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Keyword: climategate

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  • California cap-and-trade auction falls far short, delivering blow to state revenue (tr)

    05/26/2016 6:16:22 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 15 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | May 26, 2016 | by Ralph Vartarbedian
    The latest auction in California's cap-and-trade market for greenhouse gases fell sharply below expectations, as buyers purchased just 2% of the carbon credits whose sale funds a variety of state programs -- notably, the proposed high-speed rail project. The quarterly auction, conducted May 18 and announced Wednesday, will provide just $10 million for state programs, including $2.5 million for the bullet train. The rail authority had been expecting about $150 million. Whatever prompted the lack of buyers, the auction is a stark example of the uncertainty and risk of relying on actively-traded carbon credits to build the bullet train. The...
  • University of Victoria researchers model worst-case climate change scenario

    05/24/2016 4:52:18 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 22 replies
    MetroNews Canada ^ | May 23, 2016 | by Matt Kieltyka
    Study forecasts global temperature increases of up to 9.5 degrees C. The unmitigated burning of Earth's remaining fossil fuels would cause global warming on a scale bigger than previously anticipated, according to a new study out of the University of Victoria. Katarzyna Tokarska, a PhD student at the university, is the lead author of a new paper titled "The climate response to five trillion tonnes of carbon". Previous modelling, including those used by the United Nation's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, use projections that assume just two trillion tonnes of carbon would be released.
  • Donald Trump denies climate change--but fears it could hurt his golf course

    05/23/2016 8:12:51 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 51 replies
    CBS News ^ | May 23, 2016 | By Rebecca Shabad
    Donald Trump has said he doesn't believe in man-made climate change and has called global warming a "hoax," but he's trying to protect a golf course he owns on the coast of Ireland from its effects. The presumptive GOP nominee applied for a permit to build a seawall next to Trump International Golf Links & Hotel Ireland in County Clare to prevent erosion, according to Politico. His application included an environmental impact statement that explicitly mentions "global warming and its effects." According to Politico's report, that statement says that rising sea levels in that region could accelerate erosion. The statement...
  • Does Donald Trump represent a step forward for climate change action?

    05/17/2016 4:53:21 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 17 replies
    UK Guardian ^ | May 16, 2016 | by Kate Aronoff
    Donald Trump will have a climate plan and it will be ugly. For now, the Republican frontrunner is pedaling the kind of denialism his party loves, having called global warming everything from a "hoax" to a "con job" to a Chinese plot. But an interview with his energy adviser hinted that Trump might endeavor to Make Atmospheric Carbon Levels Great Again. "My advice would be, while I'm a skeptic as well", Trump energy honcho Kevin Cramer [said], "he is a product of political populism, and political populism believes that there needs [to be] some addressing of climate change". Cramer has...
  • Sons of Climategate: Dodgy Scientists Caught Red-Handed by FOIA Lawsuit

    05/15/2016 9:37:02 PM PDT · by george76 · 12 replies
    Breitbart News Network ^ | 15 May 2016 | James Delingpole
    The dodgy scientists who wrote to resident Obama and Attorney General Loretta Lynch demanding that RICO laws be used to prosecute climate skeptics just got even more badly screwed. Already one of them — George Mason University professor Jagadish Shukla — is under Congressional investigation for what has been described as the “largest science scandal in US history.” Now the background to their footling conspiracy has been exposed thanks to a FOIA request by the Competitive Enterprise Institute which has forced them to release their private letters and emails. Like Climategate, it makes for some fascinating reading, mainly because —...
  • Civil disobedience is the only way left to fight climate change

    05/13/2016 4:11:13 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 22 replies
    UK Guardian ^ | May 13, 2016 | by Kara Moses
    Right now, thousands of people are taking direct action as part of a global wave of protests against the biggest fossil fuel infrastructure projects across the world. With so many governments still dependent on a fossil fuel economy, they can't be relied upon to make the radical change required in the time we need to make it. It is unjust that corporations and governments can commit crimes against the planet and society without retribution. And if we really want climate justice, protest in the pursuit of this must be normalized. To overcome political barriers, we need to reclaim our power...
  • CalPERS, NYC pensions urge Exxon investors to back climate measure

    05/11/2016 2:18:40 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 9 replies
    Reuters ^ | May 11, 2016 | By Terry Wade
    Pension fund chiefs from California and New York City urged Exxon Mobil shareholders on Wednesday to back a measure that would force the company to finely detail how its business will be impacted as governments move to tackle climate change. CalPERS investment director Anne Simpson and NYC Comptroller Scott Stringer also said in a letter they would engage other shareholders as they push the world's largest publicly-traded oil company to say more about how its revenues, reserves and operations could be hurt by the Paris Agreement that governments signed in December to limit global warming to 2 degrees Celsius. Their...
  • As global temperatures rise, children must be central climate change debates

    05/05/2016 4:27:47 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 28 replies
    Science Daily ^ | May 4, 2016
    Rising temperatures, rising sea levels and the increasing likelihood of extreme weather will all alter children's lives and the lives of their own children. And yet, children are largely left out of discussions about appropriate responses to climate change, according to a journal released by Princeton University and the Brookings Institution. The findings in this issue have clear implications for policymakers and researchers trying to tackle the many challenges that climate change poses: * Policies must be developed to prepare and adapt in the face of inevitable climate change. States, cities and communities throughout the world must promote preparedness and...
  • UW-led team wins $10M EPA grant for air pollution research

    05/03/2016 7:04:54 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 6 replies
    University of Washington Today ^ | May 2, 2016 | by Brooke Fisher
    To help address the nation's pressing need for better air quality, the U.S. EPA has awarded a research team co-led by a University of Washington civil engineer a $10 million Air, Climate and Energy (ACE) grant. The researchers will use a new approach combining air pollution research with the related areas of climate change and energy usage. Since air pollution and climate change are both largely caused by the combustion of fossil fuels, this integrated approach will address commonalities and encourage solutions that will positively impact all three areas. "A critical need facing our country is addressing air pollution and...
  • Resettling the First American 'Climate Refugees'

    05/03/2016 4:42:12 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 71 replies
    New York Times ^ | May 2, 2016 | By CORAL DAVENPORT and CAMPBELL ROBERTSON
    ISLE DE JEAN CHARLES, La. - A $48 million grant for Isle de Jean Charles, La., is the first allocation of federal tax dollars to move an entire community struggling with the effects of climate change. With a first-of-its-kind "climate resilience" grant to resettle the island's native residents, Washington is ready to help. "Yes, this is our grandpa's land," Ms. Bourg said. "But it's going under one way or another." In January, the Department of Housing and Urban Development announced grants totaling $1 billion in 13 states to help communities adapt to climate change, by building stronger levees, dams and...
  • India's Answer to Global Warming: Cows That Belch Less

    05/03/2016 4:11:43 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 15 replies
    New York Times ^ | May 3, 2016 | By ELLEN BARRY
    Let no one say that India isn't doing its bit to fight global climate change: Government scientists are working hard to reduce carbon emissions by making cows less gassy. Consider the numbers: India is home to more than 280 million cows, and 200 million more ruminant animals like sheep, goats, yaks and buffalo. Scientists at the Cow Research Institute in Mathura, around 100 miles south of New Delhi, are tinkering with cattle feed, seeking a formula that will create less gas for the cows to belch out. But a team of researchers in the southern state of Kerala is working...
  • Climate to inspire exodus from Middle East, North Africa in coming decades

    05/02/2016 7:54:07 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 30 replies
    UPI ^ | May 2, 2016 | By Brooks Hays
    Temperature and sea level aren't the only things expected to rise as a result of climate change. As heat becomes more extreme in some parts of the world, scientists expect a significant rise in the number of climate refugees. Climate scientists expect the coming decades to feature a mass exodus of millions from the Middle East and North Africa as extreme temperatures become more common. "In future, the climate in large parts of the Middle East and North Africa could change in such a manner that the very existence of its inhabitants is in jeopardy," Jos Lelieveld, director of the...
  • Will Moose Thrive or Die Because of Climate Change?

    04/29/2016 8:36:30 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 41 replies
    Scientific Amerian ^ | April 29, 2016 | By Shannon Hall
    Lee Kantar lost two moose calves this past weekend. They are just a few among many calves that did not survive their first year in the forests of Maine. Kantar, a moose biologist for the state’s Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, has only been tracking calves for a few years but early death is a trend he and others can see across the animal's southern range, which stretches through the northern U.S. and Canada. Scientists speculate that young and adult moose alike are plagued by new diseases and parasites. Brain worm and winter ticks, for example, are both worsening...
  • Climate scientists are now grading climate journalism

    04/26/2016 5:18:47 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 21 replies
    UK Guardian ^ | April 26, 2016 | by Daniel Nethery and Emmanuel Vincent
    The internet represents an extraordinary opportunity for democracy. Yet despite the scientific consensus that global warming is real and primarily due to human activity, studies show that only about half the population in some countries with among the highest CO2 emissions per capita understand that human beings are the driving force of our changing climate. Even fewer people are aware of the scientific consensus on this question. Climate Feedback intends to change that. It brings together a global network of scientists who use a new web-annotation platform to provide feedback on climate change reporting. For the first time, Climate Feedback...
  • Tribes have up close perspective on climate change

    04/24/2016 5:57:47 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 41 replies
    Seattle Times ^ | April 23, 2016 | By Fawn Sharp
    QUINAULT tribal members can attest to the urgency of climate change from an up-close and personal perspective. We're being forced to relocate part of our village of Taholah on the Washington coast. Ocean encroachment, increasingly severe storm surges and flooding are forcing more than 1,000 of our people to permanently move to higher ground. Tribes are not primary contributors to weather changes. Blame it on industrial smoke stacks, thousands of cars that clog the freeways and exploiters who destroy natural habitat. But we're often the first to feel the impact because of our proximity and connection with rivers, inland seas...
  • Stop Wasting Food to Slow Global Warming

    04/21/2016 4:02:12 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 22 replies
    Scientific Amerian ^ | April 20, 2016 | By Niina Heikkinen
    Cutting down on milk and meat protein are top ways to lower an individual's carbon footprint, said Janet Ranganathan, VP of science and research at the World Resources Institute. She is the lead author of a report published today that explores how dietary changes in the world's wealthiest nations can affect the environment. The average American consumer is eating 83 grams of animal-based protein a day, well above the daily recommended amount of 51 grams. The research calls for bringing that overconsumption back in line with global average levels. Using computer modeling, the report's authors calculated that if 2 billion...
  • Global warming means unfair share for the poor

    04/18/2016 1:08:42 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 34 replies
    Deccan Herald (India) ^ | April 19, 2016 | by Tim Radford, Third World Network
    Climate change could seriously redistribute resources and reallocate wealth - but not in a fair way. In a reverse of the famous Robin Hood folklore, it could rob from the poor to give to the rich, according to researchers. Yet even the rich may not feel any richer. Eli Fenichel, assistant professor of bioeconomics and ecosystem management at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies in the US, says: "People are mostly focused on the physical reallocation of these assets, but I don't think we've really started thinking enough about how climate change can reallocate wealth and influence the...
  • Cause of global warming: Consensus on consensus

    04/13/2016 10:15:27 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 45 replies
    Science Daily ^ | April 12, 2016
    A research team confirms that 97 percent of climate scientists agree that climate change is caused by humans. The group includes Sarah Green, a chemistry professor at Michigan Technological University. "What's important is that this is not just one study -- it's the consensus of multiple studies," Green says. This consistency across studies contrasts with the language used by climate change doubters. "The public has a very skewed view of how much disagreement there is in the scientific community," she says. Only 12 percent of the US public are aware there is such strong scientific agreement in this area, and...
  • Researchers cite global warming in loon found with avian malaria

    04/12/2016 1:29:10 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 9 replies
    Press Herald ^ | April 11, 2016 | By Deirdre Fleming
    Researchers are worried about the effects of global warming after a loon in Umbagog Lake tested positive for avian malaria. The loon was found last summer in the lake, which straddles northern Maine and New Hampshire. Necropsy showed that the bird died of avian malaria – the first confirmed case of the disease among loons in either state.
  • Why uncertainty about climate change is not our friend

    04/07/2016 12:03:19 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 24 replies
    Washington Post ^ | April 7, 2016 | by Chris Mooney
    For a long time, there's been one key part of the Earth system that, just maybe, could help us out a little bit with our global warming problem: Clouds. Clouds are central to the climate because their white surfaces reflect sunlight back to space, keeping the planet cooler than it would be otherwise. But if you change the ratio of water to ice, you also change the strength of the feedback. And based on recent satellite observations, Tan and her colleagues - from Yale and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - argue that water has a higher prevalence in these clouds...
  • Climate Models May Overstate Clouds' Cooling Power, Research Says

    04/07/2016 11:55:55 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 20 replies
    New York Times ^ | April 7, 2016 | By JOHN SCHWARTZ
    The computer models that predict climate change may be overestimating the cooling power of clouds, new research suggests. If the findings are borne out by further research, it suggests that making progress against global warming will be even harder. The balance of water and ice in clouds affects the impact that carbon dioxide levels have on atmospheric temperatures, a factor known as equilibrium climate sensitivity. With less ice in the mix to start, however, there is less capacity for water to replace ice, said Ivy Tan, an author of the paper and a graduate student at the department of geology...
  • Another study says warming may be worse than experts think

    04/07/2016 11:49:41 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 38 replies
    Seattle Times ^ | April 7, 2016 | By SETH BORENSTEIN
    Most computer simulations of climate change are underestimating by at least one degree how warm the world will get this century, a new study suggests. According to the study published Thursday in the journal Science, computer model simulations say there is more ice and less liquid water in clouds than a decade of satellite observations show. Because as the climate changes, there will be more clouds with far more liquid, and global warming will be higher than previously thought, said study co-author Trude Storelvmo, a Yale atmospheric scientist.
  • Climate forecasts may be flawed, says study

    04/06/2016 2:03:58 PM PDT · by E. Pluribus Unum · 41 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 04/06/2016 | AFP
    Predictions of unprecedented rainfall extremes in the 20th century driven by global warming turned out wrong, a study said Wednesday, casting doubt on methods used to project future trends. A massive trawl of Northern Hemisphere rainfall data for the last 1,200 years revealed there had been more dramatic wet-dry weather extremes in earlier, cooler centuries before humans set off fossil fuel-driven global warming. This is problematic, said a study in the journal Nature, as the same data models used to anticipate that global warming would cause record rainfall extremes in the 1900s, are the basis for projections of things to...
  • The debate about human-caused climate change is heating up, just like the Earth

    04/06/2016 12:49:38 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 25 replies
    The Oregonian ^ | April 6, 2016 | By Douglas Perry
    On Tuesday I published a short post about the key arguments of climate-change skeptics while also pointing out that some 98 percent of published scientists in the field believe human-caused climate change is indeed happening and must be addressed. For years the two sides have been talking - or yelling - past one another, which benefits none of us. As expected, the post brought forth a wave of comments from readers. Many lambasted me for providing a forum for the "lunatics" who deny human-caused climate change. Climate skeptics, on the other hand, chastised me for only presenting their more simplistic...
  • Judge: Climate Change Imperils Wolverines and Feds Must Act

    04/06/2016 12:32:38 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 36 replies
    ABC News ^ | April 4, 2016 | By MATTHEW BROWN
    The Obama administration brushed over the threat that climate change poses to the snow-loving wolverine when it denied protections for the elusive predator, a federal judge ruled Monday. U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen ordered wildlife officials to act as quickly as possible to protect the species as it becomes vulnerable to a warming planet. Wolverines need deep mountain snows to den, and scientists warn that such habitat will shrink as Earth heats up. The ruling comes two years after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service rejected the views of many of its own scientists and decided not to protect the...
  • Climate data since Vikings cast doubt on more wet, dry extremes

    04/06/2016 12:19:53 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 15 replies
    Reuters ^ | April 6, 2016 | BY ALISTER DOYLE
    Climate records back to Viking times show the 20th century was unexceptional for rainfall and droughts despite assumptions that global warming would trigger more wet and dry extremes, a study showed on Wednesday. Stretching back 1,200 years, written accounts of climate indicated that variations in the extremes in the 20th century were less than in some past centuries. "Several other centuries show stronger and more widespread extremes," lead author Fredrik Ljungqvist of Stockholm University told Reuters. "We can't say it's more extreme now." Ljungqvist said many existing scientific models of climate change over-estimated assumptions that rising temperatures would make dry...
  • Scientists expect more mountain rock slides with climate change

    03/29/2016 6:23:23 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 43 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | March 28, 2016 | By Kevin Schultz
    A pair of local scientists say climate change may bring one more thing to worry about: rock slides from out of the blue. It's a caution they raised this month after studying a high cliff in Yosemite National Park to find out why mountainous rocks fall from high places for no obvious reason. "There are often rockfalls that happen on beautiful, sunny summer days and there is often no explanation: no rain, earthquakes or any other obvious explanation," said Brian Collins, a researcher at the U.S. Geological Survey. They concluded that daily and seasonal fluctuations in temperature led to expansions...
  • It's official: We can now say global warming has made some weather events worse

    03/11/2016 9:58:44 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 40 replies
    Washington Post ^ | March 11, 2016 | by Chris Mooney
    From Hurricane Katrina to Superstorm Sandy, to last year's devastating heat wave in India, the question never ceases to arise: Did global warming cause this? That question has long made scientists squirm. They know the atmosphere is a complicated place. But now, says a new report from the National Academy of Sciences exploring the attribution of extreme events to climate change, scientists can be at least a little bit less conservative about this. The new report argues, careful studies can be conducted that suggest that the probability of a given event occurring was increased because of the current state of...
  • Climate change could send venomous snakes slithering north

    03/08/2016 11:32:00 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 83 replies
    Toronto Star ^ | March 7, 2016 | By Raveena Aulakh
    Climate change could see a new risk slithering into Canada: snakes. New research has found that rising temperatures could drive several deadly species northward to new areas, bringing them across the U.S. border with Canada. By 2050, some snakes could make their way as far north as Alberta, Quebec and southern Ontario. Researchers at the University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute used climate models to predict the ranges of more than 75 poisonous snake species across the Americas. For this study, researchers looked at different scenarios for each of the snake species - one in which the world cut down its...
  • Climate change could cause 500,000 more deaths by 2050

    03/06/2016 5:28:32 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 75 replies
    Toronto Star ^ | March 5, 2016 | By Raveena Aulakh
    Food scarcity and malnutrition, triggered by climate change, could lead to half a million extra deaths by 2050, grim new research indicates. The deaths, say researchers in England and the United States, could occur as a result of changes in diets and bodyweight from decreased crop productivity. Three-quarters of the projected extra deaths will be in China and India. Unless action is taken to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, climate change would cut the fruit and vegetables available to people in 2050 by 4 per cent, the calories available by 3 per cent and the red and processed meat by 0.7...
  • Global warming fruit and veg shortage could lead to 1,200 extra UK deaths a year by 2050

    03/04/2016 6:55:04 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 46 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | March 3, 2016 | By Emily Gosden, Energy Editor
    Climate change could lead to more than 1,200 extra deaths a year in the UK by 2050 as global warming causes fruit and vegetable shortages, new research suggests. The typical British diet will deteriorate as the effects of climate change hit crop production, resulting in supply shortages and pushing up prices, Oxford University researchers said. Dr Marco Springmann from the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food, said: "You could expect in the UK the reduction in fruit and vegetable consumption would be the number one risk factor. “The immediate cause of the reduction in fruit and vegetable consumption...
  • Warren Buffett says it's 'highly likely' climate change poses a major problem for the planet

    02/27/2016 6:50:23 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 29 replies
    Business Insider ^ | February 27, 2016 | by Akin Oyedele
    Warren Buffett doesn't think climate change is a major worry for Berkshire Hathaway shareholders. Buffett writes that he is not denying the science showing that climate change will likely be a problem. But he's just not 100% certain that it will be. Buffett adds that Berkshire Hathaway's insurance business stands to benefit from an increase in property damage caused by the effects of climate change. Insurance policies, Buffett writes, are typically written for one year and re-priced each year to account for shifting risks. And so, if risks - from climate change or otherwise - go up, so will premiums.
  • Even in sunny LA, warming weather may be the next big public health problem

    02/23/2016 9:27:58 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 36 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | February 23, 2016 | By Soumya Karlamangla
    For years scientists have warned that climate change will cause melting ice caps, rising sea levels and severe droughts and floods. But global warming's effects can also be far more personal, seriously harming human health. The changing climate will not only bring new diseases, experts say, but also will threaten the water supply, worsen air quality and cardiovascular disease and cause deaths from extreme heat. By 2050, the Los Angeles area is expected to warm by 5 degrees on average. Higher temperatures will create more smog, leading to more asthma and cardiovascular disease, including heart attacks. When it comes to...
  • Bill Gates: 'We need an energy miracle' to prevent catastrophic climate change

    02/23/2016 6:35:16 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 61 replies
    Washington Post ^ | February 23, 2016 | by Joby Warrick
    Bill Gates thinks it may take a miracle to find the kind of cheap, clean energy source needed to safely power the planet through the next century. But he believes governments and businesses aren't doing nearly enough to discover one. In a letter issued by his foundation on Tuesday, the billionaire philanthropist repeated his plea for a financial call to arms in energy research, saying massive investments are needed to find and develop new technology that can fuel the world's economy without poisoning its inhabitants. "The challenge we face is big, perhaps bigger than many people imagine. But so is...
  • Seas Are Rising at Fastest Rate in Last 28 Centuries

    02/22/2016 12:56:48 PM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 154 replies
    New York Times ^ | February 22, 2016 | By JUSTIN GILLIS
    The oceans are rising faster than at any point in the last 28 centuries, and human emissions of greenhouse gases are primarily responsible, scientists reported Monday. They added that the flooding that is starting to make life miserable in many coastal towns - like Miami Beach; Norfolk, Va.; and Charleston, S.C. - was largely a consequence of those emissions, and that it is likely to grow worse in coming years. The ocean could rise as much as three or four feet by 2100, as ocean water expands and the great ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica begin to collapse. Experts...
  • Remember the Climate!

    02/20/2016 6:01:04 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 4 replies
    Town Hall ^ | February 20, 2016 | by Paul Driessen
    Military triumphs and catastrophes have often hinged on how well (or luckily) armies and navies employed, avoided or benefited from weather, seasonal and other natural events. But now President Obama wants to compound his social experimentation with the military, by ordering his Pentagon brass to focus not on imminent weather events surrounding battle plans - not on threats from China, Russia, Iran, North Korea, ISIL, Hamas and other real hot spots - but on climate change years or decades in the future. He wants to replace Remember the Alamo with Remember the Climate! Mr. Obama has issued an executive order...
  • Oregano will cut cows’ wind and climate change

    02/16/2016 5:33:02 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 35 replies
    Mail & Guardian ^ | February 16, 2016 | by Sipho Kings
    Famous for complementing Mediterranean and Mexican cooking, the herb could now be a key ingredient in lowering global greenhouse gas emissions. Cows' farts have long been recognised as a contributor to climate change. Their digestion creates methane as a by-product and that methane is 25 times more effective than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the atmosphere, although it only remains for a decade. Scientists and farmers have consequently been experimenting on ways of reducing those emissions. Adding fat or nitrate to animal feed - or feeding cows and other livestock better quality food - has been shown to help....
  • Why 2016 will be the best year yet for climate justice

    02/15/2016 5:48:49 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 32 replies
    Thomson Reuters Foundation ^ | February 15, 2016 | by Kari Malkki, Brown University
    Already in 2016, communities around the world have been forced to confront climate disasters of all sorts. Severe flooding in some regions and dire water shortages in others have resulted in food crises, mass migration, and economic mayhem. Climate injustices like these are becoming obvious to citizens all over our rapidly warming world, and governments are simply not responding with the expected urgency. "There is definitely a call for colored people, especially those from vulnerable groups," Kimberly Lopez Castellanos explained of the climate justice movement. "We want their voices to be heard, their stories to be told and their energy...
  • How Trump and company warmed to climate change

    02/12/2016 6:09:25 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 35 replies
    MSNBC ^ | February 11, 2016 | By Tony Dokoupil
    Something unexpected is happening in the Republican presidential field. Leading GOP candidates once denied the reality of manmade climate change, but now they seem to be softening their posture and subtly embracing it. Take the case of Donald Trump. His denial of climate change has been a centerpiece of his act for years. In tweets between 2012 and early 2015, he called climate change a "con job," a "canard," a "hoax," "bulls**t," and a concept "created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive." But as his political star has risen, he’s changed his tune on...
  • Australia Cuts 110 Climate Scientist Jobs

    02/09/2016 5:39:58 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 48 replies
    Scientific Amerian ^ | February 8, 2016 | By Gayathri Vaidyanathan
    SUBTITLE: Because the science is settled there is no need for more basic research, the government says. With an ax rather than a scalpel, Australia's federal science agency last week chopped off its climate research arm in a decision that has stunned scientists and left employees dispirited. As many as 110 out of 140 positions at the atmosphere and oceans division will be cut, Larry Marshall, the agency's chief executive, told staff Friday. "The situation is very bad here," the scientist said. "Eighty percent of our climate capability will be gone; it is clear that climate modeling will be cut...
  • We Can Expect More Outbreaks Like Zika As The Climate Changes

    02/04/2016 8:19:22 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 38 replies
    The Huffington Post ^ | February 3, 2016 | by Lydia O'Connor
    The factors leading to the current Zika outbreak won't be clear for some time, but environmental health experts say there's a good chance such infectious diseases will become more common as the global climate warms.
  • We print money to bail out banks. Why can't we do it to solve climate change?

    01/30/2016 4:16:03 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 50 replies
    UK Guardian ^ | January 30, 2016 | by Matthias Kroll
    We need an estimated $1tn per year to stay below a global temperature rise of 2C. Creating new money might be the only way to meet this financial challenge. The international community has agreed on an ambitious agenda to curb climate change. Some 195 countries have decided to try and cut greenhouse gas emissions to a level that will limit the rise in average global temperatures to well below 2C. The question we now face is: how are we going to finance the changes needed to reach this goal? Quantitative easing - creating new money - might just be the...
  • Palin's Big Oil infatuation [2008 FLASHBACK, may never Snow in DC Again]

    01/22/2016 1:46:51 PM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 2 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | September 24, 2008 | Robert Kenney, Jr.
    ... In the 1960s, we rarely saw lightning or heard thunder on the Massachusetts coast. I associate electrical storms with McLean, Va., where I spent the school year when I was growing up. In Virginia, the weather also has changed dramatically. Recently arrived residents in the northern suburbs, accustomed to today's anemic winters, might find it astonishing to learn that there were once ski runs on Ballantrae Hill in McLean, with a rope tow and local ski club. Snow is so scarce today that most Virginia children probably don't own a sled. But neighbors came to our home at Hickory...
  • Climate Change May Spell More Traffic Fatalities

    01/22/2016 1:01:48 PM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 45 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | January 22, 2016 | by Emily DeMarco
    Economists find bikers, motorcyclists and pedestrians are most at risk. (Inside Science) -- When gasoline prices fall or the economy grows, people may have more money to spend, but there can be an unexpected downside. Traffic fatalities often increase because additional drivers take to the roads. Now, economists have established that another seemingly auspicious occurrence has a dark side: nice weather. That's the surprising finding from a pair of economists, who investigated how climate change may affect traffic accident rates in the United States over the next century. In their analysis, the researchers predict that as the planet warms, there...
  • If we’re going to fix climate change, we’ll have to get creative

    01/07/2016 2:16:20 PM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 63 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | January 7, 2016 | By Thomas Kostigen
    The developing world deserves reparations from wealthier nations as compensation for the harmful climate change effects that are mostly our fault. It's us who have tainted our global commons by emitting vast amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, and us whose actions have led to extreme weather and other disasters in the world's most vulnerable regions. But a strictly financial mea culpa from rich nations won't be enough. Rich countries should also invest in geoengineering projects to provide solutions for those on the front lines of climate change: those who cannot afford to pay for more adaptive and resilient...
  • Earth is 'experiencing a global warming spurt'

    01/06/2016 8:16:00 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 46 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | January 6, 2016 | By John Upton
    Scientists say cyclical changes in the Pacific Ocean have thrown Earth’s surface into what may be an unprecedented warming spurt, following a global warming slowdown that lasted about 15 years. While El Niño is being blamed for an outbreak of floods, storms and unseasonable temperatures across the planet, a much slower-moving cycle of the Pacific Ocean has also been playing a role in record-breaking warmth. The recent effects of both ocean cycles are being amplified by climate change. A 2014 flip was detected in the sluggish and elusive ocean cycle known as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, or PDO, which also...
  • Did Two federal Agencies Fraudulently Cook Global Warming Data

    11/26/2015 7:26:59 AM PST · by detective · 21 replies
    Oversight: A federal agency keeps stonewalling congressional efforts to access its internal communications. What's the problem here? If the agency's global warming claim was honestly arrived at, just turn over the documents.
  • Top scientists start to examine fiddled global warming figures (Exaggerated records?)

    04/26/2015 4:58:36 PM PDT · by Beave Meister · 16 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 4/25/2015 | Christopher Booker
    Last month, we are told, the world enjoyed “its hottest March since records began in 1880”. This year, according to “US government scientists”, already bids to outrank 2014 as “the hottest ever”. The figures from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) were based, like all the other three official surface temperature records on which the world’s scientists and politicians rely, on data compiled from a network of weather stations by NOAA’s Global Historical Climate Network (GHCN). But here there is a puzzle. These temperature records are not the only ones with official status. The other two, Remote Sensing...
  • More Americans Trust Fox News Than Obama On Climate Change, Poll Finds

    04/03/2015 6:18:38 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 18 replies
    The Huffington Post ^ | April 2, 2015 | By James Gerken
    More U.S. adults believe Fox News is a reliable source of information about climate change than believe President Barack Obama is, according to a new poll from St. Leo University. The March poll of 1,016 Americans found that 17 percent trust Fox News on climate change, while only 11 percent trust the president. Twenty-two percent of respondents said they trust print, online and broadcast media outlets, "such as CBS, ABC, NBC, CNN, Associated Press, New York Times." Despite these poll results, Fox News and its hosts and commentators have received far more criticism for the accuracy of their climate change...
  • NYT Smears Scientist Willie Soon for Telling the Truth About ‘Global Warming’

    02/22/2015 6:53:53 AM PST · by rktman · 19 replies
    americanthinker.com ^ | 2/21/2015 | James Delingpole
    Another day, another attack on the integrity of the Harvard-Smithsonian astrophysicist Dr. Willie Soon, this time in the New York Times. I first became aware of Soon in 2009 when reading through the Climategate emails. One of them was a jocular suggestion by a warmist called Tom Wigley as to how best to smear Soon and his co-author Sallie Baliunas. Might be interesting to see how frequently Soon and Baliunas, individually, are cited (as astronomers). Are they any good in their own fields? Perhaps we could start referring to them as astrologers (excusable as…’oops, just a typo’). You might be...