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Keyword: archaeology

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  • Ancient Greek palace unearthed near Sparta dates back to 17th century BC

    08/27/2015 1:46:45 PM PDT · by the scotsman · 17 replies
    The Guardian ^ | August 26th 2015 | Agent France-Presse
    Archaeologists discover palace with archaic inscriptions built during the Mycenaean period 'Archaeologists in Greece have discovered the ruins of an ancient palace with important archaic inscriptions dating back to the Mycenaean age, the culture ministry said Tuesday. The palace, likely built around the 17th-16th centuries BC, had around 10 rooms and was discovered near Sparta in southern Greece. At the site, archaeologists found objects of worship, clay figurines, a cup adorned with a bull’s head, swords and fragments of murals.'
  • Archaeologists making exciting discoveries in Laconia

    08/28/2015 5:10:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Ekathimerini ^ | Aug 28, 2015 | Unattributed
    Ongoing excavations at a site in the southern Peloponnese are offering rare insight into the ancient past of Laconia, about which very little physical evidence exists, the state-run Athens-Macedonian News Agency cited the Culture Ministry as saying on Tuesday. Covering an expanse of 3.5 hectares, the site on Aghios Vassilios Hill near the village of Xirokambi on the Sparta plain has been under excavation since 2009 and is believed to contain valuable evidence that will shed light on life in the area during the 17th to 16th centuries BC, the announcement said. A palace complex found on the site and...
  • Coins worth $4.5m recovered from shipwreck

    08/22/2015 9:11:40 PM PDT · by bob_denard · 24 replies
    MIAMI: Treasure hunters off Florida have found $4.5 million in gold coins from a Spanish ship that sunk during a hurricane in the 18th century , the sal vage company said on Wednesday. The ship 'Ten Galleons' traveling from Havana to Spain... "Over 350 gold coins, including 9 Royals were recovered on July 30 & 31 on the actual 300th anniversary of the wreck,"
  • Massive Human Skull Rack Found at Aztec Temple

    08/21/2015 3:14:48 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 70 replies
    Discovery ^ | Rossella Lorenzi
    Found on the western side of what was once the Templo Mayor complex in Tenochtitlan, in modern Mexico City, the partially unearthed skull rack was likely built between 1485 and 1502 and may have been about 112 feet (34 meters) long and 40 feet (12 meters) wide. Mostly belonging to young adult men, but also to women and children, several of the unearthed skulls feature holes on both sides, suggesting they belonged to a tzompantli. This was a rack on which the skulls of sacrificed people were arranged on wooden poles and displayed... To make the scene even more horrifying,...
  • Pyramids exist in Bosnia: Archaeologist

    08/14/2015 8:46:43 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 22 replies
    The Straits Times ^ | August 14, 2015 | Carolyn Khew
    But experts say the five that he identified in Bosnia-Herzegovina are natural hills.Despite his many critics, maverick archaeologist Sam Osmanagich stands by his claims that he has uncovered not one, but five structures which he says are pyramids in Visoko in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Dr Osmanagich, who earned his doctorate on the history of civilisations at the University of Sarajevo in 2008, was in Singapore recently for a conference, where he spoke about his work on pyramids. The 55-year-old claims that he has discovered the "biggest complex of pyramidal structures in the world" comprising five pyramids, all connected by underground tunnels. The...
  • Has Turkey found world's oldest temple?

    08/10/2015 5:47:29 PM PDT · by markomalley · 18 replies
    Al Monitor ^ | 8/10/15 | Tulay Cetingulec
    The ancient city of Ephesus and the Diyarbakir Fortress and its surrounding Hevsel Gardens have become the latest historical sites in Turkey to be inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in July. Turkey’s next nomination is the Stone Age cult site of Gobeklitepe, located in Sanliurfa province not far from the turbulent Syrian border. The site’s discovery began with a coincidence reminiscent of a movie plot. In 1983, local farmer Mahmut Kilic found a carved stone while plowing his field in the village of Orencik. He took it to the Sanliurfa Museum, where it was to wait a decade...
  • Enormous monolith, carved 9350 years ago, found under Mediterranean Sea

    08/08/2015 11:37:46 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 50 replies
    A 12-METRE monolith, hacked out of limestone by stone-age humans some nine thousand years ago, has been found at the bottom of the Mediterranean. The enormous stone totem, now split in two and sitting in the Sicilian Channel between Tunisia and Sicily, was hewed from a rocky outcrop some 300m away when the Mediterranean Sea was still a dry basin. It’s now under 40m of water. The new study, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, says the area was submerged about 9350 years ago (give or take 200 years) when the last Ice Age retreated. Before that time the...
  • ARCHAEOLOGISTS FIND LAST FRAGMENT OF EARLY CHRISTIAN CHRISTOGRAM IN BASILICA

    08/08/2015 2:14:11 PM PDT · by NYer · 5 replies
    ARCHAEOLOGY IN BULGARIA ^ | August 4, 2015
    The fragments making up the 6th century AD marble slab with a christogram and a donor’s inscription below it have been discovered by the archaeologists excavating the Bishop’s Basilica of Ancient Parthicopolis in Bulgaria’s Sandanski over a period of 25 years. Photo: TV grab from BNT Archaeologists excavating the so called Bishop’s Basilica of the Ancient Roman and Early Byzantine city of Parthicopolis located in the town of Sandanski in Southwest Bulgaria have discovered the last fragment from a marble slab with a christogram, a Christian symbol consisting of a monogram of letters standing for the name of Jesus Christ.The...
  • 'Loch Ness monster' dinosaur fossil found in Alaska

    08/08/2015 11:44:33 AM PDT · by NYer · 17 replies
    Telegraph ^ | August 7, 2015
    Elasmosaurs had extremely long necks, small heads and paddle-shaped limbs for swimming Photo: Nobu Tamura Researchers in Alaska have uncovered the bones of a prehistoric marine reptile dating back 70 million years. This is the first time an elasmosaur has ever been unearthed in this state. Its vertebrae were discovered embedded in an eroding cliff. Curvin Metzler (left) and Dr Patrick Druckenmiller on the cliff face where the elasmosaur was discovered  Photo: University of Alaska Museum of the North Elasmosaurs had extremely long necks, small heads and paddle-shaped limbs for swimming. • Scientists study remains of massive Dreadnoughtus dinosaur, in pics...
  • Archaeologists Unearth Another Impressive Biblical Find

    08/06/2015 8:46:49 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 10 replies
    Pajamas Media ^ | 08/06/2015 | Chris Queen
    Science continues to prove the Bible on a regular basis. This time, archaeologists from Bar-Ilan University in Israel have uncovered what appears to be the hometown of the giant Goliath. The town, called Gath, was occupied until the ninth century B.C. In biblical accounts, the Philistines — the mortal enemies of the Israelites — ruled the city. The Old Testament also describes Gath as the home of Goliath, the giant warrior whom the Israelite King David felled with a slingshot.The new findings reveal just how impressive the ancient Philistine city once was, said lead archaeologist of the current excavation,...
  • Goliath Gates: Entrance to Famous Biblical Metropolis Uncovered

    08/05/2015 2:42:29 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    Live Science ^ | August 4, 2015 | Tia Ghose, Senior Writer
    A massive gate unearthed in Israel may have marked the entrance to a biblical city that, at its heyday, was the biggest metropolis in the region. The town, called Gath, was occupied until the ninth century B.C. In biblical accounts, the Philistines — the mortal enemies of the Israelites — ruled the city. The Old Testament also describes Gath as the home of Goliath, the giant warrior whom the Israelite King David felled with a slingshot. The new findings reveal just how impressive the ancient Philistine city once was, said lead archaeologist of the current excavation, Aren Maeir, of Bar-Ilan...
  • Archaeologists discover humongous gate in Goliath's hometown

    08/04/2015 6:12:36 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 26 replies
    MSN.com ^ | August 3, 2015 | Nico Lauricella
    Archaeologists at Israel's Bar-Ilan University announced on Monday the discovery of a massive gate and other fortifications in the ruins of Gath, the hometown of the Bible's Goliath. The ancient gate is one of the largest ever discovered in Israel and evidence of the Philistine city's power in the 10th and ninth centuries B.C.E, head archaeologist Professor Aren Maeir says. It even made a brief appearance in the Bible when David, Goliath's slayer and future king of Israel, "acted like a madman, making marks on the doors of the gate and letting saliva run down his beard."
  • 2000-Year-Old Cat Paw Prints Discovered on Tile

    07/31/2015 12:45:07 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    news.discovery.com ^ | Jul 30, 2015 01:26 PM ET | by Rossella Lorenzi
    The cat paw print on the Roman roof tile. David Rice ================================================================================================================== Paw prints made by a cat 2,000 years ago have been found on a Roman roof tile kept at a museum in south west England. Dug up in Gloucester in 1969, the tile fragment had long lain unnoticed at Gloucester City Museum. Only recently, a researcher spotted the cat’s paw on the tile while going through the finds from the 1969 archaeological excavation. “At that time the archaeologists seem to have been more interested in digging things up than looking at what they found,” David Rice, curator at...
  • Strange 'conehead' skeleton unearthed at Russia's Stonehenge:

    07/29/2015 6:21:12 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 63 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 15:18 EST, 27 July 2015 | Sarah Griffiths
    Elongated head was bound in tribal tradition 2,000 years ago Skeleton with long skull was unearthed in Arkaim, central Russia It's thought to belong to a woman living almost 2,000 years ago Her skull is elongated because it was bound out of tribal tradition Arkaim is known as Russia's Stonehenge because it may have been used by ancient people to study the stars, like the British site A skeleton with an unusual-shaped skull has been unearthed on a site known as Russia's Stonehenge. When images of the remains were first published, UFO enthusiasts rushed to claim they were proof that...
  • Israeli Archaeologists Discover 3,000-Year-Old Jar With Inscription of Name From the Bible

    07/27/2015 8:05:18 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 37 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 07/27/2015 | Anugrah Kumar
    Archaeologists in Israel have found a rare inscription of the name of an apparently influential person from the time of King David, a name that is also mentioned in the Bible, according to Israel Antiquities Authority. Archaeologists have discovered a 3,000-year-old large ceramic jar with the inscription of the name "Eshbaal Ben Beda," The Associated Press reported Sunday. The Old Testament book of 1 Chronicles in 8:33 and 9:39 identifies the fourth son of Saul as Eshbaal, also written as as Ish-bosheth. "Ner was the father of Kish, Kish the father of Saul, and Saul the father of Jonathan, Malki-Shua,...
  • Biblical Text from 500 A.D. Deciphered from Charred Scroll

    07/21/2015 8:17:21 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 29 replies
    Discovery ^ | Jul 20, 2015 06:06 PM ET // by | Rossella Lorenzi
    Virtual unwrapping software has revealed verses from the Book of Leviticus in a charred parchment scroll, making it the oldest biblical text after the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) announced on Monday. Found 45 years ago inside the Holy Ark of the synagogue at Ein Gedi, on the western shore of the Dead Sea, the 2.7-inch scroll was dated by C14 analysis to about 500 AD. “This is the first time in any archaeological excavation that a Torah scroll was found in a synagogue, particularly inside a Holy Ark,” the IAA said in a statement. ... To...
  • Archaeologists Find Assyrian Tablets in Turkey, Some About Women's Rights

    07/19/2015 1:05:42 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    Ancient Assyrian tablets, dictating social arrangements including women's rights, dating back to 4,000 years have been excavated in the Central Anatolian province of Kayseri, a local newspaper reported Thursday. Prof. Fikri Kulakoglu of Ankara University told Dogan News Agency that the Kultepe-Kanis-Karum trade colony site where the tablets were unearthed was remarkable. He said the tablets revealed detailed information about the Assyrians, spanning from commercial trade to the nitty-gritty of the local social life. "From women's rights to the adoption of children and marriages arranged at birth, the tablets include all kinds of civilizational and social data from Anatolia 4,000...
  • Researcher unravels century-old woolly tale to find truth behind massive bones

    07/06/2015 8:16:58 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | Jul 03, 2015 | by Mark Johnson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    Animals go extinct, places too. And stories change. Boaz, a small village in Richland County, Wis., has only 156 people these days. There are a half-dozen streets, a couple of taverns, a small park with a baseball diamond and, on the outskirts, a historic marker describing the village's lone claim to fame: "the Boaz Mastodon." The story on the marker is the one that's been told to schoolchildren for almost a century as they stare up at the mastodon skeleton, enshrined in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Geology Museum. It is a story that, until now, has endured largely unchanged: One...
  • Archeologists Find U.S. Army Bacon and Sunscreen Buried at Salisbury Plain

    07/05/2015 10:13:26 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 25 replies
    UPI ^ | July 5, 2015 | Fred Lambert
    Wessex Archeology says it has in recent years found remains from World War II mess kitchens in the area.Archeologists say they have unearthed several tins filled with U.S. Army bacon and sunscreen at Salisbury Plain, England, home of the famous Stonehenge ruins. Wessex Archeology shared the find on its website in celebration of American Independence Day. Salisbury Plain has been a British military training ground since the early 20th century, but U.S. military forces staged there in preparation for the 1944 invasion of Nazi-occupied France during World War II. "The military has been on Salisbury Plain for decades so it's...
  • Ancient tomb found at 'Sweden's Stonehenge'

    10/17/2012 3:41:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    The Local (Sweden) ^ | October 15, 2012 | Rebecca Martin
    Swedish archaeologists have unearthed what is presumed to be a dolmen, or a portal tomb, that is believed to be over 5,000 years old near the megalithic monument Ale's stones in southern Sweden... Despite a few days of rain, the archaeologists have managed to uncover enough of the site to see that what they have found is like to be a dolmen, a type of megalithic tomb, most often consisting of three or more upright stones supporting a large flat horizontal capstone... According to reports, the archaeologists have found what they believe is an imprint of the tomb, which must...
  • Jerusalem family finds 2,000-year old mikveh underneath living room

    07/01/2015 4:11:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Ha'aretz ^ | Tammuz 14, 5775 (July 1, 2015) | Nir Hasson
    A Jerusalem family ripping up its living room floor found a staircase lost for 2,000 years, leading to a large ritual bath carved out of bedrock. It took the family some years to call in the authorities and show them the discovery beneath their house, in the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ein Kerem. Throughout the interim, the family blocked off the entrance to the mikveh with wooden doors, and simply continued to live over it. When they did call in the Israel Antiquities Authority, beneath the doors, the archaeologists found the carved stone staircase leaving to a big mikveh, 3.5 meters...
  • Spiky monsters: New species of 'super-armored' worm discovered

    06/30/2015 9:59:45 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 29 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-29-2015 | Provided by University of Cambridge
    Collinsium ciliosum, a Collins' monster-type lobopodian from the early Cambrian Xiaoshiba biota of China. Credit: Javier Ortega-Hernández A new species of 'super-armoured' worm, a bizarre, spike-covered creature which ate by filtering nutrients out of seawater with its feather-like front legs, has been identified by palaeontologists. The creature, which lived about half a billion years ago, was one of the first animals on Earth to develop armour to protect itself from predators and to use such a specialised mode of feeding. The creature, belonging to a poorly understood group of early animals, is also a prime example of the broad variety...
  • University of Reading archaeologists to excavate the biggest henge in the country (Marden Henge)

    06/29/2015 10:03:32 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    Trinity Mirror Southern - UK ^ | June 20, 2015 | Linda Fort
    Archaeologists from the University of Reading will start a three-year excavation on land between the prehistoric monuments of Stonehenge and Avenbury this summer. Exploring the Vale of Pewsey in Wiltshire is expected to reveal more about the lives of the people who worshipped at Stonehenge. The work will be done in collaboration with Historic England, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and Wiltshire Museum. The site is a barely explored archaeological region of huge international importance. The project will investigate Marden Henge. Built around 2400 BC Marden is the largest henge or Neolithic earthwork in the country and one of...
  • Mysterious 2,000-year-old marble dolphin surfaces near Gaza

    06/28/2015 11:11:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | June 25, 2015 | Ilan Ben Zion
    You would think that 12 miles inland from the Mediterranean Sea is the last place to find a dolphin clutching a fish between its jaws. Hewn from marble, the 2,000-or-so-year-old statuette surfaced during archaeological excavations near Kibbutz Magen, bordering the Gaza Strip, in March of this year. The discovery of the dolphin statue amid the ruins of a late Byzantine and early Islamic site in the northern Negev was only announced this week by Israel's Antiquities Authority. Alexander Fraiberg, head archaeologist with the IAA team, said he believes the sculpture dates to the Roman era, but was incorporated into a...
  • 1000-year-old coins found in Northern Territory may rewrite Australian history

    05/20/2013 1:31:34 PM PDT · by Theoria · 23 replies
    News.com.au ^ | 20 May 2013 | BARBARA BARKHAUSEN
    REMEMBER when you were taught that Australia was discovered by James Cook in 1770 who promptly declared it "terra nullius" and claimed it for the British throne? Turns out that could be completely and utterly wrong. Five copper coins and a nearly 70-year-old map with an "X" might lead to a discovery that could rewrite Australia's history. Australian scientist Ian McIntosh, currently Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University in the US, is planning an expedition in July that has stirred up the archaeological community. The scientist wants to revisit the location where five coins were found in the Northern Territory...
  • Teeth found near Tel Aviv point to a new prehistoric human species

    06/21/2015 10:29:47 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 59 replies
    Ynet News ^ | June 20, 2015 | Dudi Goldman
    Researchers found four teeth in the Qesem Cave near Rosh Ha'ayin (not far from Tel Aviv), and they were astonished at test results that conclude the fossils to be some 400,000-years-old. The significance of this is that it's possible that the origin of prehistoric man is in Israel, and not in East Africa. And an additional surprise is that prehistoric man was mainly vegetarian and not carnivorous. The cave is 10 meters deep and its surface area is approximately 300 square meters. Researchers have been sifting through it for some 15 years to discover remains from prehistoric times. The ancient...
  • Rare King David-Era Inscription Discovered in Biblical City

    06/20/2015 8:45:01 PM PDT · by lbryce · 8 replies
    Live Science ^ | June 16, 2015 | Jeanna Bryner
    A 3,000-year-old ceramic jar discovered in pieces in Israel has been restored to reveal a rare inscription of the name of a biblical figure and ruler whose reign coincided with that of King David, archaeologists announced today (June 16). The pottery was found in an ancient city overlooking the Valley of Elah, where, as described in the Bible, the legendary David defeated Goliath. The inscription, the researchers found, read: Eshba'al Ben Bada', who the archaeologists say was likely an important person since his name was inscribed on a jar. (Eshba'al Ben Shaul ruled over Israel at the same time...
  • Biblical Name Eshbaal Found Outside of the Bible

    06/09/2015 1:57:46 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | 06/05/2015 | Robin Ngo
    The Biblical name Eshbaal has been found for the first time in an ancient inscription. Incised before firing on a 3,000-year-old pithos (large ceramic storage jar), the inscription was discovered at the site of Khirbet Qeiyafa in Israel. Researchers Yosef Garfinkel, Mitka R. Golub, Haggai Misgav and Saar Ganor have published their study of this inscription in a forthcoming issue of the journal Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research (BASOR). The Eshbaal inscription reads “[ ] | ʾšbʿl | ˹bn˺ | bdʿ” (“ʾIšbaʿal son of Bedaʿ”) and was written from right to left in the Canaanite alphabetic script....
  • Five amazing extinct creatures that aren't dinosaurs

    06/19/2015 7:19:56 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-18-2015 | Staff Source: The Conversation
    The release of Jurassic World has reignited our love for palaeontology. Many of us share a longing to understand the dinosaurs that roamed the Earth long before we arrived. But palaeontology is a discipline much broader than this. Dinosaurs dominated the land for 135 million years, but what happened during the rest of the Earth's 4.6 billion-year history? The role of palaeontologists past and present has been to unravel the mysteries of life on Earth, and in doing so they've found a lot more than just dinosaur bones. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1. The spiky-backed ocean dweller: Right side up? Credit: Natural Math/flickr,...
  • 'Israel's Burning Man' festival damages archaeological site

    06/18/2015 10:55:39 PM PDT · by BlackVeil · 5 replies
    HaAretz ^ | 28 May 2015 | Roy Arad
    <p>Last weekend’s Midburn festival, the Israeli version of the Burning Man event in the United States, apparently violated one of Burning Man’s 10 principles: “Leave no trace.”</p>
  • Israeli archaeologists find 3,000-year-old inscription of name from Bible [Psalms 85]

    06/16/2015 10:25:52 AM PDT · by Jan_Sobieski · 25 replies
    Fox News ^ | 6/16/2015 | Staff
    JERUSALEM – Israel's antiquities authority says archaeologists have discovered a rare 3,000-year-old inscription of a name mentioned in the Bible. The name "Eshbaal Ben Beda" appears on a large ceramic jar. Eshbaal of the Bible was a son of King Saul. Archaeologists Yosef Garfinkel and Saar Ganor say the jar belonged to a different Eshbaal, likely the owner of an agricultural estate. They said Tuesday it is the first time the name was discovered in an ancient inscription. It is one of only four inscriptions discovered from the biblical 10th century B.C. Kingdom of Judah, when King David is said...
  • Ancient (Byzantine) Church Uncovered During Highway Project in Israel

    06/13/2015 3:41:49 PM PDT · by NYer · 9 replies
    Live Science ^ | January 10, 2015 | Elizabeth Goldbaum,
    A 1,500-year-old church has been discovered at a Byzantine period rest stop on the road connecting Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, archaeologists announced today (June 10). The ancient road station and church, uncovered during a highway construction project, sit next to a seep spring called 'Ain Naqa'a, which is on the outskirts of Moshav Bet Neqofa, a settlement in Jerusalem. Along the old road, which was likely paved in the Roman period, "other settlements and road stations have previously been discovered that served those traveling the route in ancient times," Annette Nagar, the director of the excavation on behalf of the...
  • Scientists Discover World's Oldest Stone Tools

    05/20/2015 8:02:59 PM PDT · by OK Sun · 73 replies
    The Earth Institute ^ | 2015-05-20 | The Earth Institute
    Finds Challenge Ideas about Who Were the First Toolmakers Scientists working in the desert badlands of northwestern Kenya have found stone tools dating back 3.3 million years, long before the advent of modern humans, and by far the oldest such artifacts yet discovered. The tools, whose makers may or may not have been some sort of human ancestor, push the known date of such tools back by 700,000 years; they also may challenge the notion that our own most direct ancestors were the first to bang two rocks together to create a new technology. The discovery is the first evidence...
  • Analysis of bones found in Romania offer evidence of human and Neanderthal interbreeding in Europe

    05/15/2015 1:52:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-14-2015 | Bob Yirka
    A Neanderthal skeleton, left, compared with a modern human skeleton. Credit: American Museum of Natural History DNA testing of a human mandible fossil found in Romania has revealed a genome with 4.8 to 11.3 percent Neanderthal DNA—its original owner died approximately 40,000 years ago, Palaeogenomicist Qiaomei Fu reported to audience members at a Biology of Genomes meeting in New York last week. She noted also that she and her research team found long Neanderthal sequences. The high percentage suggests, she added, that the human had a Neanderthal in its family tree going back just four to six generations. The finding...
  • 1177 BCE, the year a perfect storm destroyed civilization

    05/03/2015 3:35:59 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 142 replies
    Haaretz ^ | April 13, 2015 | Julia Fridman
    Sometime after 1200 BCE, civilization collapsed, and a dark age prevailed. The Late Bronze Age collapse of societies throughout the Levant, the Near East and the Mediterranean some 3,200 years ago has been a mystery. Powerful, advanced civilizations disappeared, seemingly overnight. Now an archaeologist believes he has figured out what lay behind the cataclysm. The trigger seems to have been the invasion of ancient Egypt in 1177 BCE by marauding peoples known simply as the “Sea Peoples,” as recorded in the Medinet Habu wall relief at Ramses III' tomb. The relief depicts a sea battle (and also carts full of...
  • A piece of research challenges the view that Neolithic societies were egalitarian

    05/01/2015 1:33:33 PM PDT · by OK Sun · 23 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | May 1, 2015 | Heritage Daily
    The data obtained by Teresa Fernández-Crespo in seven megalithic graves in La Rioja and Araba-Álava suggest that certain individuals were excluded from burial on the basis of age and sex. The research Demographic evidence of selective burial in megalithic graves of northern Spain by Teresa Fernández-Crespo and Concepción de la Rúa of the Department of Genetics, Physical Anthropology and Animal Physiology of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country challenges the widely-held view that societies were egalitarian during the late Neolithic and Chalcolithic ages. This work, published in the leading Journal of Archaeological Science, comes from Fernández-Crespo’s PhD thesis entitled Antropología...
  • Hunt for ancient royal tomb in Mexico takes mercurial twist

    04/25/2015 4:31:06 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 4 replies
    Reuters ^ | April 24, 2015 | David Alire Garcia
    A Mexican archeologist hunting for a royal tomb in a deep, dark tunnel beneath a towering pre-Aztec pyramid has made a discovery that may have brought him a step closer: liquid mercury. In the bowels of Teotihuacan, a mysterious ancient city that was once the largest in the Americas, Sergio Gomez this month found "large quantities" of the silvery metal in a chamber at the end of a sacred tunnel sealed for nearly 1,800 years. "It's something that completely surprised us," Gomez said at the entrance to the tunnel below Teotihuacan's Pyramid of the Plumed Serpent, about 30 miles (50...
  • Will Liquid Mercury Show The Way To King's Tomb In Mysterious City Of Teotihuacan?

    04/25/2015 12:33:02 PM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 45 replies
    http://www.messagetoeagle.com ^ | 25 April, 2015 | unknown
    MessageToEagle.com - A Mexican archeologist hunting for a royal tomb in a deep, dark tunnel beneath a towering pre-Aztec pyramid has made a discovery that may have brought him a step closer: liquid mercury,' according to Reuters' report. In the bowels of Teotihuacan, a mysterious ancient city that was once the largest in the Americas, Sergio Gomez this month found "large quantities" of the silvery metal in a chamber at the end of a sacred tunnel sealed for nearly 1,800 years. "It's something that completely surprised us," Gomez said at the entrance to the tunnel below Teotihuacan's Pyramid of the...
  • UCD archaeologists seek to recreate the world of our ancestors

    04/11/2015 9:05:16 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    The Irish Times ^ | April 11, 2015 | Ronan McGreevy
    Centre for Experimental Archaeology on Belfield campus is only one of its kind in the world.Brendan O’Neill at work on his early medieval round house on the UCD campus. How did our ancestors create the world they lived in? How did they survive without the modern accoutrements that make our lives easy? The question is at the heart of archaeology and forms the basis of a unique project in a quiet corner of University College Dublin’s sprawling Belfield campus. UCD is the only university in the world with a centre for experimental archaeology. It is not made of bricks and...
  • Neanderthals Wore Eagle Talons As Jewelry 130,000 Years Ago

    03/13/2015 9:39:56 PM PDT · by blam · 40 replies
    Live Science ^ | 3-14-2015 | Megan Gannon
    Megan Gannon March 14, 2015The eight eagle talons from Krapina arranged with an eagle phalanx that was also found at the site. (Luka Mjeda, Zagreb) Long before they shared the landscape with modern humans, Neanderthals in Europe developed a sharp sense of style, wearing eagle claws as jewelry, new evidence suggests. Researchers identified eight talons from white-tailed eagles — including four that had distinct notches and cut marks — from a 130,000-year-old Neanderthal cave in Croatia. They suspect the claws were once strung together as part of a necklace or bracelet. "It really is absolutely stunning," study author David Frayer,...
  • Alexander the Great-Era Treasure Found in Israeli Cave

    03/10/2015 6:20:38 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Mar 9, 2015 07:00 PM ET | by Rossella Lorenzi
    A rare cache of jewelry and silver coins, minted during the reign of Alexander the Great, has been discovered in a stalactite filled cave in northern Israel, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) announced on Monday. The 2,300-year-old treasure was found by three members of the Israeli Caving Club who wriggled through a narrow passage at the entrance of the stalactite cave and wandered inside for several hours. Stashed inside a niche, one of the spelunkers, Hen Zakai, spotted two ancient silver coins. On one side of the coins was an image of Alexander the Great, while the other side portrayed...
  • Archaeologists uncover royal Celtic burial site in small French town

    03/08/2015 9:40:21 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    France 24 ^ | March 5, 2015 | Joseph Bamat
    The cauldron is finely decorated with designs and figures, including the head of the Greek god Achelous.France’s National Archaeological Research Institute (Inrap) on Wednesday revealed the discovery of an ancient grave site, probably that of a Celtic prince, which is helping shed light on trade between some of Europe’s earliest civilizations. Archaeologists uncovered the tomb dating from the fifth century BC in an industrial zone in the small town of Lavau, in France’s Champagne region. Inrap, which routinely scours construction sites in order to find and preserve the country’s archaeological heritage, began excavating at Lavau site in October 2014....
  • What's Been Lost to the Islamists' Sledgehammers (historians shocked)

    03/01/2015 12:28:43 PM PST · by NYer · 61 replies
    Aleteia ^ | March 1, 2015 | JOHN BURGER
    Screen Capture A video showing Islamic State militants with sledgehammers and power drills on a rampage inside the Mosul Museum shows the destruction of both reproductions and priceless originals from at least two important eras in the region’s history, said a British expert on Iraqi culture. Paul Collins, of the British Institute for the Study of Iraq, in an email to Aleteia, said it was “distressing” to watch scenes of the destruction of colossal winged bulls of the seventh century BC. “These are certainly the real things and it looks from the video that the sculptures are those situated outside...
  • The secrets of the Santa Priscilla catacombs

    02/25/2015 6:49:58 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 6 replies
    BBC ^ | 25 February 2015 | Amanda Ruggeri
    The frescoes of the Santa Priscilla catacombs in Rome call our knowledge of the past into question and challenge the teachings of the Church. Amanda Ruggeri investigates. When archaeologists in Rome at the end of the 19th Century began to excavate the Catacombs of Santa Priscilla, they hoped to find treasure: intricately carved monuments and vibrant frescoes of the type found in other ancient, underground cemeteries. Instead, they found devastation.
  • Prayers to God in wrong spot? (Temple Mount location 'misplaced'?)

    02/23/2015 9:20:32 PM PST · by Perseverando · 50 replies
    WND ^ | February 23, 2015 | Leo Hohman
    It has been called the most contested plot of land in the world — the fissure at which three major faiths come together, and break apart. There have been holy wars fought over it and holy writ foretelling of battles yet to come. It’s Jerusalem’s Temple Mount. But what if history got it wrong? What if the spot where Solomon built the first Jewish Temple, and Herod built the second, was actually about 600 feet to the south, in a place known as the ancient City of David? Enter Robert Cornuke. He travels the world solving Bible mysteries: Noah’s Ark,...
  • Ancient underwater forest discovered off Norfolk coast

    01/31/2015 4:49:37 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 18 replies
    BBC ^ | 26 January 2015 Last updated at 00:28 GMT | Credit: The underwater diving footage is copyright and courtesy of Rob Spray and Dawn Watson
    Nature experts have discovered a remarkable submerged forest thousands of years old under the sea close to the Norfolk coast. The trees were part of an area known as 'Doggerland' which formed part of a much bigger area before it was flooded by the North Sea. It was once so vast that hunter-gatherers who lived in the vicinity could have walked to Germany across its land mass.
  • Fossil Found In Asia Could Be A New Species Of Human

    01/28/2015 10:26:09 AM PST · by blam · 77 replies
    BI - Livescience ^ | 1-28-2015 | Charles Q. Choi
    Charles Q. Choi, LiveScience January 27, 2015An ancient human fossil discovered from the seafloor near Taiwan reveals that a primitive group of humans, potentially an unknown species, once lived in Asia, researchers say. These findings suggest that multiple lineages of extinct humans may have coexisted in Asia before the arrival of modern humans in the region about 40,000 years ago, the scientists added. Although modern humans, Homo sapiens, are the only surviving human lineage, others once walked the globe. Extinct human lineages once found in Asia include Neanderthals, the closest extinct relatives of modern humans; Denisovans, whose genetic legacy may...
  • Ancient Crash, Epic Wave

    01/26/2015 1:03:44 PM PST · by Sawdring · 36 replies
    New York Times ^ | November 14, 2006 | SANDRA BLAKESLEE
    At the southern end of Madagascar lie four enormous wedge-shaped sediment deposits, called chevrons, that are composed of material from the ocean floor. Each covers twice the area of Manhattan with sediment as deep as the Chrysler Building is high. On close inspection, the chevron deposits contain deep ocean microfossils that are fused with a medley of metals typically formed by cosmic impacts. And all of them point in the same direction — toward the middle of the Indian Ocean where a newly discovered crater, 18 miles in diameter, lies 12,500 feet below the surface. The explanation is obvious to...
  • Papyrus Found in Mummy Mask May Hold Oldest Known Gospel Text

    01/23/2015 9:20:32 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 18 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 01/23/2015 | By James Maynard
    The Gospel of Mark has been discovered written on a tiny fragment of ancient papyrus, found within a mummy mask. During the era when the mask was created, papyrus was expensive, and the religious text was reused to create the decorative wear for the mummy. This discovery could represent the oldest gospel text ever found by archaeologists. The oldest samples of Christian scripture date from the Second Century of the Common Era. Pharaohs and wealthy individuals were often adorned with mummy masks made of gold and precious materials. Masks for people from lower economic classes were often manufactured from papyrus,...
  • Beard on King Tut's burial mask damaged after epoxy gluing

    01/22/2015 8:36:00 AM PST · by C19fan · 29 replies
    AP ^ | January 22, 2014 | Staff
    The blue and gold braided beard on the burial mask of famed pharaoh Tutankhamun was hastily glued back on with epoxy, damaging the relic after it was knocked during cleaning, conservators at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo said Wednesday. The museum is one of the city's main tourist sites, but in some areas, ancient wooden sarcophagi lay unprotected from the public, while pharaonic burial shrouds, mounted on walls, crumble from behind open panels of glass. Tutankhamun's mask, over 3,300 years old, and other contents of his tomb are its top exhibits. Three of the museum's conservators reached by telephone gave...