Keyword: genetics

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  • Four Things You Can Do To Help Stop the Creation of Genetically-Modified Kids

    02/21/2015 3:38:33 PM PST · by NYer · 29 replies
    Catholic Lane ^ | February 20, 2015 | Rebecca Taylor
    At a time when more and more people are becoming wary of generically-modified foods in their diet, the United Kingdom is poised to begin creating genetically-modified children with the genetic material of three people, two women and one man; a genetic combination that could not occur naturally.And the way the UK goes, the United States may soon  follow.The average person may feel totally overwhelmed by the science and helpless to do anything about it. Unfortunately, we cannot stick our heads in the sand and do nothing. If we ignore this problem it will not go away. If we stay silent...
  • Gene-Altered Apples Get U.S. Approval(GMO Fruit)

    02/14/2015 1:07:03 PM PST · by Enlightened1 · 99 replies
    NY Times ^ | 2/14/15 | ANDREW POLLACK
    The government on Friday approved the commercial planting of genetically engineered apples that are resistant to turning brown when sliced or bruised.
  • Of Course 23andMe's Plan Has Been to Sell Your Genetic Data All Along

    01/07/2015 9:09:35 AM PST · by Theoria · 19 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 06 Jan 2015 | Sarah Zhang
    Today, 23andMe announced what Forbes reports is only the first of ten deals with big biotech companies: Genentech will pay up to $60 million for access to 23andMe's data to study Parkinson's. You think 23andMe was about selling fun DNA spit tests for $99 a pop? Nope, it's been about selling your data all along. Since 23andMe started in 2006, it's convinced 800,000 customers to hand over their DNA, one vial of spit at a time. Personal DNA reports are the consumer-facing side of the business, and that's the one we're most familiar with. It all seems friendly and fun...
  • Groundbreaking Study Reveals The Main Reason Behind Most Cases Of Cancer

    01/02/2015 6:32:36 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 78 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 01/02/2015 | William Dunham, Reuters
    Plain old bad luck plays a major role in determining who gets cancer and who does not, according to researchers who found that two-thirds of cancer incidence of various types can be blamed on random mutations and not heredity or risky habits like smoking. The researchers said Thursday that random DNA mutations accumulating in various parts of the body during ordinary cell division were the prime culprits behind many cancer types. They looked at 31 cancer types and found that 22 of them, including leukemia and pancreatic, bone, testicular, ovarian, and brain cancer, could be explained largely by these random...
  • Matter: Gene Linked to Obesity Hasn’t Always Been a Problem, Study Finds

    01/01/2015 9:28:04 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 29 replies
    But the gene doesn’t seem to have always been a problem. If scientists had studied FTO just a few decades ago, they would have found no link to weight whatsoever. A new study shows that FTO became a risk only in people born after World War II. The research, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, raises questions that extend far beyond obesity. Genes clearly influence our health in many ways, but so does our environment; often, it is the interplay between them that makes the difference in whether we develop obesity or cancer or...
  • US researchers identify gene network linked to autism

    12/30/2014 11:55:35 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 18 replies
    FOX News ^ | December 30, 2014 | FoxNews.com
    U.S. scientists have identified a molecular network of genes known to contribute to autism spectrum disorders, and they say their finding may help uncover new genes linked to these conditions. "The study of autism disorders is extremely challenging due to the large number of clinical mutations that occur in hundreds of different human genes associated with autism," study author Michael Snyder, genetics and personalized medicine professor at Stanford University, said in a news release. "We therefore wanted to see to what extent shared molecular pathways are perturbed by the diverse set of mutations linked to autism in the hope of...
  • Richard III's DNA throws up infidelity surprise

    12/02/2014 4:36:01 PM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 48 replies
    BBC ^ | 12-2-14 | Paul Rincon
    Analysis of DNA from Richard III has thrown up a surprise: evidence of infidelity in his family tree. Scientists who studied genetic material from remains found in a Leicester car park say the finding might have profound historical implications. Depending on where in the family tree it occurred, it could cast doubt on the Tudor claim to the English throne or, indeed, on Richard's. The study is published in the journal Nature Communications. But the scientists would not be drawn on what meaning it might have - if any - for the current Royal Family, as it was still unknown...
  • You Always Knew Your Cat Was Half Wild But Now There’s Genetic Proof

    11/12/2014 6:45:03 AM PST · by C19fan · 14 replies
    Time ^ | November 11, 2014 | Helen Regan
    A new study on house cats has found that our feline companions are actually only semi-domesticated. People began domesticating cats around 9,000 years ago but DNA researchers from Washington University in St. Louis found that house cats still have many of the same traits as their wild cousins. The fact that cats have retained the ability to hunt and survive effortlessly in the wild just underscores how little impact we humans have had on them.
  • Ebola, Marburg viruses edit genetic material during infection

    11/04/2014 7:31:05 AM PST · by wtd · 15 replies
    Medical Press ^ | November 4, 2014
    Ebola, Marburg viruses edit genetic material during infectionFiloviruses like Ebola "edit" genetic material as they invade their hosts, according to a study published this week in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The work, by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the Galveston National Laboratory, and the J. Craig Venter Institute, could lead to a better understanding of these viruses, paving the way for new treatments down the road. Using a laboratory technique called deep sequencing, investigators set out to investigate filovirus replication and transcription, processes involved in the virus...
  • Europeans descended from three ancient tribes

    09/18/2014 10:20:25 AM PDT · by ek_hornbeck · 35 replies
    BBC ^ | 9/17/14 | Paul Rincon
    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports. Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East. But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent. The findings are based on analysis of genomes from nine ancient Europeans. Agriculture originated in the Near East - in modern Syria, Iraq and Israel - before expanding into Europe around 7,500 years ago. It really does look like the indigenous West European hunter gatherers...
  • New blood test could be first to detect clinical depression

    09/17/2014 11:26:02 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    CBS News ^ | September 16, 2014, 10:00 AM | Jessica Firger
    Now a new study suggests that a simple blood test could soon allow doctors to diagnose clinical depression as easily as they check cholesterol. Researchers at Northwestern University have developed the first blood test that analyzes levels of nine blood biomarkers associated with adult clinical depression. The results of their study were published Tuesday in the journal Translational Psychiatry. The test looks at levels of nine RNA blood markers, which appear to be different among patients with diagnosed clinical depression versus those who do not have depression. RNA are the molecules that help to process DNA genetic code and carry...
  • Europeans drawn from three 'tribes'

    09/17/2014 11:17:18 AM PDT · by Natufian · 28 replies
    BBC ^ | 09/17/2014 | Paul Rincon
    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed with one another within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports. Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East. But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent. The findings are based analysis of the genomes of nine ancient Europeans.
  • What you eat, not just number of calories, is significant factor in diabetes risk

    09/09/2014 7:38:32 PM PDT · by Pining_4_TX · 24 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 09/02/14 | Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
    If you think losing weight is enough to prevent Type 2 diabetes, don't get your hopes up. A new research report in September 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, suggests that you don't have to be overweight to develop Type 2 diabetes. This study compared genetically identical twins-one heavier and one leaner-and found that after eating a fast-food meal, the circulating metabolites, including those related to Type 2 diabetes, were found in both individuals at the same levels. These findings suggest that the onset of this type of diabetes is largely influenced by genetic factors and/or the composition of gut...
  • Homosexuality Has No Genetic Cause

    09/07/2014 7:07:57 PM PDT · by WXRGina · 108 replies
    BarbWire ^ | September 5, 2014 | Jonathon Moseley
    A genetic cause for homosexuality is not scientifically possible. A homosexuality gene, if it existed, would quickly die out. However, it gradually becomes clear that liberals and progressives are poorly-educated about science. They passionately believe in evolution, yet they don’t understand it. Public discussion is driven by an assumption that one may be “born homosexual.” Being ‘born’ homosexual is a medical impossibility unless there is a specific gene causing it. That is, heterosexuals would have one genetic DNA sequence while homosexuals have a different DNA sequence in its place. I discovered something debating this topic: One central point simply escapes...
  • Three-Parent Babies: They Already Exist

    08/26/2014 11:15:22 AM PDT · by NYer · 8 replies
    onepeterfive ^ | August 26, 2014 | STEVE SKOJEC
    Back in March, I wrote a piece for CatholicVote about FDA evaluation of a process that would create multi-parent embryos: Things like this always begin for such seemingly noble scientific reasons, don’t they? But they rarely stop there. And of course in addition to creating tri-parent offspring, which creates ethical and genealogical nightmares in its own right, virtually every instance of embryonic modification involves a slew of violations of the moral law, from in-vitro fertilization to the destruction of fertilized human embryos — human life — deemed imperfect or unnecessary to achieve the desired outcome. This morning, I read...
  • The Minoans were Caucasian

    07/12/2014 4:58:18 AM PDT · by Renfield · 49 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 5-16-2013 | Damien Gayle
    DNA analysis has debunked the longstanding theory that the Minoans, who some 5,000 years ago established Europe's first advanced Bronze Age culture, were from Africa. The Minoan civilisation arose on the Mediterranean island of Crete in approximately the 27th century BC and flourished for 12 centuries until the 15th century BC. But the culture was lost until British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans unearthed its remains on Crete in 1900, where he found vestiges of a civilisation he believed was formed by refugees from northern Egypt. Modern archaeologists have cast doubt on that version of events, and now DNA tests of...
  • Genetic Science vs. Belief: Racial differences are real, but no cause for discrimination.

    07/08/2014 7:03:17 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 5 replies
    National Review ^ | 07/08/2014 | Michael Barone
    ‘New analyses of the human genome establish that human evolution has been recent, copious and regional,” writes Nicholas Wade in his recently published book A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History. That sounds reasonable, and Wade, a science reporter and editor for many years at Nature and the New York Times, seems an unimpeachable source. But many well-meaning people will regard his words as provocative and even dangerous. For they fatally undermine the idea, widely shared by so-called progressives, that any apparent differences between groups of people are the product of nurture rather than nature, of social conditioning rather...
  • Is the Gay Gene a myth? Scientists say homosexuality impossible to determine by DNA

    06/26/2014 7:09:25 PM PDT · by NetAddicted · 139 replies
    Christian News ^ | 07/23/2014 | Garrett Haley
    CHICAGO – The results of a comprehensive scientific study released earlier this year suggest that homosexuality cannot be directly traced to a ‘gay gene,’ but is instead dependent on a variety of factors, including environmental and social influences. Pro-homosexual activists have long claimed that homosexuality and abnormal “sexual orientations” are primarily caused by genetic factors. They argue that individuals with a hereditary “gay gene” are predisposed toward same-sex attractions and thus unable to appreciate traditional marriages. However, scientific findings released earlier this year during the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago call this premise into question. During...
  • Genetic counselor to parents: Don’t like what you see? Abort.

    06/11/2014 4:38:33 PM PDT · by Morgana · 20 replies
    Jill Stanek ^ | Jill Stanek
    I will always remember that look on her face. I knew it was not good news. We were expecting our third child. My wife, Samantha, went to our doctor for a routine appointment. Our first two pregnancies went perfectly. Not this time. After analyzing the blood Samantha provided, the doctor determined that there was an increased risk for our child to have spina bifida…. After we arrived at the specialist for additional tests… we met with a genetic specialist who did everything in her power to use words I had never heard of before. Illnesses, deformities and abnormalities: she laid...
  • A Biological Basis for Race?

    06/07/2014 5:58:40 AM PDT · by Jack Black · 52 replies
    City Journal ^ | June 6, 2014 | Steven Malanga
    A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History, by Nicholas Wade (Penguin Press, 288 pp., $27.95) In 2001, the New England Journal of Medicine published an editorial provocatively titled “Racial Profiling in Medical Research.” The author, Robert Schwartz, reiterated the commonly held view that no biological basis exists for race, and then argued that physicians should not consider race in their research or medical practice. This prompted a sharp response from geneticist Neil Risch, who pointed out that numerous studies had demonstrated significant genetic differences among humans based on continental ancestry, suggesting evidence of five distinct races. Among the reasons...
  • Pedophiles: born that way?

    05/31/2014 5:36:36 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 61 replies
    Discover Magazine ^ | Razib Khan
    Gawker published a piece on the neurological problems which might result in pedophilia, and naturally a lot of shock and disgust was triggered. The piece is titled Born This Way: Sympathy and Science for Those Who Want to Have Sex with Children. This isn’t something you want to click through to lightly. So fair warning. The neurobiological material did pique my interest: “There was nothing significant in the frontal lobes or temporal lobes,” says Cantor. “It turned out the differences weren’t in the grey matter. The differences were in the white matter.”“The white matter” is the shorthand term for groupings...
  • Are Homosexuals Born that Way?

    05/31/2014 5:53:32 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 167 replies
    Stand to Reason ^ | 05/31/2014 | ALAN SHLEMON
    Lady Gaga’s mega-hit song “Born this Way” sold millions of copies affirming what many people believe: homosexuality is hardwired. In fact, people think that’s as axiomatic as saying the earth revolves around the sun. No rational person rejects the idea. The only hold-outs, it is said, are either ignorant of science, homophobic, or bigots (read: Christians). But before I explain why this view is beset with problems, let me make a tactical suggestion. Many Christians get defensive when someone says homosexuality is inborn. I understand the temptation to argue against this claim. But it’s a mistake to try to show...
  • DNA From 12,000-Year-Old Skeleton Helps Answer the Question: Who Were the First Americans?

    05/16/2014 5:30:54 AM PDT · by Renfield · 35 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 5-15-2014 | Mohi Kumar
    ome 12,000 years ago, a teenage girl took a walk in what’s now the Yucatan Peninsula and fell 190 feet into a deep pit, breaking her pelvis and likely killing her instantly. Over time, the pit—part of an elaborate limestone cave system—became a watery grave as the most recent ice age ended, glaciers melted and sea levels rose. In 2007, cave divers happened upon her remarkably preserved remains, which form the oldest, most complete and genetically intact human skeleton in the New World. Her bones, according to new research published in Science, hold the key to a question that has...
  • 30-year New York Times Science Writer Out After Writing Book About Genetics, Race

    05/11/2014 10:16:48 AM PDT · by mojito · 65 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | 5/10/2014 | Chris Reed
    Nicholas Wade, a British-born science reporter and editor for more than 30 years with The New York Times, is no longer with the newspaper — just days after the release of his latest book, in which he depicts blacks with roots in sub-Saharan Africa as genetically less adapted to modern life than whites and Asians. Was The New York Times uncomfortable with Wade’s science or his conclusions? It’s unclear. Neither Wade nor his former employer returned requests for comment. Wade’s last Times article appeared April 24. His Penguin Press book “A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History” arrived in...
  • What if race is more than a social construct?

    05/10/2014 12:45:28 PM PDT · by Altura Ct. · 266 replies
    Globe & Mail ^ | 5/10/2014
    Nicholas Wade, a leading science writer whose specialty is human evolution, likes to ask interesting questions. Here are some examples: Why has the West been the most exploratory and innovative civilization in the world for the past 500 years? Why are Jews of European descent so massively overrepresented among the top achievers in the arts and sciences? Why is the Chinese diaspora successful all around the world? Why is it so difficult to modernize tribal societies? Why has economic development been so slow in Africa? Contemporary thinkers have offered lots of provocative answers for such questions. It’s all about geography....
  • Darwin’s unexploded bomb

    05/06/2014 5:19:14 PM PDT · by Altura Ct. · 86 replies
    ‘This book is an attempt to understand the world as it is, not as it ought to be.’ So writes Nicholas Wade, the British-born science editor of The New York Times, in his new book A Troublesome Inheritance. For some time the post-War view of human nature as being largely culturally-formed has been under attack just as surely as the biblical explanation of mankind’s creation began to face pressure in the early 19th century. What Steven Pinker called the blank slate view of our species, whereby humans are products of social conditions and therefore possible to mould and to perfect...
  • Muzzled by Monsanto

    04/17/2014 8:51:12 AM PDT · by Renfield · 51 replies
    Boulder Weekly ^ | 4-3-2014 | Caitlin Rocket
    After nearly 30 years studying how plants use their genes to defend against viruses, Vicki Vance, a professor at the University of South Carolina, doesn’t see genetically modifying plants as a malevolent or arrogantly God-like endeavor. “There’s DNA in the world and it gets passed from one organism to another and it’s the natural thing. If that’s the problem you have with transgenic plants, that’s not a good reason to be against them,” Vance says. She does, however, have a problem with mega corporations allegedly using their money and power to hide the risks of new forms of genetic technology....
  • California's Anti-GMO Hysteria

    04/01/2014 4:02:25 PM PDT · by neverdem · 64 replies
    National Review Online ^ | March 31, 2014 | Henry Miller
    A new bill to mandate labeling of genetically altered food gets history and science all wrong.Last week, in a victory for California’s radical anti-technology minority, S.B. 131 passed the state’s senate Health Committee by a vote of five to two. This misguided piece of legislation, introduced by state senator Noreen Evans, would require that “any food, except as provided, offered for retail sale in the state be considered misbranded if it is entirely or partially genetically engineered, as defined, and that fact is not disclosed in a specified manner.” In other words, it would require a label to inform consumers...
  • Homosexuality and the Heterosexual Dilemma

    03/22/2014 5:53:24 PM PDT · by jxb7076 · 43 replies
    Author: jxb7076 ^ | 3/22/14 | jxb7076
    From a socio-moral-biblical perspective Homosexuality is much more complex than it appears on the surface and can be argued from various viewpoints ranging from Scientific, Biblical, and Secular – to name a few. Read more at: http://jxb7076.hubpages.com/hub/Homosexuality-and-the-Heterosexual-Dilemma
  • Scientists Reconstruct Faces From DNA Samples

    03/21/2014 1:08:25 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    www.forbes.com ^ | 03-21-2014 | Alex Knapp Forbes Staff
    Sometime in the future, technicians will go over the scene of the crime. They’ll uncover some DNA evidence and take it to the lab. And when the cops need to get a picture of the suspect, they won’t have to ask eyewitnesses to give descriptions to a sketch artist – they’ll just ask the technicians to get a mugshot from the DNA. That, at least, is the potential of new research being published today in PLOS Genetics. In that paper, a team of scientists describe how they were able to produce crude 3D models of faces extrapolated from a person’s...
  • Genetic mugshot recreates faces from nothing but DNA

    03/21/2014 1:05:01 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    www.newscientist.com ^ | 20 March 2014 | by Peter Aldhous
    A MURDER has been committed, and all the cops have to go on is a trace of DNA left at the scene. It doesn't match any profile in databases of known criminals, and the trail goes cold. But what if the police could issue a wanted poster based on a realistic "photofit" likeness built from that DNA? Not if, but when, claim researchers who have developed a method for determining how our genes influence facial shape. One day, the technique may even allow us to gaze into the faces of extinct human-like species that interbred with our own ancestors. It's...
  • Woolly Mammoths Are Coming Back, Say Cloning Scientists

    03/16/2014 10:39:35 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 80 replies
    DVICE ^ | March 14, 2014 | Michael Trei
    Woolly mammoths are coming back, say cloning scientists In what sounds like it could be the plot for the next Jurassic Park movie, a team of scientists in Siberia says there's a 'high chance' that they will be able to clone a woolly mammoth. The breakthrough comes as a result of last year's discovery of an incredibly well-preserved mammoth carcass, frozen in the permafrost of Siberia's Malolyakhovskiy island. The scientists estimate that the animal is about 43,000 years old, and was 50-60 years old when it died in distress after getting stuck in the ice. In the ten months since...
  • Epigenetics: The sins of the father - The roots of inheritance may extend beyond the genome...

    03/14/2014 1:07:40 PM PDT · by neverdem · 32 replies
    Nature News ^ | 05 March 2014 | Virginia Hughes
    The roots of inheritance may extend beyond the genome, but the mechanisms remain a puzzle. When Brian Dias became a father last October, he was, like any new parent, mindful of the enormous responsibility that lay before him. From that moment on, every choice he made could affect his newborn son's physical and psychological development. But, unlike most new parents, Dias was also aware of the influence of his past experiences — not to mention those of his parents, his grandparents and beyond. Where one's ancestors lived, or how much they valued education, can clearly have effects that pass down...
  • The "Born Gay" Hoax

    02/27/2014 3:43:57 PM PST · by ResisTyr · 164 replies
    FreeWebs.com ^ | n/a | Unknown
    The Born “Gay” Hoax By 1985, the pro-sodomy movement The born “gay” hoax was invented in 1985 by Marshall Kirk and Dr. Hunter Madsen. Marshall Kirk graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1980 majoring in psychology and went on to become a writer and researcher in neuropsychiatry. Dr. Hunter Madsen earned a PhD in politics from Harvard University in 1985, then went on to become an expert on public persuasion tactics, social marketing, and has designed commercial marketing on Madison Avenue. He has also served as a consultant to pro-sodomy media campaigns across America. In 1985, Marshall Kirk...
  • FDA weighs risks of 3-person embryo fertilization

    02/25/2014 9:03:57 AM PST · by ColdOne · 33 replies
    myfoxny.com ^ | 2/25/14 | MATTHEW PERRONE/ AP
    WASHINGTON (AP) - Federal health regulators will consider this week whether to green light a provocative new fertilization technique that could eventually create babies from the DNA of three people, with the goal of preventing mothers from passing on debilitating genetic diseases to their children. The Food and Drug Administration has framed its two-day meeting as a "scientific, technologic and clinical" discussion about how to test the approach in humans. But the technique itself raises a number of ethical questions, including whether the government should sanction the creation of genetically modified humans.
  • Scientists Create Genetic Map of History

    02/15/2014 4:57:49 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | February 13, 2014 | University College London
    "Because our approach uses only genetic data, it provides information independent from other sources. Many of our genetic observations match historical events, and we also see evidence of previously unrecorded genetic mixing. For example, the DNA of the Tu people in modern China suggests that in around 1200 C.E., Europeans similar to modern Greeks mixed with an otherwise Chinese-like population. Plausibly, the source of this European-like DNA might be merchants travelling the nearby Silk Road."
  • No One is Born Gay (or Straight): Here Are 5 Reasons Why

    02/15/2014 6:22:16 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 56 replies
    Social In Qeery ^ | 03/2013 | Jane Ward
    This post has been elaborated here.1. Just because an argument is politically strategic, does not make it true: A couple of years ago, the Human Rights Campaign, arguably the country’s most powerful lesbian and gay organization, responded to politician Herman Cain’s assertion that being gay is a choice. They asked their members to “Tell Herman Cain to get with the times! Being gay is not a choice!” They reasoned that Cain’s remarks were “dangerous.” Why? “Because implying that homosexuality is a choice gives unwarranted credence to roundly disproven practices such as ‘conversion’ or ‘reparative’ therapy. The risks associated with...
  • Being gay may be in the DNA, researchers say

    02/14/2014 1:21:13 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 116 replies
    Washington Times ^ | 02/14/2014 | By Cheryl K. Chumley
    Researchers say they’ve found more DNA evidence that possibly shows gay men don’t have a choice — that their biological makeup drives them to homosexuality. In a study at Chicago University, researchers looked at DNA chains of 400-plus pairs of gay brothers and found what they said were two distinct bits of genetic material that they claim are linked to homosexuality, The Daily Mail reported. The gay brothers were identified and recruited to help with the study over the course of several years’ worth of Gay Pride festivals and marches. The research was highlighted during the recent annual American Association...
  • The Fable of Hawaiian Frankencorn: The Aloha State’s dishonest anti-biotech campaign

    02/13/2014 10:16:12 PM PST · by neverdem · 20 replies
    Reason ^ | February 2014 | Ronald Bailey
    "Anybody you see around here dressed in a Tyvek suit will be someone from Greenpeace," David Stoltzfus joked as we surveyed the thousands of carefully numbered corn plants growing in the stony rust-colored soil of a former sugar cane plantation just a few miles inland from the spectacular Wailea Beach. Stoltzfus, who heads Monsanto's Piilani seed production farm on Maui, was referring to the white disposable coveralls that protesters wear for the TV cameras when "decontaminating" biotech crop fields. Hawaii is the epicenter of a furious campaign to shut down production farms that yield genetically modified seed. It was September,...
  • Being gay IS in your genes, say scientists in controversial new DNA study

    02/13/2014 8:45:00 PM PST · by Pinkbell · 154 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | February 13, 2014 | Fiona Macrae
    Being gay could be in the DNA. Scientists have found two stretches of DNA linked to homosexuality in men. The confirmation of the existence of a ‘gay gene’ or genes will strengthen arguments that homosexuality is a matter of biology, rather than choice. However, it also raises the prospect of a genetic test that could be used by insurance companies to discriminate against clients or by pregnant women to abort gay babies. In the study, Chicago University researchers analysed the DNA of more than 400 pairs of gay brothers, recruited at Gay Pride festivals at marches over several years. This...
  • Danish zoo kills healthy giraffe, feeds body to lions

    02/09/2014 1:37:26 PM PST · by Innovative · 63 replies
    CNN ^ | Feb 9, 2014 | Bharati Naik and Marie-Louise Gumuchian
    An online petition to save a healthy young giraffe from death has failed, despite thousands of signatures from animal lovers. Copenhagen Zoo said it euthanized the male, named Marius, on Sunday because of a duty to avoid inbreeding. After an autopsy, "Marius" was dismembered in front of a zoo audience that included children, and fed to the zoo's lions.
  • Mad scientist gets his hands on power of God

    02/02/2014 7:40:49 AM PST · by Epistolizer · 14 replies
    An analysis pointing out the intersection of transhumanism and the occult.
  • DNA test reveals felon is true father of Utah woman after secret insemination sperm swap

    01/12/2014 5:43:37 AM PST · by Libloather · 14 replies
    NY Daily News ^ | 1/11/14 | Nina Golgowski
    **SNIP** Lippert, who had been convicted in a high-profile kidnapping in 1975, worked at the clinic part-time from 1988 to 1993, the University of Utah confirms. In his kidnapping case, reported by People magazine in 1975, Lippert abducted a 21-year-old female student at Purdue University whom he attempted to "brainwash" into falling in love with him through electric-shock therapy. The surprised mother told KUTV that she didn't know his criminal history until now. But she says she does remember him as being at the clinic when she visited, specifically in the front desk area.
  • DNA shows Irish people have more complex origins than previously thought

    01/11/2014 6:13:55 AM PST · by NYer · 70 replies
    scott.net ^ | July 5, 2013 | Marie McKeown
    The blood in Irish veins is Celtic, right? Well, not exactly. Although the history many Irish people were taught at school is the history of the Irish as a Celtic race, the truth is much more complicated, and much more interesting than that ... Research done into the DNA of Irish males has shown that the old Anthropological attempts to define 'Irish' have been misguided. As late as the 1950s researchers were busy collecting data among Irish people such as hair colour and height, in order to categorise them as a 'race' and define them as different to the British....
  • Was Your Ancestor a Ball of Jelly? Evolution Study Surprises Experts

    12/19/2013 11:18:26 AM PST · by EveningStar · 25 replies
    National Geographic ^ | December 12, 2013 | Jane J. Lee
    In a prehistoric version of "the chicken or the egg" question, researchers have long debated which animal group came first. A traditional view pegs sponges—marine creatures that look more like rocks or corals—as our ancient ancestors. But a new genetic study is stirring the waters, suggesting comb jellies, gelatinous marine animals that look similar to jellyfish, are actually the first animals to have evolved over 600 million years ago.
  • Why inbreeding is bad

    12/13/2013 6:52:07 PM PST · by Theoria · 30 replies
    The Unz Review ^ | 13 Dec 2013 | Razib Khan
    A shocking case of a family of ~40 in rural Australia, the “Colts” (it’s a pseudonym), which has engaged in several generations of first degree incest has surfaced. You can read the summary in the press. But the Australian government has released a report on the case. I haven’t read most of it because the snippets I have stumbled upon are very disturbing. But, I was curious as to the characterization of the 12 children who were removed by social services. In particular, only one, Cindy, had parents who were unrelated. Note how different she is: Cindy Colt (5), Rhonda...
  • Scientists discover double meaning in genetic code

    12/13/2013 8:59:54 AM PST · by aimhigh · 122 replies
    University of Washington ^ | 12/12/2013 | University of Washington
    Scientists have discovered a second code hiding within DNA. This second code contains information that changes how scientists read the instructions contained in DNA and interpret mutations to make sense of health and disease. UW scientists were stunned to discover that genomes use the genetic code to write two separate languages. One describes how proteins are made, and the other instructs the cell on how genes are controlled. One language is written on top of the other, which is why the second language remained hidden for so long. The genetic code uses a 64-letter alphabet called codons. The UW team...
  • How a century of breeding 'improvement' has turned once-healthy dogs into deformed animals

    12/06/2013 6:12:20 AM PST · by C19fan · 24 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 6, 2013 | Ted Thornhill
    The common perception of purebred dogs is that they are more striking, beautiful animals than they would be without human intervention. However, that notion has been thrown to the dogs. Strong photographic evidence has emerged that shows how 100 years of breeding has actually warped the good looks of the original hounds.
  • FDA Tells 23andMe to Halt Sales of Genetic Test

    11/26/2013 5:54:08 AM PST · by Prolixus · 10 replies
    ABC News ^ | November 25, 2013 | MATTHEW PERRONE
    The Food and Drug Administration has ordered Google-backed genetic test maker 23andMe to halt sales of its personalized DNA test kits, saying the company has failed to show that the technology is supported by science.
  • Inside 23andMe founder Anne Wojcicki's $99 DNA Revolution

    11/08/2013 11:46:17 AM PST · by null and void · 46 replies
    FastCompany.com ^ | October 14, 2013 | 6:00 AM | Elizabeth Murphy
    The $126 million genetic-testing company can tell you how to live smarter, better, and longer. It can also tell you what might kill you. You can purchase 14 gallons of organic milk or 396 lollipops. You can give her 33 rides on the Ferris wheel at the state fair, or you can get him a couple of violin lessons. You could put the money in a savings account, you could buy her her very own LeapFrog LeapPad Explorer digital learning tablet, or you could buy enough pizzas to feed all of her friends on the block. So many options, so...