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Books/Literature (General/Chat)

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  • Kullervo: Tolkien's fascination with Finland

    08/27/2015 4:43:56 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 10 replies
    On Thursday JRR Tolkien's early story The Story of Kullervo will be published for the first time. The dark tale reveals that Tolkien's Middle Earth was inspired not only by England and Wales… but also by Finland. "Hapless Kullervo," Tolkien called him. Kullervo, an orphan boy raised into slavery, a tragic hero who commits incest in the dark forests of Karelia and hurls himself on his own blade.
  • The top ten most unexpected words added to the online Oxford dictionary

    08/27/2015 4:07:05 AM PDT · by markomalley · 18 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 8/27/15 | Lucy Clarke-Billings
    The online Oxford dictionary has added 1,000 new words to its database. The latest additions have been announced, highlighting the things British people have been talking about in the summer of 2015, such as inconsiderate commuters, solidified waste and unacceptable service charges. Here are ten of the most unexpected words on the list: manspreading (noun): the practice whereby a man, especially one travelling on public transport, adopts a sitting position with his legs wide apart, in such a way as to encroach on an adjacent seat or seat awesomesauce (adjective): extremely good; excellent bants (noun): playfully teasing or mocking remarks...
  • How a Volcanic Eruption in 1815 Darkened the World but Colored the Arts

    08/25/2015 11:30:14 AM PDT · by C19fan · 35 replies
    NY Times ^ | August 24, 2015 | William J. Broad
    In April 1815, the most powerful volcanic blast in recorded history shook the planet in a catastrophe so vast that 200 years later, investigators are still struggling to grasp its repercussions. It played a role, they now understand, in icy weather, agricultural collapse and global pandemics — and even gave rise to celebrated monsters. Around the lush isles of the Dutch East Indies — modern-day Indonesia — the eruption of Mount Tambora killed tens of thousands of people. They were burned alive or killed by flying rocks, or they died later of starvation because the heavy ash smothered crops.
  • 2015 Hugo Awards

    08/23/2015 3:17:23 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 13 replies
    The Hugo Awards ^ | August 22, 2015
    2015 Hugo Awards Presented at: Sasquan, Spokane, Washington, USA, August 22, 2015Hosts: David Gerrold and Tananarive DueBase design: Matthew DockreyAwards Administration: John Lorentz, Ruth Sachter, Linda Deneroff, Ron Oakes, Dave McCarty and Glenn Glazer
  • Frederick Forsyth: Interview

    08/21/2015 7:58:23 PM PDT · by Perdogg · 16 replies
    In Frederick Forsyth’s eventful Forsyth began, as many journalists retelling of his life story, the thriller writer—famous for bestsellers such as The Day of the Jackal, The Dogs of War, The Fourth Protocol and most recently The Kill List—reveals how penury first prompted his move into fiction writing, how he almost started the Third World War and what he really thinks of the BBC, for which he briefly worked as a reporter. Forsyth is a private man and his memoir is indicatively titled The Outsider. He dislikes publicity—even when his books are published—and says he had long resisted the offer...
  • A novel 40 years in the making: "The Man Who Falls In Love With His Wife"

    08/19/2015 6:47:49 PM PDT · by BruceDeitrickPrice · 19 replies
    LinkeddIn ^ | August 8, 2015 | Bruce Deitrick Price
    I wrote the first draft of this novel circa 1976 when I was living on West 105th Street in Manhattan. The original title was Crucial Moments. Somehow I got Joe Fox, a huge name at Random House, to look at the opening chapters. He actually called me up to say: not for him. (Imagine this big shot talking to a nobody. Clearly, it was another age.) Probably I did another two or three edits and in 1992 I showed it to an agent. She said: I love it. She took me on as a writer because of this book and...
  • Need Some Naval History Help

    08/18/2015 4:21:48 PM PDT · by Crapgame · 22 replies
    Freepers I am turning to you all for assistance in preparing a class lecture on the importance of Mahan's "The Influence of Sea Power Upon History". Specifically I was hoping one of you well read Freepers can direct me to a good, excerpt or summary of Mahan's "The Influence of Sea Power Upon History". Something I can hand out in class. I have read his many articles but none of them seem to cover the major points of his theories succinctly. So I am wondering now if there is a good excerpt of his major work that you all could...
  • Sad Puppies, Rabid Chauvinists: Will Raging White Guys Succeed in Hijacking Sci-Fi's Biggest Awards?

    08/16/2015 10:31:29 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 30 replies
    YES! Magazine ^ | August 14, 2015 | Miles Schneiderman
    ... I know what it's like to love an author despite his or her controversial statements about real-life political issues. And I also feel that this year's Hugo slate is an unmitigated outrage that has serious implications for the future of speculative fiction. Next week, on Aug. 22, voters will decide if these awards are still about celebrating excellent writing and innovative ideas, or if they are just another blood-drenched battleground in the conflict between white male traditionalists and everyone else. For those who don't follow the genre-fiction awards circuit, here's what's going on. A shifting contingent of science fiction...
  • The Future (As Predicted By Science Fiction)

    08/16/2015 8:10:42 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 35 replies
    Based on speculative fiction, the following visualization analyzes 62 'foretold' future events (social, scientific, technological, or political). Many are catastrophic, but, in the end - good news - in 802,701 the world will still exist and everything will be more or less ok... 62 'foretold' future events
  • Jean Kirkpatrick -- Anybody remember?

    08/14/2015 10:36:05 AM PDT · by Fhios · 36 replies
    8/14/2015 | Linked Bio Lite
    ... "She was known for the "Kirkpatrick Doctrine", which advocated U.S. support of anticommunist governments around the world, including authoritarian dictatorships, if they went along with Washington's aims—believing they could be led into democracy by example. She wrote, "Traditional authoritarian governments are less repressive than revolutionary autocracies."[2]"
  • A lost 'Lord of the Rings' story is about to be published (The Story of Kullervo)

    08/11/2015 6:27:40 PM PDT · by Perdogg · 18 replies
    A lost story set in the "Lord of the Rings" universe is about to see the light of day in a new book out later this summer. "The Story of Kullervo" is about the titular Kullervo, a boy sold into slavery who vows revenge on a cruel wizard who killed his father. Here's how the novel's Amazon listing describes it:
  • The Roanoke Island Colony: Lost, and Found?

    08/11/2015 11:08:07 AM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 6 replies
    http://www.nytimes.com ^ | August 10, 2015 | THEO EMERY
    MERRY HILL, N.C. — Under a blistering sun, Nicholas M. Luccketti swatted at mosquitoes as he watched his archaeology team at work in a shallow pit on a hillside above the shimmering waters of Albemarle Sound. On a table in the shade, a pile of plastic bags filled with artifacts was growing. Fragments of earthenware and pottery. A mashed metal rivet. A piece of a hand-wrought nail. They call the spot Site X. Down a dusty road winding through soybean fields, the clearing lies between two cypress swamps teeming with venomous snakes. It is a suitably mysterious name for a...
  • The ‘Berenstein Bears’ Internet Conspiracy Might Rock Your Childhood

    08/07/2015 9:36:38 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 11 replies
    KFOR ^ | AUGUST 6, 2015 | M.DELATORRE
    A new conspiracy theory has taken the Internet and childhood nostalgia by storm. A popular kids book series known to most of the population as “The Berenstein Bears,” is actually called “The Berenstain Bears.” For those who grew up reading the books and have the word “Berenstein” ingrained in their minds, the fact that the title really is “Berenstain” is quite a shock to the system. A quick Internet search of the book covers and the official PBS website reveals that “The Berenstain Bears” have been there all along. The shock of this revelation has led some to believe in...
  • Two Low Budget Movies that are a must see on DVD

    08/05/2015 1:06:37 PM PDT · by Hot Tabasco · 31 replies
    8/5/2015 | Me
    Two great movies dealing with Nazi Germany that had limited play, if any, in movie theaters. "The Book Thief" "Sophie Scholl - The Final Days"
  • 10 Books You Pretend to Have Read (And Why You Should Really Read Them) (science fiction/fantasy)

    08/01/2015 1:29:27 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 237 replies
    io9 ^ | July 30, 2015 | Charlie Jane Anders
    Science fiction and fantasy offer a rich legacy of great books--but that abundant pile of reading material can also be daunting. So sometimes, it's easier to fake it. We asked some of our favorite writers, and they told us the 10 books that everyone pretends to have read. And why you should actually read them. From Asimov to Pynchon, science fiction contains some fantastic, ambitious works of genre fiction. But a lot of us get overwhelmed. And it's not that hard to fake a first-hand knowledge of these books, because they're everywhere, and we've heard people talk about them so...
  • America's New Trinity of Love: Dean, Brando, Presley by Jack Kerouac

    America's New Trinity of Love: Dean, Brando, Presley by Jack Kerouac Love is sweeping the country. While wars and riots rage all around the world, in a vortex that resembles the dying Dinosaur Age of Violence, here within her sweeter shores America is producing a Revolution of Love. Three young men of exceptional masculine beauty and compassion and sadness have been upraised by its reaching hands. This is strange and it is good. Up to now the American Hero has always been on the defensive: he killed Indians and villains and beat up his rivals and surled. He has been...
  • New Dr. Seuss Book Hits Bookshelve

    07/29/2015 8:14:37 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 6 replies
    NBC San Diego ^ | Tuesday, Jul 28, 2015 | Laura McVicker and Chris Chan
    A new Dr. Seuss book was released on Tuesday to excited fans, more than 20 years after the La Jolla author died. “What Pet Should I Get?” hit bookshelves nationwide, and at University of California San Diego’s Geisel Library, throngs of fans lined up to get their copy. The author’s widow discovered the manuscript for the book in 2013 when she was donating some of his drawings to the library; it’s believed to have been written sometime between 1958 and 1962. The book follows a brother and sister who visit a pet store to pick a pet, but aren’t able...
  • What animal lovers will hate about the new Dr. Seuss book

    07/28/2015 7:13:22 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 41 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | July 28, 2015 | Rene Lynch
    The new Dr. Seuss book "What Pet Should I Get?" is about two children who go to a pet store to buy a pet. That was a commonplace event back in the 1950s or early 1960s, when Dr. Seuss is believed to have written the long-lost book, but it's discouraged today. Which is why the new book comes with a remarkable addendum: A publisher's note urging children to walk on by the pet store and adopt from an animal shelter. But animal rights activist Ingrid Newkirk, the founder of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, said it's not enough...
  • True crime author Ann Rule dead at 83

    07/27/2015 4:13:55 PM PDT · by stylecouncilor · 12 replies
    CBS News ^ | July 27, 2015 | CBS News/AP
    SEATTLE -- True crime writer Ann Rule, who wrote more than 30 books, including a profile of her former co-worker, serial killer Ted Bundy, has died at 83. Rule died at Highline Medical Center, south of Seattle, at 10:30 p.m. Sunday, said Scott Thompson, a spokesman for CHI Franciscan Health. Rule's daughter, Leslie Rule, said on Facebook that her mother had many health issues, including congestive heart failure. "My mom died peacefully last night," Leslie Rule wrote. "She got to see all of her children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren." Ann Rule's first book, "The Stranger Beside Me," profiled Bundy, whom...
  • Vanity - When did France hit rock bottom?

    07/26/2015 5:22:37 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 32 replies
    I am reading Day of Jackal, I had read it 30 years ago but in my re-reading I have realized that France, even though unstable politically, was run by competent individuals interested in securing the history and legacy of France. Charles de Gaulle might have a autocratic and I am opposed to such, but he is miles ahead of Francois Holland. When did France turn the corner for the worse? Was it the 70s?
  • Why Are ‘Customers’ So Angry About This New Book on Marriage and Religious Freedom?

    07/25/2015 8:08:22 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 41 replies
    The Daily Signal ^ | July 19, 2015 | Marguerite Bowling
    Is the debate about marriage over after the Supreme Court’s June decision to redefine marriage in all fifty states? That’s what some Amazon.com reviewers are insisting after a new book was released last week. The book, “Truth Overruled: The Future of Marriage and Religious Freedom,” is a roadmap from Ryan Anderson, a senior research fellow at the Heritage Foundation, on how the conservative movement can move forward in promoting marriage and protecting religious freedom after the Supreme Court’s ruling. “I wrote this book for all Americans. For those who disagree with me, to at least understand the viewpoint of roughly...
  • July 25, 1788: Mozart completes Symphony No. 40 in G minor

    07/25/2015 4:32:10 PM PDT · by nwrep · 47 replies
    Leonard Bernstein and the BSO ^ | July 25, 2015 | nwrep
    On July 25, 1788, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart completed his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, the second to last of his symphonies. To Robert Schumann in the 19th century, the symphony was a work of "Grecian lightness and grace," while for a later writer, Alfred Einstein, there are passages that "plunge to the abyss of the soul." Such ambiguity is perhaps apt for one of the greatest works of a composer whose music so frequently defies adequate description. The symphony is cast in the usual four movements; the opening Molto allegro immediately announces something unusual by starting not with characteristic...
  • Caitlyn Jenner Named One of Vogue's Best Dressed Women of the Week

    07/22/2015 12:10:12 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 51 replies
    Us Magazine ^ | JUL. 21, 2015 | SOPHIE VOKES-DUDGEON
    Caitlyn Jenner has been given the ultimate fashion seal of approval by being appointed one of Vogue's best dressed women of the week. The former Olympian, 65, who has showcased a stunning array of gorgeous dresses since she first introduced herself to the world last month, has been given a huge thumbs up for the stunning cream Versace gown she wore to collect her ESPYS award last week. Vogue has placed her in its number two spot amongst the ten best dressed female celebrities of the week, behind socialite and model Olivia Palermo. Also featuring in the fashion Bible's lineup...
  • 'Ragtime' Author E.L. Doctorow Dies at 84

    07/21/2015 9:34:31 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 9 replies
    UPI ^ | July 21, 2015 | Danielle Haynes
    The National Book Award-winning author of Ragtime and Billy Bathgate, E.L. Doctorow, died Tuesday in New York, his family said. He was 84. The author's son, Richard, told The New York Times his father died of complications from lung cancer. Doctorow's agent, Ron Bernstein, confirmed the news to the Los Angeles Times. Doctorow was known for writing historical fiction in the form of a dozen novels, three volumes of short fiction and a stage drama. He also wrote essays on literature and politics. He won the National Book Award for his novel, Ragtime, which was later adapted into a Broadway...
  • What The Koran Really Says By Ibn Warraq, A Book Review

    07/19/2015 7:22:11 AM PDT · by tbw2 · 9 replies
    Hubpages ^ | 07/18/2015 | Tamara Wilhite
    The Koran contains many contradictory statements and confusing verses that even those who know classical Arabic conflict on their meaning. What are some of the major contradictory statements in the Koran, and the verses that take precedence over others? What are some of the sources of the Koran's stories that history has overlooked? What is the historical context for some of the stories and events in the Koran?
  • Forgetting Lolita

    07/17/2015 1:56:54 PM PDT · by Borges · 48 replies
    First Things ^ | 7/15/2015 | Peter J. Leithart
    We are awash in Lolitas - Britney Spears, Miley Cyrus, Katy Perry. As Ira Wells says in a New Republic piece, “at a certain echelon of pop music megastardom . . . they are all Lolitas now.” Yet Wells insists that as the number of Lolitas has risen exponentially, we've forgotten Lolita, the original Nabokov novel. These two phenomena coexist because we've taken Stanley Kubrick's film Lolita as our model more than Nabokov's. The contrast is evident from the film's opening scene: “Nabokov repeatedly emphasizes that there is nothing conventionally beautiful about the nymphet. The novel’s Lolita is a tomboyish,...
  • 55 Gallons of Lube? Customers Complain That Amazon #PrimeDay Sales Are Terrible

    07/16/2015 5:33:35 AM PDT · by C19fan · 45 replies
    The Hollywood Reporter ^ | July 15, 2015 | Staff
    Amazon's #PrimeDay launched on Wednesday as the company bragged the sales would be even better than Black Friday's. However, Amazon users were not impressed with the sales the e-commerce site offered, and many users took to Twitter to express their displeasure. #PrimeDayFail and #PrimeDay both trended as the complaints poured in. "Either I'm missing something or the @amazon prime sale is a joke. Everything I want is full price. #PrimeDayFail," said one user. "This #PrimeDay sucks ... its like a digital garage sale," said another.
  • How Green Were the Nazis?

    07/15/2015 9:17:16 AM PDT · by Olympiad Fisherman · 19 replies
    Environmentalism is Fascism ^ | 7?14/2015 | William Kay
    The eleven authors of How Green Were the Nazis? were painfully aware that contemporary studies of German conservatism’s evolution into Nazism routinely highlight the naturalistic and ecological underpinnings of this political current. An appeal to the authority of ecology for political guidance is widely acknowledged as being basic to Nazism. A need to refute this scholarly consensus motivated the writing of How Green Were the Nazis? …but alas, in vain. The eleven clods (environmentalists all) formed a circular firing squad around their target. They shot holes through one another’s arguments then fled the scene leaving behind piles of good ammunition....
  • Of Course Atticus Finch Was a Racist—And That’s Okay

    07/14/2015 11:25:50 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 39 replies
    The Federalist ^ | 07/14/2015 | David Marcus
    In American letters and mythology, there are few characters as noble as Atticus Finch. The gentleman, lawyer, and single father from Harper Lee’s “To Kill A Mockingbird” has been the very model of masculine decency for decades. Whether through the dulcet delivery of the classic novel or the buttoned-up dignity of Gregory Peck’s movie portrayal, Atticus has been loved as few figures of fiction have. As reviews trickle out for Lee’s “Go Set a Watchman,” written before, but taking place after, her masterpiece, one bit of news has dominated: Atticus Finch is a racist. Had he been a historical figure,...
  • "To Kill a Mockingbird" Author Harper Lee may have written a third novel

    07/13/2015 9:20:33 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 29 replies
    CNN ^ | 07/13/2015 | Wyatt Massey, Special to CNN
    Two startling revelations about long-hidden work by "To Kill a Mockingbird" author Harper Lee have stunned readers awaiting Tuesday's release of her new book, "Go Set a Watchman." Lee's attorney, Tonja Carter, hinted Monday in an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal that the reclusive author may have written a third novel. Carter wrote that she recently examined the contents of a safe-deposit box in Lee's hometown of Monroeville, Alabama, and saw the manuscript for "Watchman" lying "underneath a stack of a significant number of pages of another typed text." "Was it an earlier draft of 'Watchman,' or of 'Mockingbird,'...
  • Go Set a Watchman review – more complex than Harper Lee's original classic, but less compelling

    07/13/2015 9:18:29 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 07/13/2015 | Mark Lawson
    The first problem in assessing Harper Lee’s first published novel in the five and a half decades since To Kill a Mockingbird is whether to describe it as her first or second book. This apparently simple question has been contested in the months before Tuesday’s much publicised and heavily embargoed release of a manuscript that reportedly came to light only recently. Chronologically, Go Set a Watchman is, in Hollywood arithmetic, a sort of Mockingbird 2, depicting the later lives of the Finch family – lawyer Atticus, his daughter, Scout, his son, Jem and their maid, Calpurnia – who appeared in...
  • Exclusive trailer debut of Syfy's Arthur C. Clarke series 'Childhood's End'

    07/12/2015 7:26:03 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 19 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | July 11, 2015 | Tracy Brown
    We're exclusively premiering the new trailer for Syfy's miniseries "Childhood’s End," which just debuted at Comic-Con on Saturday morning. Get a good look at what Arthur C. Clarke’s sci-fi novel will look like in real life, right now. Set in a world that's already been conquered by aliens, this trailer actually shows the big "first contact" moment. "There’s no need to be afraid," says the alien voiceover. "We've come to help mankind. We are not conquerors."
  • Heartbreaking! New book reveals Atticus Finch is a racist [trunc.]

    07/11/2015 5:46:00 AM PDT · by goodwithagun · 40 replies
    Twitchy ^ | July 10, 2015 | Twitchy Staff
    The New York Times has its review up of Harper Lee’s “Go Set a Watchman,” the sequel to the iconic masterpiece “To Kill a Mockingbird,” but there’s just one problem. It turns out that Atticus Finch is not the anti-racism crusader we all believed him to be. In fact, he’s “a racist who once attended a Klan meeting.”
  • The Anger of the Legions

    07/09/2015 10:37:02 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 6 replies
    WSJ ^ | 8 Jul1 2015 | JAMES D. HORNFISCHER
    A 55-year old novel is a rich evocation of small-unit esprit de corps and the moral crossroads of counterinsurgency warfare. “The Centurions” opens with a French battalion in captivity, taken by the Viet Minh at the Battle of Dien Bien Phu, which spelled the end of French power in Indochina in 1954. Capt. Jacques Glatigny, the hidebound commander of an overrun stronghold, is bewildered that his Viet Minh counterpart seems little more than a peasant. Soon he and his men are facing re-education by a propagandist known as the Voice, whose saccharine locutions press home the usual communist complaints about...
  • Will C.S. Lewis’ spirituality survive in future Narnia films?

    07/07/2015 4:55:27 AM PDT · by BlackVeil · 25 replies
    Crux ^ | February 27, 2015 | By Steven D. Greydanus
    “The Chronicles of Narnia” film series has been somewhat at sea since “The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” (2010), the film adaptation of the third book published in the fantasy series. With a Blu-Ray edition of “The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” to be released next week, Narnia fans are wondering what’s next for the series. Christian viewers in particular are concerned if production changes mean the books’ spiritual themes will make it on to the big screen. Reports in 2011 suggested that book six – the creation-myth prequel “The Magician’s Nephew” – might be adapted next, rather than book...
  • Yorkshire Ripper Peter Sutcliffe 'Murdered 23 More Victims'

    07/04/2015 9:40:08 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    Mirror ^ | Andy Lines
    The Yorkshire Ripper killed a further 22 women and one MAN, according to explosive new evidence. One of the “new” victims was a famous Playboy bunny girl. Peter Sutcliffe was only ever convicted of 13 murders. But now a former police officer and an investigative journalist have written a book which insists this figure is just the tip of the iceberg. The Yorkshire Ripper killed a further 22 women and one MAN, according to explosive new evidence. One of the “new” victims was a famous Playboy bunny girl. Peter Sutcliffe was only ever convicted of 13 murders. But now a...
  • Countdown to Mecca by Michael Savage, a book review

    07/04/2015 7:49:31 PM PDT · by tbw2 · 17 replies
    Hubpages ^ | 07/04/2015 | Tamara Wilhite
    Michael Savage has written his third and final book in the Jack Hatfield series.
  • Reckless: How one young adult author seeks to show teenagers that abortion is “quite normal”

    07/03/2015 6:59:36 PM PDT · by Morgana · 4 replies
    liveactionnews.org ^ | Jul 2, 2015 | Susan Michelle
    Another young adult (YA) novel is making a splash in publishing–for normalizing the killing of a baby through a teenager’s abortion. Author Katie Pearson’s first novel, ’89 Walls, appears to be pay-to-publish work with Wise Ink Creative Publishing. It addresses what Cosmopolitan.com calls a “gap” in the YA publishing industry, saying: “Today’s teens are sexually active, with 46 percent of high-schoolers and nearly two-thirds of all high school seniors reporting they have had sexual intercourse, so the lack of fictional material on this topic is hard to overlook.” While the number of high schoolers who have had sex is not...
  • Rudyard Kipling and "The Gods of the Copybook Headings"

    07/01/2015 11:10:54 PM PDT · by No One Special · 31 replies
    doctorspiller.com ^ | circa 2000 | Martin S. Spiller
    Joseph Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) was an English poet, short-story writer, and novelist chiefly remembered for his celebration of British imperialism, and also for his tales and poems of British soldiers in India.  He wrote classic poems and stories which include (among many others) "The Jungle book", a children's book of short stories which contains the famous story "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi", the poems "Gunga Din" and "Mandalay". He also wrote the novels "The Man Who Would Be King" and "Captains Courageous", as well as his two most famous poems, "The Gods of the Copybook Headings" and "IF__".  He was born in India, and...
  • Maglev hover car possible?

    I'm writing a fictional novel, which includes development of a maglev hover car. Can anyone point me to scholarly articles regarding magnetic levitation for my research? I have a PhD in chemistry but know very little about physics. Than you so much.
  • Why it's important to buy Ted Cruz's book today or tomorrow, if you intend to buy it (Vanity)

    06/29/2015 7:33:35 PM PDT · by Hetty_Fauxvert · 36 replies
    6-29-2015 | Me
    If you intend to buy Ted Cruz's new book, "A Time for Truth: Reigniting the Promise of America," then today or tomorrow (6/29 or 6/30) is the absolute best time to do it. It will be released tomorrow, 6/30, and its "numbers" will be counted at that point. On Amazon, with pre-orders, it has already reached #1 in Political Leader Biographies, but it's only #143 in all books. The bigger Ted's book's numbers are, the more press it will get, and the better it makes him look overall. If his book rockets upward in the next couple of days, that...
  • The Road To Serfdom

    06/28/2015 10:15:18 AM PDT · by fella · 13 replies
    Barefoots world ^ | 1945 | Friedrich A. Hayek
    The Road to Serfdom Reader's Digest, April 1945 Condensation I, the Author have spent about half my adult life in my native Austria, in close touch with German thought, and the other half in the United States and England. In the latter period I have become increasingly convinced that some of the forces which destroyed freedom in Germany are also at work here. The very magnitude of the outrages committed by the National Socialists has strengthened the assurance that a totalitarian system cannot happen here. But let us remember that 15 years ago the possibility of such a thing happening...
  • Did your genes really make you do it?

    06/28/2015 8:36:35 AM PDT · by Cats Pajamas · 23 replies
    My Genes made me do it! ^ | 1999 | Neil and Briar Whitehead
    BLURB: First published in the USA in 1999 this book is now freely downloadable from this site. It is under constant review to keep it up-to-date so readers can be assured of its on-going relevance. My Genes Made Me Do It is one of the most comprehensive and easily-read books in the popular market today on science and homosexuality. It is an objective review of more than 10,000 scientific research papers and publications from all sides of the debate. In simple and clear terms, by analysis of the science, it shows homosexuality cannot be biologically innate, or fixed - leaving...
  • Oxford English Dictionary makes ‘Masshole’ official

    06/27/2015 2:44:19 AM PDT · by Slings and Arrows · 65 replies
    Boston Globe ^ | 6/25/15 | Stephanie McFeeters
    The Oxford English Dictionary added the word Masshole to its roster on Wednesday, formalizing a term well known to frustrated drivers throughout the Northeast. A piece of “coarse slang” defined as “a term of contempt for a native or inhabitant of the state of Massachusetts,” Masshole was one of nearly 500 words added to the dictionary on Wednesday, along with twerk, sext, hyperlocal, freegan, fratty, and fo’ shizzle.
  • Allen Weinstein, Historian of Alger Hiss Case, Dies at 77

    06/23/2015 6:40:33 PM PDT · by iowamark · 11 replies
    NY Times ^ | JUNE 20, 2015 | WILLIAM GRIMES
    Allen Weinstein, a historian of Cold War espionage whose 1978 book, “Perjury: The Hiss-Chambers Case,” marshaled a mountain of new evidence to argue that Alger Hiss was guilty as charged in one of the most famous spy trials of the postwar era, and who served as the ninth national archivist of the United States, died on Thursday at a nursing home in Gaithersburg, Md. He was 77. The cause was pneumonia, his son Andrew said. He had been suffering from Parkinson’s disease for several years. Making use of newly available F.B.I. documents totaling tens of thousands of pages, Mr. Weinstein...
  • Amazon to pay self-published authors based on pages read

    06/23/2015 7:53:38 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 11 replies
    could soon pay more to write lengthier books, if you are an author self-publishing on Amazon.com Inc's Kindle ebook platform. Starting next month, the e-commerce giant will pay independent authors based on the number of pages read, rather than the number of times their book has been borrowed. The move is aimed at authors enrolled in Kindle Direct Publishing platform – which lets authors set list prices, decide rights and edit the book at any time – and is applicable to ebooks made available via the Kindle Unlimited and Kindle Owners' Lending Library programs. Self-publishing has transformed what it means...
  • Serpo, Saucers, Spooks, and Sci-Fi

    06/22/2015 8:55:06 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    Despite the outrageous and unlikely tale that the documents told, Serpo very quickly became a sensation within certain ufological quarters and provoked massive debate – in magazines and journals, on radio shows, and at online forums. There is, however, one issue that has, for the most part, been overlooked and forgotten. In early 2006, a source that used the named “Chapman,” and who maintained they had a background with the British Ministry of Defense, claimed to know all about the Serpo files and what they really represented. Chapman explained: “…these are NOT real events that are being described here, although...
  • “How to Make a Social Justice Warrior” by William Shetterly - a Book Review

    06/21/2015 7:04:38 PM PDT · by tbw2 · 8 replies
    Hubpages ^ | 2/20/2015 | Tamara Wilhite
    This is a review of the book “How to Make a Social Justice Warrior” by William Shetterly, intriguingly written by a leftist whose criticisms are shared by the right, plus a few others no one else brings up.
  • James Joyce’s Ulysses: A classic too sexy for censors

    06/19/2015 7:25:21 AM PDT · by Borges · 24 replies
    BBC ^ | 6/16/2015 | Kevin Birmingham
    One judge grumbled, “it sounds to me like the ravings of a disordered mind – I can’t see why anyone would want to publish it.” --- British authorities weren’t far behind. Sylvia Beach published Ulysses in Paris in 1922, and when a copy seized at a London airport made its way to the Director of Public Prosecutions, Sir Archibald Bodkin, he declared Molly Bloom’s soliloquy – the only episode he bothered to read – a production of “unmitigated filth and obscenity”. Hundreds of copies of Ulysses were seized and burned as they landed in the UK and the US.
  • Mein Kampf: The world’s most dangerous book?

    06/19/2015 4:20:54 AM PDT · by Cronos · 60 replies
    BBC ^ | 15 Jan 2015 | Fiona MacDonald
    Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf falls out of copyright in Germany at the end of 2015. What will happen when authorities can no longer control its publication and distribution?“They wanted to replace the Bible.” Whispering in a hushed room of the Bavarian State Library, rare books expert Stephan Kellner describes how the Nazis turned a rambling, largely unreadable screed – part memoir, part propaganda – into a central part of the Third Reich’s ideology. According to the producer of Publish or Burn, which will be broadcast on January 14, it remains a dangerous text. “The history of Hitler is a history...