycles in China as Revealed by a Stalagmite from Buddha Cave(Journal Review)

    07/08/2003 3:48:19 PM PDT · by PeaceBeWithYou · 58 replies · 1,131+ views
    CO2 Science Magazine ^ | July 08, 2003 | Staff
    Reference Paulsen, D.E., Li, H.-C. and Ku, T.-L. 2003. Climate variability in central China over the last 1270 years revealed by high-resolution stalagmite records. Quaternary Science Reviews 22: 691-701. What was done In the words of the authors, "high-resolution records of ð13C and ð18O in stalagmite SF-1 from Buddha Cave [33°40'N, 109°05'E] are used to infer changes in climate in central China for the last 1270 years in terms of warmer, colder, wetter and drier conditions." What was learned Among the climatic episodes evident in the authors' data were "those corresponding to the Medieval Warm Period, Little Ice Age and...
  • Mesopotamian Climate Change (8,000 Years Ago)

    02/15/2004 11:18:28 AM PST · by blam · 71 replies · 5,365+ views
    Geo Times ^ | 2-15-2004
    Mesopotamian climate change Geoscientists are increasingly exploring an interesting trend: Climate change has been affecting human society for thousands of years. At the American Geophysical Union annual meeting in December, one archaeologist presented research that suggests that climate change affected the way cultures developed and collapsed in the cradle of civilization — ancient Mesopotamia — more than 8,000 years ago. Archaeologists have found evidence for a mass migration from the more temperate northern Mesopotamia to the arid southern region around 6400 B.C. For the previous 1,000 years, people had been cultivating the arable land in northern Mesopotamia, using natural rainwater...
  • Remote Lake May Be Treasure Trove of Climate Data

    12/15/2007 3:43:24 PM PST · by neverdem · 44 replies · 138+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 13 December 2007 | Phil Berardelli
    Enlarge ImageThe vault. The sediments at the bottom of the lake in Northen Quebec's Pingualuit Crater hold unmatched clues to North America's climate record.Credit: Robert Fréchette / ARK; (inset) University of Arkansas SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA--A million years ago, a large meteorite smashed into what is now northern Quebec and created a crater that may become an unprecedented repository of data with which to study long-term climate change, researchers reported here this week at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union. Canada and the northern United States are dotted with tens of thousands of lakes, most of them formed by...
  • Roman Comet 5,000 Times More Powerful Than A-Bomb

    10/17/2004 3:36:42 PM PDT · by freedom44 · 56 replies · 2,144+ views
    Scotsman ^ | 10/17/04 | John von Radowitz
    People living in southern Germany during Roman times may have witnessed a comet impact 5,000 times more destructive than the Hiroshima atom bomb, researchers say. Scientists believe a field of craters around Lake Chiemsee, in south-east Bavaria, was caused by fragments of a huge comet that broke up in the Earth’s atmosphere. Celtic artefacts found at the site, including a number of coins, appear to have been strongly heated on one side. This discovery, together with evidence from ancient tree rings and Roman reports of “stones falling from the sky”, has led researchers to conclude that the impact happened in...
  • Clay tablet holds clue to asteroid mystery

    03/30/2008 8:33:39 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 52 replies · 2,124+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | 3/31/2008 | Nic Fleming
    British scientists have deciphered a mysterious ancient clay tablet and believe they have solved a riddle over a giant asteroid impact more than 5,000 years ago. Geologists have long puzzled over the shape of the land close to the town of Köfels in the Austrian Alps, but were unable to prove it had been caused by an asteroid. Now researchers say their translation of symbols on a star map from an ancient civilisation includes notes on a mile-wide asteroid that later hit Earth - which could have caused tens of thousands of deaths. The circular clay tablet was discovered 150...
  • Climate, Culture, and Catastrophe in the Ancient World

    02/27/2010 11:58:34 AM PST · by Little Bill · 11 replies · 466+ views
    Sanford University ^ | 2001 | Meehan
    This page presents a summary narrative of and links to geological and paleoclimatalogical data bearing on the remarkable events of 3000 BCE (calendar years BC), when urban/technological society began. Most of ouromes from referenced scientific literature, although some of the studies, such as of the Mesopotamian delta,and certain sea level interpretations, are the author's. You will also find a handy chronological index HERE. A summary graph of events around 3200 BC will be found here.
  • Crater From 1908 Russian Space Impact Found, Team Says (Tunguska)

    11/14/2007 8:31:07 PM PST · by blam · 63 replies · 141+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 11-7-2007 | Maria Cristina Valsecchi
    Crater From 1908 Russian Space Impact Found, Team Says Maria Cristina Valsecchi in Rome, Italy for National Geographic NewsNovember 7, 2007 Almost a century after a mysterious explosion in Russia flattened a huge swath of Siberian forest, scientists have found what they believe is a crater made by the cosmic object that made the blast. The crater was discovered under a lake near the Podkamennaya Tunguska River in western Siberia, where the cataclysm, known as the Tunguska event, took place (see map). On June 30, 1908, a ball of fire exploded about 6 miles (10 kilometers) above the ground in...
  • Ancient Egypt was destroyed by drought, discover Scottish experts

    08/04/2011 5:51:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    Scotsman, Tall and Handsome Built ^ | Tuesday, August 2, 2011 | Lyndsay Buckland
    ...the fall of the great Egyptian Old Kingdom may have been helped along by a common problem which remains with us now -- drought... a severe period of drought around 4,200 years ago may have contributed to the demise of the civilisation. Using seismic investigations with sound waves, along with carbon dating of a 100-metre section of sediment from the bed of Lake Tana in Ethiopia, the team were able to look back many thousands of years. They were able to see how water levels in the lake had varied over the past 17,000 years, with the sediment signalling lush...
  • Asteroid Strikes Colombia -- American Media Buries It!

    09/07/2010 10:37:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 54 replies
    The Intel Hub ^ | Monday, September 6, 2010 | "Alex"
    **Update -- Intel Hub -- RSOE EDIS is reporting that a 1,000 strong search team was tasked with finding the impact area and so far have been unable to locate it... Such a colossal event, so little media coverage. Around 3:10PM Sunday afternoon residents of Colombia were awestruck when the clear sky was cracked open by a massive fireball that exploded upon impact leaving a 300 foot wide crater and a lot of rattled nerves.
  • BIG BANG IN ANTARCTICA -- KILLER CRATER FOUND UNDER ICE

    06/01/2006 2:26:58 PM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 253 replies · 6,436+ views
    Ohio State University ^ | 01 June 2006 | Staff (press release)
    Ancient mega-catastrophe paved way for the dinosaurs, spawned Australian continent. Planetary scientists have found evidence of a meteor impact much larger and earlier than the one that killed the dinosaurs -- an impact that they believe caused the biggest mass extinction in Earth's history.The 300-mile-wide crater lies hidden more than a mile beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. And the gravity measurements that reveal its existence suggest that it could date back about 250 million years -- the time of the Permian-Triassic extinction, when almost all animal life on Earth died out.Its size and location -- in the Wilkes Land...
  • The Search for the Missing Amazon Meteor

    09/27/2002 1:53:55 AM PDT · by SteveH · 46 replies · 650+ views
    space.com ^ | 9/25/2002 | diana jong
    The Search for the Missing Amazon Meteor Wed Sep 25, 9:27 AM ET By Diana Jong Staff Writer, SPACE.com The Araona people wanted $1 million before they would let the NASA ( news - web sites) scientists pass through their territory in the remote Bolivian Amazon. Given a budget of $20,000 for their entire expedition, the scientists resorted to negotiating, and the indigenous people eventually agreed to a payment of $500, plus 500 rounds of .22 ammunition and 200 D-cell batteries. "They couldn't be Eveready; they had to be Rayovac," recalls Compton Tucker, an earth scientist from NASA's Goddard Space...
  • Comets And Disaster In The Bronze Age

    04/30/2007 4:38:09 PM PDT · by blam · 63 replies · 2,021+ views
    British Archaeology ^ | December 1997 | Benny Peiser
    Comets and disaster in the Bronze AgeCosmic impact is gaining ground as an explanation of the collapse of civilisations, writes Benny Peiser At some time around 2300BC, give or take a century or two, a large number of the major civilisations of the world collapsed. The Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia, the Old Kingdom in Egypt, the Early Bronze Age societies in Israel, Anatolia and Greece, as well as the Indus Valley civilisation in India, the Hilmand civilisation in Afghanistan and the Hongshan Culture in China - the first urban civilisations in the world - all fell into ruin at more...
  • Mars Crater May Actually Be Ancient Supervolcano

    10/23/2013 4:33:47 PM PDT · by oxcart · 9 replies
    Scientists from NASA and the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Ariz., have identified what could be a supervolcano on Mars—the first discovery of its kind. The volcano in question, a vast circular basin on the face of the Red Planet, previously had been classified as an impact crater. Researchers now suggest the basin is actually what remains of an ancient supervolcano eruption. Their assessment is based on images and topographic data from NASA's Mars Odyssey, Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft, as well as the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter.In the Oct. 3 issue of the journal...
  • Slam, bang, thanks Saddam: new meteor theory

    11/05/2001 7:38:35 AM PST · by dead · 37 replies · 1,277+ views
    Perusal of an article about Saddam Hussein's canal-building projects has led a scientist to a startling discovery about the mysterious collapse of Middle East civilisations more than 4,000 years ago. Sharad Master, a geologist at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, saw on satellite images of southern Iraq a large circular depression which he believes is a meteor crater. If confirmed, it would indicate an impact equivalent to hundreds of nuclear bombs, causing devastating fires and flooding in an area which would have been shallow sea at the time. The discovery could explain why so many early cultures went into ...
  • Disaster That Struck The Ancients

    12/08/2001 2:51:43 PM PST · by blam · 206 replies · 13,091+ views
    BBC ^ | 7-26-2001 | Fekri Hassan
    Thursday, 26 July, 2001, 12:12 GMT 13:12 UK Disaster that struck the ancients The pharaohs of the Egyptian Old Kingdom had built the mightiest legacy of the ancient world - the pyramids at Giza. But after nearly a thousand years of stability, central authority disintegrated and the country collapsed into chaos for more than a 100 years. What happened, and why, has remained a huge controversy. But Professor Fekri Hassan, from University College London, UK, wanted to solve the mystery, by gathering together scientific clues. His inspiration was the little known tomb in southern Egypt of a regional governor, Ankhtifi. ...
  • Obamacare impact: Cutting hours, going part time

    01/19/2014 5:56:19 PM PST · by Libloather · 24 replies
    El Paso Inc. ^ | 1/19/14 | David Crowder
    **SNIP** Many of his students who work to pay for their education and living expenses are complaining about being cut to 28 hours. “They’re saying they couldn’t pay their bills at 40 hours, so now they’re having to get a second job,” Diaz said. “That is the new trend.” But it’s not just restaurant workers and sales clerks who are feeling the squeeze. Universities and community colleges that rely heavily on part-time faculty have had to make the hard choice of cutting the number of classes they teach because the schools can’t afford to offer them health insurance.
  • Dr. Ben Carson on ObamaCare's impact on America

    10/18/2013 7:43:35 AM PDT · by sheikdetailfeather · 10 replies
    Fox News ^ | 10-18-2013 | Fox & Friends
    Are Americans feeling the pain?
  • Did Ancient Earth-Chilling Meteor Crash Near Quebec?

    09/02/2013 4:43:48 PM PDT · by rjbemsha · 36 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 2 Sep 2013 | Becky Oskin
    A meteor or comet impact near Quebec heaved a rain of hot melted rock along North America's Atlantic Coast about 12,900 years ago, a new study claims. Scientists have traced the geochemical signature of the BB-sized spherules that rained down back to their source, the 1.5-billion-year-old Quebecia terrane in northeastern Canada near the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. At the time of the impact, the region was covered by a continental ice sheet, like Antarctica and Greenland are today. Around this time, a global cooling began and the big animals in North America all vanished. Their human hunters, the Clovis people,...
  • Ice core data supports ancient space impact idea (cosmic impact about 12,900 years ago?)

    08/01/2013 3:35:01 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 9 replies
    BBC News ^ | 8/1/13 | Simon Redfern
    New data from Greenland ice cores suggest North America may have suffered a large cosmic impact about 12,900 years ago. A layer of platinum is seen in ice of the same age as a known abrupt climate transition, US scientists report. The climate flip has previously been linked to the demise of the North American "Clovis" people. The data seem to back the idea that an impact tipped the climate into a colder phase, a point of current debate. Rapid climate change occurred 12,900 years ago, and it is proposed that this is associated with the extinction of large mammals...
  • NASA head views progress on asteroid lasso mission

    05/23/2013 1:16:28 PM PDT · by oxcart · 26 replies
    Associated Press (science) ^ | 05/23/13 | ALICIA CHANG
    <p>PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Surrounded by engineers, NASA chief Charles Bolden inspected a prototype spacecraft engine that could power an audacious mission to lasso an asteroid and tow it closer to Earth for astronauts to explore.</p> <p>Bolden checked on the progress Thursday a month after the Obama administration unveiled its 2014 budget that proposes $105 million to jumpstart the mission, which may eventually cost more than $2.6 billion.</p>
  • Bright Explosion on the Moon

    05/17/2013 12:05:52 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 40 replies
    NASA ^ | 5/17/13 | Tony Phillips
    May 17, 2013: For the past 8 years, NASA astronomers have been monitoring the Moon for signs of explosions caused by meteoroids hitting the lunar surface. "Lunar meteor showers" have turned out to be more common than anyone expected, with hundreds of detectable impacts occurring every year. They've just seen the biggest explosion in the history of the program. "On March 17, 2013, an object about the size of a small boulder hit the lunar surface in Mare Imbrium," says Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office. "It exploded in a flash nearly 10 times as bright as anything we've...
  • A Super Fast Comet Is Headed For Mars

    03/05/2013 10:10:50 AM PST · by blam · 19 replies
    TBI ^ | 3-5-2013 | The Economist
    A Super Fast Comet Is Headed For Mars The EconomistMarch 5, 2013Shutterstock A PAIR of middle-aged tourists (see previous post) are not the only thing headed for Mars. Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is also on its way. Discovered on January 3rd, some calculations of its orbit, according to Phil Plait, the rather good “Bad Astronomer”, have it passing 37,000km above the surface of the planet in October 2014—roughly the height at which communication satellites orbit Earth, and a remarkably close shave by cosmic standards. An official NASA website puts the most likely “close-approach” distance between the comet and Mars...
  • Huge Ancient Civilization’s Collapse Explained

    05/29/2012 5:32:20 AM PDT · by Renfield · 46 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 5-28-2012 | Charles Choi
    The mysterious fall of the largest of the world's earliest urban civilizations nearly 4,000 years ago in what is now India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh now appears to have a key culprit — ancient climate change, researchers say. Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia may be the best known of the first great urban cultures, but the largest was the Indus or Harappan civilization. This culture once extended over more than 386,000 square miles (1 million square kilometers) across the plains of the Indus River from the Arabian Seato the Ganges, and at its peak may have accounted for 10 percent of...
  • Evidence for an extraterrestrial impact 12,900 years ago

    09/30/2007 10:14:28 AM PDT · by baynut · 55 replies · 1,887+ views
    A carbon-rich black layer, dating to 12.9 ka, has been previously identified at 50 Clovis-age sites across North America and appears contemporaneous with the abrupt onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling. The in situ bones of extinct Pleistocene megafauna, along with Clovis tool assemblages, occur below this black layer but not within or above it. Causes for the extinctions, YD cooling, and termination of Clovis culture have long been controversial. In this paper, we provide evidence for an extraterrestrial (ET) impact event at 12.9 ka, which we hypothesize caused abrupt environmental changes that contributed to YD cooling, major ecological reorganization,...
  • Cosmic blast may have killed off megafauna Scientists say early humans doomed, too

    09/25/2007 6:45:11 PM PDT · by baynut · 52 replies · 1,333+ views
    Boston Globe ^ | September 27, 2007 | Colin Nickerson
    Wooly mammoths, giant sloths, saber-toothed cats, and dozens of other species of megafauna may have become extinct when a disintegrating comet or asteroid exploded over North America with the force of millions of hydrogen bombs, according to research by an international team of scientists. The blast, which the researchers believe occurred 12,900 years ago, may have also doomed a mysterious early human culture, known as Clovis people, while triggering a planetwide cool-down that wiped out the plant species that sustained many outsize Ice Age beasts, according to research published online yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
  • NSF Press Release: Comet May Have Exploded Over North America 13,000 Years Ago

    08/15/2007 5:32:04 PM PDT · by baynut · 49 replies · 2,218+ views
    National Science Foundation Press Release ^ | August 14, 2007 | Cheryl Dybas, NSF
    A "black mat" of algal growth in Arizona marks the extinction of mammoths 12,900 years ago New scientific findings suggest that a large comet may have exploded over North America 12,900 years ago, explaining riddles that scientists have wrestled with for decades, including an abrupt cooling of much of the planet and the extinction of large mammals. The discovery was made by scientists from the University of California at Santa Barbara and their colleagues. James Kennett, a paleoceanographer at the university, said that the discovery may explain some of the highly debated geologic controversies of recent decades. The period in...
  • Comet Theory Collides With Clovis Research, May Explain Disappearance of Ancient People

    08/03/2007 11:29:34 PM PDT · by ForGod'sSake · 121 replies · 4,803+ views
    June 28, 2007 Comet theory collides with Clovis research, may explain disappearance of ancient people A theory put forth by a group of 25 geo-scientists suggests that a massive comet exploded over Canada, possibly wiping out both beast and man around 12,900 years ago, and pushing the earth into another ice age. University of South Carolina archaeologist Dr. Albert Goodyear said the theory may not be such "out-of-this-world" thinking based on his study of ancient stone-tool artifacts he and his team have excavated from the Topper dig site in Allendale, as well as ones found in Georgia, North Carolina and...
  • Climate alarmists lose another piece of evidence

    06/11/2007 10:11:38 AM PDT · by Neville72 · 39 replies · 3,392+ views
    enterstageright ^ | 6/11/2007 | Dennis T. Avery
    Don't look now, but another big chunk of the "evidence" for man-made global warming suddenly disappeared. Poof! Researchers just reported that the world's most recent case of "abrupt climate change"—which occurred a mere 12,000 years ago—was probably due to a comet strike, not to "climate sensitivity." The Younger Dryas occurred as an Ice Age was ending. As the climate began to warm, a huge and sudden rush of fresh meltwater broke out from the Great Lakes and swept out to sea. The water surge was monumental enough that the meltwater lowered the salinity of the ocean, shut down the Atlantic...
  • Comet May Have Doomed Mammoths

    05/26/2007 6:12:53 AM PDT · by Renfield · 32 replies · 1,982+ views
    Red Orbit ^ | 5-26-07 | Betsy Mason
    mammoth some 12,900 years ago. A team of two dozen scientists say the culprit was likely a comet that exploded in the atmosphere above North America. The explosions sent a heat and shock wave across the continent, pelted the ground with a layer of telltale debris, ignited massive wildfires and triggered a major cooling of the climate, said nuclear analytic chemist Richard Firestone of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, one of the scientists who presented the controversial new theory Thursday at a conference of the American Geophysical Union in Acapulco. At least 15 species, mostly large mammals including mammoths, mastadons, giant ground...
  • Catastrophic Comet Chilled and Killed Ice Age Beasts (and Clovis people)

    05/21/2007 10:16:48 PM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 45 replies · 3,335+ views
    Live Science ^ | 05/21/07 | Jeanna Bryner
    Catastrophic Comet Chilled and Killed Ice Age Beasts Jeanna Bryner LiveScience Staff Writer LiveScience.com Mon May 21, 9:30 AM ET An extraterrestrial object with a three-mile girth might have exploded over southern Canada nearly 13,000 years ago, wiping out an ancient Stone Age culture as well as megafauna like mastodons and mammoths. The blast could be to blame for a major cold spell called the Younger Dryas that occurred at the end of the Pleistocene Epoch, a period of time spanning from about 1.8 million years ago to 11,500 years ago. Research, presented today at a meeting of the American...
  • Diamonds tell tale of comet that killed off the cavemen

    05/20/2007 4:50:33 PM PDT · by Renfield · 71 replies · 3,536+ views
    Guardian ^ | 5-20-07 | Robin McKie
    Fireballs set half the planet ablaze, wiping out the mammoth and America's Stone Age hunters Scientists will outline dramatic evidence this week that suggests a comet exploded over the Earth nearly 13,000 years ago, creating a hail of fireballs that set fire to most of the northern hemisphere. Primitive Stone Age cultures were destroyed and populations of mammoths and other large land animals, such as the mastodon, were wiped out. The blast also caused a major bout of climatic cooling that lasted 1,000 years and seriously disrupted the development of the early human civilisations that were emerging in Europe and...
  • Terrestrial Evidence of a Nuclear Catastrophe in Paleoindian Times

    07/24/2006 12:03:03 AM PDT · by ForGod'sSake · 276 replies · 7,633+ views
    Mammoth Trumpet ^ | March 2001 | Firestone/Topping
    Terrestrial Evidence of a Nuclear Catastrophe in Paleoindian Times by Richard B. Firestone & William Topping The Paleoindian occupation of North America, theoretically the point of entry of the first people to the Americas, is traditionally assumed to have occurred within a short time span beginning at about 12,000 yr B.P. This is inconsistent with much older South American dates of around 32,000 yr B.P.1 and the similarity of the Paleoindian toolkit to Mousterian traditions that disappeared about 30,000 years ago.2. A pattern of unusually young radiocarbon dates in the Northeast has been noted by Bonnichsen and Will.3,4 Our research...
  • Did comet start deadly cold snap?

    05/16/2007 3:00:33 PM PDT · by Mike Darancette · 84 replies · 4,671+ views
    Canada.com ^ | Monday, May 14, 2007 | Margaret Munro
    An extraterrestrial impact 13,000 years ago wiped out mammoths and started a mini-ice age, scientists believe Margaret Munro CanWest News Service Monday, May 14, 2007 A comet or some other extraterrestrial object appears to have slammed into northern Canada 12,900 years ago and triggered an abrupt and catastrophic climate change that wiped out the mammoths and many other prehistoric creatures, according to a team of U.S. scientists. Evidence of the ecological disaster exists in a thin layer of sediment that has been found from Alberta to New Mexico, say the researchers, whose work adds a dramatic and provocative twist to...
  • Scientist: Comets Blasted Early Americans

    10/28/2005 6:33:11 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 48 replies · 1,824+ views
    ap on Yahoo ^ | 10/28/05 | Meg Kinnard - ap
    COLUMBIA, S.C. - A supernova could be the "quick and dirty" explanation for what may have happened to an early North American culture, a nuclear scientist here said Thursday. Richard Firestone said at the "Clovis in the Southeast" conference that he thinks "impact regions" on mammoth tusks found in Gainey, Mich., were caused by magnetic particles rich in elements like titanium and uranium. This composition, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist said, resembles rocks that were discovered on the moon and have also been found in lunar meteorites that fell to Earth about 10,000 years ago. Firestone said that, based...
  • Supernova Storm Wiped Out Mammoths?

    10/17/2005 8:57:32 AM PDT · by Fzob · 110 replies · 12,216+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Sept. 28, 2005 | Jennifer Viegas
    Sept. 28, 2005— A supernova blast 41,000 years ago started a deadly chain of events that led to the extinction of mammoths and other animals in North America, according to two scientists. If their supernova theory gains acceptance, it could explain why dozens of species on the continent became extinct 13,000 years ago. Mammoths and mastodons, both relatives of today's elephants, mysteriously died out then, as did giant ground sloths, a large-horned bison, a huge species of armadillo, saber-toothed cats, and many other animals and plants. Richard Firestone, a nuclear scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National...
  • Supernova Storm Wiped Out Mammoths?

    10/04/2005 11:47:27 PM PDT · by planetesimal · 84 replies · 3,723+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 09/28/05 | Jennifer Viegas
    A supernova blast 41,000 years ago started a deadly chain of events that led to the extinction of mammoths and other animals in North America, according to two scientists. If their supernova theory gains acceptance, it could explain why dozens of species on the continent became extinct 13,000 years ago.
  • Supernova debris found on Earth

    11/24/2004 1:22:08 PM PST · by Phsstpok · 64 replies · 7,836+ views
    NEWS@NATURE.COM ^ | 02 November 2004 | Mark Peplow
    Published online: 02 November 2004; | doi:10.1038/news041101-5 Supernova debris found on Earth Mark Peplow Ancient explosion may have affected climate and, possibly, human evolution. Cosmic fallout from an exploding star dusted the Earth about 2.8 million years ago, and may have triggered a change in climate that affected the course of human evolution. The evidence comes from an unusual form of iron that was blasted through space by a supernova before eventually settling into the rocky crust beneath the Pacific Ocean. Gunther Korschinek, a physicist from the Technical University of Munich in Germany, leads a team who in 1999 found...
  • Al Goodyear And The Secrets Of Ancient Americans

    05/15/2008 3:25:21 PM PDT · by blam · 29 replies · 382+ views
    Free Times ^ | 5-14/20-2008 | Ron Aiken
    Al Goodyear and the Secrets of the Ancient AmericansUSC Professor Discovers 50,000 Year-Old Artifacts in S.C. BY RON AIKEN It was the summer of 1998, and University of South Carolina archaeologist Al Goodyear had a problem on his hands. Fourteen years of digging at an ancient chert quarry outside Allendale had begun to bear fruit: At a site called Big Pine Tree, Goodyear was well on his way to establishing that a substantial Clovis population lived here. If you’ll recall your history lessons from high school, the Clovis people — named such because the first evidence of them was found...
  • Scientists find signs of 13,000-year-old extinction event

    01/01/2009 2:09:17 PM PST · by neverdem · 79 replies · 3,658+ views
    Chicago Tribune ^ | January 2, 2009 | Robert Mitchum
    Comet may have exploded over planet, causing fires, die-offs, researchers say A meteorite colliding with the Earth 65 million years ago is considered to be the most likely reason dinosaurs vanished from the planet. Now a team of scientists says it has found new evidence that an object from space caused a similar extinction event only 13,000 years ago. In an article to be published Friday in the journal Science, researchers present what one author calls the "smoking bullet"—proof that an exploding comet triggered the sudden, thousand-year freeze that killed off mammoths, saber-toothed tigers and other large mammals that used...