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Posts by The Pack Knight

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  • If you ever wondered if the ACLU was a strictly far left wing organization

    03/13/2017 11:50:03 AM PDT · 11 of 12
    The Pack Knight to Starman417

    They also claim that Obamacare is “the most significant civil liberties and civil rights legislation of this century.”

    I happen to agree, inasmuch as no legislation this century restrains civil liberties and civil rights more than Obamacare.

    What they don’t explain is why the American “Civil Liberties” Union promotes the most massive instance of government interference in private affairs since World War II.

  • 2016 Election LIVE Thread

    11/08/2016 8:35:15 PM PST · 6,149 of 10,531
    The Pack Knight to KC_Lion

    MSNBC is the best right now. Chrissy looks like he’s having a hemorrhoid flairup.

  • How exactly would a brokered convention work? (Video Ben Guinsberg on Brokered convention)

    03/02/2016 11:43:45 AM PST · 43 of 53
    The Pack Knight to Whenifhow

    I didn’t really hear anything that would result in stealing delegates. They were talking about delegates from 37 states who are bound to vote for a particular candidate on the first ballot, but who are chosen by the state party rather than the candidate’s campaign. He said that they are bound to vote for a particular candidate for president, but are not bound to vote in any particular way on procedural issues or on the vice presidential nominee.

    None of this could result in Trump losing bound delegate votes. The vast majority of delegates are bound by state party rules (and, in some cases I believe, by state law) to vote for a particular candidate on at least the first ballot. So, if Trump has a majority of the bound delegates going into the convention, nothing Ginsburg is talking about is going to prevent him from being the nominee. It might prevent him from having his choice as running mate or in influencing the party platform, but he would still be the nominee.

    The only way any of this would affect Trump’s (or any other “frontrunner’s”) nomination is if he has less than a majority of the delegates. If more than a couple ballots go by without a majority winner, then all of the bound delegates, including Trump’s delegates, would no longer be bound and would be free to vote for whoever they chose. What Ginsburg was talking about is that while these delegates may be bound to vote for Trump on the first ballot, they are not necessarily Trump supporters themselves, and may vote for someone other than Trump if and when they become free to do so.

    My point is that if he has less than a majority of the delegates, then his losing the nomination isn’t “theft” because (1) this is not a plurality nomination, and (2) there is no obligation to nominate the “frontrunner” if he doesn’t have a majority of the delegates.

  • How exactly would a brokered convention work? (Video Ben Guinsberg on Brokered convention)

    03/02/2016 8:27:31 AM PST · 16 of 53
    The Pack Knight to Whenifhow

    Who would be disenfranchised? A nominee is chosen by a majority of delegates at the convention, not a plurality. If Trump can’t win a majority of the delegate votes at the convention, then what would give him the right to be the nominee?

    This is no different than saying that voters were “disenfranchised” in 2000 when Gore lost the election after “winning” a plurality of the popular vote.

  • Here's What You Need to Know About The Ridiculous Indictment of The Planned Parenthood

    01/27/2016 8:03:40 AM PST · 44 of 44
    The Pack Knight to WENDLE

    What prosecutor in Mississippi went to prison for instituting a prosecution?

    I’m talking about prosecutorial immunity, not official immunity. Two different things. Prosecutorial immunity is absolute. Official immunity is qualified.

  • Here's What You Need to Know About The Ridiculous Indictment of The Planned Parenthood

    01/27/2016 7:55:42 AM PST · 43 of 44
    The Pack Knight to Svartalfiar

    I’d say Harris County is considerably more conservative than Travis County. For example, Obama won Travis County by nearly 24% in 2012, while he only won Harris County by .08%—less than thousand vote margin in a county where over a million votes were cast. 2008 was similar—nearly a 30% margin for Obama in Travis, but only a 2% margin for Obama in Harris. Before 2008, Harris County hadn’t gone Democrat in a presidential election since 1964, while Travis County only went Republican twice during that time: Reagan in ‘84 and Bush in 2000.

    You’re right about Houston. About half of Harris County’s population is in Houston proper. Houston proper is very liberal (with the exception of the wealthy and conservative River Oaks-Memorial corridor) while Harris County outside of Houston is very conservative.

    Basically, Republicans in the suburbs tend to more than balance out Democrats in the city. That’s why the mayor of Houston is almost always a Democrat, while county-wide elections are normally won by Republicans. It has been trending Democrat, though. Democrats have been winning county-wide elections in the two Obama presidential election years, while Republicans continue to win county-wide elections in mid-term years. We’ll see if that continues without Obama on the ticket.

  • Here's What You Need to Know About The Ridiculous Indictment of The Planned Parenthood

    01/26/2016 4:55:31 PM PST · 36 of 44
    The Pack Knight to WENDLE

    Intent is irrelevant to absolute immunity. That is what distinguishes qualified immunity (such as what a cop enjoys) from from absolute immunity (such as what a prosecutor, grand juror, or judge enjoys). Qualified immunity is subject to exceptions for bad faith or malice. Absolute immunity is not.

    The law grants prosecutors absolute immunity from civil liability for instituting a prosecution, presenting their case to a grand jury or court, or anything else “intimately associated with the judicial phase of the criminal process.”

    Presenting a bill of indictment to a grand jury is plainly within the scope of a prosecutor’s absolute immunity. Thus, if all the prosecutor is being sued for is instituting a prosecution, which is all that it appears the prosecutor did here, then it makes no difference whether why she did so, even if it was with the specific, malicious intent to violate civil rights.

    You may disagree with this doctrine (and many people do), but it is the law in Texas and in most other states, and it has been held by the US Supreme Court to be the law applicable in 1983 suits since Imbler v. Pachtman in 1976.

  • Here's What You Need to Know About The Ridiculous Indictment of The Planned Parenthood

    01/26/2016 1:31:41 PM PST · 34 of 44
    The Pack Knight to WENDLE

    There will not be a civil suit. It is well-established that prosecutors and grand jurors both enjoy absolute immunity from 1983 suits.

  • Here's What You Need to Know About The Ridiculous Indictment of The Planned Parenthood

    01/26/2016 1:14:50 PM PST · 32 of 44
    The Pack Knight to CSM

    No, Perry was indicted in Travis County, where Austin is and probably the most liberal county in the state. This grand jury was in Harris County, which is where Houston is.

    Harris County is more conservative than Travis County, but the grand juries have been screwy for a while.

  • Donald Trump: I’ve always had good relationships with Nancy Pelosi, Harry Reid

    01/26/2016 12:53:11 PM PST · 103 of 115
    The Pack Knight to lodi90

    So he gets more than twice as much money from the bank that puts branches in Wal-Mart than he does from Goldman Sachs. Big elitist.

    I also see that he gets more money from individuals at his old law firm than he does from Goldman Sachs—funny for a guy who is supposedly hated by his colleagues.

  • Donald Trump comes out against letting states manage federal lands?

    01/23/2016 9:19:04 AM PST · 142 of 251
    The Pack Knight to Principled

    He has that “tendency” because he simply isn’t a conservative.

  • Chargers, Raiders and Rams all apply for relocation to L.A.

    01/05/2016 3:31:03 PM PST · 84 of 100
    The Pack Knight to Perdogg

    Bring back the Cleveland Rams!

  • As Usual, Bernie Sanders Doesn't Know What He's Talking About(WHAT!?)

    12/24/2015 8:54:50 AM PST · 8 of 12
    The Pack Knight to rktman

    But then the author throws out a whopper of his own:

    “Roughly 100 million Americans want to work but can’t find jobs.” That’s not even close to true.

    He appears to be referring to the BLS labor force participation numbers, which are at historic lows, and show that over 94 million out of the non institutional civilian population (over 16, not in the military, not institutionalized) of 251 million is not a member of the labor force (employed + unemployed and actively looking for a job).

    Yes, that 94 million includes those who stopped looking for a job because they can’t find one. It also includes those who do NOT want a job: retirees, the disabled, homemakers, etc.

    The number of Americans who want a job but don’t have one is more like 14 million. About 7.5 million “unemployed” and another 6.5 million “not in labor force but want job now.” Still far too many, but nowhere near 100 million.

  • As Usual, Bernie Sanders Doesn't Know What He's Talking About(WHAT!?)

    12/24/2015 8:28:22 AM PST · 2 of 12
    The Pack Knight to rktman
    Don't you see? That's why he wants 90% top marginal tax rates. What better way to cut down on 60 hour work weeks than by taxing the people who actually work those weeks? By the way, isn't the problem underemployment among the poor?
  • The growing support for an Article V Convention of the States

    08/23/2015 4:26:07 PM PDT · 29 of 30
    The Pack Knight to Artemis Webb

    I think there are a lot of reasons why this is unlikely to ever happen, not the least of which being the math.

    To call a national convention to propose a constitutional amendment would require an application by the legislatures of 34 states. There are currently 31 state legislatures controlled by Republicans (30 where Republicans control both houses, plus Nebraska, whose unicameral, nonpartisan legislature is unofficially controlled by Republicans), 8 states where each house is controlled by a different party, and 11 state legislatures where both houses are controlled by Democrats. That means, assuming all 31 Republican-controlled state legislatures voted to call a convention (which I would not consider a safe assumption), we’d still need at least three states where Democrats control at least one house of the legislature. The good news is that there is at least no language in Article V that would permit state governors a veto in this process—five of the 31 Republican-controlled legislatures have Democrat governors.

    It may not be so simple as the legislatures merely voting to call a convention, either. Article V is silent as to the composition of such a convention, the procedures to be used, whether any voting at the convention would be by state or by individual delegate, whether delegates would be bound to follow the instructions of their state legislatures, whether the legislatures can restrict the purpose of the convention, how long the convention would be allowed to sit, or what number of delegates or states are necessary to propose an amendment. There is no precedent to go by, either, because this procedure has never been used in the 227 years since the Constitution was ratified. These are some pretty important issues, so who gets to decide all of this? The legislatures themselves? Congress? What if some of the legislatures’ applications include conditions authorizing only a certain kind of voting or the proposal of certain amendments? What if Congress ignores these conditions in forming the convention?

    Assuming the convention is valid and proposes an amendment, that proposal would then have to be ratified by 3/4ths of the state legislatures, or 38 states. That means, again assuming all 31 Republican-controlled legislatures ratify the amendment, ratification either would require at least 7 states where Democrats control at least one house.

    As a result, any amendment would have to have very broad support just to be proposed by such a convention, let alone ratified. Which begs the question: If an amendment has broad enough support to be proposed through this national convention procedure, isn’t it likely that it would be proposed by Congress first? This is probably why no convention has ever been called.

    There hasn’t been a controversial constitutional amendment proposed since the 1970s—the Equal Rights Amendment in 72 and the D.C. Voting Rights Amendment in 78. Neither was ratified, of course. The last controversial amendment ratified was the 24th Amendment prohibiting poll taxes, which was only controversial in the South. There are only eleven former-Confederate states—two too few to block an amendment.

    This is all by design, of course. In rejecting Jefferson’s idea of allowing a convention to be called on the concurrence of two of the three branches of government, Madison warned in Federalist 49: “The danger of disturbing the public tranquillity by interesting too strongly the public passions, is a still more serious objection against a frequent reference of constitutional questions to the decision of the whole society.”

    A convention is an interesting idea, but any discussion about it is either academic or wishful thinking at this point. It is certainly no shortcut past the hard work of winning elections and convincing the public to support your views, which is where the focus should be right now.

  • NFL passes helmet rule, ends tuck rule

    03/22/2013 5:22:08 PM PDT · 78 of 79
    The Pack Knight to Perdogg

    I don’t get all the consternation about this rule. I was ALWAYS taught to keep my head up learning to play football in Ohio. In fact, if I remember correctly, it was a personal foul to hit with the crown of the helmet back when I was playing high school ball, at least in open field.

    Of course, I’ve noticed that they don’t seem to teach proper fundamentals anymore, so maybe that’s the problem. Watching what seems to pass for open field tackling or ball carrying anymore, I guess I can see why a lot of NFL players are going to have difficulty adjusting.

    If you have to lower your head to make a tackle or cover the ball, you’re doing it wrong.

  • JUDGE ORDERS EARLY VOTING IN ORANGE COUNTY, FLA. EXTENDED 4 HOURS....

    11/04/2012 12:48:48 PM PST · 74 of 89
    The Pack Knight to dsrtsage

    Right. I don’t know what ‘s wrong with using scan cards like we had in NC. It’s a simple to use, fill-in-the-dot form which is counted automatically and immediately at the poll, but they can always be independently recounted by hand if necessary.

    Regardless of what security measures they use in “direct record” electronic systems, you’ll never have that hard evidence to verify. All you’ll ever have is what the computer tells you.

  • JUDGE ORDERS EARLY VOTING IN ORANGE COUNTY, FLA. EXTENDED 4 HOURS....

    11/04/2012 12:26:46 PM PST · 71 of 89
    The Pack Knight to conservativeinbflo.

    Absolutely. That’s at least one reason behind all these polls that assume an even larger turnout of minorities as a percentage of voters than 2008. If, or rather when, those polls prove wrong and Romney wins, it will be because of “voter suppression”.

  • U.S. Rep. Paul Broun: Evolution a lie 'from the pit of hell'

    10/08/2012 10:46:00 PM PDT · 89 of 116
    The Pack Knight to markomalley
  • Turkey dubs Syria 'a clear threat', vows to retaliate

    06/26/2012 10:41:32 AM PDT · 24 of 67
    The Pack Knight to MeganC

    Not through open warfare, but I can certainly see them providing some financial and other support in order to draw out any Turko-Syrian hostilities in order to make it more costly, both materially and politically, for Turkey. A weakened and less assertive Turkey is definitely in Russia’s core interests.