Keyword: barley

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  • What Did People Eat and Drink in Roman Palestine?

    05/04/2019 7:41:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 66 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | April 23, 2019 | Megan Sauter
    In a land flowing with milk and honey, what kinds of food made up the ancient Jewish diet? What did people eat and drink in Roman Palestine? Susan Weingarten guides readers through a menu of the first millennium C.E. in her article "Biblical Archaeology 101: The Ancient Diet of Roman Palestine," published in the March/April 2019 issue of Biblical Archaeology Review. Although it is difficult to reconstruct the diet of the average person in Palestine during the Roman and Late Antique periods, Weingarten, as both a food historian and an archaeologist, is well equipped for the task. Using archaeological remains...
  • A 5,000-year-old barley grain discovered in Finland changes understanding of livelihoods

    04/05/2019 8:23:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | April 3, 2019 | University of Helsinki
    The age of the grains was ascertained using radiocarbon dating. Based on the results, the grains originated in the period of the Pitted Ware culture, thus being approximately 4,300-5,300 years old. In addition to the cereal grains, the plant remnants found in the sites included hazelnut shells, apple seeds, tuberous roots of lesser celandine and rose hips. The study suggests that small-scale farming was adopted by the Pitted Ware Culture by learning the trade from farmers of the Funnel Beaker Culture, the latter having expanded from continental Europe to Scandinavia. Other archaeological artefacts are also evidence of close contact between...
  • Unpublished Egyptian texts reveal new insights into ancient medicine

    08/22/2018 7:52:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | August 14, 2018 | Lise Brix, tr by Catherine Jex
    The University of Copenhagen in Denmark is home to a unique collection of Ancient Egyptian papyrus manuscripts. A large part of the collection has not yet been translated, leaving researchers in the dark about what they might contain. "A large part of the texts are still unpublished. Texts about medicine, botany, astronomy, astrology, and other sciences practiced in Ancient Egypt," says Egyptologist Kim Ryholt, Head of the Carlsberg Papyrus Collection at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark... "It's totally unique for me to be able to work with unpublished material. It doesn't happen in many places around the world," says PhD...
  • Scientists Have Discovered The Earliest Evidence of Bread, And It's Much Older Than We Expected

    07/16/2018 9:01:11 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 34 replies
    The people who built the ancient structure, members of what's called the Natufian culture, struggled in a "hostile environment to gain more energy from their food," said Ehud Weiss, an archaeobotanist at Bar-Ilan University in Israel who was not involved with the study. Archaeologists found the bread remains in sediment samples at a site named Shubayqa 1 in Jordan. The structure was oval with a fireplace in the center, and its builders carefully laid stones into the ground. Arranz Otaegui said she did not know whether the building was a dwelling or had other, perhaps ceremonial, purposes. Sifting through the...
  • German Justice Minister demands Facebook explain data scandal

    03/22/2018 5:41:41 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 25 replies
    TheLocal.de ^ | 22 March 2018 12:24 CET+01:00 | DPA/The Local
    Germany is the latest country to demand answers from Facebook after it emerged data from 50 million users was used to inform targeted election campaigns. German Justice Minister Katharina Barley on Thursday called such methods “a danger to democracy.” “The European Facebook management [team] must submit a comprehensive position on the scandal to the German government,” Barley told the Funke MedienGruppe on Thursday, demanding Facebook representatives visit her ministry in Berlin. […] Barley’s comments came as pressure grew on Facebook from politicians on both sides of the Atlantic in the wake of a scandal involving British analysis firm Cambridge Analytica,...
  • Weekly Cooking (and related issues) Thread

    02/22/2018 4:20:07 PM PST · by Jamestown1630 · 154 replies
    When I was young and single, I rented part of an older lady’s house for many years. She had children who had become vegetarians, and was always hunting for something meatless but special to make for holidays. One Christmas she made this Dilled Vegetable-Barley Soup, from Molly Katzen’s ‘Enchanted Broccoli Forest’; it became one of my favorite recipes, and Katzen’s book one of my all-time favorite cookbooks. If you aren’t averse to the wine, add it, as it really brightens the soup; but the recipe is still very good without it. I’ve never used the fennel in this recipe, but...
  • Complex engineering and metal-work discovered beneath ancient Greek 'pyramid'

    01/18/2018 2:45:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Thursday, January 18, 2018 | Maev Kennedy
    More than 4,000 years ago builders carved out the entire surface of a naturally pyramid-shaped promontory on the Greek island of Keros. They shaped it into terraces covered with 1,000 tonnes of specially imported gleaming white stone to give it the appearance of a giant stepped pyramid rising from the Aegean: the most imposing manmade structure in all the Cyclades archipelago... Archaeologists from three different countries involved in an ongoing excavation have found evidence of a complex of drainage tunnels -- constructed 1,000 years before the famous indoor plumbing of the Minoan palace of Knossos on Crete -- and traces...
  • Beer makes you happy: German scientists link beer to brain’s happiness receptors

    01/04/2018 6:10:03 PM PST · by SJackson · 26 replies
    Vail Daily ^ | December 30, 2017 | Randy Wyrick
    Benjamin Franklin famously said, "Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." Science has proved him correct … still. A team of German scientists examined more than 13,000 molecular food compounds, looking for substances that may activate dopamine receptors in the same way that actual dopamine does. In other words, food that makes you happy. They found one in beer, a drink so noble that it is thought that beer was the nectar of the gods sipped by the Greek god Zeus from his goblet. "Drink. Be merry," commanded Zeus, or at least that's what...
  • Ancient barley took high road to China

    11/26/2017 3:45:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, November 22, 2017 | Washington University in St. Louis
    First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research... "Wheat was introduced to central China in the second or third millennium B.C., but barley did not arrive there until the first millennium B.C.," Liu said. "While previous research suggests wheat cultivation moved east along the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, our study calls attention to the possibility of a southern route...
  • Students recreate 5,000-year-old Chinese beer recipe

    02/09/2017 9:11:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    phys.org ^ | February 8, 2017 | Alex Shashkevich
    Liu, together with doctoral candidate Jiajing Wang and a group of other experts, discovered the 5,000-year-old beer recipe by studying the residue on the inner walls of pottery vessels found in an excavated site in northeast China. The research, which was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provided the earliest evidence of beer production in China so far. The ancient Chinese made beer mainly with cereal grains, including millet and barley, as well as with Job's tears, a type of grass in Asia, according to the research. Traces of yam and lily root parts also appeared in...
  • Ancient Beverage Brewed In Milwaukee

    10/28/2016 9:51:13 AM PDT · by fishtank · 27 replies
    Archaeology ^ | 10-25-16 | NPR
    ANCIENT BEVERAGE BREWED IN MILWAUKEE MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN — NPR reports that archaeologist Bettina Arnold of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and her research team worked with Lakefront Brewery to try to re-create an alcoholic beverage that had been placed in a bronze cauldron and buried in a grave sometime between 400 and 450 B.C. in what is now Germany. The recipe was based upon the research of paleobotanist Manfred Rösch, who analyzed the residues in the Iron Age cauldron. He found evidence of honey, meadowsweet, barley, and mint—ingredients in a type of beverage known as a braggot.
  • Starch grains found on Neandertal teeth debunks theory that dietary deficiencies caused their ext...

    03/03/2012 2:32:00 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 1+ views
    Smithsonian Science ^ | 3 January 2011 | unattributed
    Researchers from George Washington University and the Smithsonian Institution have discovered evidence to debunk the theory that Neandertals' disappearance was caused in part by a deficient diet -- one that lacked variety and was overly reliant on meat. After discovering starch granules from plant food trapped in the dental calculus on 40-thousand-year-old Neandertal teeth, the scientists believe that Neandertals ate a wide variety of plants and included cooked grains as part of a more sophisticated, diverse diet similar to early modern humans... The discovery of starch granules in the calculus on Neandertal teeth provides direct evidence that they made sophisticated,...
  • 5,000-Year-Old Beer Recipe Had Secret Ingredient

    05/24/2016 7:14:00 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    discovery.com ^ | May 24, 2016 09:42 AM ET | Tom Metcalfe, Live Science
    Scientists conducted tests on ancient pottery jars and funnels found at the Mijiaya archaeological site in China’s Shaanxi province. The analyses revealed traces of oxalate — a beer-making byproduct that forms a scale called “beerstone” in brewing equipment — as well as residues from a variety of ancient grains and plants. These grains included broomcorn millets, an Asian wild grain known as “Job’s tears,” tubers from plant roots, and barley. Barley is used to make beer because it has high levels of amylase enzymes that promote the conversion of starches into sugars during the fermenting process. It was first cultivated...
  • 11,000-Year-Old Grain Shakes Up Beliefs On Beginnings Of Agriculture

    06/19/2006 1:04:07 PM PDT · by blam · 90 replies · 2,127+ views
    Jerusalem Post ^ | 6-18-2006 | Judy Siegel-Itzkovich
    Jun. 18, 2006 0:24 | Updated Jun. 18, 2006 10:4511,000-year-old grain shakes up beliefs on beginnings of agriculture By JUDY SIEGEL-ITZKOVICH Bar-Ilan University researchers have found a cache of 120,000 wild oat and 260,000 wild barley grains at the Gilgal archaeological site near Jericho that date back 11,000 years - providing evidence of cultivation during the Neolithic Period. The research, performed by Drs. Ehud Weiss and Anat Hartmann of BIU's department of Land of Israel studies and Prof. Mordechai Kislev of the faculty of life sciences, appears in the June 16 edition of the prestigious journal Science. It is the...
  • Ancient nomads spread earliest domestic grains along Silk Road, study finds

    04/05/2014 8:57:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | April 1, 2014 | Gerry Everding
    Charred grains of barley, millet and wheat deposited nearly 5,000 years ago at campsites in the high plains of Kazakhstan show that nomadic sheepherders played a surprisingly important role in the early spread of domesticated crops throughout a mountainous east-west corridor along the historic Silk Road... "Ancient wheat and broomcorn millet, recovered in nomadic campsites in Kazakhstan, show that prehistoric herders in Central Eurasia had incorporated both regional crops into their economy and rituals nearly 5,000 years ago, pushing back the chronology of interaction along the territory of the 'Silk Road' more than 2,000 years," Frachetti said... ...several strains of...
  • European festival recycles urine to make beer: Weird business news

    07/12/2015 2:30:53 PM PDT · by Slings and Arrows · 32 replies
    Yahoo! Finance ^ | July 10, 2015 | Nicole Goodkind
    Organizers at Northern Europe’s largest music festival, Roskilde and the Danish Agriculture & Food Council partnered last weekend to collect 25,000 liters of urine from more than 100,000 festivalgoers. In a program they’re calling “From piss to pilsner.” The collected goods will be sent to local farmers to fertilize barley crops used to grow beer. The program will be used to create 425 kegs of beer that will be sold at the festival in 2017.
  • Barley and wheat residues in Neolithic cemeteries of Central Sudan and Nubia

    02/10/2015 12:15:00 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | February 9, 2015 | PLOS ONE
    A research team successfully identified ancient barley and wheat residues in grave goods and on teeth from two Neolithic cemeteries in Central Sudan and Nubia, showing that humans in Africa were already exploited domestic cereals 7,000 years ago and thus five hundred years earlier than previously known. Dr. Welmoed Out from Kiel University said, “With our results we can verify that people along the Nile did not only exploit gathered wild plants and animals but had crops of barley and wheat.” These types of crops were first cultivated in the Middle East about 10,500 years ago and spread out from...
  • Bad barley crop probably won't affect 2015 beer prices

    01/04/2015 7:39:36 AM PST · by DeaconBenjamin · 10 replies
    maktoob news ^ | By LISA BAUMANN
    Problems with the 2014 malt barley crop in the western United States resulted in the worst year for malting production in the nation. This year, farmers and maltsters scrambled to salvage a large portion of the crop hit by heavy rains in August, especially in Montana and Idaho, the top two barley-growing states in the U.S. Growers in North Dakota and Alberta, Canada, faced similar issues. Scott Heisel, vice president at the American Malting Barley Association, said "the industry has never had to deal with this issue on this scale before." Fields with half of Montana's crop and 85 percent...
  • How Archaeologists Recreate Ancient Booze (interview with Patrick McGovern)

    01/03/2015 1:57:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Slate ^ | Saturday, January 3, 2015 | Linda Geddes (in New Scientist)
    Phrygians were brewing with barley before it was cool. Resurrecting ancient beers and wines is a subtle alchemy, but Patrick McGovern knows all the tricks. He directs the Biomolecular Archaeology Project for Cuisine, Fermented Beverages, and Health at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. Many of his ancient brews are sold by Dogfish Head brewery in Delaware. How did you start making ancient drinks? One of the first we made was the Midas beverage, based on residues in bronze vessels recovered from the Midas tomb in Turkey, which dates from 700 B.C. These pointed to an unusual drink combining wine, barley...
  • Joni Ernst Wins Election, First Woman to Represent Iowa in US Senate

    11/04/2014 7:54:38 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 62 replies
    WHO-TV ^ | November 4, 2014 | Aaron Hepker
    DES MOINES, Iowa – Joni Ernst has been elected as the next U.S. Senator from Iowa. The Republican, a state Senator from Red Oak, defeated Democrat U.S. Representative Bruce Braley in one of the nation’s closest watched elections. Ernst will fill the seat currently occupied by Senator Tom Harkin. Harkin, who has served in the U.S. Senate since 1985, announced in January 2013 that he would retire at the end of his term in January 2015....