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Keyword: chicxulub

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  • ‘Something is weird’: Incredible dinosaur graveyard raising eyebrows in the paleontology world

    04/06/2019 9:49:14 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    Dr. Stephen Brusatte, a Palaeontologist at University of Edinburgh and author of The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs, is among those that have questions around the extraordinary claims made by the team that have... ... said he was “very excited about this discovery” but noted aside from a single partial dinosaur hip bone mentioned in the paper, ideas of a dinosaur graveyard being reported in the media lack any real evidence so far. “The New Yorker article reports a dinosaur graveyard with bones of many types of dinosaurs, along with feathers, eggs, and even embryos,” he said. “I’m afraid...
  • A seismically induced onshore surge deposit at the KPg boundary, North Dakota

    04/04/2019 8:16:25 AM PDT · by centurion316 · 24 replies
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ^ | April 1, 2019 | Robert A. DePalma
    The most immediate effects of the terminal-Cretaceous Chicxulub impact, essential to understanding the global-scale environmental and biotic collapses that mark the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction, are poorly resolved despite extensive previous work. Here, we help to resolve this by describing a rapidly emplaced, high-energy onshore surge deposit from the terrestrial Hell Creek Formation in Montana. Associated ejecta and a cap of iridium-rich impactite reveal that its emplacement coincided with the Chicxulub event. Acipenseriform fish, densely packed in the deposit, contain ejecta spherules in their gills and were buried by an inland-directed surge that inundated a deeply incised river channel before accretion of...
  • Dinosaur fossils kept secret for years show the day of killer asteroid

    04/01/2019 7:03:20 AM PDT · by ETL · 65 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | April 1, 2019 | Chris Ciaccia | Fox News
    The researchers say they found evidence in North Dakota of the asteroid hit in Mexico, including fish with hot glass in their gills from flaming debris that showered back down on Earth. They also reported the discovery of charred trees, evidence of an inland tsunami and melted amber. Additionally, University of Amsterdam professor Jan Smit said he and his colleagues found footsteps from dinosaurs moments before they met their untimely death. Smit said the footprints — one from a plant-eating hadrosaur and the other of a meat eater, maybe a small Tyrannosaurus Rex — is "definite proof that the dinosaurs...
  • 66 million-year-old deathbed linked to dinosaur-killing meteor

    03/29/2019 10:25:37 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 64 replies
    UC Berkeley News ^ | 3/29/19 | Robert Sanders
    66 million-year-old deathbed linked to dinosaur-killing meteor By Robert Sanders, Media relations| March 29, 2019March 29, 2019 Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) A meteor impact 66 million years ago generated a tsunami-like wave in an inland sea that killed and buried fish, mammals, insects and a dinosaur, the first victims of Earth’s last mass extinction event. The death scene from within an hour of...
  • Asteroids have been crushing Earth for nearly 300 million years and no one knows why

    01/18/2019 10:41:27 AM PST · by EdnaMode · 67 replies
    Fox News ^ | January 18, 2019 | Chris Ciaccia
    Asteroids have been hitting the Earth for nearly 1 billion years, but the atmosphere has largely shielded the planet from some catastrophic events. However, some space rocks make their way through — including the one that wiped out the dinosaurs. But a new study notes that, over the past 290 million years, asteroids have been impacting the Earth at triple the rate they were previously and scientists aren't sure why. After looking at 1 billion years' worth of asteroid impacts on both the Earth and Moon, researchers found that dinosaurs' fate was perhaps an inevitability.
  • New Seafloor Map Reveals How Strange the Gulf of Mexico Is

    05/27/2017 6:13:31 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    nationalgeographic.com ^ | 05/26/2017 | Betsy Mason
    The floor of the Gulf of Mexico is one of the most geologically interesting stretches of the Earth’s surface. The gulf’s peculiar history gave rise to a landscape riddled with domes, pockmarks, canyons, faults, and channels — all revealed in more detail than ever before by a new 1.4 billion-pixel map. This striking view of the ocean floor off the coasts of Louisiana and Texas was created by a government agency you’ve likely never heard of called the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). The bureau’s job is to manage exploration and development of the country’s offshore mineral and energy...
  • Amazon River Once Flowed in Opposite Direction

    10/24/2006 9:54:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies · 505+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | October 24, 2006 | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Russell Mapes, a graduate student from Grass Valley, Calif., ...explains that these sediments of eastern origin were washed down from a highland area that formed in the Cretaceous Period, between 65 million and 145 million years ago, when the South American and African tectonic plates separated and passed each other. That highland tilted the river's flow westward, sending sediment as old as 2 billion years toward the center of the continent. A relatively low ridge, called the Purus Arch, which still exists, rose in the middle of the continent, running north and south, dividing the Amazon's flow - eastward toward...
  • We Finally Know How Much the Dino-Killing Asteroid Reshaped Earth

    03/22/2016 10:32:51 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 60 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 2/25/2016 | Jane Palmer
    More than 65 million years ago, a six-mile wide asteroid smashed into Mexico's Yucatán peninsula, triggering earthquakes, tsunamis and an explosion of debris that blanketed the Earth in layers of dust and sediment. Now analysis of commercial oil drilling data—denied to the academic community until recently—offers the first detailed look at how the Chicxulub impact reshaped the Gulf of Mexico. Figuring out what happened after these types of impacts gives researchers a better idea of how they redistribute geological material around the world. It also gives scientists an idea of what to expect if another such impact were to occur...
  • Did a Planetary Society citizen scientist help find one of Earth’s biggest impact craters?

    07/03/2017 12:22:01 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 18 replies
    Planetary Society ^ | 6/12/17 | Jason Davis
    Did a Planetary Society citizen scientist help find one of Earth’s biggest impact craters? About 66 million years ago, a 10-kilometer-wide hunk of rock smashed into Earth near what is now Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula.The impact created a global dust cloud that snuffed out the sunlight, leading to the demise of 80 percent of Earth's plants and animals—including most of the dinosaurs. A 200-kilometer-wide crater buried near the city of Chicxulub is all that's left. It's ground zero for one of the world's most notable extinction events.But throughout Earth's history, there have actually been five major extinction events. The largest of...
  • Asteroid strike made 'instant Himalayas'

    11/18/2016 9:20:25 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 30 replies
    BBC ^ | 18 Nov, 2916 | Jonathan Amos BBC Science Correspondent
    Scientists say they can now describe in detail how the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs produced its huge crater. The reconstruction of the event 66 million years ago was made possible by drilling into the remnant bowl and analysing its rocks. These show how the space impactor made the hard surface of the planet slosh back and forth like a fluid. At one stage, a mountain higher than Everest was thrown up before collapsing back into a smaller range of peaks. "And this all happens on the scale of minutes, which is quite amazing," Prof Joanna Morgan from Imperial...
  • The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs almost got us, too

    06/29/2016 10:26:05 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 30 replies
    THE WEEK ^ | June 28, 2016 | Joshua A. Krisch
    The age of the dinosaurs ended 66 million years ago, when an asteroid six miles in diameter crashed into what is now southeastern Mexico. The world went up in flames. Dinosaurs, along with the massive reptiles that ruled the sea and the sky, perished as forest fires raged across the globe, dust blotted out the sun, and Earth experienced intense heat, frigid cooling, and then more heat. Conventional wisdom states that mammalian diversity emerged from the ashes of the mass extinction, ultimately giving rise to our own humble species. But according to a study in the Journal of Evolutionary Biology,...
  • 'Trickle of food' helped deep sea creatures survive asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs

    04/25/2016 9:28:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Thursday, April 14, 2016 | Cardiff University
    Study of fossil shells solves unanswered question of how deep sea creatures survived asteroid strike during immense upheaval of the world's oceans... Like the dinosaurs themselves, giant marine reptiles, invertebrates and microscopic organisms became extinct after the catastrophic asteroid impact in an immense upheaval of the world's oceans, yet deep sea creatures managed to survive. This has puzzled researchers as it is widely believed that the asteroid impact cut off the food supply in the oceans by destroying free-floating algae and bacteria. However, in a study published in the April issue of the journal Geology, a team led by researchers...
  • Scientists gear up to drill into ‘ground zero’ of the impact that killed the dinosaurs

    03/06/2016 8:35:56 PM PST · by Utilizer · 59 replies
    Science mag online ^ | Mar. 3, 2016 , 2:00 PM | Eric Hand
    This month, a drilling platform will rise in the Gulf of Mexico, but it won’t be aiming for oil. Scientists will try to sink a diamond-tipped bit into the heart of Chicxulub crater—the buried remnant of the asteroid impact 66 million years ago that killed off the dinosaurs, along with most other life on the planet. They hope that the retrieved rock cores will contain clues to how life came back in the wake of the cataclysm, and whether the crater itself could have been a home for novel microbial life. And by drilling into a circular ridge inside the...
  • It's Official: An Asteroid Wiped Out the Dinosaurs

    03/05/2010 5:46:05 AM PST · by jilliane · 96 replies · 1,368+ views
    Reuters ^ | 03/05/2010 | Kate Kelland
    A giant asteroid smashing into Earth is the only plausible explanation for the extinction of the dinosaurs, a global scientific team said on Thursday, hoping to settle a row that has divided experts for decades.
  • It's official: An asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs

    03/04/2010 1:37:39 PM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 123 replies · 1,893+ views
    Reuters ^ | March 4, 2010
    LONDON (Reuters) - A giant asteroid smashing into Earth is the only plausible explanation for the extinction of the dinosaurs, a global scientific team said on Thursday, hoping to settle a row that has divided experts for decades. A panel of 41 scientists from across the world reviewed 20 years' worth of research to try to confirm the cause of the so-called Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) extinction, which created a "hellish environment" around 65 million years ago and wiped out more than half of all species on the planet. Scientific opinion was split over whether the extinction was caused by an asteroid...
  • Expert: Volcanoes in Today's India Wiped Out Dinos

    05/07/2009 12:50:26 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 7 replies · 2,026+ views
    Volcanoes that erupted in India about 65 million years ago were instrumental in the extinction of dinosaurs, according to new research. For the last thirty years scientists have believed a giant meteorite that struck Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula was responsible for the mass extinction of dinosaurs, the Daily Telegraph reported on Wednesday. But now Gerta Keller, a geologist at Princeton University, New Jersey, says fossilised traces of plants and animals dug out of low lying hills at El Penon in northeast Mexico show this event happened 300,000 years after the dinosaurs disappeared. Keller suggests that the massive volcanic eruptions at the...
  • Bang goes that theory: Dinosaur extinction 'occurred 300,000 years AFTER asteroid impact'

    04/27/2009 4:35:51 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 16 replies · 1,024+ views
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | April 27, 2009 | Daily Mail Reporter
    The popular theory that dinosaurs were wiped out by an asteroid 65million years ago has been challenged. It was believed the Chicxulub crater in Mexico was the 'smoking gun' of the mass extinction event. Molten droplets from the ancient asteroid impact were found just below the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary - a geological layer of sediment linked with the extinction. But soil samples from the 112-mile wide crater show the impact predates the disappearance of the dinosaurs by about 300,000 years. The latest research has been published in the Journal of the Geological Society. Study author Professor Gerta Keller from Princeton University...
  • NEW EVIDENCE THAT VOLCANOS KILLED THE DINOSAURS -

    09/15/2003 8:48:14 PM PDT · by UnklGene · 60 replies · 4,705+ views
    Red Nova ^ | September 15, 2003
    September 15, 2003 Could an enormous volcanic eruption have killed the dinosaurs? Cardiff University -- The extinction of the dinosaurs -– thought to be caused by an asteroid impact some 65 million years ago –- was more likely to have been caused by a 'mantle plume' -– a huge volcanic eruption from deep within the earth's mantle, the region between the crust and the core of the earth. This theory, already supported by a significant body of geologists and palaeontologists, is strengthened by new evidence to be presented at an international conference at Cardiff University on 11-12 September. Research by...
  • Dinosaurs' climate shifted too, reports show

    09/25/2006 4:15:43 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 28 replies · 830+ views
    Indiana University ^ | 23-Sep-2006 | David Bricker
    Caption: IU Bloomington geochemist Simon Brassell (right), Penn State sedimentologist Michael Arthur (middle), and Tohoku Univ. sedimentologist Harumasa Kano (left) inspect an ancient shale aboard the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Ancient rocks from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean suggest dramatic climate changes during the dinosaur-dominated Mesozoic Era, a time once thought to have been monotonously hot and humid. In this month's Geology, scientists from Indiana University Bloomington and the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research present new evidence that ocean surface temperatures varied as much as 6 degrees Celsius (about 11 degrees Fahrenheit) during the...
  • Cosmic Collision May Have Created Hawaii

    02/20/2004 7:50:03 PM PST · by Mike Darancette · 32 replies · 228+ views
    SPACE.com ^ | 01 August 2001 | Michael Paine
    It's bad enough when, every few million years, an asteroid rocks our planet. It's worse if the impact triggers regional or global volcanic activity, which is not only hazardous to nearby plants and animals but can choke Earth's atmosphere with deadly gases for months or years. But there's also a possible bright side, like the birth of nice places like Hawaii. For more than three decades, scientists have explored the question of whether an asteroid impact could cause significant volcanic eruptions, hot spots that spring up out of nowhere and create new landforms or rearrange old ones. The process might...