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Keyword: impact

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  • Obamacare impact: Cutting hours, going part time

    01/19/2014 5:56:19 PM PST · by Libloather · 24 replies
    El Paso Inc. ^ | 1/19/14 | David Crowder
    **SNIP** Many of his students who work to pay for their education and living expenses are complaining about being cut to 28 hours. “They’re saying they couldn’t pay their bills at 40 hours, so now they’re having to get a second job,” Diaz said. “That is the new trend.” But it’s not just restaurant workers and sales clerks who are feeling the squeeze. Universities and community colleges that rely heavily on part-time faculty have had to make the hard choice of cutting the number of classes they teach because the schools can’t afford to offer them health insurance.
  • Dr. Ben Carson on ObamaCare's impact on America

    10/18/2013 7:43:35 AM PDT · by sheikdetailfeather · 10 replies
    Fox News ^ | 10-18-2013 | Fox & Friends
    Are Americans feeling the pain?
  • Did Ancient Earth-Chilling Meteor Crash Near Quebec?

    09/02/2013 4:43:48 PM PDT · by rjbemsha · 36 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 2 Sep 2013 | Becky Oskin
    A meteor or comet impact near Quebec heaved a rain of hot melted rock along North America's Atlantic Coast about 12,900 years ago, a new study claims. Scientists have traced the geochemical signature of the BB-sized spherules that rained down back to their source, the 1.5-billion-year-old Quebecia terrane in northeastern Canada near the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. At the time of the impact, the region was covered by a continental ice sheet, like Antarctica and Greenland are today. Around this time, a global cooling began and the big animals in North America all vanished. Their human hunters, the Clovis people,...
  • Ice core data supports ancient space impact idea (cosmic impact about 12,900 years ago?)

    08/01/2013 3:35:01 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 9 replies
    BBC News ^ | 8/1/13 | Simon Redfern
    New data from Greenland ice cores suggest North America may have suffered a large cosmic impact about 12,900 years ago. A layer of platinum is seen in ice of the same age as a known abrupt climate transition, US scientists report. The climate flip has previously been linked to the demise of the North American "Clovis" people. The data seem to back the idea that an impact tipped the climate into a colder phase, a point of current debate. Rapid climate change occurred 12,900 years ago, and it is proposed that this is associated with the extinction of large mammals...
  • NASA head views progress on asteroid lasso mission

    05/23/2013 1:16:28 PM PDT · by oxcart · 26 replies
    Associated Press (science) ^ | 05/23/13 | ALICIA CHANG
    <p>PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Surrounded by engineers, NASA chief Charles Bolden inspected a prototype spacecraft engine that could power an audacious mission to lasso an asteroid and tow it closer to Earth for astronauts to explore.</p> <p>Bolden checked on the progress Thursday a month after the Obama administration unveiled its 2014 budget that proposes $105 million to jumpstart the mission, which may eventually cost more than $2.6 billion.</p>
  • Bright Explosion on the Moon

    05/17/2013 12:05:52 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 40 replies
    NASA ^ | 5/17/13 | Tony Phillips
    May 17, 2013: For the past 8 years, NASA astronomers have been monitoring the Moon for signs of explosions caused by meteoroids hitting the lunar surface. "Lunar meteor showers" have turned out to be more common than anyone expected, with hundreds of detectable impacts occurring every year. They've just seen the biggest explosion in the history of the program. "On March 17, 2013, an object about the size of a small boulder hit the lunar surface in Mare Imbrium," says Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office. "It exploded in a flash nearly 10 times as bright as anything we've...
  • A Super Fast Comet Is Headed For Mars

    03/05/2013 10:10:50 AM PST · by blam · 19 replies
    TBI ^ | 3-5-2013 | The Economist
    A Super Fast Comet Is Headed For Mars The EconomistMarch 5, 2013Shutterstock A PAIR of middle-aged tourists (see previous post) are not the only thing headed for Mars. Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is also on its way. Discovered on January 3rd, some calculations of its orbit, according to Phil Plait, the rather good “Bad Astronomer”, have it passing 37,000km above the surface of the planet in October 2014—roughly the height at which communication satellites orbit Earth, and a remarkably close shave by cosmic standards. An official NASA website puts the most likely “close-approach” distance between the comet and Mars...
  • Huge Ancient Civilization’s Collapse Explained

    05/29/2012 5:32:20 AM PDT · by Renfield · 46 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 5-28-2012 | Charles Choi
    The mysterious fall of the largest of the world's earliest urban civilizations nearly 4,000 years ago in what is now India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh now appears to have a key culprit — ancient climate change, researchers say. Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia may be the best known of the first great urban cultures, but the largest was the Indus or Harappan civilization. This culture once extended over more than 386,000 square miles (1 million square kilometers) across the plains of the Indus River from the Arabian Seato the Ganges, and at its peak may have accounted for 10 percent of...
  • Evidence for an extraterrestrial impact 12,900 years ago

    09/30/2007 10:14:28 AM PDT · by baynut · 55 replies · 1,887+ views
    A carbon-rich black layer, dating to 12.9 ka, has been previously identified at 50 Clovis-age sites across North America and appears contemporaneous with the abrupt onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling. The in situ bones of extinct Pleistocene megafauna, along with Clovis tool assemblages, occur below this black layer but not within or above it. Causes for the extinctions, YD cooling, and termination of Clovis culture have long been controversial. In this paper, we provide evidence for an extraterrestrial (ET) impact event at 12.9 ka, which we hypothesize caused abrupt environmental changes that contributed to YD cooling, major ecological reorganization,...
  • Cosmic blast may have killed off megafauna Scientists say early humans doomed, too

    09/25/2007 6:45:11 PM PDT · by baynut · 52 replies · 1,333+ views
    Boston Globe ^ | September 27, 2007 | Colin Nickerson
    Wooly mammoths, giant sloths, saber-toothed cats, and dozens of other species of megafauna may have become extinct when a disintegrating comet or asteroid exploded over North America with the force of millions of hydrogen bombs, according to research by an international team of scientists. The blast, which the researchers believe occurred 12,900 years ago, may have also doomed a mysterious early human culture, known as Clovis people, while triggering a planetwide cool-down that wiped out the plant species that sustained many outsize Ice Age beasts, according to research published online yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
  • NSF Press Release: Comet May Have Exploded Over North America 13,000 Years Ago

    08/15/2007 5:32:04 PM PDT · by baynut · 49 replies · 2,218+ views
    National Science Foundation Press Release ^ | August 14, 2007 | Cheryl Dybas, NSF
    A "black mat" of algal growth in Arizona marks the extinction of mammoths 12,900 years ago New scientific findings suggest that a large comet may have exploded over North America 12,900 years ago, explaining riddles that scientists have wrestled with for decades, including an abrupt cooling of much of the planet and the extinction of large mammals. The discovery was made by scientists from the University of California at Santa Barbara and their colleagues. James Kennett, a paleoceanographer at the university, said that the discovery may explain some of the highly debated geologic controversies of recent decades. The period in...
  • Comet Theory Collides With Clovis Research, May Explain Disappearance of Ancient People

    08/03/2007 11:29:34 PM PDT · by ForGod'sSake · 121 replies · 4,803+ views
    June 28, 2007 Comet theory collides with Clovis research, may explain disappearance of ancient people A theory put forth by a group of 25 geo-scientists suggests that a massive comet exploded over Canada, possibly wiping out both beast and man around 12,900 years ago, and pushing the earth into another ice age. University of South Carolina archaeologist Dr. Albert Goodyear said the theory may not be such "out-of-this-world" thinking based on his study of ancient stone-tool artifacts he and his team have excavated from the Topper dig site in Allendale, as well as ones found in Georgia, North Carolina and...
  • Climate alarmists lose another piece of evidence

    06/11/2007 10:11:38 AM PDT · by Neville72 · 39 replies · 3,392+ views
    enterstageright ^ | 6/11/2007 | Dennis T. Avery
    Don't look now, but another big chunk of the "evidence" for man-made global warming suddenly disappeared. Poof! Researchers just reported that the world's most recent case of "abrupt climate change"—which occurred a mere 12,000 years ago—was probably due to a comet strike, not to "climate sensitivity." The Younger Dryas occurred as an Ice Age was ending. As the climate began to warm, a huge and sudden rush of fresh meltwater broke out from the Great Lakes and swept out to sea. The water surge was monumental enough that the meltwater lowered the salinity of the ocean, shut down the Atlantic...
  • Comet May Have Doomed Mammoths

    05/26/2007 6:12:53 AM PDT · by Renfield · 32 replies · 1,982+ views
    Red Orbit ^ | 5-26-07 | Betsy Mason
    mammoth some 12,900 years ago. A team of two dozen scientists say the culprit was likely a comet that exploded in the atmosphere above North America. The explosions sent a heat and shock wave across the continent, pelted the ground with a layer of telltale debris, ignited massive wildfires and triggered a major cooling of the climate, said nuclear analytic chemist Richard Firestone of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, one of the scientists who presented the controversial new theory Thursday at a conference of the American Geophysical Union in Acapulco. At least 15 species, mostly large mammals including mammoths, mastadons, giant ground...
  • Catastrophic Comet Chilled and Killed Ice Age Beasts (and Clovis people)

    05/21/2007 10:16:48 PM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 45 replies · 3,335+ views
    Live Science ^ | 05/21/07 | Jeanna Bryner
    Catastrophic Comet Chilled and Killed Ice Age Beasts Jeanna Bryner LiveScience Staff Writer LiveScience.com Mon May 21, 9:30 AM ET An extraterrestrial object with a three-mile girth might have exploded over southern Canada nearly 13,000 years ago, wiping out an ancient Stone Age culture as well as megafauna like mastodons and mammoths. The blast could be to blame for a major cold spell called the Younger Dryas that occurred at the end of the Pleistocene Epoch, a period of time spanning from about 1.8 million years ago to 11,500 years ago. Research, presented today at a meeting of the American...
  • Diamonds tell tale of comet that killed off the cavemen

    05/20/2007 4:50:33 PM PDT · by Renfield · 71 replies · 3,536+ views
    Guardian ^ | 5-20-07 | Robin McKie
    Fireballs set half the planet ablaze, wiping out the mammoth and America's Stone Age hunters Scientists will outline dramatic evidence this week that suggests a comet exploded over the Earth nearly 13,000 years ago, creating a hail of fireballs that set fire to most of the northern hemisphere. Primitive Stone Age cultures were destroyed and populations of mammoths and other large land animals, such as the mastodon, were wiped out. The blast also caused a major bout of climatic cooling that lasted 1,000 years and seriously disrupted the development of the early human civilisations that were emerging in Europe and...
  • Terrestrial Evidence of a Nuclear Catastrophe in Paleoindian Times

    07/24/2006 12:03:03 AM PDT · by ForGod'sSake · 276 replies · 7,633+ views
    Mammoth Trumpet ^ | March 2001 | Firestone/Topping
    Terrestrial Evidence of a Nuclear Catastrophe in Paleoindian Times by Richard B. Firestone & William Topping The Paleoindian occupation of North America, theoretically the point of entry of the first people to the Americas, is traditionally assumed to have occurred within a short time span beginning at about 12,000 yr B.P. This is inconsistent with much older South American dates of around 32,000 yr B.P.1 and the similarity of the Paleoindian toolkit to Mousterian traditions that disappeared about 30,000 years ago.2. A pattern of unusually young radiocarbon dates in the Northeast has been noted by Bonnichsen and Will.3,4 Our research...
  • Did comet start deadly cold snap?

    05/16/2007 3:00:33 PM PDT · by Mike Darancette · 84 replies · 4,671+ views
    Canada.com ^ | Monday, May 14, 2007 | Margaret Munro
    An extraterrestrial impact 13,000 years ago wiped out mammoths and started a mini-ice age, scientists believe Margaret Munro CanWest News Service Monday, May 14, 2007 A comet or some other extraterrestrial object appears to have slammed into northern Canada 12,900 years ago and triggered an abrupt and catastrophic climate change that wiped out the mammoths and many other prehistoric creatures, according to a team of U.S. scientists. Evidence of the ecological disaster exists in a thin layer of sediment that has been found from Alberta to New Mexico, say the researchers, whose work adds a dramatic and provocative twist to...
  • Scientist: Comets Blasted Early Americans

    10/28/2005 6:33:11 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 48 replies · 1,824+ views
    ap on Yahoo ^ | 10/28/05 | Meg Kinnard - ap
    COLUMBIA, S.C. - A supernova could be the "quick and dirty" explanation for what may have happened to an early North American culture, a nuclear scientist here said Thursday. Richard Firestone said at the "Clovis in the Southeast" conference that he thinks "impact regions" on mammoth tusks found in Gainey, Mich., were caused by magnetic particles rich in elements like titanium and uranium. This composition, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist said, resembles rocks that were discovered on the moon and have also been found in lunar meteorites that fell to Earth about 10,000 years ago. Firestone said that, based...
  • Supernova Storm Wiped Out Mammoths?

    10/17/2005 8:57:32 AM PDT · by Fzob · 110 replies · 12,216+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Sept. 28, 2005 | Jennifer Viegas
    Sept. 28, 2005— A supernova blast 41,000 years ago started a deadly chain of events that led to the extinction of mammoths and other animals in North America, according to two scientists. If their supernova theory gains acceptance, it could explain why dozens of species on the continent became extinct 13,000 years ago. Mammoths and mastodons, both relatives of today's elephants, mysteriously died out then, as did giant ground sloths, a large-horned bison, a huge species of armadillo, saber-toothed cats, and many other animals and plants. Richard Firestone, a nuclear scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National...
  • Supernova Storm Wiped Out Mammoths?

    10/04/2005 11:47:27 PM PDT · by planetesimal · 84 replies · 3,723+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 09/28/05 | Jennifer Viegas
    A supernova blast 41,000 years ago started a deadly chain of events that led to the extinction of mammoths and other animals in North America, according to two scientists. If their supernova theory gains acceptance, it could explain why dozens of species on the continent became extinct 13,000 years ago.
  • Supernova debris found on Earth

    11/24/2004 1:22:08 PM PST · by Phsstpok · 64 replies · 7,836+ views
    NEWS@NATURE.COM ^ | 02 November 2004 | Mark Peplow
    Published online: 02 November 2004; | doi:10.1038/news041101-5 Supernova debris found on Earth Mark Peplow Ancient explosion may have affected climate and, possibly, human evolution. Cosmic fallout from an exploding star dusted the Earth about 2.8 million years ago, and may have triggered a change in climate that affected the course of human evolution. The evidence comes from an unusual form of iron that was blasted through space by a supernova before eventually settling into the rocky crust beneath the Pacific Ocean. Gunther Korschinek, a physicist from the Technical University of Munich in Germany, leads a team who in 1999 found...
  • Al Goodyear And The Secrets Of Ancient Americans

    05/15/2008 3:25:21 PM PDT · by blam · 29 replies · 382+ views
    Free Times ^ | 5-14/20-2008 | Ron Aiken
    Al Goodyear and the Secrets of the Ancient AmericansUSC Professor Discovers 50,000 Year-Old Artifacts in S.C. BY RON AIKEN It was the summer of 1998, and University of South Carolina archaeologist Al Goodyear had a problem on his hands. Fourteen years of digging at an ancient chert quarry outside Allendale had begun to bear fruit: At a site called Big Pine Tree, Goodyear was well on his way to establishing that a substantial Clovis population lived here. If you’ll recall your history lessons from high school, the Clovis people — named such because the first evidence of them was found...
  • Scientists find signs of 13,000-year-old extinction event

    01/01/2009 2:09:17 PM PST · by neverdem · 79 replies · 3,658+ views
    Chicago Tribune ^ | January 2, 2009 | Robert Mitchum
    Comet may have exploded over planet, causing fires, die-offs, researchers say A meteorite colliding with the Earth 65 million years ago is considered to be the most likely reason dinosaurs vanished from the planet. Now a team of scientists says it has found new evidence that an object from space caused a similar extinction event only 13,000 years ago. In an article to be published Friday in the journal Science, researchers present what one author calls the "smoking bullet"—proof that an exploding comet triggered the sudden, thousand-year freeze that killed off mammoths, saber-toothed tigers and other large mammals that used...
  • Exploding Asteroid Theory Strengthened By New Evidence Located In Ohio, Indiana

    07/02/2008 3:27:51 PM PDT · by blam · 68 replies · 1,699+ views
    Physorg ^ | 7-1-2008 | University of Cincinnati
    Exploding asteroid theory strengthened by new evidence located in Ohio, Indiana Space & Earth science / Earth Sciences Ken Tankersley seen working in the field in a cave in this publicity photo from the National Geographic Channel. Geological evidence found in Ohio and Indiana in recent weeks is strengthening the case to attribute what happened 12,900 years ago in North America -- when the end of the last Ice Age unexpectedly turned into a phase of extinction for animals and humans -- to a cataclysmic comet or asteroid explosion over top of Canada. A comet/asteroid theory advanced by Arizona-based geophysicist...
  • Fungi, Feces Show Comet Didn't Kill Ice Age Mammals?

    06/24/2010 8:43:43 AM PDT · by Palter · 18 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 22 June 2010 | John Roach
    Tiny balls of fungus and feces may disprove the theory that a huge space rock exploded over North America about 12,900 years ago, triggering a thousand-year cold snap, according to a new study. The ancient temperature drop, called the Younger Dryas, has been well documented in the geologic record, including soil and ice core samples.The cool-down also coincides with the extinction of mammoths and other Ice Age mammals in North America, and it's thought to have spurred our hunter-gatherer ancestors in the Middle East to adopt an agricultural lifestyle.But the theory that a comet or asteroid explosion is behind the...
  • The Mystery Of Mammoth Tusks With Iron Fillings

    03/08/2008 2:03:28 PM PST · by blam · 99 replies · 2,731+ views
    Alaska Report News ^ | 3-5-2008 | Ned Rozell
    The mystery of mammoth tusks with iron fillings By By Ned RozellMarch 5, 2008 A giant meteor may have exploded over Alaska thousands of years ago, shooting out metal fragments like buckshot, some of which embedded in the tusks of woolly mammoths and the horns of bison. Simultaneously, a large chunk of the meteor hit Alaska south of Allakaket, sending up a dust cloud that blacked out the sun over the entire state and surrounding areas, killing most of the life in the area. Embedded iron particles surrounded by carbonized rings in the outer layer of a mammoth tusk from...
  • Humans Did Not Kill Off Mammoths; Comet, Climate Change Helped, Studies Show

    06/12/2012 7:03:32 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 115 replies
    Indian Country Today ^ | June 13, 2012 | ICTMN Staff
    Although human hunting played a part in the demise of the woolly mammoth about 10,000 years ago, homo sapiens were but bit players in a global drama involving climate change, comet impact and a multitude of other factors, scientists have found in separate studies. Previous research had blamed their demise on tribal hunting. But new findings “pretty much dispel the idea of any one factor, any one event, as dooming the mammoths,” said Glen MacDonald, a researcher and geographer at the University of California in Los Angeles, to LiveScience.com. In other words, hunting didn’t help, but it was not instrumental....
  • Younger Dryas -The Rest of the Story!

    06/21/2012 2:16:17 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 8 replies
    watts Up With That? ^ | June 16, 2012 | Guest Post By: Rodney Chilton
    Posted on June 16, 2012 by Anthony Watts WUWT readers may recall this recent story: New evidence of Younger Dryas extraterrestrial impact The story below provides much more detail about the Younger Dryas event and the split that has developed in the scientific community over the cause. I’ve added this graph below from NCDC to give readers a sense of time and magnitude of the event. – Anthony The Younger Dryas cold interval as viewed from central Greenland. From:Quaternary Science Reviews Volume 19, Issues 1-5, 1 January 2000, Richard B. AlleyGuest Post By: Rodney Chilton www.bcclimate.com A consideration of many...
  • Did Comets Cause Ancient American Extinctions?

    05/07/2008 6:40:10 PM PDT · by blam · 29 replies · 475+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 5-6-2008 | Anne Casselman
    Did Comets Cause Ancient American Extinctions?Anne Casselman for National Geographic NewsMay 6, 2008 Debate has heated up over a controversial theory that suggests huge comet impacts wiped out North America's large mammals nearly 13,000 years ago. The hypothesis, first presented in May 2007, proposes that an onslaught of extraterrestrial bodies caused the mass extinction known as the Younger Dryas event and triggered a period of climatic cooling. The theory has been debated widely since it was introduced, but it drew new scrutiny in March at the annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology annual meeting in Vancouver, Canada. Stuart...
  • Did a Comet Hit Earth 12,000 Years Ago?

    01/02/2009 6:02:32 PM PST · by neverdem · 35 replies · 2,014+ views
    Scientific American ^ | January 2, 2009 | David Biello
    Nanodiamonds found across North America suggest that major climate change could have been cosmically instigatedRoughly 12,900 years ago, massive global cooling kicked in abruptly, along with the end of the line for some 35 different mammal species, including the mammoth, as well as the so-called Clovis culture of prehistoric North Americans. Various theories have been proposed for the die-off, ranging from abrupt climate change to overhunting once humans were let loose on the wilds of North America. But now nanodiamonds found in the sediments from this time period point to an alternative: a massive explosion or explosions by a fragmentary...
  • Comet May Have Collided With Earth 13,000 Years Ago(MEXICO)

    07/15/2012 5:03:34 PM PDT · by ForGod'sSake · 49 replies
    Spacedotcom ^ | March 6, 2012 | Clara Moskowitz
    Central Mexico’s Lake Cuitzeo contains melted rock formations and nanodiamonds that suggest a comet impacted Earth around 12,900 years ago, scientists say. CREDIT: Israde et al. (2012) New evidence supports the idea that a huge space rock collided with our planet about 13,000 years ago and broke up in Earth's atmosphere, a new study suggests. This impact would have been powerful enough to melt the ground, and could have killed off many large mammals and humans. It may even have set off a period of unusual cold called the Younger Dryas that began at that time, researchers say. The...
  • 12,900 Years Ago: North American Comet Impact Theory Disproved

    01/27/2009 3:06:57 AM PST · by decimon · 35 replies · 782+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Jan. 27, 2009 | Unknown
    New data disproves the recent theory that a large comet exploded over North America 12,900 years ago, causing a shock wave that travelled across North America at hundreds of kilometres per hour and triggering continent-wide wildfires. Dr Sandy Harrison from the University of Bristol and colleagues tested the theory by examining charcoal and pollen records to assess how fire regimes in North America changed between 15 and 10,000 years ago, a time of large and rapid climate changes. Their results provide no evidence for continental-scale fires, but support the fact that the increase in large-scale wildfires in all regions of...
  • Humans to Blame for Extinction? - Not Necessarily So ...

    07/21/2009 1:09:33 PM PDT · by George - the Other · 21 replies · 867+ views
    Science News ^ | July 21, 2009 | Science News
    "These findings are inconsistent with the alternative and already hotly debated theory that overhunting by Clovis people led to the rapid extinction of large mammals at the end of the ice age, the research team argues in the PNAS paper."
  • Ice Age Ends Smashingly: Did A Comet Blow Up Over Eastern Canada? (More) (Carolina Bays)

    06/02/2007 3:14:23 PM PDT · by blam · 106 replies · 5,308+ views
    Science News ^ | 6-1-2007 | Sid Perkins
    Ice Age Ends Smashingly: Did a comet blow up over eastern Canada? Sid Perkins Evidence unearthed at more than two dozen sites across North America suggests that an extraterrestrial object exploded in Earth's atmosphere above Canada about 12,900 years ago, just as the climate was warming at the end of the last ice age. The explosion sparked immense wildfires, devastated North America's ecosystems and prehistoric cultures, and triggered a millennium-long cold spell, scientists say. IT'S IN THERE. A layer of carbon-rich sediment (arrow) found here at Murray Springs, Ariz., and elsewhere across North America, provides evidence that an extraterrestrial object...
  • New evidence supporting extraterrestrial impact at the start of the Younger Dryas

    03/12/2012 4:54:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 1+ views
    Watts Up With That 'blog ^ | Monday, March 12, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    We report the discovery in Lake Cuitzeo in central Mexico of a black, carbon-rich, lacustrine layer, containing nanodiamonds, microspherules, and other unusual materials that date to the early Younger Dryas and are interpreted to result from an extraterrestrial impact. These proxies were found in a 27-m-long core as part of an interdisciplinary effort to extract a paleoclimate record back through the previous interglacial. Our attention focused early on an anomalous, 10-cm-thick, carbon-rich layer at a depth of 2.8 m that dates to 12.9 ka and coincides with a suite of anomalous coeval environmental and biotic changes independently recognized in other...
  • Great beasts peppered from space

    12/12/2007 9:55:00 AM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies · 531+ views
    BBC News ^ | 12-11-07
    Startling evidence has been found which shows mammoth and other great beasts from the last ice age were blasted with material that came from space.Eight tusks dating to some 35,000 years ago all show signs of having being peppered with meteorite fragments. The ancient remains come from Alaska, but researchers also have a Siberian bison skull with the same pockmarks. The scientists released details of the discovery at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco, US. They painted a picture of a calamitous event over North America that may have severely knocked back the populations of some...
  • Geologist Wins Top Science Award (Walter Alvarez)

    03/14/2006 5:40:39 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 394+ views
    All Headlines News ^ | 3-6-2006 | Yvonne Lee
    Geologist Wins Top Science Award March 6, 2006 10:00 p.m. EST Yvonne Lee - All Headline News Staff Reporter Reno, Nevada (AHN) - Geologist Walter Alvarez will receive the Desert Research Institute's silver medallion and a $20,000 prize. The Associated Press reports the University of California-Berkeley scientist came up with the theory that dinosaurs were killed off when a comet or asteroid crashed into the Earth. President of the institute Stephen G. Wells says, "Until the impact theory was finally proven, Dr. Alvarez and his colleagues were regarded as heretics by the `old guard' in the field of geology." In...
  • Tale Of (King) Arthur Points To Comet Catastrophe

    04/21/2006 4:39:40 PM PDT · by blam · 97 replies · 2,039+ views
    The Times ^ | 9-9-2000 | Nick Nuttall
    TALE OF ARTHUR POINTS TO COMET CATASTROPHE From The Times, 9 September 2000 http://www.the-times.co.uk BY NICK NUTTALL Arthur: myth links him to fire from the sky THE story of the death of King Arthur and its references to a wasteland may have been inspired by the apocalyptic effects of a giant comet bombarding the Earth in AD540, leading to the Dark Ages, a British scientist said yesterday. The impacts filled the atmosphere with dust and debris; a long winter began. Crops failed, and there was famine, Dr Mike Baillie of Queen's University, Belfast, told the British Association for the Advancement...
  • Massive Eltanin Meteor 2.5 million years ago set off mass tsunami, changed the climate?

    09/28/2012 11:55:36 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 13 replies
    JoNova ^ | September 21st, 2012 | Joanne
    From the file of “Things that would really be catastrophic”. Did a meteor have a role in a major shift in Earth’s Climate?The start of the Quaternary period (2.588 million years ago, where the Pliocene became Pleistocene) coincides with evidence of a mega tsunami in the South Pacific.The Eltanin Meteor fell into the South Pacific 2.5 million years ago setting off a (likely) tsunami that was hundreds of meters high and theoretically pushed mass material into the atmosphere which may have contributed to the cooling the globe had already started on. This meteor was hard to detect because it hit...
  • Hospices Reveal Obamacare’s Impact

    02/12/2013 3:21:13 PM PST · by Nachum · 28 replies
    Heritage.org ^ | 2/12/13 | Bob Moffit and Alyene Senger
    Two hospice care centers are struggling to make ends meet, and Obamacare’s cuts to Medicare are to blame. Hospices—health care facilities for the terminally ill—along with other Medicare providers are facing Medicare pay cuts. Of the $716 billion in payment reductions, hospice care was hit by a $17 billion payment cut from 2013 to 2022. Now, contrary to all of the misleading claims, this effect is already beginning. San Diego Hospice recently laid off 260 workers, closed a 24-bed hospital, and has recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. San Diego Hospice’s financial condition is attributed mainly to reduced Medicare reimbursement,...
  • Edge of Huygens Crater

    10/20/2004 8:46:46 AM PDT · by ckilmer · 2 replies · 479+ views
    Edge of Huygens Crater Summary - (Oct 19, 2004) The European Space Agency's Mars Express took this image of the rim of impact crater Huygens, which is 450 km (280 miles) across. By counting craters in the area, researchers have determined that Huygens was blasted out approximately 4 billion years ago, early on in Mars' history when the planet was being heavily bombarded like the rest of the planets in the Solar System. The rim seems to show a tributary system that could have been water runoff in the ancient Martian past. Full Story - This image, taken by the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Stickney Crater

    01/18/2013 3:13:45 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 52 replies
    NASA ^ | January 18, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Stickney Crater, the largest crater on the martian moon Phobos, is named for Chloe Angeline Stickney Hall, mathematician and wife of astronomer Asaph Hall. Asaph Hall discovered both the Red Planet's moons in 1877. Over 9 kilometers across, Stickney is nearly half the diameter of Phobos itself, so large that the impact that blasted out the crater likely came close to shattering the tiny moon. This stunning, enhanced-color image of Stickney and surroundings was recorded by the HiRISE camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as it passed within some six thousand kilometers of Phobos in March of 2008. Even...
  • Jupiter Has Taken a Massive Meteor Hit (So Earth Didn’t Have To)

    09/12/2012 2:41:21 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 9/12/12 | Jamie Condliffe
    On Monday, Jupiter took a massive hit from a meteor, which was spotted by amateur astronomers based in the US—and if previous evidence is anything to go by, it could have saved Earth from a massive collision in the process. Dan Peterson of Racine, Wisconsin, was gazing at Jupiter on Monday when he saw a bright, white flash on the surface of the planet. When he posted his observation online, another astrophotographer, George Hall, discovered he'd unknowingly captured the massive explosion on video. Turns out it was probably a meteor striking the surface of the planet—and you can watch the...
  • DNC vs. RNC: Which convention had the most impact?

    09/10/2012 8:41:08 AM PDT · by sheikdetailfeather · 18 replies
    Fox News ^ | September 10, 2012 | Fox & Friends
    September 10, 2012 DNC vs. RNC: Which convention had the most impact? Donald Trump weighs in
  • Long-run Macroeconomic Impact of Increasing Tax Rates on High-income Taxpayers in 2013

    08/07/2012 3:20:15 AM PDT · by Son House · 4 replies
    Ernst & Young LLP ^ | July 2012 | Drs. Robert Carroll and Gerald Prante, Ernst & Young LLP
    Executive Summary ... This report finds that these higher marginal tax rates result in a smaller economy, fewer jobs, less investment, and lower wages. Specifically, this report finds that the higher tax rates will have significant adverse economic effects in the long-run: lowering output, employment, investment, the capital stock, and real after-tax wages when the resulting revenue is used to finance additional government spending. Long-run macroeconomic impact of increasing tax rates on high-income taxpayers in 2013 Through lower after-tax rewards to work, the higher tax rates on wages reduce work effort and labor force participation. The higher tax rates on...
  • Impact melt products as evidence for cosmic airbursts/impacts 12,900 years ago

    07/14/2012 6:00:04 AM PDT · by rjbemsha · 11 replies
    This paper supports the proposal that fragments of an asteroid or comet impacted Earth, deposited silica-and iron-rich microspherules and other proxies across several continents, and triggered the Younger Dryas cooling episode 12,900 years ago.
  • Flashback 2010, Remembering Christina Romer: Tax Increases and Their Economic Impact

    07/09/2012 12:48:04 PM PDT · by Son House
    Seeking Alpha ^ | August 10, 2010 | Ian McAbeer
    In June of this year, a little known organization called the American Economic Review published a 39 page research article, titled “The Macroeconomic Effects of Tax Changes: Estimates Based on a New Measure of Fiscal Shocks.” I have quoted from the publication here: This paper investigates the causes and consequences of changes in the level of taxation in the postwar United States. Our results indicate that tax changes have very large effects on output. Our baseline specification implies that an exogenous tax increase of one percent of GDP lowers real GDP by almost three percent… and that [capital] investment falls...
  • Oldest known impact crater found

    07/08/2012 11:37:26 PM PDT · by rjbemsha · 15 replies
    Cardiff University ^ | Cardiff University
    A 100 kilometre-wide crater has been found in Greenland, the result of a massive asteroid or comet impact a billion years before any other known collision on Earth.
  • Large Meteorite Hits Near Columbia CA at 7:55AM, Several Fires Reported

    04/22/2012 10:56:12 AM PDT · by .454Puma · 89 replies
    News 10 Sacramento ^ | 04/22/2012 | News 10 Sacramento
    An eyewitness says: "It was pretty freakin' real when all the dogs started barking right before it hit, then EVERYTHING shook. We were in the field just outside the barn & the barn continued to shake for a couple minutes afterward. We are about 50-60 miles or so from where it hit."