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Posts by The Pack Knight

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  • Here's What You Need to Know About The Ridiculous Indictment of The Planned Parenthood

    01/27/2016 8:03:40 AM PST · 44 of 44
    The Pack Knight to WENDLE

    What prosecutor in Mississippi went to prison for instituting a prosecution?

    I’m talking about prosecutorial immunity, not official immunity. Two different things. Prosecutorial immunity is absolute. Official immunity is qualified.

  • Here's What You Need to Know About The Ridiculous Indictment of The Planned Parenthood

    01/27/2016 7:55:42 AM PST · 43 of 44
    The Pack Knight to Svartalfiar

    I’d say Harris County is considerably more conservative than Travis County. For example, Obama won Travis County by nearly 24% in 2012, while he only won Harris County by .08%—less than thousand vote margin in a county where over a million votes were cast. 2008 was similar—nearly a 30% margin for Obama in Travis, but only a 2% margin for Obama in Harris. Before 2008, Harris County hadn’t gone Democrat in a presidential election since 1964, while Travis County only went Republican twice during that time: Reagan in ‘84 and Bush in 2000.

    You’re right about Houston. About half of Harris County’s population is in Houston proper. Houston proper is very liberal (with the exception of the wealthy and conservative River Oaks-Memorial corridor) while Harris County outside of Houston is very conservative.

    Basically, Republicans in the suburbs tend to more than balance out Democrats in the city. That’s why the mayor of Houston is almost always a Democrat, while county-wide elections are normally won by Republicans. It has been trending Democrat, though. Democrats have been winning county-wide elections in the two Obama presidential election years, while Republicans continue to win county-wide elections in mid-term years. We’ll see if that continues without Obama on the ticket.

  • Here's What You Need to Know About The Ridiculous Indictment of The Planned Parenthood

    01/26/2016 4:55:31 PM PST · 36 of 44
    The Pack Knight to WENDLE

    Intent is irrelevant to absolute immunity. That is what distinguishes qualified immunity (such as what a cop enjoys) from from absolute immunity (such as what a prosecutor, grand juror, or judge enjoys). Qualified immunity is subject to exceptions for bad faith or malice. Absolute immunity is not.

    The law grants prosecutors absolute immunity from civil liability for instituting a prosecution, presenting their case to a grand jury or court, or anything else “intimately associated with the judicial phase of the criminal process.”

    Presenting a bill of indictment to a grand jury is plainly within the scope of a prosecutor’s absolute immunity. Thus, if all the prosecutor is being sued for is instituting a prosecution, which is all that it appears the prosecutor did here, then it makes no difference whether why she did so, even if it was with the specific, malicious intent to violate civil rights.

    You may disagree with this doctrine (and many people do), but it is the law in Texas and in most other states, and it has been held by the US Supreme Court to be the law applicable in 1983 suits since Imbler v. Pachtman in 1976.

  • Here's What You Need to Know About The Ridiculous Indictment of The Planned Parenthood

    01/26/2016 1:31:41 PM PST · 34 of 44
    The Pack Knight to WENDLE

    There will not be a civil suit. It is well-established that prosecutors and grand jurors both enjoy absolute immunity from 1983 suits.

  • Here's What You Need to Know About The Ridiculous Indictment of The Planned Parenthood

    01/26/2016 1:14:50 PM PST · 32 of 44
    The Pack Knight to CSM

    No, Perry was indicted in Travis County, where Austin is and probably the most liberal county in the state. This grand jury was in Harris County, which is where Houston is.

    Harris County is more conservative than Travis County, but the grand juries have been screwy for a while.

  • Donald Trump: I’ve always had good relationships with Nancy Pelosi, Harry Reid

    01/26/2016 12:53:11 PM PST · 103 of 115
    The Pack Knight to lodi90

    So he gets more than twice as much money from the bank that puts branches in Wal-Mart than he does from Goldman Sachs. Big elitist.

    I also see that he gets more money from individuals at his old law firm than he does from Goldman Sachs—funny for a guy who is supposedly hated by his colleagues.

  • Donald Trump comes out against letting states manage federal lands?

    01/23/2016 9:19:04 AM PST · 142 of 251
    The Pack Knight to Principled

    He has that “tendency” because he simply isn’t a conservative.

  • Chargers, Raiders and Rams all apply for relocation to L.A.

    01/05/2016 3:31:03 PM PST · 84 of 100
    The Pack Knight to Perdogg

    Bring back the Cleveland Rams!

  • As Usual, Bernie Sanders Doesn't Know What He's Talking About(WHAT!?)

    12/24/2015 8:54:50 AM PST · 8 of 12
    The Pack Knight to rktman

    But then the author throws out a whopper of his own:

    “Roughly 100 million Americans want to work but can’t find jobs.” That’s not even close to true.

    He appears to be referring to the BLS labor force participation numbers, which are at historic lows, and show that over 94 million out of the non institutional civilian population (over 16, not in the military, not institutionalized) of 251 million is not a member of the labor force (employed + unemployed and actively looking for a job).

    Yes, that 94 million includes those who stopped looking for a job because they can’t find one. It also includes those who do NOT want a job: retirees, the disabled, homemakers, etc.

    The number of Americans who want a job but don’t have one is more like 14 million. About 7.5 million “unemployed” and another 6.5 million “not in labor force but want job now.” Still far too many, but nowhere near 100 million.

  • As Usual, Bernie Sanders Doesn't Know What He's Talking About(WHAT!?)

    12/24/2015 8:28:22 AM PST · 2 of 12
    The Pack Knight to rktman
    Don't you see? That's why he wants 90% top marginal tax rates. What better way to cut down on 60 hour work weeks than by taxing the people who actually work those weeks? By the way, isn't the problem underemployment among the poor?
  • The growing support for an Article V Convention of the States

    08/23/2015 4:26:07 PM PDT · 29 of 30
    The Pack Knight to Artemis Webb

    I think there are a lot of reasons why this is unlikely to ever happen, not the least of which being the math.

    To call a national convention to propose a constitutional amendment would require an application by the legislatures of 34 states. There are currently 31 state legislatures controlled by Republicans (30 where Republicans control both houses, plus Nebraska, whose unicameral, nonpartisan legislature is unofficially controlled by Republicans), 8 states where each house is controlled by a different party, and 11 state legislatures where both houses are controlled by Democrats. That means, assuming all 31 Republican-controlled state legislatures voted to call a convention (which I would not consider a safe assumption), we’d still need at least three states where Democrats control at least one house of the legislature. The good news is that there is at least no language in Article V that would permit state governors a veto in this process—five of the 31 Republican-controlled legislatures have Democrat governors.

    It may not be so simple as the legislatures merely voting to call a convention, either. Article V is silent as to the composition of such a convention, the procedures to be used, whether any voting at the convention would be by state or by individual delegate, whether delegates would be bound to follow the instructions of their state legislatures, whether the legislatures can restrict the purpose of the convention, how long the convention would be allowed to sit, or what number of delegates or states are necessary to propose an amendment. There is no precedent to go by, either, because this procedure has never been used in the 227 years since the Constitution was ratified. These are some pretty important issues, so who gets to decide all of this? The legislatures themselves? Congress? What if some of the legislatures’ applications include conditions authorizing only a certain kind of voting or the proposal of certain amendments? What if Congress ignores these conditions in forming the convention?

    Assuming the convention is valid and proposes an amendment, that proposal would then have to be ratified by 3/4ths of the state legislatures, or 38 states. That means, again assuming all 31 Republican-controlled legislatures ratify the amendment, ratification either would require at least 7 states where Democrats control at least one house.

    As a result, any amendment would have to have very broad support just to be proposed by such a convention, let alone ratified. Which begs the question: If an amendment has broad enough support to be proposed through this national convention procedure, isn’t it likely that it would be proposed by Congress first? This is probably why no convention has ever been called.

    There hasn’t been a controversial constitutional amendment proposed since the 1970s—the Equal Rights Amendment in 72 and the D.C. Voting Rights Amendment in 78. Neither was ratified, of course. The last controversial amendment ratified was the 24th Amendment prohibiting poll taxes, which was only controversial in the South. There are only eleven former-Confederate states—two too few to block an amendment.

    This is all by design, of course. In rejecting Jefferson’s idea of allowing a convention to be called on the concurrence of two of the three branches of government, Madison warned in Federalist 49: “The danger of disturbing the public tranquillity by interesting too strongly the public passions, is a still more serious objection against a frequent reference of constitutional questions to the decision of the whole society.”

    A convention is an interesting idea, but any discussion about it is either academic or wishful thinking at this point. It is certainly no shortcut past the hard work of winning elections and convincing the public to support your views, which is where the focus should be right now.

  • NFL passes helmet rule, ends tuck rule

    03/22/2013 5:22:08 PM PDT · 78 of 79
    The Pack Knight to Perdogg

    I don’t get all the consternation about this rule. I was ALWAYS taught to keep my head up learning to play football in Ohio. In fact, if I remember correctly, it was a personal foul to hit with the crown of the helmet back when I was playing high school ball, at least in open field.

    Of course, I’ve noticed that they don’t seem to teach proper fundamentals anymore, so maybe that’s the problem. Watching what seems to pass for open field tackling or ball carrying anymore, I guess I can see why a lot of NFL players are going to have difficulty adjusting.

    If you have to lower your head to make a tackle or cover the ball, you’re doing it wrong.

  • JUDGE ORDERS EARLY VOTING IN ORANGE COUNTY, FLA. EXTENDED 4 HOURS....

    11/04/2012 12:48:48 PM PST · 74 of 89
    The Pack Knight to dsrtsage

    Right. I don’t know what ‘s wrong with using scan cards like we had in NC. It’s a simple to use, fill-in-the-dot form which is counted automatically and immediately at the poll, but they can always be independently recounted by hand if necessary.

    Regardless of what security measures they use in “direct record” electronic systems, you’ll never have that hard evidence to verify. All you’ll ever have is what the computer tells you.

  • JUDGE ORDERS EARLY VOTING IN ORANGE COUNTY, FLA. EXTENDED 4 HOURS....

    11/04/2012 12:26:46 PM PST · 71 of 89
    The Pack Knight to conservativeinbflo.

    Absolutely. That’s at least one reason behind all these polls that assume an even larger turnout of minorities as a percentage of voters than 2008. If, or rather when, those polls prove wrong and Romney wins, it will be because of “voter suppression”.

  • U.S. Rep. Paul Broun: Evolution a lie 'from the pit of hell'

    10/08/2012 10:46:00 PM PDT · 89 of 116
    The Pack Knight to markomalley
  • Turkey dubs Syria 'a clear threat', vows to retaliate

    06/26/2012 10:41:32 AM PDT · 24 of 67
    The Pack Knight to MeganC

    Not through open warfare, but I can certainly see them providing some financial and other support in order to draw out any Turko-Syrian hostilities in order to make it more costly, both materially and politically, for Turkey. A weakened and less assertive Turkey is definitely in Russia’s core interests.

  • We will not waste our limited resources on FR in support for a liberal progressive LIAR

    04/13/2012 3:55:53 PM PDT · 621 of 2,352
    The Pack Knight to traderrob6
    Is there anyone on this forum that truly believes that a Romney term would be worse than 4 more years of Obama???

    I doubt many really believe that, though it has been fashionable to post off-the-wall nonsense like that on FR for as long as I can remember.

    I wouldn't worry too much. The wounds are still raw right now and everyone will have a long time until November to think about the consequences of their vote.
  • Left Shocked by Court Developments

    03/28/2012 7:19:02 PM PDT · 193 of 218
    The Pack Knight to Twotone

    I was at a dinner once where Scalia told us the same thing. The question was, “What was the most persuasive oral argument you’ve ever heard?”. Scalia’s answer, “I’ve never heard a persuasive oral argument.”

    Later on, I was a law clerk for an appellate judge. I can certainly say that I’ve never seen a judge change his mind after oral arguments. More than once, I had already drafted the judge’s opinion.

  • Exclusive: U.S., Britain to agree emergency oil stocks release

    03/15/2012 10:02:28 PM PDT · 83 of 89
    The Pack Knight to mojito

    I didn’t like it much when Bush did it, and he wasn’t simultaneously trying to torpedo domestic oil production. This is just plain asinine.

  • CONFIRMED: The Trillion-Dollar Lawsuit That Could End Financial Tyranny

    02/24/2012 11:39:28 AM PST · 8 of 19
    The Pack Knight to TPOOH

    I have to say I don’t blame the MSM for ignoring a crackpot law suit. Hundreds of them are filed every day in courts across the country.

    The only thing interesting about this is that a licensed attorney (from an apparently reputable firm, no less) apparently signed his name to this nonsense.

  • Attempt to block MetroRail funding fails

    02/24/2012 11:27:35 AM PST · 1 of 4
    The Pack Knight
    This was mainly a proxy-war between neighboring Houston Congressmen John Culberson and Sheila Jackson Lee, but I really want to point out the following absurdities:

    Metro chairman Gilbert Garcia said he had been "surprised that a congressman representing the citizens of Corpus Christi would get involved in our local matter."

    Local matter? So the appropriation of tens of millions of federal dollars that come out of the pockets of taxpayers from across the nation is a "local matter"? Later in the article: . . . .

    [Florida Democrat Congresswoman Corinne] Brown derided Republicans' attempted intervention, saying, "You all ought to be on the city council or the transit (committee). We're Congress."

    Yes, I agree that planning of local projects should be left to local government. But here's an idea - how about letting local government pay for local projects as well.

    Only a Democrat would think that stopping federal tax dollars from being spent on local boondoggles is somehow meddling in local issues.
  • CONFIRMED: The Trillion-Dollar Lawsuit That Could End Financial Tyranny

    02/24/2012 10:57:07 AM PST · 3 of 8
    The Pack Knight to TPOOH
    Where is this in the MSM?

    I have to say I don't blame the MSM for ignoring a crackpot lawsuit.
  • Santorum wins Straw Poll in Advance of Georgia Rally (Santorum 40% Gingrich 27% Romney 5%)

    02/20/2012 11:29:30 AM PST · 111 of 172
    The Pack Knight to Dubya-M-DeesWent2SyriaStupid!
    He has a better chance than Gingrich.

    I absolutely agree. For one thing, while he may be more passionately hated by voters who are going to vote for Obama no matter what, Santorum is far less unpopular among independents and swing voters than Gingrich is.

    Furthermore, while I personally am not a big fan of his proposal to give manufacturers and those with large numbers of children preferential tax treatment, there's no denying that his populist, pro-manufacturing, socially conservative message will be appealing to Reagan Democrats and can energize the socially conservative vote in a number of key states. It is a campaign built to win in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and the rest of the industrial Midwest, which is the key region in today's Presidential elections.

    One need only look back to 2004 to see how important this segment of the vote is in the midwest. The state that decided the 2004 election was quintessentially "purple" Ohio, and the turnout in Appalachian Ohio due in large part to the gay marriage proposition sealed the deal.

    Perhaps even more important is Hamilton County (Cincinnati), which Bush won by over 20,000 votes in 2004, but Obama won by over 20,000 votes in 2008. This is crucial, because Cincinnati had only voted Democrat in one election - 1964 - since World War 2 and was the only major city not to vote for FDR. Cincinnati, like the rest of southern Ohio and like some important northern counties like Sandusky that also swung to Obama in 2008, is socially conservative and tends to be more populist economically. In other words, it is ripe ground for Santorum in a way it is not for Romney or Gingrich.

    It is absolutely essential for any Republican to reverse the 2008 result in Hamilton County in order to win Ohio, and it is absolutely essential for any Republican to win Ohio and at the very least one other midwestern state or Pennsylvania in order to win the election. My own problems with Santorum aside, he is probably the best candidate to do it.
  • Polls: Santorum in First Place in Minnesota, Second in Colorado

    02/05/2012 11:15:55 AM PST · 36 of 68
    The Pack Knight to Innovative

    Frankly, I think Santorum would have a significantly better chance of beating Obama than Gingrich. Santorum appeals to Reagan Democrats in a way Gingrich doesn’t, and he’s less unpopular among the mushy middle than Gringrich is.

  • Obama Got Served

    02/01/2012 10:12:13 PM PST · 199 of 693
    The Pack Knight to faucetman

    Either that, or the reporting was not entirely accurate. Given the media’s (traditional and otherwise) track record with regards to reporting on legal proceedings, I’ll presume the latter.

  • Obama Got Served

    02/01/2012 10:05:50 PM PST · 189 of 693
    The Pack Knight to MadMax, the Grinning Reaper

    It’s called capias, which is a name for a number of writs that command a sheriff or other officer to arrest a person and bring them before the court. They cannot be executed outside the jurisdiction on the issuing court.

    There are state statutes that require courts to issue capias, warrants, or other writs on out-of-state actions in certain circumstances, such as child support situations. These statutes are in derogation of the common law rule that no capias would issue on a foreign cause of action.

    I’m not sure what Delaware was doing, but I rather doubt a sheriff in Maryland would feel compelled to obey the writs of a Delaware court. There must be some compact or other arrangement where the local court issued capias on request of the Delaware authorities.

  • Obama Got Served

    02/01/2012 8:05:00 PM PST · 41 of 693
    The Pack Knight to Sallyven

    Strange. Last I checked, state courts couldn’t issue subpoenas to persons who aren’t in that state. They don’t have jurisdiction. All they can do is request that the witness’s state’s courts issue one. And even then, it is generally only available for depositions, not to compel appearance in court.

  • SOPA, PIPA Threaten Free Speech, First Amendment

    01/18/2012 6:38:56 PM PST · 6 of 17
    The Pack Knight to Kaslin

    WSJ’s editorial today was fully in support of SOPA. IBD’s editorial page is generally more conservative than WSJ’s, but it’s rare to see the two diametrically opposed.

  • Seizing the Wealth of Landlords, One District at a Time

    01/16/2012 2:13:04 PM PST · 6 of 10
    The Pack Knight to SeekAndFind
    Building on President Johnson's Great Society endeavor, which relied on the newly-enacted Civil Rights Act and federal taxing and spending authority to address the lingering effects of slavery on the nation's inner cities, the Court cast aside a centuries-old common law tenet and empowered D.C. tenants to simply stop paying rent if their landlords were derelict in correcting serious housing code violations in their units.

    This would be the implied warranty of habitability. It has been adopted in more than 40 states. Only a few states (about a dozen) allow the tenant the remedy of remaining in possession and withholding rent. Usually the most you can do is either terminate the lease, sue for damages, or have the condition repaired yourself and deduct the reasonable cost from the rent.
  • South Dakota considers open carry shift

    01/16/2012 8:14:23 AM PST · 5 of 19
    The Pack Knight to reaganaut
    Seriously. That's easily the cheapest I've ever seen, and the first I really know of that doesn't require a class. IN a lot of states it's $60 to $80 or much more for the permit/background check, plus another $60+ for the required class.

    Here in supposedly gun-friendly Texas, it's $140 just for the licensing fee, plus another $100 for the class! It costs more than twice as much to get a CCW permit here than it did back in North Carolina.
  • Russia: Attack on Tehran is Attack on Moscow

    01/15/2012 10:01:08 AM PST · 71 of 113
    The Pack Knight to Bobalu
    Russia: Attack on Tehran is Attack on Moscow

    No it's not. Ivan is just running his mouth here. I don't believe for a second that they're willing to go to war over us over Iran.
  • Newt, Perry Push Voters to Romney and Paul

    01/13/2012 11:34:58 AM PST · 47 of 59
    The Pack Knight to Crichton
    Seriously. We're all sitting here begging for a conservative alternative to Romney, so what do his opponents do? Why, attack him from the left, of course!

    I think my palm has become permanently attached to my forehead over the course of this election cycle.
  • Rick Santorum's Naive Blast To An Impoverished Past (Zero taxes for manufacturers is bad policy)

    01/12/2012 4:18:34 PM PST · 34 of 34
    The Pack Knight to itsahoot

    You won’t get any arguments from me about fraud mills like Binder & Binder. They managed to get through a rule years ago where they could use “qualified” non-attorney representatives to represent people in disability procedings before the administrative law judge. In fact, the vast majority of Binder & Binder’s work is done by large numbers of low-paid non-attorneys “supervised” by a couple lawyers. Needless to say, it’s a mess.

  • The Case for a 21-Hour Work Week (More socialist agenda blow?)

    01/12/2012 10:29:15 AM PST · 19 of 43
    The Pack Knight to AngelesCrestHighway
    Okay, I broke down and did read the whole article, where I came across this gem:

    The NEF argues we need to achieve truly happy lives, we need to challenge social norms and reset the industrial clock ticking in our heads. It sees the 21-hour week as integral to this for two reasons: it will redistribute paid work, offering the hope of a more equal society (right now too many are overworked, or underemployed).

    On what does he base the assumption that the "underemployed" is even capable of doing the work of the "overworked"? Does he really think that an "underemployed" literature major can take work off the hands of an "overworked" neurosurgeon? Who is "commodifying" now?

    The very idea that all work is the same and that you can essentially plug any work, with a little training, into any job is a relic of the very Industrial Age the author claims to be moving past. It was a key concept of that other relic of the Industrial Age, communism. We saw it in the Soviet Union, where the labor of doctors was valued the same as the labor of unskilled factory workers - with predictable results. The fact that this author seems to harbor the same assumption says a lot.
  • The Case for a 21-Hour Work Week (More socialist agenda blow?)

    01/12/2012 10:11:11 AM PST · 5 of 43
    The Pack Knight to Personal Responsibility

    I refuse to read any further than “To save the world”.

  • Mouvement Qubec franais protests unilingual Canadiens coach

    01/11/2012 11:58:05 AM PST · 15 of 15
    The Pack Knight to Alberta's Child
    One of the great ironies of this idiotic obsession these Montreal hockey fans have about the French language is that the English language is far more useful in the Montreal Canadiens' locker room than French is. The team has very few players from Quebec these days (only 2 of the 25 players listed on their website today).

    I remember the kerfuffle back in the 90s when Kirk Muller was traded away and Mike Keane was named the new captain. Keane pointed out exactly what you said, that it didn't matter whether the captain spoke French since all the players spoke English. Needless to say, he was pilloried by the Quebecois media.

    Too bad for Montreal they didn't fire Jacques Martin a few weeks earlier, or they could have hired Muller before Carolina did.
  • Rick Santorum's Naive Blast To An Impoverished Past (Zero taxes for manufacturers is bad policy)

    01/11/2012 11:32:09 AM PST · 32 of 34
    The Pack Knight to SeekAndFind
    That’s what you get when you try to favor one segment of business over the other.

    Better to simply CUT CORPORATE TAXES to one LOW, COMEPTITIVE LEVEL and get out of the way.


    Hear hear. Also, while I would certainly like to see some more manufacturing attracted back to our shores, that doesn't mean ANY manufacturing is preferable to any non-manufacturing business.

    After all, what's better for our economic viability and national security, a software company or a t-shirt factory? I used to live in North Carolina which has for decades been losing the latter but gaining the former. Some might disagree, but I think it has been for the best in that state. Certainly, I feel safer having our military have to buy Chinese-made undershirts than having them buy Chinese-made targeting software.
  • Rick Santorum's Naive Blast To An Impoverished Past (Zero taxes for manufacturers is bad policy)

    01/11/2012 11:31:51 AM PST · 31 of 34
    The Pack Knight to SeekAndFind
    That’s what you get when you try to favor one segment of business over the other.

    Better to simply CUT CORPORATE TAXES to one LOW, COMEPTITIVE LEVEL and get out of the way.


    Hear hear. Also, while I would certainly like to see some more manufacturing attracted back to our shores, that doesn't mean ANY manufacturing is preferable to any non-manufacturing business.

    After all, what's better for our economic viability and national security, a software company or a t-shirt factory? I used to live in North Carolina which has for decades been losing the latter but gaining the former. Some might disagree, but I think it has been for the best in that state. Certainly, I feel safer having our military have to buy Chinese-made undershirts than having them buy Chinese-made targeting software.
  • Rick Santorum's Naive Blast To An Impoverished Past (Zero taxes for manufacturers is bad policy)

    01/11/2012 6:06:14 AM PST · 30 of 34
    The Pack Knight to itsahoot

    Your hard on for lawyers aside, I think I see what you are saying and agree with it. That’s why I think the corporate income tax ought to be eliminated - corporations should be “pass through” just like partnerships and most LLCs. There is no reason for the double taxation of income just because it is earned in the corporate form, other than rank populism.

  • Rick Santorum's Naive Blast To An Impoverished Past (Zero taxes for manufacturers is bad policy)

    01/10/2012 8:01:17 PM PST · 28 of 34
    The Pack Knight to itsahoot

    Well, if you know of a common sense way to resolve this issue without (a) creating a rule that would be easily gamed, (b) coming up with a completely arbitrary rule that has nothing to do with what’s good for the country, or (c) leaving it up to the unpredictable whim of IRS bureaucrats or tax judges, I’d be interested to hear it.

    The truth is that there is no way to implement Santorum’s proposal that wouldn’t provide a lot of work for lawyers. Even though I am a lawyer, as a citizen, I don’t want that kind of system.

  • Rick Santorum's Naive Blast To An Impoverished Past (Zero taxes for manufacturers is bad policy)

    01/10/2012 12:38:38 PM PST · 22 of 34
    The Pack Knight to SeekAndFind
    Good article. The other problem with Santorum's proposal is this: How do you determine what is manufacturing?

    Think that's a simple question? Then answer this one:

    Which of the following, if any, is a "manufacturing" business?

    1. An integrated auto manufacturer.
    2. An auto manufacturer that assembles cars from parts bought from China.
    3. An auto dealer who buys cars without headlights, buys the headlights separately, installs them on site, and sells the cars.
    4. An engineering consulting firm that designs cars.
    5. A fast food restaurant.
    6. A fast food restaurant's supplier.
    7. A caterer.
    8. A meatpacker.
    9. A corn farmer.
    10. A beef cattleman.
    11. A dairy farmer.
    12. A dog breeder.
    13. A guy who makes cabinets by hand.
    14. A toilet paper factory.
    15. A software company.
    16. A CD printing company.
    17. A software company that owns its own CD presses and sells its software on CD-ROMs.
    18. A movie studio.
    19. A coal mine.
    20. An oil driller.
    21. An oilfield services company.
    22. An oil refiner.
    23. A homebuilder.
    24. A prefabricated home manufacturer.
    25. A mobile home manufacturer.


    Then if you can answer that, then answer this: How is this not arbitrarily picking winners and losers in the economy and, if it is, when did it become okay for conservatives to do that? Also, why are the businesses for which you said "Yes" better for America than the businesses for which you said "No"? Why should the latter businesses have to pick up the slack for the former?

    I'd like to see Santorum answer these questions. I'd like it even more if he rethought this nonsense and started acting like a conservative on this issue, because I generally like the guy and would love to support him.
  • Dixville Notch: In First New Hampshire District Its a Romney-Huntsman Tie

    01/10/2012 12:15:57 PM PST · 55 of 62
    The Pack Knight to NVDave
    It further astounded me that Perry couldn’t think of three agencies to cut to nothing when there’s a list a dozen long. If you can’t remember one on stage, then name another, fer cryin’ out loud. Just start swinging an axe in DC, and fast.

    It shocked me that the guy who wrote Fed Up! couldn't knock that one out of the park. It sure made me question how serious he was about a limited federal government.

    Also, you make a good point with Greece, Italy, and Spain. With what's going on in the world right now, the time should be ripe for bold conservative reforms in government, but we couldn't come up with a single candidate who can actually articulate those reforms - except Gingrich, who nonetheless has an irritating tendency to want to replace liberal government meddling with conservative government meddling.
  • Dixville Notch: In First New Hampshire District Its a Romney-Huntsman Tie

    01/10/2012 12:08:41 PM PST · 54 of 62
    The Pack Knight to WhistlingPastTheGraveyard

    Agreed. I’m talking about Huntsman out not so much as an endorsement (though I really would prefer him to Romney) as a way of pointing out the maddening situation we’re in, where the one self-professed “moderate” in the race has one of the most conservative tax plans. It’s maddening because it isn’t even that conservative compared to what was proposed only a few years ago.

  • Updated: Comparison of Tax Plans for 2012 Presidential Candidates

    01/10/2012 12:00:13 PM PST · 24 of 24
    The Pack Knight to RockinRight
    I've been thinking about this, too, so I came up with a little multiple choice question over my lunch break the other day that I think anyone considering Santorum's tax proposal needs to consider.

    Which of the following, if any, is a "manufacturing" business?

    1. An integrated auto manufacturer.
    2. An auto manufacturer that assembles cars from parts bought from China.
    3. An auto dealer who buys cars without headlights, buys the headlights separately, installs them on site, and sells the cars.
    4. An engineering consulting firm that designs cars.
    5. A fast food restaurant.
    6. A fast food restaurant's supplier.
    7. A caterer.
    8. A meatpacker.
    9. A corn farmer.
    10. A beef cattleman.
    11. A dairy farmer.
    12. A dog breeder.
    13. A guy who makes cabinets by hand.
    14. A toilet paper factory.
    15. A software company.
    16. A CD printing company.
    17. A software company that owns its own CD presses and sells its software on CD-ROMs.
    18. A movie studio.
    19. A coal mine.
    20. An oil driller.
    21. An oilfield services company.
    22. An oil refiner.
    23. A homebuilder.
    24. A prefabricated home manufacturer.
    25. A mobile home manufacturer.


    As you can see, some of them are easy, some not so easy. All of it, however, ultimately involves picking winners and losers in the economy in a rather arbitrary manner, something we conservatives were supposed to be against last I checked.

    I cheered Santorum on in Iowa, but the tax plan makes it very hard to give him more than lukewarm support going forward.
  • Updated: Comparison of Tax Plans for 2012 Presidential Candidates

    01/10/2012 11:48:04 AM PST · 23 of 24
    The Pack Knight to 92nina

    Huntsman’s are SUPPOSED to be revenue neutral, and at a glance it looks like a good faith effort to be revenue neutral.

    However, revenue-neutrality is always a somewhat speculative endeavor.

  • Updated: Comparison of Tax Plans for 2012 Presidential Candidates

    01/10/2012 11:22:23 AM PST · 20 of 24
    The Pack Knight to RockinRight

    I have to disagree with you on a couple of those. I think Huntsman has one of the better plans, in that he actually advocates scrapping all of the credits and exemptions and going with a flatter, broader tax base. It is still progressive in that it has three brackets, but stripping away all of the deductions and credits - which increase compliance and return preparation costs and allow politicians pick winners and losers - is actually more important to me than having one tax bracket.

    I think Santorum’s tax plan is abysmal for a conservative. It looks more like a Blue Dog Democrat’s proposal than a Republican’s - and as you might know, I’m not one who throws around “RINO” accusations very often. The elmination of corporate income taxes for anyone engaged in “manufacturing” would be a disaster - can you imagine the type of shenanigans that will go on, both in Congress and among tax-paying companies, to play with that exemption? It’s a shame, too, because I like a lot of Rick’s policies and I like him a lot personally.

    For what it’s worth, I think Santorum truly believes this is what’s best for the country. Coming from anyone else, I’d think it was shameless populist pandering and an attempt to get crossover votes from Reagan Democrats. Santorum is one of the most honest guys in politics, however.

  • Updated: Comparison of Tax Plans for 2012 Presidential Candidates

    01/10/2012 11:08:45 AM PST · 19 of 24
    The Pack Knight to 92nina
    This chart is missing some important details, particulary with regards to simplification of the tax code. There are also some conflicts between this chart and the one put forth by the Tax Foundation.

    I noticed it particularly with Huntsman - never a candidate I've supported, but I have been interested in his tax plan of late. With the possible exception of Perry's and Gingrich's respective optional flat taxes, Huntsman is the only candidate I am aware of who is in favor of eliminating all deductions and credits in favor of lower rates, and that isn't reflected on the chart. Also, I've seen conflicting reports on Huntsman's stance on the death tax - the Tax Foundation's chart says he is in favor of eliminating the estate tax. ATR cites Huntsman's campaign site as the source for this chart, but that site doesn't address the estate tax issue.

    Certainly every candidate is better than Obama on this issue, but I would have liked to see at least one candidate explicitly come out in favor of scrapping the entire tax code and starting over, something which is long overdue.
  • Dixville Notch: In First New Hampshire District Its a Romney-Huntsman Tie

    01/10/2012 10:44:50 AM PST · 45 of 62
    The Pack Knight to RockinRight

    Ain’t that the truth. They may be two of the worst possible states for picking a Republican nominee. Is it any wonder why most of the campaign consists of “culture war” red meat and pandering to Iowa farm subsidies?

  • Dixville Notch: In First New Hampshire District Its a Romney-Huntsman Tie

    01/10/2012 10:39:10 AM PST · 44 of 62
    The Pack Knight to Lazlo in PA

    Frankly, I think I’d prefer Huntsman to Romney. Huntsman arguably has the best tax plan of any candidate, and unlike Gingrich, he didn’t wait until he was getting killed in the Iowa polls to announce it.

    Of all the disappointments I’ve had in this year’s field, it’s been on taxes. It was just four years ago, in a FAR more hostile environment for conservatives, that virtually EVERY Republican candidate, Romney included, was proposing very significant tax reform or at least tax cuts. Now they’ve all retreated - no candidate other than the erstwhile Cain came out in favor of a non-optional flat tax, only a few are in favor of eliminating the capital gains and dividend taxes, and only Huntsman would really simplify the tax code in any meaningful way.

    I was particularly disappointed in Bachmann on this issue. She must be the first tax attorney I’ve ever heard from who did NOT have a strong opinion on simplifying the tax code and ending double taxation, and I know quite a few tax attorneys.

  • Election 2012: South Carolina Republican Primary(Romney 27%, Santorum 24%)

    01/06/2012 12:51:50 PM PST · 178 of 312
    The Pack Knight to RecoveringPaulisto; 11th Commandment

    That’s what I’ve heard as well. DeMint has stated he won’t endorse anyone this time, at least before the SC primary.