Keyword: genetics

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  • Frankengrain

    12/07/2016 8:28:25 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 55 replies
    Wheat Belly Blog ^ | September 11, 2016 | Dr. William Davis
    Here’s an excerpt from the Wheat Belly Cookbook about modern high-yield, semi-dwarf wheat, what I call the “Frankengrain” because of the extensive and bizarre changes introduced into this grass by geneticists and agribusiness. (Even though a cookbook, I tried to make the Wheat Belly Cookbook a standalone book that discusses the background on why and how the Wheat Belly lifestyle yields such unexpected and extravagant health and weight loss successes. For this reason, the first 90 pages of the cookbook reiterate many of the Wheat Belly basic concepts.)From the Wheat Belly Cookbook: Wheat encapsulates a fundamental dilemma of our technological...
  • Genes of This Tribe Carry A DNA of A Third Unknown

    10/31/2016 2:51:36 AM PDT · by Jacob Kell · 33 replies
    spasique.com ^ | October 29, 2016
    New evidence found by scientists has started to suggest that the people living on the islands of Melanesia could have human DNA the world has never seen. The theory is that the DNA does not come from a Neanderthal or Denisovan (which are the two ancient species we most closely relate humans with). Scientists believe that they come from a new undiscovered species that derived from the South Pacific, northeast of Austrailia.
  • Exclusive: Worlds first baby born with new 3 parent technique

    09/28/2016 7:26:00 AM PDT · by plain talk · 42 replies
    New Science ^ | Sep 27, 2016 | Jessica Hamzelou
    Its a boy! A five-month-old boy is the first baby to be born using a new technique that incorporates DNA from three people, New Scientist can reveal. This is great news and a huge deal, says Dusko Ilic at Kings College London, who wasnt involved in the work. Its revolutionary. The controversial technique, which allows parents with rare genetic mutations to have healthy babies, has only been legally approved in the UK. But the birth of the child, whose Jordanian parents were treated by a US-based team in Mexico, should fast-forward progress around the world, say embryologists.
  • Were Not Quite Born This Way

    09/01/2016 1:20:52 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 19 replies
    Back in 2014, a bigoted African leader put J. Michael Bailey, a psychologist at Northwestern, in a strange position. Yoweri Museveni, the president of Uganda, had been issuing a series of anti-gay tirades, and partially fueled by anti-gay religious figures from the U.S. was considering toughening Ugandas anti-gay laws. The rhetoric was getting out of control: The commercialisation of homosexuality is unacceptable, said Simon Lokodo, Ugandas ethics minister. If they were doing it in their own rooms we wouldnt mind, but when they go for children, thats not fair. They are beasts of the forest. Eventually, Museveni said...
  • Manitoba Men Weep After Learning They Were Switched at Birth 41 Years Ago (2nd Same Hospital)

    08/29/2016 11:50:30 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 35 replies
    CBC ^ | Aug 26, 2016 | Jillian Taylor
    DNA tests confirm both were given to wrong mothers after being born at Norway House Indian HospitalLeon Swanson and David Tait Jr. are both 41 years old and have just learned they're not exactly who they thought they were. Both wept Friday in Winnipeg as Eric Robinson, a former NDP member of the Manitoba Legislative Assembly for Keewatinook, told media that the two men were switched at birth more than 40 years ago at a hospital in Norway House Cree Nation. "What happened here is lives were stolen," Robinson said. "You can't describe it as anything less than that." Swanson...
  • Intersex Athlete Wins Gold Medal In Womens 800M

    08/21/2016 1:20:41 PM PDT · by Mr. Mojo · 140 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | 8/20/16 | Peter Hasson
    South African runner Caster Semenya dominated the womens 800-meter final Saturday in Rio, finishing well ahead of the competition to take home the gold medal. Semenya is widely believed to be intersex, defined by the United Nations as people born with sex characteristics that do not fit typical binary notions of male or female bodies. The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) last summer suspended International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF) rules prohibiting athletes who exceed a testosterone threshold from competing in womens track and field events, clearing the way for Semenya to compete in Rio. The CAS ruling claimed...
  • Plant and animal DNA suggests first Americans took the coastal route

    08/15/2016 10:22:44 AM PDT · by Theoria · 14 replies
    Nature ^ | 10 Aug 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Life came to ice-free Canadian corridor too late to sustain migrations of Clovis and pre-Clovis people. Archaeologists need a new theory for the colonization of the Americas. Plant and animal DNA buried under two Canadian lakes squashes the idea that the first Americans travelled through an ice-free corridor that extended from Alaska to Montana.The analysis, published online in Nature on 10August and led by palaeogeneticist Eske Willerslev of the University of Copenhagen, suggests that the passageway became habitable 12,600years ago1. Thats nearly 1,000years after the formation of the Clovis culture once thought to be the first Americans and...
  • North Carolina School District Plans To Stop Labeling Students as 'Boys' And 'Girls'

    08/11/2016 10:12:47 AM PDT · by C19fan · 45 replies
    Independent Journal Review ^ | August 9, 2016 | Sister Toldjah
    The Charlotte-Mecklenburg (North Carolina) School System had to temporarily put its HB2-defying transgender bathroom plan on hold due to a recent Supreme Court ruling. But the ruling hasn't stopped the slow roll-out of other controversial gender-related recommendations that it is set to make to the local school board on Tuesday night. Charlotte news station WSOC-TV reports:
  • Genetic testing on animals in Germany tripled over decade

    08/10/2016 6:41:14 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 5 replies
    TheLocal.de ^ | 10 Aug 2016 11:30 GMT+02:00 | (DPA/The Local)
    A new study reveals that genetic manipulation of mice, rats, cows and pigs has increased threefold since 2004. Between 2004 and 2013, the number of tests conducted using genetically modified animals in Germany nearly tripled, according to reports by Funke Mediengruppe, citing a study by research group Testbiotech, which investigates the consequences of genetic engineering. In total nearly 950,000 animals, mainly mice and rats, were genetically tested in 2013 alone one third of all animals on which scientific testing was conducted during that year in Germany.
  • CMS recommends children not be called boys and girls

    08/07/2016 10:26:25 AM PDT · by ColdOne · 48 replies
    wsoctv.com ^ | 8/6/16 | Joe Bruno
    A CMS presentation to principals and counselors recommends kids are not referred to as boys and girls, but instead as scholars and students. DOCUMENT: CMS transgender student presentation Eliminating boy and girl references is one of several policies included in the CMS bully prevention regulations. One policy allows students to participate in extracurricular activities and overnight field trips based on their gender identity. A student who identifies as a girl would be allowed to participate in an "all-girl" overnight trip. Another policy says CMS must evaluate all gender-based activities and "maintain only those that have clear and sound pedagogical purpose."
  • Your best diet might depend on your genetics

    07/16/2016 2:02:28 PM PDT · by Pining_4_TX · 28 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 07/13/16 | Genetics Society of America
    If you've ever seen a friend have good results from a diet but then not been able to match those results yourself, you may not be surprised by new findings in mice that show that diet response is highly individualized. "There is an overgeneralization of health benefits or risks tied to certain diets," said William Barrington, Ph.D., a researcher from North Carolina State University who conducted this work in the laboratory of David Threadgill, Ph.D., at Texas A&M University. "Our study showed that the impact of the diet is likely dependent on the genetic composition of the individual eating the...
  • Ancient giant cattle genome first

    02/20/2010 5:30:54 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 28 replies · 878+ views
    bbc ^ | 17 February 2010 | Steven McKenzie
    Scientists have analysed the DNA of ancient giant European wild cattle that died out almost 400 years ago. They have determined the first mitochondrial genome sequence from aurochs (Bos primigenius) from bone found in a cave in England. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed down from a mother to her offspring....... One of the researchers involved, Dr Ceiridwen Edwards, has previously investigated the remains of a polar bear found in the Scottish Highlands.... The species became extinct when a female animal died in a forest in Poland in 1627. Roman general and dictator Julius Caesar was said to have been impressed...
  • Scientists in aurochs genome sequence first (wild cattle)

    02/18/2010 3:33:47 AM PST · by decimon · 10 replies · 405+ views
    BBC ^ | Feb 17, 2010 | Steven McKenzie
    Scientists have analysed the DNA of ancient giant European wild cattle that died out almost 400 years ago.They have determined the first mitochondrial genome sequence from aurochs (Bos primigenius) from bone found in a cave in England. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed down from a mother to her offspring. One of the researchers involved, Dr Ceiridwen Edwards, has previously investigated the remains of a polar bear found in the Scottish Highlands. The work was carried out at the University College Dublin's Animal Genomics Laboratory and Conway Institute using new technology that allows billions of base pairs of DNA to be...
  • Rare Skull From Korea's Silla Kingdom Reconstructed

    06/26/2016 6:11:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Scientists have studied a rare skeleton from the Silla culture, which ruled over part of the Korean Peninsula from 57 B.C. to A.D. 935. The skeletons are not preserved well in the soil of Korea, bioanthropologist Dong Hoon Shin of Seoul National University College of Medicine told Live Science. The skeleton, of a woman in her late 30s, was found in a traditional coffin that had been buried near the historic capital of the Silla Kingdom, Gyeongju. Analysis of her mitochondrial DNA suggests that she belonged to a genetic lineage that is present in East Asia today. Carbon isotopes in...
  • Trained immune cells raise prospect of universal cancer vaccine

    06/02/2016 8:25:57 AM PDT · by Hostage · 9 replies
    gizmag ^ | June 1, 2016 | Nick Lavars
    Engineering immune cells to attack cancer is a form of treatment that is showing great promise, but it is complex because it involves extracting and modifying T cells before injecting them back into the body. Scientists have now demonstrated a way to not just arm immune cells while still inside the body, but equip them with the ability to fight any kind of cancer, providing an early proof-of-concept for a cheap, universal vaccine for the deadly disease. ............Snip............ But German scientists are now reporting an immunotherapy breakthrough that is significant in more ways than one. Led by Professor Ugur Sahin...
  • DNA Captured From 2,500-Year-Old Phoenician

    05/28/2016 10:34:05 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    This is the first ancient DNA to be obtained from Phoenician remains. Known as “Ariche,” the young man came from Byrsa, a walled citadel above the harbor of ancient Carthage. Byrsa was attacked by the Roman general Scipio Aemilianus “Africanus” in the Third Punic War. It was destroyed by Rome in 146 B.C. Analysis of the skeleton revealed the man died between the age of 19 and 24, had a rather robust physique and was 1.7 meters (5’6″) tall. He may have belonged to the Carthaginian elite, as he was buried with gems, scarabs, amulets and other artifacts. Now genetic...
  • 1400 years of Inbreeding

    05/24/2016 9:29:41 AM PDT · by Yollopoliuhqui · 92 replies
    IsraPundit ^ | May 24, 2016 | Nesara
    We asked several Muslims in Saudi Arabia why they marry their first cousins. All of them told us its to keep the wealth within the family and that the Prophet allows them to do this. There is one town in Saudi Arabia where there are only two last names listed for all its citizens. This came from a Lockheed employee who has had three assignments to Saudi Arabia. Worth the read! During the pilot transition program with the KV-107 and C-130 with Lockheed, we found that most Saudi pilot trainees had very limited night vision, even on the brightest of...
  • DNA test traces origins of Hillary cackle to hyena ancestors

    05/22/2016 6:24:50 AM PDT · by maddog55 · 14 replies
    The Peoples Cube ^ | 5/11/2016, 3:49 pm | Hammer and Loupe
    Animal behaviorist Dr. Kale Crumlin didn't know how close he was to the truth when a few months ago he first shared his observations with a small circle of colleagues in a paper titled, "The Behavior and Habits of Hillary Clinton," in which he compared the former First Lady to the dominant female in a clan of spotted hyenas, also known as laughing hyenas. "The cackle, the facial expressions, and the predisposition to dominate males were the first behavioral clues," wrote Dr. Crumlin, referring to a known scientific fact that spotted hyena society is matriarchal; females are larger than males...
  • Fat? Maybe you cant blame your genes after all

    05/02/2016 9:14:49 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 28 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 05/02/16 | Patrick Hahn
    An impressive array of brainpower Fat? Blame your genes, say doctors Overweight? Maybe you really can blame your genes Blame your genes for obesity Headlines such as these have become a staple of science and health journalism. Are they right? Are obese people really helpless victims of their genes? Let us begin by distinguishing between monogenic obesity and what scientists call common obesity. Monogenic obesity, as the name implies, is caused by a mutation in a single gene, which is inherited in a Mendelian fashion, just as conditions such as sickle-cell anemia and cystic fibrosis are. In the case of...
  • Cannabis: scientists call for action amid mental health concerns

    04/15/2016 9:55:27 AM PDT · by familyop · 103 replies
    The Guardian ^ | Friday 15 April 2016 | Ian Sample Science editor
    The call for action from scientists in the UK, US, Europe and Australia reflects a growing consensus among experts that frequent cannabis use can increase the risk of psychosis...In the UK, cannabis is the most popular illegal drug, and according to Public Health England data, more young people enter treatment centres for help with cannabis than any other drug, alcohol included.
  • [Vanity] 23 and Me Dot Com - Potential for Medical Spying, Govt. & Corp.

    04/16/2016 6:00:27 PM PDT · by CharlesOConnell · 19 replies
    A search using Google ^ | 04/16/2016 | Charles O'Connell
    23 & Me dot com advertises for you to send in a genetic sample, and to receive specialized medical advice in return. What is the potential for government & corporate violation of your medical records privacy rights, potentially denying you employment, life insurance, medical services on the basis of "futility" owing to pre-existing conditions? Google query 23 and me medical spying.
  • You think eugenics is a discredited practice? Think again, its back.

    04/04/2016 6:41:23 AM PDT · by C19fan · 15 replies
    Genetic Literacy Project ^ | March 31, 2016 | Jon Entine
    Its a subject doctors, health providers and medical experts are discussing feverishly, but often quietly: Whether parents should undergo genetic tests, either before conception or after, to determine if their unborn child might have a serious genetic disorder. Hanging over the debate is the specter of eugenicsfears that the ability to manipulate the health of our future babies could devalue the sanctity of life.
  • More Ancient Viruses Lurk In Our DNA Than We Thought

    03/28/2016 6:19:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    University of Michigan ^ | March 22, 2016 | Kara Gavin
    One whole endogenous retrovirus genome -- and bits of 17 others -- were spotted in a study of 2,500 human genomes... Nineteen new pieces of DNA -- left by viruses that first infected our ancestors hundreds of thousands of years ago -- have just been found, lurking between our own genes. And one stretch of newfound DNA, found in about 50 of the 2,500 people studied, contains an intact, full genetic recipe for an entire virus, say the scientists who published their findings today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Whether or not it can replicate, or...
  • Is Crime Genetic? Scientists Don't Know Because They're Afraid To Ask

    03/10/2016 7:09:31 AM PST · by ghosthost · 45 replies
    Boston Globe ^ | 3-6-2016 | Brian Boutwell
    Social scientists generally, and criminologists especially, often lack the ability (usually due to both ethical and practical concerns) to perform randomized controlled trials, the gold standard of research. We might expect, for instance, that having low levels of self-control is a cause of criminal behavior. In fact, some of the most powerful explanations of crime have been built on this idea, and there is much evidence to support it. We might also hypothesize that bad parenting causes children to develop low levels of self-control. Yet we cant randomly assign people to have different levels of self-control, and we most assuredly...
  • Super-Intelligent Humans Are Coming [Genetic Engineering]

    03/04/2016 7:28:47 AM PST · by C19fan · 29 replies
    Nautilus ^ | March 3, 2016 | Stephen Hsu
    Lev Landau, a Nobelist and one of the fathers of a great school of Soviet physics, had a logarithmic scale for ranking theorists, from 1 to 5. A physicist in the first class had ten times the impact of someone in the second class, and so on. He modestly ranked himself as 2.5 until late in life, when he became a 2. In the first class were Heisenberg, Bohr, and Dirac among a few others. Einstein was a 0.5! My friends in the humanities, or other areas of science like biology, are astonished and disturbed that physicists and mathematicians (substitute...
  • Neanderthals and modern humans mated 50,000 years earlier than we thought, scientists say.

    02/21/2016 5:06:59 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 108 replies
    CS Monitor ^ | 02/20/2016 | By Eva Botkin-Kowacki,
    Ever since geneticists sequenced the first Neanderthal genome in 2010, researchers have been reporting just how related humans are to their ancient, extinct cousins. Since then, there's been more research. And more. And more. As it turns out, non-African modern humans have Neanderthals to thank for 1 to 4 percent of their DNA. The two species were thought to have interbred around 50,000 to 60,000 years ago, based on the Neanderthal DNA found in anatomically modern human specimens and people living today. But scientists had yet to find a signature of such mating interactions in Neanderthal DNA, until now. "Instead...
  • English DNA one third Anglo-Saxon

    01/20/2016 7:49:52 AM PST · by ek_hornbeck · 53 replies
    BBC ^ | 1/20/15 | Paul Rincon
    The present-day English owe about a third of their ancestry to the Anglo-Saxons, according to a new study. Scientists sequenced genomes from 10 skeletons unearthed in eastern England and dating from the Iron Age through to the Anglo-Saxon period. Many of the Anglo-Saxon samples appeared closer to modern Dutch and Danish people than the Iron Age Britons did. The results appear in Nature Communications journal. According to historical accounts and archaeology, the Anglo-Saxons migrated to Britain from continental Europe from the 5th Century AD. They brought with them a new culture, social structure and language. Genetic studies have tackled the...
  • There's no such thing as a 'male brain' or 'female brain,' and scientists have the scans...

    11/30/2015 6:07:37 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 73 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | Karen Kaplan•
    If you didn’t expect this to be a yes-or-no question, you’re not alone. Male brains do seem to be built differently than female brains. An analysis of more than 100 studies found that the volume of a man’s brain is 8% to 13% greater than the volume of a woman’s brain, on average. Some of the most noticeable differences were in areas of the brain that control language, memory, emotion and behavior, according to a 2014 report in the journal Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. To find out whether these structural differences translated into cognitive differences, scientists examined detailed brain scans...
  • Researchers decode patterns that make our brains human

    11/16/2015 3:16:32 PM PST · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/16/2015 | Allen Institute
    The human brain may be the most complex piece of organized matter in the known universe, but Allen Institute researchers have begun to unravel the genetic code underlying its function. Research published this month in Nature Neuroscience identified a surprisingly small set of molecular patterns that dominate gene expression in the human brain and appear to be common to all individuals, providing key insights into the core of the genetic code that makes our brains distinctly human. "So much research focuses on the variations between individuals, but we turned that question on its head to ask, what makes us similar?"...
  • Muslim inbreeding

    11/12/2015 6:44:44 AM PST · by Rummyfan · 50 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 12 Oct 2015 | Carol Brown
    Inbreeding is common in Islamic culture. It’s been going on since Mohammed sanctioned first-cousin marriages 1,400 years ago. I guess there’s nothing like getting marriage advice handed down from one generation to the next that originated with a lunatic pedophile. PJ Media reports that because Mohammed encouraged inbreeding, many Muslims regard intermarriage as part of their religion. First-cousin marriages are also viewed as a source of social status, as a means of keeping wealth within the family, and as a form of control. In addition, it is a vehicle to safeguard families against the influence of non-Muslim outsiders, which contributes...
  • First Gene-Edited Dogs Reported in China

    10/20/2015 6:59:45 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | 10/19/2015 | By Antonio Regalado
    Beagles named Hercules, at left, and Tiangou are the worlds first gene-edited dogs. =============================================================================================================================== Mans best friend is now his newest genetic engineering project. Scientists in China say they are the first to use gene editing to produce customized dogs. They created a beagle with double the amount of muscle mass by deleting a gene called myostatin. The dogs have more muscles and are expected to have stronger running ability, which is good for hunting, police (military) applications, Liangxue Lai, a researcher with the Key Laboratory of Regenerative Biology at the Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health, said in an...
  • Scientists: Genetically Modified Humans Can Fight Climate Change

    10/08/2015 5:10:25 PM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 36 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 10/08/15 | Patrick Wood
    The U.N.'s dream of Sustainable Development is precisely a Brave New World It was just a matter of time before Eugenics met Climate Change. Even if it sounds like science fiction and absurd speculation, the discussion is taking place now in scientific circles. In fact, this is the ultimate application of science to the human condition. For instance, designer babies might be genetically engineered to be smaller as adults: This would proportionally reduce their carbon footprint. Or genes might be inserted to improve night vision. That would allow nighttime lighting requirements to be reduced, thus saving boatloads of energy and...
  • Study: Eurasian Farmers Migrated to Africa 3,000 Years Ago

    10/08/2015 1:15:06 PM PDT · by Theoria · 10 replies
    AP ^ | 08 Oct 2015 | AP
    Scientists say they have extracted ancient DNA from the skull of a man buried in the highlands of Ethiopia 4,500 years ago that supports the theory that Eurasian farmers migrated into Africa some 3,000 years ago. This Stone Age resettlement had previously been theorized, but the rare find allowed scientists to see what DNA looked like well before the time the migration would have taken place. A comparison with modern populations around the world allowed them to see that the migrants left their genetic mark in the furthest corners of Africa. "This is the first ancient human genome found in...
  • Culture Not Genetics Is the Key to Success

    10/08/2015 7:27:42 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 22 replies
    National Review ^ | 10/08/2015 | Thomas Sowell
    The prevailing social dogma of our time that economic and other disparities among groups are strange, if not sinister has set off bitter disputes between those who blame genetic differences and those who blame discrimination. Both sides ignore the possibility that the groups themselves may differ in their orientations, their priorities, and in what they are prepared to sacrifice for the sake of other things. Back in the early 19th century, an official of the Russian Empire reported that even the poorest Jews saw to it that their daughters could read, and their homes had at least ten...
  • Scientists find how obesity gene works, a clue to treatment

    08/19/2015 11:09:22 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 8 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Aug 19, 2015 10:46 PM EDT | Marilynn Marchione
    Scientists have finally figured out how the key gene tied to obesity makes people fat, a major discovery that could open the door to an entirely new approach to the problem beyond diet and exercise. The work solves a big mystery: Since 2007, researchers have known that a gene called FTO was related to obesity, but they didnt know how, and could not tie it to appetite or other known factors. Now experiments reveal that a faulty version of the gene causes energy from food to be stored as fat rather than burned. Genetic tinkering in mice and on human...
  • Ex-President Warren Harding's Love Child Confirmed Through DNA Testing

    08/13/2015 6:20:33 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 52 replies
    ABC News ^ | 08/13/2015 | By JORDYN PHELPS
    After nearly 100 years of rumors and historical speculation, DNA testing has confirmed that President Warren Harding had a child out of wedlock his only biological child with mistress Nan Britton. Britton first came forward publically with the claim that her daughter, Elizabeth Ann, was Hardings daughter in a 1927 autobiography The Presidents Daughter. In her account, Britton detailed a steamy six-year-long affair with the 29th president, including one encounter in a White House closet, before his untimely death in 1923. At the time of its publishing, the book was met with public ridicule and widely discounted as...
  • Did your genes really make you do it?

    06/28/2015 8:36:35 AM PDT · by Cats Pajamas · 23 replies
    My Genes made me do it! ^ | 1999 | Neil and Briar Whitehead
    BLURB: First published in the USA in 1999 this book is now freely downloadable from this site. It is under constant review to keep it up-to-date so readers can be assured of its on-going relevance. My Genes Made Me Do It is one of the most comprehensive and easily-read books in the popular market today on science and homosexuality. It is an objective review of more than 10,000 scientific research papers and publications from all sides of the debate. In simple and clear terms, by analysis of the science, it shows homosexuality cannot be biologically innate, or fixed - leaving...
  • Investigation of Rachel Dolezal's roots reveals she has no black relatives dating back to 1671

    06/16/2015 4:31:46 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 54 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | June 16, 2015 | Daniel Bates
    Rachel Dolezal has no genealogical claim whatsoever that she is black, going back through the last four centuries, an investigation by Daily Mail Online has revealed. The woman who sparked a national debate on race has no black relatives dating back to 1671; in fact her family were entirely white including some who were Mormons. Archives show that Rachels ancestors came to the US from Europe and have no bloodlines linking them to slaves or Africa. Even a great grandmother who has almost identical features to Rachel was identified as white in two census documents. Our reporters commissioned Massachusetts-based genealogist...
  • Scientists just found soft tissue inside a dinosaur fossil. Here's why that's exciting.

    06/09/2015 12:22:24 PM PDT · by ETL · 167 replies
    Vox.com ^ | June 9, 2015 | Joseph Stromberg
    Dinosaur fossils, it was long thought, are simple objects. The fossilization process leaves the overall shape of a dinosaur's bones intact, but all the microscopic structures inside them the blood cells, connective fibers, and other sorts of soft tissue inevitably decay over time. The photo above, from a new study published today in Nature Communications and led by Sergio Bertazzo of Imperial College London, shows an extremely zoomed-in view of a 75-million-year-old theropod claw, taken from the London Natural History Museum's collection. When researchers scraped tiny pieces off the fossil and looked at them under an electron microscope,...
  • Are gays born that way? Most Americans now say yes, but science says no

    05/21/2015 8:09:52 AM PDT · by xzins · 66 replies
    LifeSite News ^ | May 20, 2015
    HOMOSEXUALITYWed - 4:29 pm EST Homosexuality , Poll PRINCETON, NJ, May 20, 2015 (LifeSiteNews.com) -- For the first time, a majority of Americans say that homosexuals are "born that way." According to the latest Gallup poll, 51 percent of Americans say that people are born gay or lesbian, while only 30 percent say outside factors such as upbringing and environment determine sexual orientation. However, science would not bear that out. No fewer than eight major studies from around the world have found homosexuality is not a genetic condition. Peter Sprigg of the Family Research Council says that these numerous, rigorous...
  • Bruce Jenner, Get Real

    04/25/2015 4:11:28 PM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 56 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 04/25/15 | Judi Mcleod
    Whether he wears high heels or not, Jenners still what his Creator made him--a guy. In the 60s and 70s, spouses wanting to duck out on commitment and responsibility abandoned their marriages on the pretext of going off to find myself. With the Me Generation coming into its own, and free love in abundant supply, what could possibly go wrong? Life for the Lib-Left tumbled along like tumbling tumbleweeds down the empty streets of Americas western ghost towns over ensuing decades. People got used to knowing that Liberals have not only always justified any and all behavior with bleeding heart...
  • No, Senator Rubio, Homosexuals Aren't Born that Way

    04/20/2015 5:01:58 PM PDT · by xzins · 190 replies
    AFA ^ | Monday, April 20, 2015 | Bryan Fischer
    I dont believe that your sexual preferences are a choice for a vast and enormous majority of the people. The bottom line is I believe that sexual preference is something people are born with. ~ Sen. Marco Rubio, April 19, 2015 Marco Rubio has become the latest GOP presidential candidate to stumble badly over the issue of homosexuality. Sen. Rand Paul hurt himself by saying that gay marriage is okay, as long as its a matter of private contract, a view which will satisfy no one. Dr. Ben Carson hurt himself by asserting that people do change their sexual orientation...
  • Poor Children May Have Smaller Brains Than Rich Children. Does That Tell Us Anything?

    04/18/2015 2:50:13 AM PDT · by Cincinatus' Wife · 102 replies
    Slate ^ | April 17, 2015 | Jordan Weissmann
    Social scientists have found that by the time children enter kindergarten, there is already a large academic achievement gap between students from wealthy and poor families. We still don't know exactly why that's the case. There's a sense that it at least partly has to do with the fact that affluent mothers and fathers have more intensive parenting sytlesthey're more likely to read to their kids, for instanceand have enough money to make sure their toddlers grow up well-nourished, generally cared for, and intellectually stimulated. At the same time, poor children often grow up in chaotic, food-insecure, stressful homes that...
  • Gerties Babies, Sold at Birth, Use DNA to Unlock Secret Past

    04/10/2015 12:58:35 PM PDT · by Lorianne · 7 replies
    New York Times ^ | 04 April 2015 | Kirk Johnson
    Sue Dockens start in life, in 1951, with a no-questions-asked cash adoption at the hands of a midwife, had strong elements of the crime scene that it was. Her adoptive father was told to stay in the car and keep the motor running. His wife went into a nondescript office building in Butte, Mont., where she met with the midwife, Gertrude Pitkanen, and was handed the hours-old infant and the afterbirth, offered a peek through a curtain at the young mother lying in a bed, and told to leave. The afterbirth was thrown out the window on the drive home,...
  • Dog-poop DNA tests nail non-scoopers

    04/04/2015 8:54:38 AM PDT · by Cry if I Wanna · 59 replies
    Seattle Times ^ | April 30th, 2015 | Erik Lactis
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  • I am Angelina's ovary last words from a dying grey clump

    03/27/2015 9:33:25 PM PDT · by sukhoi-30mki · 40 replies
    Scroll.in ^ | 28 March 2015 | Ishrat Syed
    They say I might have turned cancerous, but there's a fair chance that other organs could go rogue too. So why me? Correction. I used to be Angelinas ovary. Now Im a grey clump drying in a steel tray, dying in a steel tray. Is that any end for a decent ovary? Clamped, cut, avulsed, evicted, tossed into a cold emptiness, I lie here leaching out my juices and turning into a sticky pebble that will soon begin to stink. Sure, Im famous. Shes famous, is Angelina. I powered her fame. I made her, though you wouldnt think that from...
  • Study Shows Humans Are Evolving Faster Than Previously Thought

    03/25/2015 10:01:56 PM PDT · by Steelfish · 61 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | March 25, 2015 | Hannah Devlin
    Study Shows Humans Are Evolving Faster Than Previously Thought Hannah Devlin 25 March 2015 Humans are evolving more rapidly than previously thought, according to the largest ever genetics study of a single population. Scientists reached the conclusion after showing that almost every man alive can trace his origins to one common male ancestor who lived about 250,000 years ago. The discovery that so-called genetic Adam, lived about 100,000 years more recently than previously understood suggests that humans must have been genetically diverging at a more rapid rate than thought. Kri Stefnsson, of the company deCODE Genetics and senior author of...
  • DNA study shows that Celts are not a unique genetic group

    03/19/2015 8:39:02 AM PDT · by ek_hornbeck · 53 replies
    BBC ^ | 3/18/15 | Pallab Ghosh
    A DNA study of Britons has shown that genetically there is not a unique Celtic group of people in the UK. According to the data, those of Celtic ancestry in Scotland and Cornwall are more similar to the English than they are to other Celtic groups. The study also describes distinct genetic differences across the UK, which reflect regional identities. And it shows that the invading Anglo Saxons did not wipe out the Britons of 1,500 years ago, but mixed with them. Published in the Journal Nature, the findings emerge from a detailed DNA analysis of 2,000 mostly middle-aged Caucasian...
  • Genetic study reveals 30% of white British DNA has German ancestry

    03/19/2015 8:18:37 AM PDT · by C19fan · 54 replies
    The Guardian ^ | March 18, 2015 | Hannah Devlin
    The Romans, Vikings and Normans may have ruled or invaded the British for hundreds of years, but they left barely a trace on our DNA, the first detailed study of the genetics of British people has revealed. The analysis shows that the Anglo-Saxons were the only conquering force, around 400-500 AD, to substantially alter the countrys genetic makeup, with most white British people now owing almost 30% of their DNA to the ancestors of modern-day Germans.
  • Get Ready for Embryos From Two Men or Two Women

    03/19/2015 2:32:28 AM PDT · by C19fan · 31 replies
    Time ^ | March 18, 2015 | Dr. Guy Ringler
    Genetic research is advancing to the day when gay couples could fulfill their dreams of having children related to them both. Ive helped many same-sex couples over the years have children of their own through assisted reproductive procedures. Egg donation and surrogacy allow two gay men to have children genetically related to one partner and the egg donor, but not to both. Its the same dynamic for lesbians and sperm donors. Ive been asked many times by countless same-sex couples over the years: can we make a baby thats a combination of both of us?