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Keyword: dna

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  • How to preserve fleeting digital information with DNA for future generations

    08/17/2015 4:40:44 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 7 replies
    One team has demonstrated that DNA they encapsulated can preserve information for at least 2,000 years, and they're now working on a filing system to make it easier to navigate. ... "A little after the discovery of the double helix architecture of DNA, people figured out that the coding language of nature is very similar to the binary language we use in computers," says Grass, who is with ETH Zurich. "On a hard drive, we use 0s and 1s to represent data, and in DNA, we have four nucleotides A, C, T and G." But DNA has two major advantages...
  • Ex-President Warren Harding's Love Child Confirmed Through DNA Testing

    08/13/2015 6:20:33 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 52 replies
    ABC News ^ | 08/13/2015 | By JORDYN PHELPS
    After nearly 100 years of rumors and historical speculation, DNA testing has confirmed that President Warren Harding had a child out of wedlock – his only biological child – with mistress Nan Britton. Britton first came forward publically with the claim that her daughter, Elizabeth Ann, was Harding’s daughter in a 1927 autobiography “The President’s Daughter.” In her account, Britton detailed a steamy six-year-long affair with the 29th president, including one encounter in a White House closet, before his untimely death in 1923. At the time of its publishing, the book was met with public ridicule and widely discounted as...
  • More DNA Evidence Against Human Chromosome Fusion

    08/04/2015 7:23:08 AM PDT · by fishtank · 8 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Aug. 2015 | Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D.
    More DNA Evidence Against Human Chromosome Fusion by Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D. * One of the most common arguments evolutionists use to promote the theory that humans evolved from an apelike ancestor is the idea of a “chromosome 2 fusion.” This story proposes that in a common ancestor shared by humans and chimps, two small chromosomes somehow fused end to end to produce human chromosome 2 (Figure 1).1 This supposedly explains the difference in chromosome numbers between humans and great apes—humans have 46 chromosomes, while great apes such as chimps, gorillas, and orangutans have 48.
  • A DNA Search for the First Americans Links Amazon Groups to Indigenous Australians

    07/24/2015 6:56:41 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    www.smithsonianmag.com ^ | July 21, 2015 | By Helen Thompson
    The new genetic analysis takes aim at the theory that just one founding group settled the Americas =========================================================================================================== Brazil's Surui people, like the man pictured above, share ancestry with indigenous Australians, new evidence suggests. (PAULO WHITAKER/Reuters/Corbis) ==================================================================================================================== More than 15,000 years ago, humans began crossing a land bridge called Beringia that connected their native home in Eurasia to modern-day Alaska. Who knows what the journey entailed or what motivated them to leave, but once they arrived, they spread southward across the Americas. The prevailing theory is that the first Americans arrived in a single wave, and all Native American populations...
  • Report: Bill Clinton might not be Chelsea Clinton's biological dad

    07/10/2015 3:48:22 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 104 replies
    National Enquirer via Sun Times ^ | 7-9-15 | Scott Sutton
    Chelsea Clinton has “secretly undergone a DNA test,” and it looks like former President Bill Clinton might not be her biological father. That’s according to a National Enquirer report released Thursday, which says that Hillary’s former law partner Webb Hubble might be the father. An exhaustive investigation by The National Enquirer obtained “touch DNA” samples from both Chelsea and Webb Hubbell, samples that were turned over to a nationally recognized laboratory that specializes in paternity testing. A lab official confirmed that finding “does not discount the possibility” that Webb could be Chelsea’s biological dad! Keep in mind, it’s the National...
  • Support for a Young Earth? Scientists Baffled by Preserved Dinosaur Blood Cells [Psalms 85:11]

    07/09/2015 9:48:38 AM PDT · by Jan_Sobieski · 110 replies
    CNS News ^ | 6/15/2015 | Garrett Haley
    LONDON – The discovery of well-preserved blood and proteins in a supposedly 75-million-year-old dinosaur fossil has stumped secular scientists and led one Christian apologist to herald the findings as evidence of a young Earth. A team of scientists at the U.K.’s Imperial College London carefully examined eight Cretaceous dinosaur bones discovered in North America, scrutinizing the bones’ interiors with an electron microscope. The researchers were stunned when they discovered what appeared to be red blood cells in one of the specimens. Upon closer examination, the British scientists identified an internal structure within the dinosaur cells, complete with nuclei and amino...
  • Homosexuality Has No Genetic Cause

    07/09/2015 6:47:42 AM PDT · by Moseley · 92 replies
    BARBWIRE.com ^ | Septemer 4, 2014 | Jonathon Moseley
    A genetic cause for homosexuality is not scientifically possible. A homosexuality gene, if it existed, would quickly die out. However, it gradually becomes clear that liberals and progressives are poorly-educated about science. They passionately believe in evolution, yet they don’t understand it. Public discussion is driven by an assumption that one may be “born homosexual.” Being ‘born’ homosexual is a medical impossibility unless there is a specific gene causing it. That is, heterosexuals would have one genetic DNA sequence while homosexuals have a different DNA sequence in its place. I discovered something debating this topic: One central point simply escapes...
  • First Cousin Marriages In Pakistani Communities Leading To 'Appalling' Disabilities Among Children

    07/07/2015 11:27:34 PM PDT · by Steelfish · 32 replies
    Telegraph (UK) ^ | July 7, 2015 | Steven Swinford,
    First Cousin Marriages In Pakistani Communities Leading To 'Appalling' Disabilities Among Children By Steven Swinford, 07 Jul 2015 Couples who are getting married should be forced to have a DNA test first to ensure they are not cousins amid growing concern about incest within Pakistani communities, Britain's first Asian peer has claimed. Baroness Flather, a former Tory who now sits as a cross-bencher, said in the House of Lords that it is "absolutely appalling" that first cousin marriages in Pakistani communities are leading to "so much disability among children". She said: "There are a lot of first-cousin marriages in certain...
  • Changing our DNA; Letter to the editor

    07/06/2015 8:21:54 AM PDT · by rey · 18 replies
    Letter to the editor, Santa Rosa, CA (Obviously stands for Crazy America) Changing our DNA EDITOR: I think it’s about time that we give up trying to reform anyone’s attitudes about gun control and racism. As President Barack Obama said the other day, that stuff is in our DNA. Yes, our DNA makes us human beings the greedy, selfish and dangerously inconsiderate people we usually are when dealing with those whom we don’t love and respect such as parents, children, friends and the like. It’s time for the genetic engineers to work seriously on eliminating from our gnome that which...
  • First comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome completed

    07/02/2015 1:34:26 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 07-02-2015 | Provided by University of Chicago Medical Center
    The first comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome reveals extensive genetic changes that allowed mammoths to adapt to life in the arctic. Credit: Giant Screen Films © 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC ======================================================================== The first comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome reveals extensive genetic changes that allowed mammoths to adapt to life in the arctic. Mammoth genes that differed from their counterparts in elephants played roles in skin and hair development, fat metabolism, insulin signaling and numerous other traits. Genes linked to physical traits such as skull shape, small ears and short tails were also identified. As a...
  • Kuwait Makes DNA Tests Mandatory After ISIS Bombing

    07/01/2015 2:19:30 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 8 replies
    Al Alarabiya ^ | Wednesday, 1 July 2015
    Kuwait’s parliament, reacting to a suicide bombing last week that killed 26 people, adopted a law Wednesday requiring mandatory DNA testing on all the country’s citizens and foreign residents. The legislation, requested by the government to help security agencies make quicker arrests in criminal cases, calls on the interior ministry to establish a database on all 1.3 million citizens and 2.9 million foreign residents. Under the law, people who refuse to give samples for the test face one year in jail and a fine of up to $33,000 (29,700 euros). Those who provide fake samples can be jailed for seven...
  • Dakota County(MN) to start collecting DNA from some charged with crime

    06/24/2015 8:00:58 PM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 21 replies
    Fox 9 ^ | 6-24-15 | Ted Haller
    Dakota County Sheriff Tim Leslie will soon have his deputies obtaining DNA from people arrested and charged for certain violent crimes. This DNA collection will take place before they are convicted – a departure from current Minnesota law. In 2006, the Minnesota Court of Appeals ruled the practice of gathering DNA, without a warrant, from people charged but not convicted, was illegal. Two years ago, in 2013, the United States Supreme Court ruled the practice was okay – at least in Maryland. In light of that ruling, Dakota County is betting that if their new procedure is challenged in court,...
  • New DNA Results Show Kennewick Man Was Native American

    06/18/2015 11:51:48 AM PDT · by Theoria · 31 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 18 June 2015 | Carl Zimmer
    In July 1996, two college students were wading in the shallows of the Columbia River near the town of Kennewick, Wash., when they stumbled across a human skull. At first the police treated the case as a possible murder. But once a nearly complete skeleton emerged from the riverbed and was examined, it became clear that the bones were extremely old — 8,500 years old, it would later turn out. The skeleton, which came to be known as Kennewick Man or the Ancient One, is one of the oldest and perhaps the most important — and controversial — ever found...
  • DNA Deciphers Roots of Modern Europeans

    06/10/2015 3:20:13 PM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 29 replies
    New York Times ^ | June 10, 2015 | By Carl Zimmer
    For centuries, archaeologists have reconstructed the early history of Europe by digging up ancient settlements and examining the items that their inhabitants left behind. More recently, researchers have been scrutinizing something even more revealing than pots, chariots and swords: DNA. On Wednesday in the journal Nature, two teams of scientists — one based at the University of Copenhagen and one based at Harvard University — presented the largest studies to date of ancient European DNA, extracted from 170 skeletons found in countries from Spain to Russia. Both studies indicate that today’s Europeans descend from three groups who moved into Europe...
  • Ice age camel bones found in Yukon redraw species' lineage

    06/10/2015 1:31:42 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-10-2015 | Staff
    Miners in northwestern Canada have discovered ice age camel bones whose DNA is forcing scientists to redraw the family tree of the now-extinct species. Grant Zazula, a paleontologist with the Yukon's Department of Tourism and Culture, said three fossils recovered from a gold mine in the Klondike in 2008 are the first western camel bones found in the territory or Alaska in decades. Scientists had believed western camels that once lived in North America were related to llamas and alpacas common to South America, but they now have genetic proof that the animals are more closely tied to the camels...
  • Scientists just found soft tissue inside a dinosaur fossil. Here's why that's exciting.

    06/09/2015 12:22:24 PM PDT · by ETL · 167 replies
    Vox.com ^ | June 9, 2015 | Joseph Stromberg
    Dinosaur fossils, it was long thought, are simple objects. The fossilization process leaves the overall shape of a dinosaur's bones intact, but all the microscopic structures inside them — the blood cells, connective fibers, and other sorts of soft tissue — inevitably decay over time. The photo above, from a new study published today in Nature Communications and led by Sergio Bertazzo of Imperial College London, shows an extremely zoomed-in view of a 75-million-year-old theropod claw, taken from the London Natural History Museum's collection. When researchers scraped tiny pieces off the fossil and looked at them under an electron microscope,...
  • Should Hillary Clinton Call for Debt-Free College for All Americans?

    06/08/2015 1:18:10 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 33 replies
    NBC News ^ | June 8, 2015 | by Perry Bacon Jr.
    An aggressive push for what's being billed as "debt-free college" has galvanized progressive activists, putting Hillary Clinton in the position of either endorsing an idea that will be controversial or being criticized by liberals as too timid if she does not. The proposal, which is also energizing Democrats on Capitol Hill, attempts to enshrine a promise that all Americans can attend a public college and get a four-year degree with little tuition cost and while incurring no student debt. One of Clinton's Democratic rivals, ex-Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, has endorsed the idea. Another Democratic candidate, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, has...
  • DNA carries traces of past events meaning poor lifestyle can affect future generations

    06/04/2015 5:37:50 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 41 replies
    The London Telegraph ^ | June 4, 2015 | Sarah Knapton, Science Editor
    Scientists now know that our DNA is being altered all the time by environment, lifestyle and traumatic events. Genetic faults caused by trauma, poor lifestyle or environmental stress can be passed down to future generations, scientists at the University of Cambridge have discovered. Previously large studies have shown that devastating events such as famine can scar future generations, making them more prone to obesity and diabetes. However it is the first time that the biological mechanism for the effect has been seen. Although the same genes are passed down through generations, scientists now know that our DNA is being altered...
  • Cops Use DNA Analysis to Prove Chili's Waiter Spit in Customer's Drink

    06/04/2015 3:51:57 AM PDT · by Las Vegas Dave · 33 replies
    abcnews.go.com ^ | Jun 3, 2015 | EVAN SIMON
    A New York man who suspected that a Chili's restaurant waiter had spit into his drink got the law involved and investigators were able to determine who spit into the drink using DNA analysis, according to court documents. The incident took place last July, when Ken Yerdon and his wife, Julie Aluzzo Yerdon, went to dinner at a Chili's restaurant on Route 31 in Clay, New York, according to court documents from a lawsuit filed Tuesday. The couple complained to their server, Gregory Lamica, then 24, that their food was under-cooked and that they hadn't been served chips, Yerdon said....
  • Leon Cooperman: I don't need Hillary Clinton 'crapping' on me

    06/03/2015 12:15:04 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 15 replies
    CNBC ^ | June 3, 2015 | by Lawrence Delevingne
    Billionaire investor Leon Cooperman is no friend of Hillary Clinton. "I don't need anybody crapping all over what I do for a living," the founder of $9.2 billion hedge fund firm Omega Advisors said . "I have nothing to apologize for. I've made a lot of money. I'm giving it all back to society," Cooperman, long a critic of President Barack Obama, added in a CNN Money interview. Cooperman echoed some of his peers in noting that Clinton criticizes the industry despite her own hedge fund ties. "[She] hangs out with all these people in Martha's Vineyard and in the...
  • An Award for Bill Clinton Came With $500,000 for His Foundation

    05/29/2015 7:06:09 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 15 replies
    New York Times ^ | May 29, 2015 | By DEBORAH SONTAG
    To commemorate the 10th anniversary of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, Petra Nemcova, a Czech model who survived the disaster by clinging to a palm tree, decided to pull out all the stops for the annual fund-raiser of her school-building charity, the Happy Hearts Fund. She booked Cipriani 42nd Street, which greeted guests with Bellini cocktails on silver trays. She flew in Sheryl Crow with her band and crew for a 20-minute set. The gala cost $363,413. But the real splurge? Bill Clinton. The former president of the United States agreed to accept a lifetime achievement award at the June...
  • Taking Back Thomas Jefferson

    03/13/2015 12:21:52 PM PDT · by don-o · 11 replies
    The Abbeville Review ^ | March 10, 2015 | James Rutledge Roesch
    Jefferson, a member of the gentry of Old Virginia, was always regarded as one of the best and brightest of his generation, a gentleman of the finest intellect, taste, and manners. Although Jefferson loved and was loyal to the Union, he was a Virginian first and an American second; Virginia, Jefferson avowed, was his “country.” This order of allegiance – State over Union, or “Society” over “the State” – was firmly rooted in the Old South. Accordingly, in the emerging conflict between the North and the South, Jefferson sided with his own country. “It is true that we are completely...
  • Clinton campaigning in a bubble, largely isolated from real people

    05/21/2015 2:06:36 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 22 replies
    Kansas City Star ^ | May 21, 2015 | BY ANITA KUMAR
    Here’s how Hillary Clinton campaigned for president this week: She took a private 15-minute tour of a bike shop that had closed for her visit. She spoke to four small-business owners chosen by her staff in front of an audience of 20, also chosen by her staff. She answered a few questions from the media following weeks of silence. And after a little more than an hour, Clinton was off, whisked away by aides and Secret Service agents, into a minivan and on to the next event. Members of the public who wanted to go inside the building to support...
  • Analysis of bones found in Romania offer evidence of human and Neanderthal interbreeding in Europe

    05/15/2015 1:52:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-14-2015 | Bob Yirka
    A Neanderthal skeleton, left, compared with a modern human skeleton. Credit: American Museum of Natural History DNA testing of a human mandible fossil found in Romania has revealed a genome with 4.8 to 11.3 percent Neanderthal DNA—its original owner died approximately 40,000 years ago, Palaeogenomicist Qiaomei Fu reported to audience members at a Biology of Genomes meeting in New York last week. She noted also that she and her research team found long Neanderthal sequences. The high percentage suggests, she added, that the human had a Neanderthal in its family tree going back just four to six generations. The finding...
  • DNA test reveals NJ twins have different fathers

    05/12/2015 3:03:23 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 44 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | May 08, 2015 | FoxNews.com
    <p>Research shows that the odds of a set of twins being conceived from two separate fathers is 1 in 13,000, and yet a paternity test has revealed that’s exactly what happened in one New Jersey family.</p> <p>According to court documents, the mother, identified only as “T.M.,” gave birth to twin girls January 2013 and named a man, identified as “A.S.,” the father of both children when she applied for child support. But when she revealed she had sex with both A.S. and another man within a week of each other, social services requested a DNA test.</p>
  • Scientists Discover the Secret to Keeping Cells Young

    04/30/2015 2:47:14 PM PDT · by Beave Meister · 7 replies
    Time.com ^ | 4/30/2015 | Alice Park
    Researchers say it may be possible to slow and even reverse aging by keeping DNA more stably packed together in our cells In a breakthrough discovery, scientists report that they have found the key to keeping cells young. In a study published Thursday in Science, an international team, led by Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte at the Salk Institute, studied the gene responsible for an accelerated aging disease known as Werner syndrome, or adult progeria, in which patients show signs of osteoporosis, grey hair and heart disease in very early adulthood. These patients are deficient in a gene responsible for copying...
  • Police can now tell identical twins apart – just melt their DNA

    04/27/2015 7:10:20 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 1 replies
    newscientist.com ^ | Jessica Hamzelou
    Graham Williams at the University of Huddersfield, UK, has a different way – to look for modifications to the twins' DNA that have come about as a result of their lifestyles. Such epigenetic changes occur when a chemical group known as a methyl group attaches to a gene and modifies the way it is expressed. This happens as a body is influenced by a person's environment, lifestyle and disease. Williams's team took mouth swabs from five pairs of twins. After extracting the DNA from each sample, the group used a chemical to target parts of the DNA that did not...
  • An Algorithm Set To Revolutionize 3-D Protein Structure Discovery

    04/26/2015 7:57:25 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | April 23, 2015
    One of the great challenges in molecular biology is to determine the three-dimensional structure of large biomolecules such as proteins. But this is a famously difficult and time-consuming task. The standard technique is x-ray crystallography, which involves analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern from a crystal of the molecule under investigation. That works well for molecules that form crystals easily. But many proteins, perhaps most, do not form crystals easily. And even when they do, they often take on unnatural configurations that do not resemble their natural shape. So finding another reliable way of determining the 3-D structure of large biomolecules...
  • Three-Dimensional DNA Code Defies Evolution

    04/27/2015 8:00:46 AM PDT · by fishtank · 23 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 4-27-2015 | Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D.
    Three-Dimensional DNA Code Defies Evolution by Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D. * Scientists have long been baffled as to what actually tells proteins called transcription factors (TFs) where to bind in the genome to turn genes off and on. However, new research incorporating the three-dimensional shape of DNA has revealed an incredibly complex system of interacting biochemical codes.1 We know that genes are turned off and on across the genome by intricate networks of transcription factors which bind to DNA in strategic places in and around the genes. But discovering what tells the transcription factors where to bind has proven extremely...
  • Researchers can trace dust samples using fungal DNA

    04/15/2015 10:22:14 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 1 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 4/15/15
    Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Colorado, Boulder, have developed a statistical model that allows them to tell where a dust sample came from within the continental United States based on the DNA of fungi found in the sample. The primary goal of the research was to develop a new forensic biology tool for law enforcement or archaeologists. "But it may also give us a greater understanding of the invisible ecosystems of microbial life that we know are all around us, but that we don't fully comprehend," says Neal Grantham, a Ph.D. student in statistics at...
  • Pernicious Junk Science

    04/15/2015 8:31:29 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 5 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 4/15/15 | Michael D. Shaw
    Those of us, of a certain age, remember the post-World War II promise of Science. Splitting the atom would bring us virtually unlimited cheap electrical power; antibiotics and vaccine technology (a la Salk/Sabin) would eliminate the scourge of infectious disease; and elucidation of the structure of DNA would lead to a cancer cure. But 60-odd years later, we have radioactive waste; terrifying antibiotic resistant pathogens; and despite spending hundreds of billions of dollars on cancer research and mapping the human genome, are no closer to that elusive cure. As to DNA, its greatest contribution has been to forensic science, which...
  • We’re ALL Out of Africa

    04/14/2015 8:07:11 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 28 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 04/14/15 | Al Caruba
    Everyone is African: How Science Explodes the Myth of Race I think if we were honest enough to admit it, we are all bigoted in some way. Our gender or religion doesn’t really qualify us as superior to anyone else, but we tend to fall back on these identities and, consciously or not, assume they give us a reason to feel that we are not only in possession of a special truth, but that it grants us the privilege to feel better than others. When we examine the issue of race, however, the bigotry is inherent because racial groups are...
  • ‘Gertie’s Babies,’ Sold at Birth, Use DNA to Unlock Secret Past

    04/10/2015 12:58:35 PM PDT · by Lorianne · 7 replies
    New York Times ^ | 04 April 2015 | Kirk Johnson
    Sue Docken’s start in life, in 1951, with a no-questions-asked cash adoption at the hands of a midwife, had strong elements of the crime scene that it was. Her adoptive father was told to stay in the car and keep the motor running. His wife went into a nondescript office building in Butte, Mont., where she met with the midwife, Gertrude Pitkanen, and was handed the hours-old infant and the afterbirth, offered a peek through a curtain at the young mother lying in a bed, and told to leave. The afterbirth was thrown out the window on the drive home,...
  • Why Dutch People Are So Tall

    04/08/2015 7:17:23 AM PDT · by blam · 42 replies
    BI - AFP ^ | 4-8-2015 | Richard Ingham, AFP
    Richard Ingham, AFPApril 8, 2015 The Netherlands is the land of giants: on average, its women stand almost 5 feet 6 inches tall, and its men 6 feet tall. But how the Dutch became the world's tallest people has been somewhat of a mystery. After all, two centuries ago they were renowned for being among the shortest. What happened since then? A popular explanation is nutrition -- a calorie-stuffed diet rich in meat and dairy products. But that can't be the whole story, experts say. Other European countries, too, have enjoyed similar prosperity and a rise in living standards, yet...
  • Another Horizontal Gene Transfer Fairy Tale

    04/06/2015 9:54:36 AM PDT · by fishtank · 7 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 4-6-2015 | Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D.
    Another Horizontal Gene Transfer Fairy Tale by Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D. * As the genomes of many new creatures rapidly fill the public DNA sequence databases, the problems for the grand evolutionary story are becoming overwhelming. One issue is the fact that different creatures have unique sets of genes specific to their kind with no apparent evolutionary history. To explain this glaring problem, evolutionists have resorted to the myth of pervasive horizontal gene transfer. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the process whereby genes are transferred from one type of creature to another without sexual reproduction. Earlier in my career, I...
  • Was 19th Century apewoman a yeti? 6ft 6in Russian serf who could outrun a horse was 'not human'...

    04/05/2015 12:49:20 PM PDT · by PROCON · 45 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | April 4, 2015 | Jennifer Newton
    Full Title: Was 19th Century apewoman a yeti? 6ft 6in Russian serf who could outrun a horse was 'not human', according to DNA tests Witnesses said Zana the apewoman had the 'characteristics of a wild animal' She was allegedly trapped in Caucusus mountains and covered in thick hair Had 'enormous athletic power' and she could infamously outrun a horse A genetics professor has analysed DNA of six of her living descendants Hundreds of explorers, theorists and fantasists have spent their lives searching for the infamous 'big-foot'. But a leading geneticist believes he has found evidence to prove that it...
  • New DNA Tech: Creating Unicorns and Curing Cancer for Real?

    04/05/2015 11:12:38 AM PDT · by E. Pluribus Unum · 12 replies
    The Daily Beast ^ | 04/04/2015 | David Ewing Duncan
    We have the earth-shattering technology in our hands—but even its inventors worry about its awesome power to alter our genetic future. “We have within our grasp the technology to change evolution. This could change the course of biological life.” — Paul Berg, Nobel Laureate and a pioneer of genetic engineeringIn 2012, scientists in the U.S. and Sweden invented a technology as potentially life-altering as splitting the atom. One that you haven’t heard of—yet—called “CRISPR-Cas9”. This innovation with the cumbrous name allows biologists to edit DNA almost as easily as cutting and pasting words and letters on a laptop.Scientists say...
  • Apewoman (6ft 6in) could outrun horse 'not human' per DNA test

    04/04/2015 9:01:56 PM PDT · by concernedcitizen76 · 85 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | April 4, 2015 | Jennifer Newton and Jay Akbar
    Witnesses said Zana the apewoman had the 'characteristics of a wild animal.' She was allegedly trapped in Caucusus mountains and covered in thick hair. Had 'enormous athletic power' and she could infamously outrun a horse. A genetics professor has analysed DNA of six of her living descendants. Identified an uncatalogued strain of west African DNA.
  • Dog-poop DNA tests nail non-scoopers

    04/04/2015 8:54:38 AM PDT · by Cry if I Wanna · 59 replies
    Seattle Times ^ | April 30th, 2015 | Erik Lactis
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  • DNA can't explain all inherited biological traits, research shows

    04/03/2015 11:57:35 AM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 14 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4-2-2015 | University of Edinburgh
    Characteristics passed between generations are not decided solely by DNA, but can be brought about by other material in cells, new research shows. Scientists studied proteins found in cells, known as histones, which are not part of the genetic code, but act as spools around which DNA is wound. Histones are known to control whether or not genes are switched on. Researchers found that naturally occurring changes to these proteins, which affect how they control genes, can be sustained from one generation to the next and so influence which traits are passed on. The finding demonstrates for the first time...
  • Saudi Arabia: Genetic tests lead to 165,000 break-ups

    03/31/2015 3:39:55 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 27 replies
    According to Dr Saidi, 60% of couples end their engagements after receiving their results, which he says is a sign of success. "The high percentage of failed engagements due to medical risks shows that the society has become more educated and aware of the importance of physical health," he says. "This will also save money for the family and the country." In January, a Riyadh-based genetic researcher said Saudi Arabia has one of the highest rates of genetic diseases in the world. Pre-marital health tests aim to prevent marriages between close relatives - a longstanding practice in Saudi Arabia -...
  • Wyoming cave dig unearths bones of ancient horses, cheetahs and bison

    08/09/2014 2:33:26 AM PDT · by blueplum · 31 replies
    Reuters ^ | August 8, 2014 5:23pm EDT | LAURA ZUCKERMAN
    (Reuters) - Scientists excavating an ancient Wyoming sinkhole containing a rare trove of fossils of Ice Age mammals have unearthed hundreds of bones of such prehistoric animals as American cheetahs, a paleontologist said on Friday. The two-week dig by an international team of researchers led by Des Moines University paleontologist Julie Meachen marked the first exploration of Natural Trap Cave at the base of the Bighorn Mountains in north-central Wyoming since its initial discovery in the 1970s. Meachen said the extensive excavation that began late last month uncovered roughly 200 large bones of animals like horses that roamed North America...
  • Man freed after 20 years in prison for Waukegan murder gets $20 million

    03/24/2015 6:12:37 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 7 replies
    Authorities have reached a $20 million settlement with a man who spent two decades in prison before he was cleared by DNA of the rape and murder of an 11-year-old girl in Waukegan, ending a controversial chapter for Lake County's troubled justice system. Lawyers for Juan Rivera said the agreement with the city of Waukegan and other governmental bodies marks the largest settlement for a wrongfully convicted person in Illinois. "No amount of money could ever sum up to 20 years in prison," Rivera, who hopes to go to college to study business management, said Friday at the offices of...
  • Genetic study reveals 30% of white British DNA has German ancestry

    03/19/2015 8:18:37 AM PDT · by C19fan · 54 replies
    The Guardian ^ | March 18, 2015 | Hannah Devlin
    The Romans, Vikings and Normans may have ruled or invaded the British for hundreds of years, but they left barely a trace on our DNA, the first detailed study of the genetics of British people has revealed. The analysis shows that the Anglo-Saxons were the only conquering force, around 400-500 AD, to substantially alter the country’s genetic makeup, with most white British people now owing almost 30% of their DNA to the ancestors of modern-day Germans.
  • DNA study shows that Celts are not a unique genetic group

    03/19/2015 8:39:02 AM PDT · by ek_hornbeck · 53 replies
    BBC ^ | 3/18/15 | Pallab Ghosh
    A DNA study of Britons has shown that genetically there is not a unique Celtic group of people in the UK. According to the data, those of Celtic ancestry in Scotland and Cornwall are more similar to the English than they are to other Celtic groups. The study also describes distinct genetic differences across the UK, which reflect regional identities. And it shows that the invading Anglo Saxons did not wipe out the Britons of 1,500 years ago, but mixed with them. Published in the Journal Nature, the findings emerge from a detailed DNA analysis of 2,000 mostly middle-aged Caucasian...
  • Britons still live in Anglo-Saxon tribal kingdoms, Oxford University finds

    03/19/2015 8:46:13 AM PDT · by I still care · 41 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 18 Mar 2015 | Sarah Knapton, Science Editor
    A new genetic map of Britain shows that there has been little movement between areas of Britain which were former tribal kingdoms in Anglo-Saxon England. Britons are still living in the same 'tribes' that they did in the 7th Century, Oxford University has found after an astonishing study into our genetic make-up. Archaeologists and geneticists were amazed to find that genetically similar individuals inhabit the same areas they did following the Anglo-Saxon invasion, following the fall of the Roman Empire. In fact, a map showing tribes of Britain in 600AD is almost identical to a new chart showing genetic variability...
  • Unearthed, The Prince Of Stonehenge

    08/25/2002 5:04:48 PM PDT · by blam · 78 replies · 3,337+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 8-26-2002 | Roger Highfield
    Unearthed, the prince of Stonehenge By Roger Highfield (Filed: 21/08/2002) A prehistoric prince with gold ear-rings has been found near Stonehenge a few yards away from the richest early Bronze Age burial in Britain. Earlier this year, archaeologists found an aristocratic warrior, also with gold ear-rings, on Salisbury Plain and speculated that he may have been an ancient king of Stonehenge. The body was laid to rest 4,300 years ago during the construction of the monument, along with stone arrow heads and slate wristguards that protected the arm from the recoil of the bow. Archaeologists named him the Amesbury Archer....
  • Scientists unlock tangled mysteries of DNA

    03/07/2015 5:25:59 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 7 replies
    phys.org ^ | 2015-03-06 | Joann C. Adkins
    While today's human body contains a variety of these proteins, Eirin-Lopez believes they evolved from a single ancestor millions of years ago. This finding, published recently in Molecular Biology and Evolution, is pivotal in unraveling the mysteries of DNA organization and regulation, and could someday lead to innovative biomonitoring strategies and therapies targeting a variety of diseases including cancer.
  • Building a Face, and a Case, on DNA

    02/23/2015 7:03:12 PM PST · by Theoria · 13 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 23 Feb 2015 | ANDREW POLLACK
    There were no known eyewitnesses to the murder of a young woman and her 3-year-old daughter four years ago. No security cameras caught a figure coming or going. Nonetheless, the police in Columbia, S.C., last month released a sketch of a possible suspect. Rather than an artist’s rendering based on witness descriptions, the face was generated by a computer relying solely on DNA found at the scene of the crime. It may be the first time a suspect’s face has been put before the public in this way, but it will not be the last. Investigators are increasingly able to...
  • Just A Bit Of DNA Helps Explain Humans' Big Brains

    02/20/2015 11:40:45 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 23 replies
    National Public Radio ^ | February 19, 2015 | Nell Greenfieldboyce
    (AUDIO-AT-LINK)Scientists studying the difference between human and chimpanzee DNA have found one stretch of human DNA that can make the brains of mice grow significantly bigger. "It's likely to be one of many DNA regions that's critical for controlling how the human brain develops," says Debra Silver, a neurobiologist at Duke University Medical School. It could also help explain why human brains are so much bigger than chimp brains, says Silver, who notes that "there are estimates of anywhere from two to four times as big." In addition to having bigger brains, Silver says, humans also "have more neurons, and...