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Keyword: heartdisease

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  • Why Is Common Sense So Controversial?

    04/26/2017 5:55:38 AM PDT · by NOBO2012 · 10 replies
    Michelle Obama's Mirror ^ | 4-26-17 | MOTUS
    How much obesity has to be created in a single decade for people to realize that diet has to be responsible for it? - Dr. Robert Atkins, the much maligned early advocate of the low carb diets. There may be other things more important but I’m more interested in junk science this week; I blame Earth Day, Climate Change and Trump. In any event I thought you might like to know about this article related to your health and diet: Vegans Suck at Science. Here’s Proof. It debunks several decades long myths about meat such as “Meat Eating Leads to...
  • From heart failure to health: Pump shown to restore organ to fitness

    04/11/2017 6:00:30 AM PDT · by RoosterRedux · 12 replies
    As we face a shortage of donated hearts for transplant, the study authors are calling for the devices to be considered as a tool which can allow patients to restore their health. The research examined the effect of mechanical heart pumps, known as left ventricular assist devices (LVAD). The devices are used to support patients with severe heart failure while they wait for a heart transplant. Surgeons implant the battery operated, mechanical pump which helps the main pumping chamber of the heart- the left ventricle - - to push blood around the body. Fitted at the six specialist NHS centres...
  • Fat is GOOD for you! New research says cheese and cream to PREVENT diabetes and heart risk

    12/11/2016 1:35:02 PM PST · by RoosterRedux · 168 replies
    express.co.uk ^ | Lucy Johnston
    Current dietary advice says foods containing high levels of saturated fats such as cream, butter, red meat, eggs and cheese should be avoided because they increase the risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and cancer. But a study published in a leading medical journal has found the opposite is true, with a diet full of natural fats improving the health of people taking part. Professor Sherif Sultan, a heart specialist from the University of Ireland, said: “We urgently need to overturn current dietary guidelines." "People should not be eating high carbohydrate diets as they have been told over the...
  • Taking ibuprofen could raise heart risk by a fifth

    10/11/2016 7:36:29 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 73 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Sept. 29, 2016 | Sophie Borland
    Ibuprofen and other painkillers may trigger a heart condition which affects almost a million Britons, a major study has shown. Patients who regularly take the pills are up to 20 per cent more likely to develop heart failure. Long-term use of the medication causes chemical reactions in the body which place extra strain on the heart, research suggests. This can lead to heart failure in patients who have a history of previous heart attacks or high blood pressure. An estimated 900,000 adults in Britain have heart failure which occurs when the muscle becomes too weak to pump blood around the...
  • Study details sugar industry attempt to shape science

    09/16/2016 12:03:38 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Sep. 12, 2016 2:58 PM EDT | Candice Choi
    The sugar industry began funding research that cast doubt on sugar’s role in heart disease — in part by pointing the finger at fat — as early as the 1960s, according to an analysis of newly uncovered documents. The analysis published Monday is based on correspondence between a sugar trade group and researchers at Harvard University, and is the latest example showing how food and beverage makers attempt to shape public understanding of nutrition. In 1964, the group now known as the Sugar Association internally discussed a campaign to address “negative attitudes toward sugar” after studies began emerging linking sugar...
  • Low-Salt Diet Bad For Your Heart? Not So Fast!

    05/22/2016 8:43:07 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 67 replies
    tech times ^ | 22 May 2016 | James Maynard
    A low-salt diet could damage hearts, according to a new study published in the prestigious medical journal The Lancet. However, that research is already under fire from medical investigators who take issue with the authors' methods and conclusions.... While our data highlights the importance of reducing high salt intake in people with hypertension, it does not support reducing salt intake to low levels.
  • Editorial: The heretical Minnesota heart study: When science stops asking questions

    04/30/2016 4:16:08 AM PDT · by rellimpank · 31 replies
    Chicago Tribune ^ | 30 apr 2016
    In the second half of the 20th century, conventional wisdom in the medical community held that overconsumption of saturated fats — the kind found in milk, cheese, meats and butter — was dangerous. And so, between 1968 and 1973, a well-planned, well-executed study involving more than 9,000 patients was performed to test this widely accepted relationship between diet and heart disease. The results of the Minnesota Coronary Experiment were notable for two reasons. First, the findings contradicted much of what was believed at the time: The study demonstrated that people who ate a diet rich in saturated fats did not...
  • The Iceman's Stomach Bugs Offer Clues to Ancient Human Migration

    01/07/2016 7:00:24 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 25 replies
    smithsonianmag ^ | 01/07/2016 | Brian Handwerk
    Otzi the legendary “Iceman” wasn't alone when he was mummified on a glacier 5,300 years ago. With him were gut microbes known to cause some serious tummy trouble. These bacteria, Helicobacter pylori, are providing fresh evidence about Otzi's diet and poor health in the days leading up to his murder. Intriguingly, they could also help scientists better understand who his people were and how they came to live in the region. ... Discovered in the 1990s, Otzi lived in what are today the Eastern Italian Alps, where he was naturally mummified by ice after his violent death. The body is...
  • Cancer Loves Sugar CBS 60 Minutes April 2012

    11/24/2015 2:21:27 PM PST · by WhiskeyX · 155 replies
    YouTube ^ | Aug 12, 2012 | CBS 60 Minutes
    Sobering report. If you have cancer, you should avoid sugar of any kind. If you don't want cancer, I suggest that you limit your sugar intake. Avoid "high fructose corn syrup", and processed sugars. If you want to lose weight, avoid things that quickly become sugar (white breads, potato, rice, alcohol, etc). Reducing these things has a major impact on your liver and pancreas. Eat lots of green things!
  • Dr. Peter Attia: The limits of scientific evidence and the ethics of dietary guidelines

    11/20/2015 6:22:31 PM PST · by WhiskeyX · 14 replies
    YouTube ^ | Jul 25, 2014 | DrR1pper
    Dr. Peter Attia: The limits of scientific evidence and the ethics of dietary guidelines Description: Most of the dietary recommendations made in the United States are not firmly grounded in well-controlled science. The implications for this are profound, especially at a time where two-thirds of Americans are overweight and obesity and its related diseases – diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease to name a few – are claiming the lives of more people each year. In this presentation, Peter Attia takes a close look at one such pillar of dietary wisdom, the recommendation that Americans minimize their consumption of...
  • Enjoy Eating Saturated Fats: They're Good for You. Donald W. Miller, Jr., M.D.

    11/14/2015 7:09:29 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 7 replies
    YouTube ^ | Aug 28, 2011 | jersnav
    Dr. Miller is professor of surgery, cardiothoracic division, Univ. Washington, and writes frequently for http://www.Lewrockwell.com.
  • Health warning for all Freepers using the Baking Soda / Dakin's Solution Oral Hygiene Protocol

    09/27/2015 12:49:26 AM PDT · by Swordmaker · 165 replies
    Vanity from Swordmaker | September 26, 2014 | Swordmaker
    IMPORTANT! HEALTH WARNING! FOR ALL FREEPERS WHO HAVE BEEN FOLLOWING THE BAKING SODA AND CLOROX-DAKIN'S SOLUTION PROTOCOL FOR ORAL HYGIENE AND TOOTH BRUSHING!!! The CLOROX Company has changed its basic Clorox formula to make it "concentrated" but has ALSO added LAUNDRY chemicals! I just went to the Clorox™ website because I noticed the "concentrated" label on that bottle you linked to and it worried me. . . I wanted to check what the concentration of Sodium Hypochlorite was in their "concentrated" product. . . and to my horror I learned that Clorox has CHANGED their entire product line. ....
  • Statins: Heart disease drug speeds up ageing process, warns new research

    09/26/2015 6:30:32 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 125 replies
    Sunday Express (UK) ^ | Sunday, Sept 27, 2015 | By LUCY JOHNSTON
    Fears are growing over the side effects of cholesterol-lowering pillsScientists have found the heart disease drug badly affects our stem cells, the internal medical system which repairs damage to our bodies and protects us from muscle and joint pain as well as memory loss. Last night experts warned patients to “think very carefully” before taking statins as a preventative medicine. A GP expert in the field said: “They just make many patients feel years older. Side effects mimic the ageing process.” The new research by scientists at Tulane University in New Orleans has reignited the debate about statin side effects which many doctors...
  • Inuit Study Adds Twist to Omega-3 Fatty Acids’ Health Story

    09/18/2015 5:31:08 PM PDT · by re_nortex · 24 replies
    New York Slimes ^ | SEPT. 17, 2015 | Carl Zimmer
    Today, at least 10 percent of Americans regularly take fish oil supplements. But recent trials have failed to confirm that the pills prevent heart attacks or stroke. And now the story has an intriguing new twist. A study published on Thursday in the journal Science reported that the ancestors of the Inuit evolved unique genetic adaptations for metabolizing omega-3s and other fatty acids. Those gene variants had drastic effects on Inuit’s bodies, reducing their heights and weights.
  • Not brushing your teeth can trigger dementia and heart disease

    06/01/2015 5:25:47 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 119 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | June 1, 2015 | Christoffer Van Tulleken
    My dental health is something I have always taken seriously — and as a gadget fan, I’ve spent hundreds of pounds on the latest high-tech electronic toothbrushes and expensive toothpastes, gels and mouthwashes. But then I had to go without brushing my teeth for a fortnight. This was for a new two-part series on dental health for the BBC, and what we discovered was truly eye-opening, with implications not just for me, but for all of us. My wife was anything but keen on the no-brushing experiment and there was a lot less kissing during that fortnight. And she was...
  • Vitamin D prevents diabetes and clogged arteries in mice

    03/19/2015 7:27:28 PM PDT · by ConservativeMind · 26 replies
    In recent years, a deficiency of vitamin D has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease, two illnesses that commonly occur together and are the most common cause of illness and death in Western countries. Both disorders are rooted in chronic inflammation, which leads to insulin resistance and the buildup of artery-clogging plaque. Now, new research in mice at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests vitamin D plays a major role in preventing the inflammation that leads to type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. Further, the way key immune cells behave without adequate vitamin D may...
  • Anti-depressant [Paxil/Paroxetine/Seroxat] can also help repair failing hearts

    03/04/2015 7:43:48 PM PST · by rickmichaels · 11 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | March 4, 2015 | FIONA MACRAE
    Pills used to treat depression also help mend ailing hearts, a study has found. Seroxat, a widely-used anti-depressant, worked ‘far better’ than the standard treatment for heart failure. The so-called happy pills not only stopped the heart from deteriorating further – they actually helped mend it.
  • Man suffers fatal heart attack while robbing Edgewood Aldi, police say

    01/22/2015 7:15:37 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 55 replies
    The Baltimore Sun ^ | January 22, 2015 | Erika Butler
    An Edgewood man died Monday night from an apparent heart attack while trying to rob the Aldi grocery store in Edgewood, police said. Investigators also said the same man is also connected to two other recent robberies in Edgewood. Around 8:50 p.m. Monday, a man later identified as Wayne Clark, 52, of Meadowood Court, walked into the Aldi in the 1300 block of Business Center Way, according to Cristie Kahler, spokesperson for the Harford County Sheriff's Office. Deputies responded to the store where Clark was lying face down, appearing to be suffering from cardiac arrest, she said. A witness told...
  • Adult Stem Cells Offering Patients New Hope

    03/21/2008 8:24:56 PM PDT · by neverdem · 12 replies · 372+ views
    wbztv.com ^ | Mar 20, 2008 | Mallika Marshall, MD
    BOSTON (WBZ) ― There's been a lot of controversy over the use of embryonic stem cells in recent years, but adult stem cells, which few people oppose using, are already giving some patients a new lease on life. Donald Reid is hoping adult stem cells will give him more time. "There's not many options left for me." The 57-year-old has clogged arteries and heart disease so bad; he's not a candidate for surgery. Instead, he's joined an experimental study that involves a special machine. It's taking his blood and pulling out stem cells. We're not talking about stem cells from...
  • Pomegranate peel may cure deadly brain disorders (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's)

    08/23/2014 3:43:03 AM PDT · by Innovative · 20 replies
    Business Standard ^ | Aug 23, 2014 | IANS
    Two years of research by a Nigerian scientist has shown that sufferers of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease could be helped by punicalagin, a compound extracted from pomegranates. Olumayokun Olajide from the University of Huddersfield in West Yorkshire showed how punicalagin could inhibit inflammation in specialised brain cells known as micrologia. He also found the painful inflammation that accompanies illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis and Parkinson's disease could be reduced using the same drug. "We do know that regular consumption of pomegranate has a lot of health benefits, including prevention of neuro-inflammation related to dementia," Olajide added.