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Books/Literature (General/Chat)

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  • Hillary's Lame Duck Presidential Politics

    10/24/2014 1:57:14 PM PDT · by Ouchthatonehurt · 2 replies
    10/24/14 | Me
    Cast in the deep hot lazy months of lame duck Democrat political infighting, a spurned and entitled Hillary Clinton will seek to take the shine off the reputation and legacy of "the one we've been waiting for." Should be fun.
  • Anthony Horowitz To Write New James Bond Novel

    10/20/2014 6:48:59 PM PDT · by Perdogg · 29 replies
    Anthony Horowitz to write new James Bond novel inspired by original unseen Fleming material Ian Fleming Publications Ltd. and the Ian Fleming Estate are delighted to announce that bestselling and award-winning author Anthony Horowitz has been invited to write the next James Bond novel, due for worldwide release on 8th September 2015. Horowitz is one of the UK’s most successful authors and has over forty books to his name including his recent Sherlock Holmes novel, The House of Silk, and his enormously successful teen spy series featuring Alex Rider. As a TV screenwriter he created both Midsomer Murders and the...
  • Man Jailed For Legally Owning Gun Publishes Book

    10/20/2014 6:56:04 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 17 replies
    progressivestoday.com ^ | 10-19-2014 | Pat Kane
    While Brian Aitken’s The Blue Tent Sky: How The Left’s War On Guns Cost Me My Son And My Freedom is written is an unassuming and accessible way, it is by no means an ‘easy read.’ In fact, it will likely be the most difficult book you’ll ever read.Brian Aitken is a man who was forced into a tragedy thought inconceivable in the United States — being stripped of his family and his freedom all for owning a gun in New Jersey. When Brian was pulled over in 2009 he had not committed any crimes, the guns he would...
  • Mint Juleps with Teddy Roosevelt: The Complete History of Presidential Drinking

    10/19/2014 3:57:28 PM PDT · by skeptoid · 24 replies
    Amazon.com ^ | 10/19/2014 | Mark Will-Weber
    “Far too often, what passes for history is nothing more than rehashed, undocumented folklore and myth, and this is especially true with ‘cocktail history.’ Not so with this fine book, Mint Juleps with Teddy Roosevelt. It is well-researched and documented, while also immensely enjoyable to read.” —Philip Greene, vice president, co-founder, and legal counsel of the Museum of the American Cocktail and author of To Have and Have Another: A Hemingway Cocktail Companion “This charming and erudite book is full of surprises. I never dreamed that the presidents were such boozers! Pour yourself a toddy and ponder a vexing question:...
  • Book published in 1999 about man arriving in Dallas with Ebola to start pandemic.

    10/19/2014 9:59:28 AM PDT · by Chance Hart · 25 replies
    http://www.godlikeproductions.com/forum1/message2674557/pg1
    ABSOLUTE ZERO Book Description Publication Date: May 4, 1999 Ebola. The very sound conjures up hideous images, images that cannot begin to convey the horrors of the disease itself. An African man carrying the virus has arrived unhindered in Dallas. Experts assure the public there is no cause for fear. But is there really nothing to fear? Absolute Zero is the tale of an attack on America, of an unlikely hero who saved millions. One man, his life as ordinary as any among us, did something he could never have anticipated, something he never intended. It is a cautionary tale...
  • An A to Z of Noah Webster's Finest Forgotten Words

    10/18/2014 9:51:40 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 20 replies
    Huffington Post ^ | 10/16/2014 | Paul Anthony Jones
    October 16 is World Dictionary Day, marking the birthday of the great American lexicographer Noah Webster. Born in Connecticut in 1758, Webster published his first dictionary, A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language, in 1806, but it was his two-volume American Dictionary of the English Language published in 1828 (when he was 70 years old) that earned him his place in history as the foremost lexicographer of American English. The statistics alone speak for themselves: Webster's American Dictionary took him 28 years to complete. In preparation he learned 26 languages, including Old English, Ancient Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit. The final...
  • BBC to adapt John Le Carre's The Night Manager

    10/18/2014 11:50:33 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 8 replies
    BBC ^ | October 7, 2014
    The BBC is adapting John le Carre's novel The Night Manager for a new six-part series. The book, published in 1993, is about a former British soldier who ends up going undercover as part of a sting against a black market weapons dealer. Hugh Laurie and Tom Hiddleston are set to star, according to the Hollywood Reporter, but the BBC said that was just speculation. US networks are also looking to pick up the series, the magazine reported.
  • Vanity: Post your review of Andrew Cuomo's new book at Amazon

    10/17/2014 6:41:05 AM PDT · by Ouderkirk · 42 replies
    Amazon.com ^ | 10/17/2014
    Best Review yet... it could be a little thicker though. my AR-15 shoots right through it.
  • Diary

    10/16/2014 3:55:58 AM PDT · by Taliesan · 10 replies
    London Review of Books ^ | 1 October | Paul Farmer
    I have just returned from Liberia with a group of physicians and health activists. We are heading back in a few days. The country is in the midst of the largest ever epidemic of Ebola haemorrhagic fever. It’s an acute and brutal affliction. Ebola is a zoonosis – it leaps from animal hosts to humans – which is caused by a filovirus (a thread-like virus that causes internal and external bleeding). It was first described in 1976 in rural Congo, not far from the Ebola River, as an acute-onset syndrome characterised by complaints of weakness, followed by fever and abdominal...
  • Not Worried About Ebola? You Should Be.

    If you’re like me, you’re baffled and disturbed, that weeks after the ebola epidemic has raged across Africa, we are still letting people from those areas into the U.S. If you are not baffled or disturbed, I’m thinking you don’t understand what ebola is. What it is not is the flu or measles. You have the flu and cough in a room full of people, most won’t even get sick, let alone die. You have ebola and cough in a room, many may get it (no immunities) and, well, the fatality rate puts this disease somewhere above anthrax (which doesn’t...
  • Why buttons changed the world more than the internet: Forget today’s marvels...

    This original and fascinating book sets out to discover which of the ten centuries from 1000 to 2000 saw the most change in the human condition. Surely, most of us would say, it can only be the 20th century? Flying, mass motoring, space travel, advanced weapons, atomic power, telephones, radio and television, computers and iPads — what more change do you want? Ah, says the historian Ian Mortimer, history is not just a matter of inventions. More important are changes in the conditions under which we live and, above all, in the ideas that are ruling at any one time....
  • Last Stand at Khe Sahn (interview w author)

    10/09/2014 7:00:27 PM PDT · by Lorianne · 10 replies
    John Batchelor Show ^ | 08 October 2014 | John Batchelor interviews Gregg Jones
    Audio 39:53 John Batchelor interviews Gregg Jones author of new book Last Stand at Khe Sahn (Vietnam)
  • Book review: Leon Panetta’s ‘Worthy Fights’

    10/08/2014 2:06:35 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 12 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | October 6, 2014 | David Ignatius
    Maybe President Obama should have asked his Cabinet secretaries to sign book-royalty agreements when they took their oaths of office, so he could share in the spoils. Too late now: Here’s Leon Panetta, former defense secretary and CIA director, publishing the third memoir by a top foreign policy official while Obama is still in office.
  • The Savage Nation Radio Show - OCTOBER 2014 - 3 to 6pm ET

    10/07/2014 11:01:18 AM PDT · by SilvieWaldorfMD · 67 replies
    SAVAGE! 855 400 7282
  • BOOK REVIEW: How did Patton die?

    10/07/2014 7:55:14 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 47 replies
    washingtontimes.com ^ | October 6, 2014 | Wes Vernon
    “If you have read ‘Killing Kennedy,’” author and TV commentator Bill O'Reilly reminds his readers, “you know that Martin Dugard and I are not conspiracy theorists. We write from a factual point of view, with no axes to grind.” Thus, in the afterword of “Killing Patton: The Strange Death of World War II’s Most Audacious General” Mr. O'Reilly seeks to assure those who have just read this most recent volume in the co-authored (with Mr. Dugard) “killing” series that their findings are simply facts, not hype. Careful shoe-leather detective work buttressed by research, access to decades-old correspondence and never-before publicized...
  • BTK serial killer Dennis Rader cooperating on a book about murders

    10/06/2014 3:15:42 PM PDT · by Morgana · 30 replies
    LA Times ^ | Michael Schaub
    Dennis Rader, the Kansas serial killer known as the "BTK killer," told a Wichita newspaper that he's cooperating with Katherine Ramsland, an author writing a book about his crimes. Rader murdered 10 people in the Wichita area from 1974 to 1991, and his victims ranged in ages from 9 to 62. He gave himself the nickname "BTK," which he said stood for "bind, torture, kill." Rader is serving 10 consecutive life sentences for the slayings, and won't be eligible for parole until 2180. In a letter to Wichita reporter Roy Wenzl, Rader claims he's cooperating with the book project in...
  • But They All Vote Democratic ... Strange & Disgusting Fashions Worn In Public.

    10/05/2014 11:46:42 AM PDT · by Robert A. Cook, PE · 29 replies
    Pulptastic Site ^ | 5 Oct 2014 | RACookPE1978
    Just a link. http://pulptastic.com/thought-fashion-sense-bad-discovered-god-help-us/ Yes, the images are "Safe for Work" .. Just not recommended for viewing after a meal.
  • Building the Machine – interviews with parents re: Common Core

    10/04/2014 1:26:34 PM PDT · by BruceDeitrickPrice · 2 replies
    YouTube ^ | Sept. 30, 2014 | HSLDA
    I've been campaigning against Common Core for six years -– this VIDEO is one of the best things I've seen. A bit long at 22 minutes but please watch it all. Yes, you'll be depressed and may even cry. This video confirms my sense that we should cancel Common Core entirely. Don't discuss or negotiate. The people behind Common Core are far-leftists. They will keep lying and manipulating. I don't imagine they will negotiate in good faith. ----- (My own most recent article is called "Common Core fulfills an ugly dream." It gives an historical perspective. On Examiner.com. Just Google...
  • The writer who took Mao out into the cold

    10/03/2014 3:10:38 AM PDT · by BlackVeil · 5 replies
    Catholic News Service ^ | 2 Oct 2014 | anon
    Pierre Ryckmans, writer and academic. Born 1935, died 2014 Nowadays Mao is generally regarded as a tyrant on a par with Hitler and Stalin — worse, by some measures, if “indirect deaths” (starvation due to his policies) are counted in the overall toll. Yet in the 1970s he was the darling of the European radical Left. Pierre Ryckmans was born in Brussels into a well-off, devout Roman Catholic family. One relative was a monsignor; another a governor of the Belgian Congo. He first visited China in 1955 as a student and subsequently worked in Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong before...
  • 'How Writers Write' shifts focus to fiction: Second Massive Open Online Course

    10/01/2014 4:11:00 PM PDT · by iowamark · 13 replies
    University of Iowa ^ | 9/23/2014 | Christopher Clair
    After a successful summer engaging poets near and far, the University of Iowa International Writing Program (IWP) will launch its second Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), How Writers Write Fiction, on Friday, Sept. 26.The course, taught entirely on the Internet through the use of recorded video lectures, is designed to reach an unlimited number of participants. The first UI MOOC, How Writers Write Poetry, had just over 4,500 participants by the end of the course; the fiction MOOC should easily surpass that number. “The International Writing Program has developed the University of Iowa’s first MOOCs, and the university has...
  • Archaeologist believes he's found 'Dracula's dungeon'

    09/30/2014 12:34:23 PM PDT · by dware · 20 replies
    Fox News ^ | 09.30.2014 | Kate Seamons
    An archaeologist who has been part of the restoration and excavation effort at Turkey's Tokat Castle believes he has uncovered the dungeons where Vlad the Impaler was once held. Ibrahim Cetin tells the Hurriyet Daily News that the two dungeons that were found were "built like a prison." And while he deems it "hard to estimate" which room the man who served as Dracula's inspiration was held in, "he was around here," he says.
  • Serbia is a homeland of vampires, not Romania, claims American journalist

    09/30/2014 7:08:02 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 10 replies
    romaniantimes.at ^ | 05. 11. 13. - 13:00 | romaniantimes.at
    An American journalist has revealed the homeland of vampires is Serbia, not Romania.
  • Book Review: 'God Traitors' by Jessie Childs

    09/30/2014 2:50:39 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 3 replies
    wsj.com ^ | Sept. 28, 2014 | Henrik Bering
    Persecuted Catholic clergymen in Elizabethan England hid in 'priest holes' built into the stately homes of sympathetic nobles.
  • "Left Behind" Movie Remake Coming Soon

    09/26/2014 10:57:00 PM PDT · by RginTN · 11 replies
    Charisma Magazine ^ | 10/24/12 | CHRISTIAN RETAILING
    Actor Nicolas Cage will reportedly star in what producers hope will be a new, improved movie version of the best-selling, end-times thriller Left Behind.
  • The 12 Weirdest Reasons For Banning Science Fiction and Fantasy Books

    09/25/2014 12:26:51 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 63 replies
    io9 ^ | September 25, 2014 | Diana Biller and Charlie Jane Anders
    It's Banned Books Week! But people are trying to keep great books out of libraries and schools every hour of every day, year round. And often, people's reasons for challenging these titles are really, really... outlandish. Here are 12 SF and fantasy books that people have given incomprehensible reasons for banning.
  • Atlas Shrugged part 3 in Theaters (find one near you)

    09/21/2014 8:57:42 AM PDT · by FreeAtlanta · 25 replies
    atlas shrugged movie ^ | 9/21/2014 | freeAtlanta
    Atlas Shrugged - the movieFind Theater near you
  • The Most Important American You May Not Know

    09/21/2014 6:18:40 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 23 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | September 21, 2014 | Bruce Bialosky
    If you live in New York you may have heard of him, but outside the area his name may be a mystery. Robert Caro, famed author of four books on Lyndon Johnson, wrote his first book about him for which he won the Pulitzer Prize. The book was later named one of the one hundred greatest non-fiction books of the 20th century. The man is Robert Moses and the book is The Power Broker. The book was written in 1974 (celebrating its 40th anniversary.) I have owned it for about ten years and finally tackled it on my recent vacation....
  • Amazon Kindle Voyage vs Nook GlowLight vs Kobo Aura H2O

    09/19/2014 11:06:10 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 19 replies
    pocket-lint.com ^ | 18 September 2014 | Rik Henderson
    With Amazon's announcement of a new Kindle device in time for Christmas this year and major rivals Barnes & Noble and Kobo also revealing their new eBook readers recently, there seems no better a time than to consider that purchase. However, which should you choose? The eBook reader market has been simplified since Sony's withdrawal, but there are still three main competitors at the top end, each with their own flagship devices, so which of them draws your eye the most?
  • Sportsman Channel Renews ‘Amazing America with Sarah Palin’

    09/19/2014 5:05:19 AM PDT · by Cringing Negativism Network · 8 replies
    Ammoland ^ | September 19 2014
    Sportsman Channel has renewed its original series Amazing America with Sarah Palin for a second season. Produced by Pilgrim Studios for Sportsman Channel, the popular show will return to air in early 2015. Read more: http://www.ammoland.com/2014/09/sportsman-channel-renews-amazing-america-with-sarah-palin/#ixzz3DlL3ucIv Under Creative Commons License: Attribution Follow us: @Ammoland on Twitter | Ammoland on Facebook
  • NY Times Book Review Banishes David Limbaugh From Rightful Place on Best-Seller List

    09/18/2014 12:20:04 PM PDT · by servo1969 · 9 replies
    newsbusters.org ^ | 9-18-2014 | NB Staff
    Paul Bedard of the Washington Examiner has been dogging the compilers of the formerly prestigious New York Times best-seller list for trying to deny best-seller status to conservative authors. First it was Dinesh D’Souza’s book America. Now it's David Limbaugh's latest book Jesus on Trial. He reports the Times crew has "banished conservative legal author David Limbaugh's latest, Jesus on Trial, from its upcoming best seller list despite having sales better than 17 other books on the list." According to publishing sources, Limbaugh's probe into the accuracy of the Bible sold 9,660 in its first week out, according to Nielsen...
  • 10 Lessons From Real-Life Revolutions That Fictional Dystopias Ignore

    09/16/2014 8:05:57 AM PDT · by ctdonath2 · 14 replies
    io9 ^ | 9/16/14 | Esther Inglis-Arkell
    Today's genre books are full of future dystopias, which only have one weakness: teenagers. And everybody knows that most dystopias are kind of contrived. But here are 10 lessons from real-life rebellions against repressive regimes, that we wish the creators of fictional dystopias would pay attention to. 10. The Enemy of Your Enemy Is Not Your Friend [snip] 9. The Top Guy Isn't Always the Problem [snip] 8. Sometimes Making Concessions Leads To Rebellion [snip] 7. Two Downtrodden Groups Will Usually Be Fighting Each Other [snip] 6. Never Neglect the Practicalities [snip] 5. New Regimes Come With Crazy Ideology [snip]...
  • Book Review: 'Robert the Bruce' by Michael Penman

    09/16/2014 2:10:48 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 27 replies
    wsj.com ^ | Sept. 12, 2014 | Barton Swaim
    It is one of the tragedies of recent cultural history that, thanks to Mel Gibson's preposterous movie "Braveheart," the world knows more about William Wallace's short-lived Scottish rebellion of 1296-97 than about Robert the Bruce. For it was Bruce who, after 18 years of plotting and war making, finally threw off the yoke of the English king and consolidated a sense of Scottish identity. "Never will we on any conditions be subjected to the lordship of the English," said the Declaration of Arbroath, a diplomatic letter commissioned by Bruce in 1320. "It is in truth not for glory, nor riches,...
  • A Book for the People of Ferguson -- And Oppressed People Everywhere (Book review & article)

    09/15/2014 2:59:42 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    The American Prospect ^ | September 14, 2014 | Peter Dreier
    Fred Ross's change-making Axioms for Organizers is updated for the Internet age, and for a new generation battling discrimination and police brutality.Most residents of Ferguson, Missouri, have probably never heard of Fred Ross, Sr., but they could use his help now. Ferguson's population is two-thirds African American, but the mayor, almost all members of the city council and school board, and 95 percent of the police department is white, and in last year's municipal election only 7 percent of blacks came to the polls. Ross—perhaps the most influential (but little-known) community organizer in American history—had a successful career mobilizing people...
  • The Sci-Fi Book Classics You Need to Read Before You Die

    09/12/2014 5:32:37 PM PDT · by Fzob · 201 replies
    Popsugar ^ | 09/06/2014 | NICOLE NGUYEN
    Happy National Read a Book Day! Celebrate with these essential sci-fi classics. Space, dystopian futures, robots, technology, aliens . . . what is there not to love about science fiction, a genre that stretches the imagination and offers a glimpse into what lies in a galaxy and time far, far away? Now that you've indulged on the most compelling, classic epic fantasy series, it's time to switch gears. Onward, futurists! We recruited our own POPSUGAR editors to help compile the ultimate list of geeky reads. And this week, we're showcasing the best sci-fi narratives, with all the traditional elements of...
  • James Bond Villain Richard Kiel Dies at 74

    09/11/2014 12:48:09 PM PDT · by prisoner6 · 52 replies
    hollywoodreporter ^ | 09/10/2014 | Mike Barnes
    He played Jaws, the towering bad guy with the steel teeth, in 'The Spy Who Loved Me' and 'Moonraker' Richard Kiel, the 7-foot-2 actor who played Jaws, the James Bond villain with the teeth of steel, died Wednesday. He was 74. Kiel broke his leg last week and died in St. Agnes Medical Center in Fresno, Calif., according to several media reports. Kiel's signature character appeared in the Bond films The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979).
  • Textbooks or Tablets? Some students say they learn better w/ physical text books.

    09/11/2014 12:49:14 AM PDT · by lee martell · 38 replies
    Sept. 11, 2014 | lee martell
    The matter remains unsettled, and probably will for quite a while. Many schools have gone with the flow of offering students a tablet or laptop computer that will contain all their most essential lessons. Many schools consider it a given, that within five to ten years, there will be no physical books at all. Every piece of study matter will be found on a computer owned or rented by the student. But wait, there is subtle pushback. Not so fast, say many of the students themselves. Most students, from elementary through grad school, have grown up surrounded with digital inventions,...
  • Leo Tolstoy: an epic Google doodle for novelist of 'astonishing scope and vigour'

    09/09/2014 6:58:32 AM PDT · by Borges · 54 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 9/9/2014 | Alison Flood
    ...Anna Karenina, is brought to life by Google with an image of Anna and Vronsky as they first meet ...His epic novel, War and Peace, is illustrated with Pierre Bezukhov, looking up at the great comet of 1812:
  • What English Pet Peeves do You Love to Hate?

    09/08/2014 6:29:29 AM PDT · by PeteePie · 179 replies
    OneHourSelfPub.com ^ | Sep 4, 2014 | Dave Bricker
    Discus­sions of English Language pet peeves pro­vide an enter­tain­ing forum for the expres­sion of ire. In fact, if a “pet” is some­thing we cher­ish, and a “peeve” is some­thing that annoys us, “pet peeves” are what we love to hate. Here’s a col­lec­tion of com­mon English solecisms—guaranteed not to lit­er­ally blow your mind:
  • How the growing generation gap is changing the face of fandom

    09/07/2014 3:36:39 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 17 replies
    The Daily Dot ^ | August 25, 2014 | Gavia Baker-Whitelaw
    Earlier this month, two fan conventions came to London: Nine Worlds and the World Science Fiction Convention, commonly know as Worldcon. Worldcon is in its 72nd year, a huge old dinosaur (or perhaps an aging dragon) of science-fiction fandom. This year more than 10,000 people paid for memberships, which included entrance to the annual Hugo Awards. The official guests of honor were revered science-fiction and fantasy authors, editors, and illustrators, all of whom were in their 60s and 70s. Nine Worlds was smaller, younger, and catered to a more varied crowd including comics, TV, and fanfic followers. But since both...
  • Typos Spotted in San Francisco Rainbow Honor Walk Tribute to LGBT Heroes

    09/03/2014 1:06:38 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 11 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | Wednesday, Sep 3, 2014 | Lisa Fernandez
    Too bad there's no such thing as White Out for sidewalks. Turns out, after the organizers of the Rainbow Honor Walk unveiled 20 "heroines and heroes" of the LGBT communities in San Francisco's Castro District on Tuesday, several eagle-eyed copy editor types spotted two glaring typos cemented in the sidewalk. Playwright Oscar Wilde’s plate, for example, says the writer was “known for his bitting wit.” And Christine Jorgensen, the first widely known person to have sex reassignment surgery, is called the “first trangendered American” rather than “transgendered.” The CastroBubble blog was the first online site to point out the mistakes,...
  • Deep Frieze Meaning: What is the Parthenon telling us?

    09/02/2014 11:54:52 AM PDT · by mojito · 20 replies
    The Weekly Standard ^ | 9/8/2014 | A. E. STALLINGS
    The Parthenon represents, for many, a golden age in human achievement: the 5th-century b.c. Greek flowering of democracy, sciences, and the arts. But what if its chief ornament, the Parthenon frieze, turned out to be not an embodiment of reason and proportion—of stillness at the heart of motion, quiet piety, and enlightened civic responsibility—but (or, rather, also) something darker, more primitive: a representation of the critical moment in an ancient story of a king at war, a human sacrifice, and a goddess’s demand for virgin blood? That’s the argument at the heart of The Parthenon Engima. The plot involves not...
  • Kirsten Gillibrand Gives Self-Help Book to Staffers

    09/01/2014 6:59:49 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 17 replies
    New York Post ^ | August 30, 2014 | Mara Siegler
    Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is a fan of positive-thinking self-help book “The Secret” by Rhonda Byrne.
  • ‘The Giver’ to ‘The Great Gatsby’: How the Movie Adaptations Stack Up to the Books

    08/31/2014 4:44:38 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 55 replies
    Washington Post ^ | August 30 | Mariana Marcaletti
    ‘The Giver’ to ‘The Great Gatsby’: How the movie adaptations stack up to the books that inspired themDuring a panel moderated by The Washington Post’s film critic Anne Hornaday — Great Books to Great Movies on Saturday, Aug. 30 at 8 p.m. during the National Book Festival — authors E.L. Doctorow, Alice McDermott, Paul Auster and Lisa See, whose books were made into movies, will discuss and present in a multimedia exhibit clips from films based on their writing. But what happens when really good books fail to live up to people’s expectations in really bad movie adaptations? Or, the...
  • Will Self Attacks 'Literary Mediocrity' George Orwell

    08/31/2014 4:33:01 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 15 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 31 Aug 2014
    Prize-winning novelist Will Self has launched a stinging attack on George OrwellThe novelist Will Self has denounced George Orwell as the "Supreme Mediocrity" of postwar literary Britain, in a piece written for the BBC Radio 4 programme A Point of View which aired on August 29. The thrust of Self's argument is that Orwell's famous 1946 essay, 'Politics and the English Language', in which he argues for simplicity and clarity in written English, is fundamentally flawed. In the essay, Orwell encourages the use of short words and everyday English, and the avoidance of cliché. But, according to Self, who is...
  • The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition: A New History of the Great Depression

    08/31/2014 12:54:32 PM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 11 replies
    amazon ^ | Amity Shlaes
    An illustrated edition of Amity Shlaes’s #1 New York Times bestseller, featuring vivid black-and-white illustrations that capture this dark period in American history and the men and women, from all walks of life, whose character and ideas helped them persevere. This imaginative illustrated edition brings to life one of the most devastating periods in our nation’s history—the Great Depression—through the lives of American people, from politicians and workers to businessmen, farmers, and ordinary citizens. Smart and stylish, black-and-white art from acclaimed illustrator Paul Rivoche provides an utterly original vision of the coexistence of despair and hope that characterized Depression-era America....
  • 34 Facts You Probably Didn’t Know About "The Lord Of The Rings" Trilogy

    08/31/2014 6:48:45 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 55 replies
    1. Nicolas Cage passed up the role of Aragorn because of “family obligations.” 2. Daniel Day-Lewis also turned down the role multiple times. 3. The same fight choreographer and fencer who worked on Lord of the Rings also worked on The Parent Trap and Star Wars. 4. And he said that Viggo Mortensen was “the best swordsman [he] ever trained.”
  • Who owns the Blues, today ?

    08/29/2014 8:45:47 PM PDT · by Zeneta · 59 replies
    me ^ | today | me
    I think there was a time in which the left owned the blues but things have come full circle to a point in which we own the blues. The Blues will never go away and conservatives need to push this into our culture. IMHO The "Blues" cuts to the core of virtually everything that matters. I will put forth my modern and somewhat obscure samples, as I hope to see yours.
  • Sheridan Le Fanu's gothic spirit lives on

    08/29/2014 8:48:47 AM PDT · by Borges · 2 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 8/28/2014
    The latest Google doodle – a wispy, fanged blonde girl-head floating over a sleeping dark-haired woman – commemorates the 200th birthday of the Irish novelist Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814-73). The image honours his most famous story, Carmilla, first published in 1871 in a magazine called The Dark Blue, then incorporated a year later into the important collection In a Glass Darkly. The novella is notable for tackling a vampire theme decades before Le Fanu's countryman Bram Stoker wrote Dracula (which contains several deliberate echoes of Carmilla) and presenting an eroticised view of predatory female friendship which earns it a...
  • Katie Couric accused Diane Sawyer of trading sex for interviews, new book claims

    08/29/2014 5:02:02 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 41 replies
    NY Daily News ^ | 8-29-14 | Don Kaplan , Corky Siemaszko
    Sheila Weller’s forthcoming tell-all ‘The News Sorority’ claims to offer up details on the scandalous and sometimes catty escapades of noteworthy newswomen, including how some apparently hold strong disdain for each other. Katie Couric cultivated an “American Girl identity” but she was also a bully with a “chip on her shoulder.” Diane Sawyer strived to be “America’s Aunt” but she rode her staff hard and used “staged humility” to disarm critics. Christiane Amanpour was fearless in the field and would remind her bosses, “Do you know that I’m the world’s best-known foreign correspondent?” And, when feeling threatened, these pioneering, primetime...
  • Ancient DNA Sheds New Light on Arctic's Earliest People

    08/28/2014 4:40:35 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 17 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 8-28-14 | Heather Pringle
    The earliest people in the North American Arctic remained isolated from others in the region for millennia before vanishing around 700 years ago, a new genetic analysis shows. The study, published online Thursday, also reveals that today's Inuit and Native Americans of the Arctic are genetically distinct from the region's first settlers. Inuit hunters in the Canadian Arctic have long told stories about a mysterious ancient people known as the Tunit, who once inhabited the far north. Tunit men, they recalled, possessed powerful magic and were strong enough to crush the neck of a walrus and singlehandedly haul the massive...