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Keyword: heartdisease

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  • Eating more fruit, veggies may cut stroke risk: Study

    05/09/2014 7:10:27 AM PDT · by Innovative · 13 replies
    Sun News Network ^ | May 9, 2014 | QMI Agendy
    Researchers at the Medical College of Qingdao University in Qingdao, China, saw a 32% decrease of stroke risk with every 200 grams of fruit consumed each day, and an 11% decrease for every 200 g of vegetables eaten daily. High fruit and vegetable intake can lower blood pressure and improve microvascular function, the researchers said in the study, which was published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke.
  • Bacon Is Good for You

    05/04/2014 4:24:46 PM PDT · by kingattax · 100 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 5-4-14 | Peter Wilson
    Those who love rib-eye steaks and double-cream Brie will feel better about their guilty pleasures after reading Nina Teicholz’s article in this weekend’s Wall Street Journal, “The Questionable Link Between Saturated Fat and Heart Disease.” She writes, for example: Too much whole-grain oatmeal for breakfast and whole-grain pasta for dinner, with fruit snacks in between, add up to a less healthy diet than one of eggs and bacon, followed by fish. Gary Taubes covered some of the same ground in his excellent 2008 book, Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health. Taubes argued...
  • The Questionable Link Between Saturated Fat and Heart Disease

    05/04/2014 12:04:14 PM PDT · by Rusty0604 · 132 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 05/02/2014 | Nina Teicholz
    "Saturated fat does not cause heart disease"—or so concluded a big study published in March in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. How could this be? The very cornerstone of dietary advice for generations has been that the saturated fats in butter, cheese and red meat should be avoided because they clog our arteries. The new study's conclusion shouldn't surprise anyone familiar with modern nutritional science, however. The fact is, there has never been solid evidence for the idea that these fats cause disease. We only believe this to be the case because nutrition policy has been derailed over the...
  • Young blood reverses effects of aging in mice

    05/04/2014 11:26:46 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 27 replies
    L A Times ^ | May 4, 2014, 10:15 a.m. | Monte Morin
    In a group of studies published Sunday in the journals Science and Nature Medicine, researchers say old mice who were infused with the blood of spry younger mice showed clear improvements in memory, sensory function, strength and endurance. Researchers say a specific protein, found in the blood of mice and humans, appears to be at the root of this rejuvenation. They say they hope to test the protein's effect on humans in clinical trials in the next few years.
  • The End of Heart Attacks

    04/26/2014 6:43:51 PM PDT · by willk · 49 replies
    The Daily Beast ^ | 4-25-2014 | Dale Eisinger
    Scientists at Johns Hopkins University may be one step closer to eradicating debilitating heart diseases in humans, particularly those caused by excessive buildup of cholesterol.
  • Glycemic Control For Fun And Profit

    04/23/2014 9:15:16 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 4 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 4/23/14 | Michael D. Shaw
    According to the American Diabetes Association, 25.8 million children and adults in the United States–8.3% of the population–have diabetes (90-95% are type 2). This includes 18.8 million who are diagnosed and 7 million who are “undiagnosed.” And, if that weren’t bad enough, the ADA estimates that there are also 79 million so-called “prediabetics” in this country. Much more statistical information–and some elucidation of the dubious methodology behind it is available here. Why dubious? At best, these widely touted statistics are pedal to the metal extrapolations from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, which examines “a nationally representative sample of...
  • Diet drinks linked with heart disease, death

    03/30/2014 1:04:08 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 48 replies
    CNBC ^ | March 29, 2014 | Maggie Fox
    Women who drink the most diet sodas may also be more likely to develop heart disease and even to die, according to a new study published Saturday. Researchers found women who drank two or more diet drinks a day were 30 percent more likely to have a heart attack or other cardiovascular "event," and 50 percent more likely to die, than women who rarely touch such drinks. The findings, being presented at a meeting of the American College of Cardiology, don't suggest that the drinks themselves are killers. But women who toss back too many diet sodas may be trying...
  • Saturated fat does not cause heart disease: Study

    03/19/2014 9:51:50 PM PDT · by Innovative · 31 replies
    Times of India ^ | Mar 20, 2014 | Kounteya Sinha
    Researchers from the University of Cambridge and the British Heart Foundation have found there is actually no evidence that confirms changing the type of fat you eat from "bad" saturated to "healthier" polyunsaturated cuts heart risk. The researchers analysed data from 72 unique studies with over 600,000 participants from 18 nations and found total saturated fatty acid, whether measured in the diet or in the bloodstream as a biomarker, was not associated with coronary disease risk in the observational studies.
  • Angry People May Be at Greater Risk of Heart Attack, Study Finds

    03/06/2014 10:57:34 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 19 replies
    ctv nEWS ^ | Tuesday, March 4, 2014
    Sudden bursts of anger may trigger heart attacks, strokes or other cardiovascular events within two hours of a flare-up, a team of U.S. researchers suggest. In a new study published in The European Heart Journal, researchers examined studies that spanned amore-than-18-year period from experts in the medical field. The Harvard School of Public Health team found that cardiovascular events can be triggered by psychological stress, such as an angry outburst, which has “shown to increase heart rate and blood pressure, and vascular resistance.” And people who are obese, smokers, or have a history of heart disease are more susceptible to...
  • Loneliness is deadlier than obesity among elderly people, warns study

    02/17/2014 8:51:58 PM PST · by Innovative · 31 replies
    Tech Times ^ | Feb 17, 2014 | Rhodilee Jean Dolor,
    Obesity comes with a number of life threatening risks. The condition, for instance, is linked to cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and even cancer. However, loneliness is a more threatening killer than obesity, at least among elderly people. The researchers also found that extreme loneliness increases an older person's risks of early death by 14 percent which means that loneliness has a double the impact on early death as obesity. Cacioppo explained that chronic loneliness is associated with higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which raises risks of strokes and heart attacks. It is also linked with high blood pressure and...
  • Five Vitamins and Supplements That Are Actually Worth Taking

    02/17/2014 12:02:28 AM PST · by Innovative · 46 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | Feb 14, 2014 | Joseph Stromberg
    Vitamin D ...the researchers found that adults who took vitamin D supplements daily lived longer than those who didn't. Probiotics ...they're useful in very specific circumstances, but it's not necessary to continually take them on a daily basis. Zinc ...the mineral significantly reduced the duration of the cold, and also made symptoms less severe. Niacin ...Also known as vitamin B3, niacin is talked up as a cure for all sorts of conditions (including high cholesterol, Alzheimer's, diabetes and headaches) but in most of these cases, a prescription-strength dose of niacin has been needed to show a clear result. At over-the-counter...
  • National Wear Red Day is Feb. 7

    02/05/2014 3:27:34 PM PST · by Libloather · 19 replies
    WTHI TV ^ | 2/05/14
    INDIANAPOLIS – The American Heart Association, through its Go Red For Women movement, urges everyone to support the fight against heart disease by wearing red on National Wear Red Day – Friday, Feb. 7. American Heart Month is in February, a perfect time to focus on the prevalence of heart disease, America’s No. 1 killer.
  • Hearts - the next stage of the 3D printing revolution: This medical miracle is shockingly close

    01/30/2014 3:45:26 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    The London Spectator ^ | February 1, 2014 | Mary Wakefield, deputy editor
    (VIDEO-AT-LINK)I have seen the future — your future if you’re rich enough or brave enough to embrace it — and I have to tell you, it’s weird. Imagine this: it’s 2025 and you’re getting on, feeling your knees a bit. You’re bending over one day to pick up junk mail when you feel a terrible pain in your chest. You call 999 and within the hour (in this ideal world) you’re in hospital under the knife. But this isn’t heart surgery you’re having, it’s bottom surgery: the doctor’s taking a chunk of fat from your bum. Have they made a...
  • Processed food NOT fat is the real cause of heart disease, claims heart surgeon

    01/29/2014 9:00:04 AM PST · by dennisw · 51 replies
    dailymail ^ | 29 January 2014
    Processed food NOT fat is the real cause of heart disease, claims heart surgeon who says a diet of natural food can even reverse the illness Dr. Dwight Lundell admits prescribing cholesterol-lowering medications, and a low-fat, high-simple carbohydrate diet for two-and-a-half decades was misguided 'These recommendations are no longer scientifically or morally defensible,' he writes in an essay that has ignited the Internet He vlaims these foods actively destroy the walls of our blood vessels by causing chronic inflammation, which in turn causes heart disease The cardiac surgeon recommends only eating foods your grandmother, or great-grandmother, would recognise An Arizona...
  • One Baby Boomer health risk no one talks about

    11/11/2013 11:13:28 AM PST · by Armen Hareyan · 67 replies
    EmaxHealth ^ | 2013-11-10 | Kathleen Blanchard
    Baby Boomers might not be aware of the harm to their health that could come from high levels of copper and iron in the blood stream. Of course, that's because you haven't seen any public health messages and probably haven't been warned by your doctor that you could be ingesting either of the two from unknown sources that can put you at risk for a variety of common health problems that we shrug off as inevitable with aging. Iron is necessary to carry oxygen throughout the body. Copper helps our body use iron, protects our nerve cells and is important...
  • More than four cups of coffee a day puts you at risk of early death, claim experts

    08/16/2013 4:19:06 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 100 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 19:27 EST, 15 August 2013 | Jenny Hope
    If you’re already holding your first coffee of the morning, you might want to put it down, because drinking four cups a day could raise your risk of dying young, researchers warn—but only if you’re under 55. They found that consuming 28 cups of coffee a week increases the chances of premature death in younger people by half. … The risk of death from all causes rose by 56 percent for men and women younger than 55 who drank more than 28 cups of coffee a week, said a report in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. … Recent research has...
  • Gut microbes get first dibs on heart meds

    07/20/2013 4:47:40 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies
    Science News ^ | July 19, 2013 | Jessica Shugart
    Some people harbor a strain of bacteria that chews through cardiac medication The next time you pop a pill, know that the microbes in your gut might get to it before you do. Some people harbor a strain of bacteria that inactivates a common cardiac drug, a finding that could explain why people have different reactions to some medications. “Microbes have long been known to ‘steal’ drugs by converting them into inactive forms,” says Peter Turnbaugh of Harvard University, who led the study. But picking out the specific culprits among the gut’s throngs of bacterial suspects has been a challenge...
  • Randy Travis in Critical Condition: What is Viral Cardiomyopathy?

    07/09/2013 1:35:15 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 36 replies
    Decoded Science ^ | 07/09/2013 | JANELLE VAESA
    Country singer, Randy Travis is in critical condition after being admitted to a Texas hospital on Sunday, July 7, 2013 for viral cardiomyopathy, reports USA Today. Cardiomyopathy is a weakening of the heart muscles, and can be genetic, but also can be caused by a virus, or can even be a result of another medical condition. So what is cardiomyopathy – specifically, what is viral cardiomyopathy – and what are some of the possible treatments that Randy Travis may have to undergo for recovery? What is Cardiomyopathy? Cardiomyopathy is a disease that makes the heart to become enlarged, thick, or...
  • Regular coffee drinkers ‘at increased risk of weight gain’

    05/29/2013 2:21:34 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 44 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 6:53PM BST 28 May 2013 | Graeme Paton
    Too much coffee can lead to weight gain and other health problems, even if drinkers stick to decaffeinated, according to research. Experts warned that drinking five or more cups a day increased the amount of fat stored in the abdomen. It was revealed that even a “moderate intake” of coffee in the average day could also lead to problems such as increased risk of heart disease and diabetes. Repeated studies in the past have shown that coffee can have benefits for regular drinkers, including lowing the chances of a stroke and certain forms of cancer. …
  • Glyphosate ("Roundup") Responsible for Modern Human Diseases

    04/26/2013 11:32:02 PM PDT · by Renfield · 66 replies
    Entropy ^ | 4-18-2013 | Anthony Samsel and Stephanie Seneff
    Abstract: Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup®, is the most popular herbicide used worldwide. The industry asserts it is minimally toxic to humans, but here we argue otherwise. Residues are found in the main foods of the Western diet, comprised primarily of sugar, corn, soy and wheat. Glyphosate's inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes is an overlooked component of its toxicity to mammals. CYP enzymes play crucial roles in biology, one of which is to detoxify xenobiotics. Thus, glyphosate enhances the damaging effects of other food borne chemical residues and environmental toxins. Negative impact on the body is insidious and...
  • Samoan health blogger drops 150 lbs; takes on 26.2-mile marathon

    04/16/2013 8:44:07 PM PDT · by coconutt2000 · 9 replies
    Tautalatala Media ^ | 4/14/2013 | tautalatala.com staff
    ‘SHE’S NOW OR NEVER’ FOUNDER MENNE TALIVA’A HALL RUNS IN NORTH SHORE MARATHON (Honolulu, HAWAI'I)--She’s running to fight obesity, diabetes and heart disease. She’s running for her family. “I run for change!” exclaims Menne Taliva’a Hall, founder of a health and wellness sisterhood and Blog called ‘She’s Now or Never’ or SNN. "My quest to run marathons is a demonstration to prove that change is possible! I leave footprints in honor of family and friends that have passed on and for those that I love dearly." After shedding 150 pounds and finishing more than 20 half-marathons, Hall – blogger and...
  • Low Magnesium Linked To Heart Disease [magnesium overlooked as the MAIN FACTOR in heart disease]

    04/06/2013 8:39:15 AM PDT · by Bulwinkle · 66 replies
    Medical News Today ^ | Kelly Fitzgerald
    Low magnesium levels have been found to be the best predictor of heart disease, contrary to the traditional belief that cholesterol or saturated fat play the biggest roles....
  • Researchers Develop Injectable Gel to Repair Damaged Hearts

    02/25/2013 9:31:30 PM PST · by neverdem · 22 replies
    Voice of America ^ | February 21, 2013 | Jessica Berman
    People who suffer heart attacks are at increased risk of having a second and potentially fatal occurrence because of the damage the heart attack does to cardiac muscle tissue. Now scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed a new biomaterial - an injectable hydrogel  - that can repair the damage from heart attacks, and help promote the growth of new heart tissue.   Millions of people around the world suffer heart attacks every year and survive. These traumatic events occur when blood supply to the heart muscles is somehow blocked, robbing them of oxygen and causing them...
  • Stem cell heart repairs: 21st century medicine in action

    02/22/2013 5:45:02 PM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies
    Miami Herald ^ | February 22, 2013 | LIDIA DINKOVA
    Gerard Cuomo loves to dance. Until recently, however, the 70-year-old couldn’t even do a two-step. After having three heart attacks in the early 1990s, Cuomo’s heart was severely damaged. The scar tissue that had formed around his heart left him easily fatigued. “I felt like an old man,” said Cuomo of Aventura. “I could barely climb the stairs. I could walk for about a quarter of a mile. Shopping at the mall — I wish I did not have to sit down all the time.” In May 2010, he participated in a University of Miami Miller School of Medicine’s clinical...
  • Blue Cheese May Be Good for Your Health, Study Suggests

    12/22/2012 10:54:59 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    Global Post ^ | December 21, 2012 | Alexander Besant
    A study by the UK-based biotech company Lycotec found that blue cheese may have anti-inflammatory properties that protect against many diseases. Blue cheeses like Roquefort and Bleu d'Auvergne are being credited with helping reduce cardiovascular disease in France. A studyby the UK-based biotech company Lycotec found that blue cheese may have anti-inflammatory properties that protect against many diseases. The anti-inflammatory properties increased the longer the cheese was ripened, said the Globe and Mail. AFP reported that the benefits of the cheese work best in the gut and just underneath the skin, which may help slow signs of aging. The researchers...
  • Gut bacteria may affect cardiovascular risk

    12/10/2012 7:22:13 PM PST · by neverdem · 11 replies
    ScienceNews ^ | December 4, 2012 | Tina Hesman Saey
    Antioxidant-producing microbes may keep atherosclerotic plaques in place Though atherosclerosis is an artery problem, microscopic denizens of the intestines may play a surprising role in how the disease plays out. A new study suggests that different mixes of intestinal microbes may determine whether people will have heart attacks or strokes brought on by break-away plaque from the arteries. Compared with healthy people, heart disease patients who have had strokes or other complications of atherosclerosis carry fewer microbes that make anti-inflammatory compounds. These patients also have more bacteria that produce inflammation-triggering molecules, researchers report online December 4 in Nature Communications. Inflammation...
  • Heart cells coaxed to divide and conquer

    12/06/2012 12:33:50 AM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies
    NATURE NEWS ^ | 05 December 2012 | Kerri Smith
    The heart does have a limited ability to heal itself — and a genetic 'trick' can harness this. Can heart cells renew themselves, and can scientists help them do so? Two papers published online in Nature today suggest that heart muscle cells can make copies of themselves at a very low rate1, but that a genetic trick can prompt them to do a better job2. Those results give hope that hearts damaged by cardiovascular disease — which causes the deaths of almost 17 million people a year — could be coaxed to regenerate themselves. Heart muscle cannot renew itself very...
  • The Shot That Prevents Heart Attacks

    11/27/2012 5:42:20 AM PST · by blam · 24 replies
    Yahoo.net ^ | 11-26-2012 | Lisa Collier Cool
    The Shot That Prevents Heart Attacks By Lisa Collier Cool Nov 26, 2012 If you’re tempted to skip your flu shot, consider this: Getting vaccinated cuts risk for a heart attack or stroke by up to 50 percent, according to two studies presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress. Scientists from TIMU Study Group and Network for Innovation in Clinical Research analyzed published clinical trials involving a total of 3,227 patients, half of whom had been diagnosed with heart disease. Participants, whose average age was 60, were randomly assigned to either receive flu vaccine or a placebo shot, then their health...
  • Common heart treatment fails to help - Beta blockers may offer little against heart attack, stroke

    10/05/2012 10:59:15 AM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    ScienceNews ^ | October 2nd, 2012 | Nathan Seppa
    Beta blockers may offer little against heart attack, stroke Commonly prescribed drugs called beta blockers fail to protect against heart attacks and strokes even while helping to control heart rate and blood pressure, researchers report in the Oct. 3 Journal of the American Medical Association. Beta blockers also didn’t lessen the odds of a heart-related death, in heart attack patients or others at risk, over a median follow-up of 44 months. The American Heart Association had previously discouraged the long-term use of beta blockers as a post–heart attack treatment beyond three years. The new findings further dim the prospects for...
  • Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Not Associated With Lower Risk of Major Cardiovascular Disease...

    09/17/2012 10:37:49 PM PDT · by neverdem · 33 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Sep. 11, 2012 | NA
    Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Not Associated With Lower Risk of Major Cardiovascular Disease Events In a study that included nearly 70,000 patients, supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was not associated with a lower risk of all-cause death, cardiac death, sudden death, heart attack, or stroke, according to an analysis of previous studies published in the Sept. 12 issue of JAMA. "Treatment with marine-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for the prevention of major cardiovascular adverse outcomes has been supported by a number of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and refuted by others. Although their mechanism of action is not clear,...
  • FoxNews claims Obamacare punishes hospitals if their patients with heart failure live instead of die

    08/23/2012 8:52:05 PM PDT · by grundle · 29 replies
    wordpress ^ | August 23, 2012 | Dan from Squirrel Hill
    Fox News reports: A provision of ObamaCare is set to punish roughly two-thirds of U.S. hospitals evaluated by Medicare starting this fall over high readmission rates Starting in October, Medicare will reduce reimbursements to hospitals with high 30-day readmission rates “Among patients with heart failure, hospitals that have higher readmission rates actually have lower mortality rates,” said Sunil Kripalani, MD, a professor with Vanderbilt University Medical Center who studies hospital readmissions. “So, which would we rather have — a hospital readmission or a death?”If this is really true, then it’s quite scary. I googled the doctor’s quote to try to...
  • Panel recommends against ECG tests for heart disease

    08/02/2012 5:38:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies
    Reuters ^ | Jul 31, 2012 | Genevra Pittman
    Testing electrical activity of the heart using an electrocardiogram is unlikely to help doctors figure out who is at risk of coronary heart disease, according to recommendations from a U.S. government-backed panel. The United States Preventive Services Task Force wrote on Monday that there's no good evidence the test, also known as an ECG, helps doctors predict heart risks any better than traditional considerations such as smoking, blood pressure and cholesterol levels in people with no symptoms. "It could potentially be helpful if we had evidence that doing a test like an ECG or an exercise ECG would better classify...
  • Obese adults should get counseling, federal task force says

    06/27/2012 9:55:53 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 61 replies
    The Los Angeles Times ^ | June 25, 2012 | Melissa Healy
    In a move that could significantly expand insurance coverage of weight-loss treatments, a federal health advisory panel on Monday recommended that all obese adults receive intensive counseling in an effort to rein in a growing health crisis in America. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force urged doctors to identify patients with a body mass index of 30 or more — currently 1 in 3 Americans — and either provide counseling themselves or refer the patient to a program designed to promote weight loss and improve health prospects. Under the current healthcare law, Medicare and most private insurers would be required...
  • Aspirin and Warfarin Equally Effective for Most Heart Failure Patients, Study Suggests

    05/10/2012 7:39:51 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | May 2, 2012 | NA
    Neither aspirin nor warfarin is superior for preventing a combined risk of death, stroke, and cerebral hemorrhage in heart failure patients with normal heart rhythm, according to a landmark clinical trial published in the May 3, 2012, New England Journal of Medicine. The 10-year Warfarin and Aspirin for Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF) trial is the largest double-blind comparison of these medications for heart failure, following 2,305 patients at 168 study sites in 11 countries on three continents. The research was led by clinical principal investigator Shunichi Homma, MD, of Columbia University Medical Center/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, and statistical principal investigator John...
  • Really? Optimism Reduces the Risk of Heart Disease

    04/24/2012 5:41:53 PM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies
    NY Times ^ | April 23, 2012 | ANAHAD O'CONNOR
    Laughter may not exactly be the best medicine. But a cheerful outlook on life may be good for your heart. So concludes new research on the impact of happiness and optimism on cardiovascular health. Scientists have known about the reverse relationship between psychological health and heart health for some time; studies show that depression and anxiety can worsen outcomes for heart patients. But the findings on happiness and its medical impact over the years have not been as consistent. In a new analysis, researchers at Harvard sought a more definitive conclusion by reviewing the results of more than 200 studies...
  • Red meat is blamed for one in 10 early deaths

    03/12/2012 4:48:53 PM PDT · by Sub-Driver · 60 replies
    Red meat is blamed for one in 10 early deaths The Department of Health was last night urged to review its guidance on red meat after a study found that eating almost half the daily recommended amount can significantly increase the risk of dying early from cancer and heart disease. By Rebecca Smith, Medical Editor 10:00PM GMT 12 Mar 2012 Small quantities of processed meat such as bacon, sausages or salami can increase the likelihood of dying by a fifth, researchers from Harvard School of Medicine found. Eating steak increases the risk of dying by 12%. The study found that...
  • VANITY: Article by MD quoted by Rush today (low-fat diets, statin drugs all wrong)

    03/08/2012 1:28:48 PM PST · by Joe the Pimpernel · 41 replies
    I can't find the article that Rush was talking about. Does anybody have a link?
  • The Rush Limbaugh LIVE Radio Show Thread - Thursday, March 8, 2012

    03/08/2012 7:42:18 AM PST · by IMissPresidentReagan · 112 replies
    Quick post Hubby's grandmother is not doing well so off to see her. Please send prayers. She's a real gem!
  • Enzymes Show Early Heart Damage in Diabetes

    01/24/2012 5:40:57 PM PST · by neverdem · 6 replies · 1+ views
    MedPage Today ^ | January 24, 2012 | Kurt Ullman
    Reviewed by Zalman S. Agus, MD; Emeritus Professor University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Action Points   New, extremely sensitive assays for circulating troponin levels allow detection of low levels which may reflect chronic sources of myocardial injury and may predict long-term heart failure. This study found an association between low levels of troponin and HbA1c in individuals free of evident coronary heart disease and heart failure. A highly sensitive troponin test revealed evidence of subclinical heart damage in patients with hyperglycemia but no known coronary artery disease or heart failure, with particularly high enzyme levels in those with diabetes, according to a...
  • Fried food heart risk 'a myth'

    01/25/2012 2:54:55 PM PST · by PJ-Comix · 80 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | January 25, 2012 | Stephen Adams
    They say there is mounting research that it is the type of oil used, and whether or not it has been used before, that really matters. The latest study, published in the British Medical Journal, found no association between the frequency of fried food consumption in Spain - where olive and sunflower oils are mostly used - and the incidence of serious heart disease.
  • American first at the Montreal Heart Institute: A patient treated with a disappearing heart device

    12/05/2011 7:50:14 AM PST · by decimon · 3 replies
    Montreal Heart Institute ^ | December 5, 2011
    Montreal -- The interventional cardiology team at the Montreal Heart Institute (MHI) used the world's first drug eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold to successfully treat a woman suffering from coronary artery disease. This landmark procedure was performed by Dr. Jean-François Tanguay, interventional cardiologist and coordinator of the Coronary Unit, as part of the ABSORB EXTEND clinical trial. This successful intervention was a first in North America. A breakthrough that could change the lives of patientsThe patient, a woman in her sixties, had suffered from chest pain for a number of months. She was diagnosed with a severe lesion to the heart...
  • Chronic disease to cost $47 trillion by 2030: WEF

    09/18/2011 3:54:48 PM PDT · by Clairity · 31 replies
    Reuters ^ | Sept. 18, 2011 | Kate Kelland
    The global economic impact of the five leading chronic diseases -- cancer, diabetes, mental illness, heart disease, and respiratory disease -- could reach $47 trillion over the next 20 years, according to a study by the World Economic Forum (WEF). The estimated cumulative output loss caused by the illnesses, which together already kill more than 36 million people a year and are predicted to kill tens of millions more in future, represents around 4 percent of annual global GDP over the coming two decades, the study said. "This is not a health issue, this is an economic issue -- it...
  • Lower Income Individuals Have 50% Higher Risk Of Heart Disease

    08/28/2011 10:42:07 PM PDT · by Rabin · 23 replies
    medicalnewstoday ^ | Date: 28 Aug 2011
    According to a recent UC Davis study published online in BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, people with lower socioeconomic status are at greater risk of developing heart disease compared to those who are wealthier or better educated. The likelihood of heart disease persists, even with long-term progress in addressing traditional risk factors, such as smoking, high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol.
  • Genetic study shows that low body fat may not lower risk for heart disease and diabetes

    06/26/2011 12:20:32 PM PDT · by decimon · 7 replies
    BOSTON—Having a lower percentage of body fat may not always lower your risk for heart disease and diabetes, according to a study by an international consortium of investigators, including two scientists from the Institute for Aging Research of Hebrew SeniorLife, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School (HMS). The Institute researchers, Douglas P. Kiel, M.D., M.P.H., and David Karasik, Ph.D., who are working with the Framingham Heart Study, identified a gene that is linked with having less body fat, but also with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, examples of so-called "metabolic diseases." "We've uncovered a truly...
  • Damaged Hearts Pump Better When Fueled With Fats

    05/04/2011 11:02:47 AM PDT · by decimon · 28 replies
    Case Western Reserve University ^ | May 4, 2011 | Salam Kabbani
    CLEVELAND - Contrary to what we’ve been told, eliminating or severely limiting fats from the diet may not be beneficial to cardiac function in patients suffering from heart failure, a study at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine reports. Results from biological model studies conducted by assistant professor of physiology and biophysics Margaret Chandler, PhD, and other researchers, demonstrate that a high-fat diet improved overall mechanical function, in other words, the heart’s ability to pump, and was accompanied by cardiac insulin resistance. “Does that mean I can go out and eat my Big Mac after I have a heart...
  • Mayo Clinic CPR efforts successful on man with no pulse for 96 minutes (capnography)

    05/02/2011 12:00:23 PM PDT · by decimon · 16 replies
    Mayo Clinic ^ | May 2, 2011 | Unknown
    ROCHESTER, Minn. -- By all counts, the 54-year-old man who collapsed on a recent winter night in rural Minnesota would likely have died. He'd suffered a heart attack, and even though he was given continuous CPR and a series of shocks with a defibrillator, the man was without a pulse for 96 minutes. But this particular instance of cardiac arrest (http://www.mayoclinic.org/heart-attack/), reported first in Mayo Clinic Proceedings (http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.com) online, turned out to be highly unusual: "The patient made a complete recovery following prolonged pulselessness," says anesthesiologist and cardiac care specialist Roger White, M.D. (http://www.mayoclinic.org/bio/10114106.html), lead author of the article. Emergency...
  • Researchers find link between common dietary fat, intestinal microbes and heart disease

    04/08/2011 1:19:41 PM PDT · by decimon · 48 replies
    Lerner Research Institute ^ | April 6, 2011 | Unknown
    How specific digestive tract microbes react to a dietary lipid increases risk of heart attack, stroke and deathA new pathway has been discovered that links a common dietary lipid and intestinal microflora with an increased risk of heart disease, according to a Cleveland Clinic study published in the latest issue of Nature. The study shows that people who eat a diet containing a common nutrient found in animal products (such as eggs, liver and other meats, cheese and other diary products, fish, shellfish) are not predisposed to cardiovascular disease solely on their genetic make-up, but rather, how the micro-organisms that...
  • A dose of safflower oil each day might help keep heart disease at bay (& insulin sensitivity)

    03/21/2011 9:09:19 AM PDT · by decimon · 22 replies · 1+ views
    Ohio State University ^ | March 21, 2011 | Unknown
    COLUMBUS, Ohio – A daily dose of safflower oil, a common cooking oil, for 16 weeks can improve such health measures as good cholesterol, blood sugar, insulin sensitivity and inflammation in obese postmenopausal women who have Type 2 diabetes, according to new research. This finding comes about 18 months after the same researchers discovered that safflower oil reduced abdominal fat and increased muscle tissue in this group of women after 16 weeks of daily supplementation. This combination of health measures that are improved by the safflower oil is associated with metabolic syndrome, a cluster of symptoms that can increase risk...
  • Do Cholesterol Drugs Do Any Good?

    01/06/2011 6:16:40 PM PST · by Pining_4_TX · 100 replies
    Bloomberg Business Week ^ | 01/17/2008 | John Carey
    Yes, Wright saw, the drugs can be life-saving in patients who already have suffered heart attacks, somewhat reducing the chances of a recurrence that could lead to an early death. But Wright had a surprise when he looked at the data for the majority of patients, like Winn, who don't have heart disease. He found no benefit in people over the age of 65, no matter how much their cholesterol declines, and no benefit in women of any age. He did see a small reduction in the number of heart attacks for middle-aged men taking statins in clinical trials. But...
  • A Diet Manifesto: Drop the Apple and Walk Away

    01/02/2011 3:16:05 PM PST · by neverdem · 166 replies
    NY Times ^ | December 27, 2010 | ABIGAIL ZUGER, M.D.
    Another year ends, and still the war drags on. In the final salvo of 2010, the combatants are lobbing fruit. Not literally, of course, though they might like to: The long war of the weight-loss diets has aroused passions just about as overheated as those of any military conflict. How is a person best advised to lose extra weight and retreat from diabetes and heart disease? Count calories, cut fat and fill up on fruits and vegetables? Or turn instead to a high-protein, high-fat... --snip-- In the opposite corner we have Gary Taubes, the science journalist who has thrown in...