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Keyword: archaeology

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  • Medieval Siberian mummies baffle archaeologists

    04/15/2014 1:08:43 PM PDT · by Renfield · 29 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 4-10-2014 | Kate Baklitskaya
    Academics restart work to unlock secrets of mystery medieval civilization with links to Persia on edge of the Siberian Arctic. A red-haired man was found, protected from chest to foot by copper plating [Credit: Kate Baklitskaya/Go East] The 34 shallow graves excavated by archaeologists at Zeleniy Yar throw up many more questions than answers. But one thing seems clear: this remote spot, 29 km shy of the Arctic Circle, was a trading crossroads of some importance around one millennium ago. The medieval necropolis include 11 bodies with shattered or missing skulls, and smashed skeletons. Five mummies were found to be shrouded...
  • Is There New Evidence That Jesus Had a Wife?

    04/14/2014 9:05:44 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 212 replies
    Townhall ^ | 04/14/2014 | Michael Brown
    The internet has been abuzz with intriguing headlines announcing that scholars have determined that the so-called “Gospel of Jesus’ Wife” papyrus is “authentic” and that there is “no forgery evidence” in the manuscript. What exactly does this mean? And should Christians be concerned that a new discovery might contradict the biblical account and undermine their faith? Actually, the report from scholars working with the Harvard Divinity School found that the manuscript is much younger than previously thought – in other words, it is even further removed from the time of the New Testament than scholars originally believed – meaning that,...
  • The "Gospel of Jesus' Wife" Is Most Likely Not a Modern Fake

    04/11/2014 6:35:46 AM PDT · by Renfield · 87 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 4-10-2014 | Colin Schultz
    In 2012, Harvard researcher Karen King revealed the "Gospel of Jesus' Wife." A small piece of papyrus, the lightly worn document was written in Coptic Egyptian, with parts missing and ink faded, and didn't say much. But what it did say, wrote Ariel Sabar in Smithsonian Magazine two years ago was enough to “send jolts through the world of biblical scholarship—and beyond.” The fragment’s 33 words, scattered across 14 incomplete lines, leave a good deal to interpretation. But in King’s analysis, and as she argues in a forthcoming article in the Harvard Theological Review, the “wife” Jesus refers to is probably Mary Magdalene, and Jesus...
  • Canaanite Fortress Discovered in the City of David

    04/07/2014 7:21:44 AM PDT · by NYer · 19 replies
    Bible Archaeology ^ | April 7, 2014
    A massive 3,800-year-old fortress that protected the Gihon Spring was uncovered in the City of David. Photo: Eli Mandelbaum, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.Excavations around the Gihon Spring in the City of David have uncovered a massive 3,800-year-old fortress. Called the “Spring Citadel” by archaeologists, the discovery is part of a 15-year excavation led by Professor Ronny Reich of the University of Haifa and Eli Shukrun of the Israel Antiquities Authority. This enormous 18th-century B.C.E. structure that isolates and protects the Gihon Spring is believed to be the fortress described in the Book of Samuel that King David...
  • Historians claim to have recovered Holy Grail

    03/31/2014 11:02:26 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 34 replies
    The New York Post ^ | March 31, 2014 | Bob Fredericks
    Spanish historians say they have discovered what Monty Python could not – the Holy Grail, the legendary cup Jesus supposedly drank from at the Last Supper. The Spaniards – Margarita Torres and José Ortega del Río – believe the 2,000-year-old vessel is in a church in León in northern Spain. The pair spent three years studying the history of the chalice and last week published a book, “The Kings of the Grail,” making their case. The onyx chalice, they explained, was concealed within another antique vessel known as the Chalice of Dońa Urruca, which is located in León’s basilica of...
  • Antiquities Robbers Caught Selling Rare Ancient Burial Chests

    03/31/2014 1:09:05 PM PDT · by BlueDragon · 9 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 3/31/2014 | Ari Yashar
    Some of the 11 Jewish ossuaries from Second Temple period still held bones, featured Hebrew script listing names of those interred. The Antiquities Authority and police cooperated last Friday to arrest suspects who allegedly stole ornate stone ossuary burial chests, which were used by Jews in Israel during the Second Temple period roughly 2,000 years ago. The suspects were caught while in possession of eleven ossuaries, some of them still containing skeletal remains. The suspected grave robbers, who were arrested and brought in for questioning, came from the Arab village of Abadiyah in Judea, located near Bethlehem, as well as...
  • 800-year-old monk found poking out of cliff face

    03/11/2014 1:11:46 PM PDT · by Sawdring · 64 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 10 Mar 2014 | Sarah Knapton
    The legs of an 800-year-old medieval monk have been discovered, poking out of a cliff face in Wales. Although badly damaged and missing their knees, shins and feet, the thigh bones were found after the fierce recent storms caused severe coastal erosion.
  • China's 'Jurassic Park' yields feathered dinosaurs, earliest swimming mammal & strange salamanders

    03/10/2014 10:22:54 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | March 6, 2014 | Sarah Griffiths
    A 'Jurassic Park' in China was once home to dinosaurs that lived among early mammals, amphibians and other strange creatures 160 million years ago. The extraordinary fossil bed contains the bones of pterosaurs - early mammals – including the first known swimming mammal with a beaver-like tail, the earliest gliding mammal and feathered dinosaurs. Their remarkably preserved remains were discovered in rocks beneath the Jehol Biota in north eastern China - a famous collection of 130 million-year-old fossils from the Cretaceous Period. The latest discovery sheds light on life in the Middle-Upper Jurassic 30million years earlier when birds are believed...
  • The world's oldest masks: 9,000-year-old stone 'portraits of the dead' go on show in Jerusalem

    03/08/2014 5:40:14 PM PST · by Renfield · 27 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 3-5-2014 | Sarah Griffiths
    A collection of rare 9,000-year old masks, which are considered among the most ancient human portraits, are to go on show in Jerusalem. The masks all originated from Israel and have the same striking features, perhaps to resemble the spirits of dead ancestors. It is thought they were used by in religious and social ceremonies and in rites of healing and magic. The exhibition at The Israel Museum is the result of a decade of investigative work into where the masks came from and it is the first time that the group of 12 Neolithic masks will be displayed together...
  • Ancient Egyptian Soldier's Letter Home Deciphered

    03/08/2014 3:47:49 AM PST · by Makana · 9 replies
    Live Science ^ | March 7, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    A newly deciphered letter home dating back around 1,800 years reveals the pleas of a young Egyptian soldier named Aurelius Polion who was serving, probably as a volunteer, in a Roman legion in Europe. In the letter, written mainly in Greek, Polion tells his family that he is desperate to hear from them and that he is going to request leave to make the long journey home to see them.
  • Gobekli Tepe Report

    03/05/2014 1:40:49 PM PST · by imardmd1 · 34 replies
    UBtheNews ^ | Updated 10/26/11 | Prepared by Halbert Katzen, J.D.
    Gobekli Tepe Summary In 1994, almost forty years after The Urantia Book’s 1955 publication, excavations began at the Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Turkey. The Gobekli Tepe site already reveals 50 engraved stone monoliths, some of them dating back to 12,000 years ago, that are at least 6,000 years older than Stonehenge and the Egyptian pyramids. A full excavation to the bottom of the site has not yet occurred, and only a small percentage of the site has been uncovered. The evidence suggests that the complex of round rooms with two especially large pillars in the middle were built for...
  • Nine new Qumran scrolls discovered

    03/03/2014 9:33:58 AM PST · by aimhigh · 8 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 03/01/2014 | Giorgio Bernardelli
    They were hidden inside some phylacteries discovered during some excavations sixty years ago but never opened. The news was announced at a conference at the Faculty of Theology in Lugano. . . So there are now nine Qumran scrolls to keep experts busy. The discovery was made very recently and was announced a few days ago at the international research seminar. . . “The new discovery shows that the research being carried out on the Qumran is not complete yet. There are a thousand reasons, especially political ones, why the material unearthed is still being studied and why the the...
  • New Texts Found in Caves That Yielded Dead Sea Scrolls

    03/03/2014 1:25:38 PM PST · by Renfield · 32 replies
    Live Science ^ | 3-3-2014 | Megan Gannon
    An archaeologist says he discovered nine tiny scrolls with biblical text from the Qumran caves where the Dead Sea Scrolls were unearthed, according to news reports. The newfound scrolls, which date back to about 2,000 years ago, were hidden inside three leather tefillin cases, also known as phylacteries, traditionally carried by observant Jewish men, Italian news agency Ansa Mediterranean reported. These cases were first pulled out of the caves in the 1950s, but their contents apparently were not examined until now....
  • Infamous Mass Grave of Young Women in Ancient City of Cahokia Also Holds Men: Study

    03/01/2014 3:51:42 AM PST · by Renfield · 23 replies
    Western Digs ^ | 8-5-2013 | Blake de Pastino
    <p>The victims all appeared to be women, mostly in their late teens or early 20s. Evidence suggested they were strangled, or perhaps cut at the throat, at the edge of their shared mass grave, and then interred, meters away from an ornate burial of two men thought to be clan elders, political leaders, spiritual guides, or all three.</p>
  • Epic Fire Marked ‘Beginning of the End’ for Ancient Culture of Cahokia, New Digs Suggest

    03/01/2014 3:33:14 AM PST · by Renfield · 27 replies
    Western Digs ^ | 9-16-2013 | Blake de Pastino
    Excavations in the Midwest have turned up evidence of a massive ancient fire that likely marked “the beginning of the end” for what was once America’s largest city, archaeologists say.The digs took place in southern Illinois, just meters away from the interstate highways that carve their way through and around modern-day St. Louis. But 900 years ago, this was the heart of Greater Cahokia, a civilization whose trade routes and religious influence stretched from the Great Lakes to the Deep South, and whose culture shaped the lifeways of the Plains and Southern Indians.An artist’s rendering depicts Cahokia’s city center...
  • Ancient mummies found buried with world's oldest cheese

    03/01/2014 3:15:21 AM PST · by Renfield · 29 replies
    L. A. Times ^ | 2-28-2014 | Jean Harris
    For some cheese lovers, the older and stinkier the cheese, the better. Well, what about a cheese that's been aging for 3,600 years? Yellow lumps, believed to be the world's oldest cheese, were found on mummies buried in the Taklamakan Desert in northwestern China. The cheese, which was found during archaeological excavations that took place between 2002 and 2004, dates to as early as 1615 BC. The cheese was found on the necks and chests of the mummies. The multiple layers of cowhide the mummies were buried in, and the dry, salty desert helped preserve the cheese....
  • Oldest fortified settlement ever found in North America? Location of Fort Caroline may be in Georgia

    02/22/2014 3:38:46 AM PST · by Makana · 70 replies
    Science Daily ^ | February 22, 2014 | Florida State University
    In an announcement likely to rewrite the book on early colonization of the New World, two researchers have proposed a location for the oldest fortified settlement ever found in North America. They believe that the legendary Fort Caroline, a long-sought fort built by the French in 1564, is located near the mouth of the Altamaha River in southeast Georgia.
  • Ancient graves hint at cultural shift to Anglo-Saxon Britain

    02/17/2014 1:08:17 PM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 2-14-2014 | Alex Peel
    Human remains dug up from an ancient grave in Oxfordshire add to a growing body of evidence that Britain's fifth-century transition from Roman to Anglo-Saxon was cultural rather than bloody. The traditional historical narrative is one of brutal conquest, with invaders from the North wiping out and replacing the pre-existing population. But a new study, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, hints at a more peaceful process. Dr Andrew Millard, from Durham University, is one of the study's authors. 'The main controversy over the years has centred on how many Anglo-Saxons came across the North Sea,' he says. 'Was...
  • Mount Sinai Found!

    02/08/2014 1:58:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 64 replies
    Simcha Jacobovici TV ^ | June 11, 2013 | Simcha Jacobovici
    For those who have never been to Mitzpe Ramon, you’re missing out. It’s on the edge of the Ramon makhtesh -- Israel’s Grand Canyon. In fact, although it is called a “crater” in English, it is actually a “makhtesh” i.e., a “box canyon”, formed not by a meteor or a river, but by geological processes of a receding ocean. It is the world’s largest “makhtesh”! ... In any event, no one listened, but everyone had a lot of fun. My friend Hershel Shanks who moderated my session chided me for being too confident. He wanted me to have an appropriate...
  • Spanish, Egyptian Archaeologists Make Discovery That Changes Chronology of the Pharaohs

    02/15/2014 1:33:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Hispanically Speaking ^ | February 8, 2014 | unattributed
    A team of Spanish and Egyptian archaeologists made a find in a southern Egyptian tomb that opens the way to a reinterpretation of Pharaonic chronology, since it could show that Amenhotep III and his son Amenhotep IV reigned together. The team, headed by Spaniard Francisco Martin Valentin and funded by Spain’s Gaselec foundation, excavated the remains of a wall and columns of the mausoleum of a minister of the 18th Pharaonic dynasty - 1569-1315 B.C. - in the province of Luxor. What is exceptional about the discovery, Martin Valentin told Efe, is that in the excavation they found the names...
  • Prehistoric Boy May Be Native American 'Missing Link' (Aznick Boy)

    02/12/2014 2:05:43 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies
    Live Science - Yahoo News ^ | 2-12-2014 | Charles Q. Choi
    Prehistoric Boy May Be Native American 'Missing Link' LiveScience.com By By Charles Q. Choi, LiveScience ContributorFebruary 12, 2014 A prehistoric boy's DNA now suggests that ancient toolmakers long thought of as the first Americans may serve as a kind of "missing link" between Native Americans and the rest of the world, researchers say. The findings reveal these prehistoric toolmakers are the direct ancestors of many contemporary Native Americans, and are closely related to all Native Americans. Scientists investigated a prehistoric culture known as the Clovis, named after sites discovered near Clovis, N.M. Centuries of cold, nicknamed the "Big Freeze," helped...
  • Scientists find 800,000-year-old footprints in UK

    02/08/2014 10:55:20 AM PST · by artichokegrower · 29 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | February 7, 2014 | JILL LAWLESS
    LONDON (AP) — They were a British family on a day out — almost a million years ago. Archaeologists announced Friday that they have discovered human footprints in England that are between 800,000 and 1 million years old — the most ancient found outside Africa, and the earliest evidence of human life in northern Europe.
  • Scientists Find 800,000-Year-Old Footprints In UK

    02/07/2014 3:10:44 PM PST · by blam · 46 replies
    phys.org/news ^ | 2-7-2014 | Jill Lawless
    Scientists Find 800,000-Year-Old Footprints Inn UK (Update) Jill LawlessFebuary 7, 2014Undated handout photo issued by the British Museum Friday Feb. 7, 2014 of some of the human footprints, thought to be more than 800,000 years old, found in silt on the beach at Happisburgh on the Norfolk coast of England, with a camera lens …They were a British family on a day out—almost a million years ago. Archaeologists announced Friday that they have discovered human footprints in England that are between 800,000 and 1 million years old—the most ancient found outside Africa, and the earliest evidence of human life in...
  • British Museum: Prototype for Noah's Ark was round

    01/25/2014 2:08:46 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    The Associated Press ^ | January 24, 2014 | Jill Lawless
    It was a vast boat that saved two of each animal and a handful of humans from a catastrophic flood. But forget all those images of a long vessel with a pointy bow - the original Noah's Ark, new research suggests, was round. A recently deciphered 4,000-year-old clay tablet from ancient Mesopotamia - modern-day Iraq - reveals striking new details about the roots of the Old Testament tale of Noah....
  • One million-year-old settlement uncovered in Britain

    01/16/2014 8:11:02 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 56 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | January 13, 2014 | April Holloway
    Archaeologists believe they have found the birthplace of British civilisation, and it is underneath a Ł15-a-night caravan park in Norfolk, England. Discoveries at the site include one million-year-old artefacts and fossilised animal remains, which are the oldest ever found in the UK. Scientists now believe that it was the first, or one of the first settlement sites of early humans in Britain. Although researchers are yet to uncover any human remains from our predecessors, it is believed the site currently lying beneath Manor Caravan Park in Happisburgh, Norfolk, was a settlement created by early human relatives, such as Homo erectus....
  • Zakynthos - Cover up of a lost Greek city?

    01/16/2014 4:41:35 AM PST · by Renfield · 12 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | 1-15-2014 | Pavlos Voutos
    About 25 years ago, I started diving in the clear blue waters of Zakynthos. Many times I passed through the water seeing small broken pieces of ceramics and I asked myself where they were from. I thought that maybe there was something buried in the sand. I believed that there was definitely something ancient around the area that deserved more investigation. For many years I didn’t find any other clues to prove this. My love for the sea made me buy an underwater camera to start taking photographs of my diving excursions. It was then that the secret was...
  • Mystery of 39 skulls found at London Wall is solved after 25 years

    01/16/2014 4:32:45 AM PST · by Renfield · 9 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 1-15-2014 | Amanda Williams
    Skulls discovered within the boundaries of ancient London a quarter of a century ago are now believed to be those of gladiators, brutally killed for the amusement of Roman audiences. The haul of 39 skulls, discovered beneath the site of the Guildhall in the City of London, were discovered in 1988 and were believed to have originated from human remains washed out of burial sites by the Walbrook, one of the area’s lost rivers. But now after 25 years in storage, the remains have been re-examined by an historian from the Museum of London, who believes they are the first...
  • Searching for the Amazon's Hidden Civilizations

    01/13/2014 3:40:59 PM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Science Magazine ^ | 1-7-2014 | Crystal McMichael
    Look around the Amazon rainforest today and it’s hard to imagine it filled with people. But in recent decades, archaeologists have started to find evidence that before Columbus’s arrival, the region was dotted with towns and perhaps even cities. The extent of human settlement in the Amazon remains hotly debated, partly because huge swaths of the 6-million-square-kilometer rainforest remain unstudied by archaeologists. Now, researchers have built a model predicting where signs of pre-Columbian agriculture are most likely to be found, a tool they hope will help guide future archaeological work in the region. In many ways, archaeology in the Amazon...
  • Skeleton of 2,000-year-old woman unearthed in Davie (Florida)

    01/09/2014 8:17:00 PM PST · by ConservativeStatement · 34 replies
    South Florida Sun-Sentinel ^ | January 9, 2014 | Ken Kaye
    She rested in peace for about 2,000 years until utility crews came shortly before Christmas to install a new waterline on Pine Island Road in Davie. That's when the fully intact skeleton of what is believed to be a Tequesta Indian woman was found — perhaps the best-preserved remains of an ancient human uncovered in the past 40 years, authorities said Thursday. "It's either Tequesta or the member of a people that predates the Tequesta," said Bob Carr, of the Archaeological and Historical Conservancy in Davie. "It's unusually well preserved, considering it's been under a highway with thousands and thousands...
  • Disease and trauma within collapsing Indus Civilisation

    12/27/2013 3:02:52 AM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 12-25-2013
    During the third millennium BCE, the Indus Civilisation flourished in what is now northwest India and Pakistan. Between 2200-1900 BCE the culture was characterised by long-distance exchange networks, carefully planned urban settlements such as Harappa and Mohenjo Daro that had sophisticated sanitation facilities, standardised weights and measures, and a sphere of influence that extended over a million square kilometres of territory. The culture was seemingly at its height when the end came (collapse attributed to climatic change) but recent research published in both the open access journal PLoS ONE and an earlier 2012 article in the International Journal of Palaeopathology...
  • Unlocking the scrolls of Herculaneum

    12/20/2013 9:11:01 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    BBC News ^ | 12-19-2013 | Robin Banerji
    For centuries scholars have been hunting for the lost works of ancient Greek and Latin literature. In the Renaissance, books were found in monastic libraries. In the late 19th Century papyrus scrolls were found in the sands of Egypt. But only in Herculaneum in southern Italy has an entire library from the ancient Mediterranean been discovered in situ. On the eve of the catastrophe in 79 AD, Herculaneum was a chic resort town on the Bay of Naples, where many of Rome's top families went to rest and recuperate during the hot Italian summers. It was also a place where...
  • The world’s first detailed prehistoric maps of Britain

    12/19/2013 5:05:23 PM PST · by Renfield · 21 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 12-8-2013 | TANN
    The ABC Publishing Group has announced the publication of the world’s first prehistoric maps of Britain. These maps are based on the recently published book by Robert John Langdon titled ‘The Stonehenge Enigma’ which proves that Britain suffered massive ‘Post Glacial Flooding’ directly after the last Ice Age ten thousand years ago, and that mankind placed their ancient sites on the shorelines of these raised waterways. Stonehenge - surrounded by water on three sides[Credit: ABC Publishing Group] The maps are presented on the old ordnance survey first edition that shows the natural ancient environment to a higher degree of detail...
  • The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

    12/19/2013 12:22:35 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 56 replies
    The Scientist ^ | December 18, 2013 | Ruth Williams
    A high-quality genome sequence obtained from a female Neanderthal toe bone reveals that the individual’s parents were close relatives and that such inbreeding was prevalent among her recent ancestors, according to a paper published today (December 18) in Nature. But the sequence also reveals that interbreeding occurred between Neanderthals and other hominin groups, including early modern humans. “Did humans evolve like a constantly branching tree? A lot of people think so,” said Milford Wolpoff, a professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan, who was not involved in the study. “But there’s also been this thread of thought, by some...
  • Ancient Humans Had Sex With A Mystery Species (Not Neanderthals Or Denisovans)

    12/05/2013 6:33:43 AM PST · by blam · 129 replies
    BI/Live Science ^ | 12-4-2013 | Stephanie Pappas
    Ancient Humans Had Sex With A Mystery Species Stephanie Pappas Live Science Dec. 4, 2013, 3:33 PM A new, improved sequencing of ancient human relative genomes reveals that Homo sapiens didn't only have sex with Neanderthals and a little-understood line of humans called Denisovans. A fourth, mystery lineage of humans was in the mix, too. As reported by the news arm of the journal Nature, new genetic evidence suggests that several hominids — human relatives closer than humans' current living cousin, the chimpanzee — interbred more than 30,000 years ago. This group of kissing cousins included an unknown human ancestor...
  • FIRST-PERSON: Can archaeology help confirm the Bible?

    12/01/2013 11:48:13 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    The Baptist Press ^ | November 4, 2013 | David Roach
    Whenever there's an archaeological discovery related to the Bible, conflicting interpretations by various experts can leave a believer's head spinning. Take the discovery in Israel of a palace from the era of King David earlier this year. An archaeologist from Hebrew University in Jerusalem said there's "unequivocal evidence" that David and his descendants ruled at the site. But critics, including some committed believers, say it could have belonged to other kingdoms and that David's palace likely would have been in Jerusalem some 18 miles northwest. Still others claim there is no archaeological evidence that David even existed. Similar confusion ensued...
  • PA Caught Digging at Ancient Hasmonean Fortress

    11/27/2013 5:10:45 AM PST · by SJackson · 12 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | Arutz Sheva | Ari Yashar
    The fortress, an important site in the Maccabee revolts which Hanukkah commemorates, is located in 'Area A' not under Israeli control. Tour guides from the Kfar Etzion Field School this week discovered that the Palestinian Authority (PA) has been digging at Beit Betzi, a Hasmonean fortress located between Bethlehem and the Herodion in "Area A." The Hasmonean revolt against the Greek empire is commemorated in the holiday of Hanukkah that begins Wednesday night. Following the Oslo Accords the site, one of the only existing discoveries from the days of the Hasmoneans, was transfered to PA control. News of PA digs...
  • Wine Cellar, Well Aged, Is Revealed in Israel

    11/23/2013 6:03:17 AM PST · by NYer · 21 replies
    NY Times ^ | November 22, 2013 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    Digging this summer at the ruins of a 1700 B.C. Canaanite palace in northern Israel, archaeologists struck wine. Near the banquet hall where rulers of a Middle Bronze Age city-state and their guests feasted, a team of American and Israeli researchers broke through to a storage room holding the remains of 40 large ceramic jars. The vessels were broken, their liquid contents long since vanished — but not without a trace. A chemical analysis of residues left in the three-foot-tall jars detected organic traces of acids that are common components of all wine, as well as ingredients popular in ancient...
  • Neanderthal String Theory

    11/21/2013 6:28:04 AM PST · by Renfield · 17 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 11-19-2013
    In a further study of Neanderthal occupation at Abri du Maras, Ardèche in France, the evidence is stacking up to support the view that this group was behaviourally flexible and capable of creating a variety of sophisticated tools including projectile points and more importantly, cord and string.Fibrous materials that can be used to create cords are difficult to find in the archaeological record and have usually rotted away, so the oldest known string dated back only 30,000 years. However, perforations in small stone and tooth artefacts as well as shells from other Neanderthal sites in France suggested the pieces had...
  • First South Americans Ate Giant Sloths (30,000 years ago!)

    11/21/2013 4:11:30 AM PST · by Renfield · 22 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 11-19-2013 | Jennifer Viegas
    Giant sloths were eaten by a population living in Uruguay 30,000 years ago, suggesting humans arrived in the Americas far earlier than previously thought, according to a new study. The discovery, along with other recent findings, strengthens the theory that people arrived in South America via ocean crossings long before humans might have walked into North America from northeastern Asia, during the end of the last glacial period around 16,000 years ago. The study was published in the latest Proceedings of the Royal Society B. These brave individuals apparently did not shy away from big game either, with giant sloth...
  • Downfall of Ancient Greece Caused by 300-Year Drought

    10/25/2013 4:43:00 AM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    The Weather Channel ^ | 10-22-2013 | Tia Ghose
    A 300-year drought may have caused the demise of several Mediterranean cultures, including ancient Greece, new research suggests. A sharp drop in rainfall may have led to the collapse of several eastern Mediterranean civilizations, including ancient Greece, around 3,200 years ago. The resulting famine and conflict may help explain why the entire Hittite culture, chariot-riding people who ruled most of the region of Anatolia, vanished from the planet, according to a study published in August in the journal PLOS ONE. Lost golden period Even during the heyday of Classical Greek civilization, there were hints of an earlier culture that was...
  • First Americans came from Europe NOT Asia?

    10/18/2013 1:13:08 PM PDT · by Renfield · 47 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 2-28-2012 | Jill Reilly
    America was first discovered by Stone Age hunters from Europe, according to new archaeological evidence. Across six locations on the U.S. east coast, several dozen stone tools have been found. After close analysis it was discovered that they were between 19,000 and 26,000 years old and were a European-style of tool. The discovery suggests that the owners of the tools arrived 10,000 years before the ancestors of the American Indians set foot in the New World, reported The Independent...
  • Stone Age Bow and Arrows Uncovered in Norway

    10/18/2013 6:38:03 AM PDT · by Renfield · 27 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 10-1-2013 | Tia Ghose
    A melting patch of ancient snow in the mountains of Norway has revealed a bow and arrows likely used by hunters to kill reindeer as long ago as 5,400 years. The discovery highlights the worrying effects of climate change, said study author Martin Callanan, an archaeologist at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. "It's actually a little bit unnerving that they're so old and that they're coming out right now," Callanan told LiveScience. "It tells us that there's something changing." Locked in snow Callanan and his colleagues spend every summer hiking up the Trollheim and Dovre mountains a few...
  • Archaeologists unearth section of an Anglo Saxon cross in Weardale

    09/28/2013 11:50:09 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    The Northern Echo ^ | Wednesday, September 25th, 2013 | Crook & Weardale desk
    Archaelogists excavating a medieval church in a dales village have found further evidence that the site was an Anglo Saxon settlement. A carved section from an eighth century stone cross was unearthed during a dig at St Botolph"s field in Frosterley in Weardale this week. The discovery was met with great excitement from the archaeologists and volunteers who were digging on the site as part of the Altogether Archaeology project... Mr Frodsham said Frosterley was largely a post-medieval village but recent finds have suggested people lived in the area much earlier... It has already attracted more than 500 volunteers who...
  • No seafood for early Easter Islanders -- they ate rats

    09/27/2013 3:48:08 AM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    NBC News ^ | 9-26-2013 | Owen Jarus
    Chemical analyses of teeth from 41 human skeletons excavated on Easter Island revealed the inhabitants ate rats rather than seafood; Here, Moai statues at Ahu Tongariki on the south-eastern part of the island, where 26 of the skeletons were found. The inhabitants of Easter Island consumed a diet that was lacking in seafood and was, literally, quite ratty. The island, also called Rapa Nui, first settled around A.D. 1200, is famous for its more than 1,000 "walking" Moai statues, most of which originally faced inland. Located in the South Pacific, Rapa Nui is the most isolated inhabited landmass on Earth;...
  • Proof of Solomon’s mines found in Israel

    09/23/2013 1:02:58 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 11 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Sep 03, 2013
    New findings from an archaeological excavation led this winter by Dr. Erez Ben-Yosef of Tel Aviv University’s Jacob M. Alkow Department of Archaeology and Near Eastern Cultures prove that copper mines in Israel thought to have been built by the ancient Egyptians in the 13th century BCE actually originated three centuries later, during the reign of the legendary King Solomon.Based on the radiocarbon dating of material unearthed at a new site in Timna Valley in Israel’s Aravah Desert, the findings overturn the archaeological consensus of the last several decades. Scholarly work and materials found in the area suggest the mines...
  • Head of goddess Aphrodite statue unearthed in Turkey

    09/22/2013 7:48:13 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    NBC ^ | 23 hours ago | Megan Gannon,
    Buried under soil for hundreds of years, the goddess of love and beauty has some chipping on her nose and face. Researchers think her presence could shed light on the extent of the Roman Empire's wide cultural influence at the time of its peak. Archaeologists found the sculpture while working at a site called Antiochia ad Cragum (Antioch on the cliffs), on the Mediterranean coast. The researchers believe the region, which is dotted with hidden inlets and coves, would have been a haven for Cilician pirates — the same group who kidnapped Julius Caesar and held him for ransom around...
  • Extraordinary Kurgan Burial Shines New Light on Sarmatian Life

    09/17/2013 6:26:47 PM PDT · by rjbemsha · 11 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 17 Sep 2013 | Leonid T. Yablonsky
    A Sarmatian burial mound excavated this summer in Russia’s Southern Ural steppes has yielded a magnificent but unusual treasure. The artefacts contained within the mound are helping to shed light on a little-known period of the illiterate nomadic culture that flourished on the Eurasian steppe in the 1st millennium BC and interacted with the Persian Achaemenid and Greek civilizations. The archaeological study of this remarkable ancient tomb, or kurgan, was carried out by the expedition of the Institute of Archaeology (Russian Academy of Sciences), led by Professor Leonid T. Yablonsky.
  • Collapse reported on Temple Mount

    08/28/2013 6:02:29 AM PDT · by NYer · 62 replies
    Israel Today ^ | August 27, 2013
    Eyewitnesses told Turkish media this week that a portion of the Temple Mount platform near the Al Aqsa Mosque has collapsed, creating a serious safety hazard and a possible threat to the stability of the Islamic structure. If the report is accurate, it would be the second serious collapse on the Temple Mount in the past five years. Palestinian officials claim that the collapses are caused by deliberate Israeli action to bring down the Al Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of the Rock so that the Jewish Temple can be rebuilt. But archaeologists and engineers have been warning for...
  • Tomb find confirms powerful women ruled Peru long ago

    08/26/2013 4:58:49 AM PDT · by Renfield · 30 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 8-22-2013 | Roberto Cortijo
    The discovery in Peru of another tomb belonging to a pre-Hispanic priestess, the eighth in more than two decades, confirms that powerful women ruled this region 1,200 years ago, archeologists said. The remains of the woman from the Moche—or Mochica—civilization were discovered in late July in an area called La Libertad in the country's northern Chepan province. It is one of several finds in this region that have amazed scientists. In 2006, researchers came across the famous "Lady of Cao"—who died about 1,700 years ago and is seen as one of the first female rulers in Peru. "This find makes...
  • Have archaeologists discovered the grave of Alexander the Great?

    08/23/2013 7:47:03 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | August 23, 2013
    Experts find enormous marble tomb fit for a king under a massive mound in Greece Archaeologists have uncovered what could be the grave of Alexander the Great at a site near ancient Amphipolis, 370 miles north of Athens The warrior king was thought to be buried in Egypt but experts have discovered a marble-faced wall dating from the 4th century BC Site archaeologist Aikaterini Peristeri has voiced hopes of finding 'a significant individual or individuals' withinArchaeologists have uncovered what could be the grave of Alexander the Great at a site near ancient Amphipolis. The warrior king - who ruled in...