Keyword: archaeology

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Ancient Wind God Temple Found Under Mexico City Supermarket

    12/02/2016 12:41:07 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 19 replies
    Seeker ^ | 2 Dec, 2016 | ROSSELLA LORENZI
    The temple, 36 feet across, falls within what is believed to be the perimeter of a large ceremonial site in the Tlatelolco neighborhood. Archaeologists excavating the site of a demolished supermarket in Mexico City have unearthed a circular temple built more than 650 years ago for an Aztec deity. The platform, about 36 feet in diameter and four feet tall, was part of the sacred area of the city-state Tlatelolco and was likely dedicated to the god of wind Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl. It now stands just yards away from the site of the Tlatelolco 1968 massacre, where Mexican soldiers killed protesting students....
  • Extremely rare and ancient 'thinking man' jug discovered in Israel

    11/23/2016 7:00:16 AM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | November 23, 2016 13:54 GMT | By Hannah Osborne
    Excavators unearth the ancient 'thinking man' jug at at an archaeological site in Yehud, Israel (Israel Antiquities Authority) ================================================================================================================================== An ancient jug bearing the image of a "reflective" person has been discovered in Israel. The vessel dates back to the Middle Bronze Age and is believed to be approximately 3,800 years old. Archaeologists at the site in Yehud said similar pottery jugs have never before been found in the country. The jug is believed to have been a funeral offering to a "respected member of the ancient settlement," a statement from Israel Antiquities Authority said. It was found alongside daggers,...
  • Significant Bronze Age city discovered in Northern Iraq

    11/07/2016 7:32:42 AM PST · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/7/2016 | University of Tübingen
    Archeologists from the Institute for Ancient Near Eastern Studies (IANES) at the University of Tübingen have uncovered a large Bronze Age city not far from the town of Dohuk in northern Iraq. The excavation work has demonstrated that the settlement, which is now home to the small Kurdish village of Bassetki in the Autonomous Region of Kurdistan, was established in about 3000 BC and was able to flourish for more than 1200 years. The archeologists also discovered settlement layers dating from the Akkadian Empire period (2340-2200 BC), which is regarded as the first world empire in human history. Scientists headed...
  • Ancient Beverage Brewed In Milwaukee

    10/28/2016 9:51:13 AM PDT · by fishtank · 27 replies
    Archaeology ^ | 10-25-16 | NPR
    ANCIENT BEVERAGE BREWED IN MILWAUKEE MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN — NPR reports that archaeologist Bettina Arnold of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and her research team worked with Lakefront Brewery to try to re-create an alcoholic beverage that had been placed in a bronze cauldron and buried in a grave sometime between 400 and 450 B.C. in what is now Germany. The recipe was based upon the research of paleobotanist Manfred Rösch, who analyzed the residues in the Iron Age cauldron. He found evidence of honey, meadowsweet, barley, and mint—ingredients in a type of beverage known as a braggot.
  • Ghost fleet: Explorers accidentally find a graveyard of more than 40 perfectly preserved ancient sh

    10/24/2016 12:09:25 PM PDT · by ColdOne · 25 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | 10/24/16 | Shivali Best
    Full title.......Ghost fleet: Explorers accidentally find a graveyard of more than 40 perfectly preserved ancient shipwrecks at the bottom of the Black Sea............................ The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project has been scouring the sea bed of the Black Sea The primary focus is to carry out geophysical surveys, but over 40 shipwrecks have also been found They are 'astonishingly well preserved' due to the lack of oxygen in the Black Sea's 'dead zone' The findings provide new information on the communities living on the Black Sea coast
  • Roman coins ID'd in Japanese ruins, but their origin baffles

    10/18/2016 7:08:04 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 14 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 18, 2016 9:18 PM EDT | Mari Yamaguchi
    The eyes of a visiting archaeologist lit up when he was shown the 10 tiny, tarnished discs that had sat unnoticed in storage for two and a half years at a dig on a southern Japan island. He had been to archaeological sites in Italy and Egypt, and recognized the “little round things” as old coins, including a few likely dating to the Roman Empire. “I was so excited I almost forgot what I was there for, and the coins were all we talked about,” said Toshio Tsukamoto of the Gangoji Institute for Research of Cultural Property in Nara, an...
  • Archaeologists unearth ancient gate-shrine in Israel [Psalm 85]

    09/29/2016 2:49:44 PM PDT · by Jan_Sobieski · 5 replies
    Fox News ^ | 9/28/2016 | Staff
    Israeli archaeologists have unearthed a 2,900-year-old gate-shrine they say confirms the biblical story of King Hezekiah, who mandated the worship of God and the rejection of all other deities. The gate-shrine in Tel Lachish National Park was uncovered decades ago, but a new excavation has completely exposed the gate, which is the largest one known from the First Temple period. "The size of the gate is consistent with the historical and archaeological knowledge we possess, whereby Lachish was a major city and the most important one after Jerusalem," said excavation director Sa'ar Ganor. According to the Book of Kings, he...
  • First Temple-Era Gate Shrine Unearthed in Israel [PHOTOS]

    09/28/2016 9:23:26 AM PDT · by Lera · 28 replies
    Breaking Israel News ^ | 9/28/16 | Jonathan Benedek
    Archaeologists have unearthed a city-gate and shrine dating to the First Temple Era. An Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) team headed by Sa'ar Ganor discovered the ruins in the Tel Lachish National Park. "Tel Lachish was the most important city in Judea, after Jerusalem," Ganor told Tazpit Press Service (TPS). "This is the biggest city-gate we have found in the Land of Israel." "The size of the gate is consistent our historical and archaeological data that indicates Lachish was a major city and the most important one after Jerusalem," Ganor said. The city gate is approximately 24 by 24 meters in...
  • Listen To The World's Oldest-Known Melody (1400 BC)

    09/27/2016 10:12:31 AM PDT · by blam · 50 replies
    Fox News Science - Newser ^ | 9-27-2016 | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore
    Elizabeth Armstrong Moore September 27, 2016 In 1950, a collection of 29 tablets was discovered in the ruins of Ugarit, an ancient city in the northern region of present-day Syria, but only one had survived the intervening centuries well enough to be deciphered. Known as H6, the 3,500-year-old clay tablet revealed a simple hymn specifying the use of nine lyre strings and the intervals between them, much like an "ancient guitar tab," reports ClassicFM, which has recently picked up the story. The resulting melody, it says, isn't just the oldest discovered in the world, but "utterly enchanting." Musician and composer...
  • Human skeleton discovered at Antikythera shipwreck after more than 2,000

    09/20/2016 3:08:48 AM PDT · by Islander7 · 16 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Sept 19, 2016 | By Associated Press and Cheyenne Macdonald
    Full title: Human skeleton discovered at Antikythera shipwreck after more than 2,000 years at the bottom of the sea Buried beneath sand and the fragments of ancient pottery, researchers have discovered the 2,000-year-old remains of a sailor who died upon the ill-fated 'Antikythera ship.' Archaeologists have investigated the famous shipwreck off a tiny Greek island for which it's named for over a century, revealing a trove of remarkable artefacts – including the mysterious 'Antikythera Mechanism,' thought to be a 'guide to the galaxy.'
  • Unearthed Where David Battled Goliath

    09/15/2016 9:16:33 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    Algemeiner ^ | September 11, 2016 | Maayan Jaffe-Hoffman
    Archaeologists believe they have found the location of the battle between David and Goliath, narrated in the Book of Samuel, in a mysterious two-gated city from the early 10th century. Known by its modern name, Khirbet Qeiyafa, the site is located in the the Elah Valley, 20 miles southwest of Jerusalem. The excavation project took nearly seven years, and was led by Professor Yosef Garfinkel, the Yigal Yadin Chair of Archeology at Hebrew UniversityÂ’s Institute of Archeology in Jerusalem, together with SaÂ’ar Ganor from the Israel Antiquities Authority and Professor Michal Hazel of Southern Adventist University of Tennessee. Through the...
  • Beneath This Medieval German Town Lie Over 25 Miles of Forgotten Tunnels

    09/11/2016 4:57:56 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | September 7, 2016 | Jennifer Nalewicki
    O n the surface, Oppenheim looks like your typical German town resting along the banks of the Rhine River. But there's more to Oppenheim than beer halls and a Gothic-style cathedral from the Middle Ages. Beneath its narrow cobblestone streets lies something deeper—an entire labyrinth of tunnels and cellars. “The town is practically honeycombed with cavities,” Wilfried Hilpke, a tour guide with Oppenheim’s tourism office, tells Smithsonian.com. Hilpke should know. For the past ten years, he’s spent much of his time leading hour-long hardhat tours of Oppenheim’s elaborate tunnel system, taking visitors through a journey that covers just a fraction...
  • Archaeology team makes world-first tool discovery

    08/08/2016 6:38:05 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 30 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/8/2016 | A. Nowell
    How smart were human-like species of the Stone Age? New research published in the Journal of Archaeological Science by a team led by paleoanthropologist April Nowell of the University of Victoria reveals surprisingly sophisticated adaptations by early humans living 250,000 years ago in a former oasis near Azraq, Jordan. The research team from UVic and partner universities in the US and Jordan has found the oldest evidence of protein residue -- the residual remains of butchered animals including horse, rhinoceros, wild cattle and duck -- on stone tools. The discovery draws startling conclusions about how these early humans subsisted in...
  • Oldest Egyptian writing on papyrus displayed for first time

    07/14/2016 3:35:11 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 10 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 7/14/16 | AFP
    Cairo (AFP) - The Egyptian Museum in Cairo is showcasing for the first time the earliest writing from ancient Egypt found on papyrus, detailing work on the Great Pyramid of Giza, antiquities officials said Thursday. The papyri were discovered near Wadi el-Jarf port, 25 kilometres (15 miles) south of the Gulf of Suez town of Zafarana, the antiquities ministry said. The find by a French-Egyptian team unearths papers telling of the daily lives of port workers who transported huge limestone blocks to Cairo during King Khufu's rule to build the Great Pyramid, intended to be his burial structure. One document...
  • The Hittite capital hosts ambassadors

    07/11/2016 11:47:26 PM PDT · by Cronos · 4 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | 12 July 2016 | HDN
    The archaeological site of Hattusha, the capital of the Hittite civilization which entered the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1986, was visited by a number of ambassadors in Turkey over the weekend as part of its two-day 30th anniversary celebrations organized by the governor’s office in the Central Anatolian province Çorum. The ancient site is notable for its cuneiform inscriptions, one of the most important discoveries at the site, consisting of official correspondence and contracts, as well as legal codes, procedures for cult ceremonies, oracular prophecies and literature of the ancient Near East. The cuneiforms entered the UNESCO Memory...
  • Archaeologists unearth 87,000 artifacts including wig curlers and a punch bowl... (Philly)

    07/04/2016 4:15:31 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 17 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | July 3, 2016 | Ollie Gillman
    Excavating toilets might not seem like glamorous work. But this team of archaeologists were not complaining when they unearthed 87,000 artifacts dating back to the American Revolution while digging up 250-year-old outhouses in Philadelphia. The Commonwealth Heritage Group made the fascinating find on a dig at the site of the new Museum of the American Revolution, which opens next year. Twelve of the brick bathrooms were uncovered during the dig just two blocks away from Philadelphia's Independence Hall, the Huffington Post reported. Intricate crockery, finely detailed jugs, wig curlers and an array of beads were found during the excavation....
  • For Peaceable Humans, Don’t Look to Prehistory

    07/01/2016 9:22:43 AM PDT · by SES1066 · 37 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 06/30/2016 | MELVIN KONNER
    Along a river in northern Germany, thousands of men lined up for a pitched battle. Some had come great distances, determined to seize or hold this modest waterway. They went at it mercilessly, leaving hundreds dead, many shot in the back while fleeing. Victory was decisive. [1250 BC]
  • Could the first Maltese have been Neanderthals?

    06/19/2016 7:15:34 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 34 replies
    The Times of Malta ^ | June 19, 2016 | Ivan Martin
    Maltese prehistory may have just been extended by 30,000 years. The verdict of experts from the London Natural History Museum has revived the theory that a tooth discovered in Għar Dalam in 1917 may prove Neanderthals once roamed the island. The claim is not new. It was made in the 1920s by two British anthropologists, but four decades later the theory no longer had credence. “Anyone who wrote a history book from 1964 till today will say there were never any Neanderthals on Malta. According to them, the first people to come here were Sicilian farmers around 7,000 years ago,”...
  • Revealed: Cambodia's vast medieval cities hidden beneath the jungle

    06/11/2016 7:23:18 AM PDT · by C19fan · 16 replies
    UK Guardian ^ | June 10, 2016 | Lara Dunston
    Archaeologists in Cambodia have found multiple, previously undocumented medieval cities not far from the ancient temple city of Angkor Wat, the Guardian can reveal, in groundbreaking discoveries that promise to upend key assumptions about south-east Asia’s history. The Australian archaeologist Dr Damian Evans, whose findings will be published in the Journal of Archaeological Science on Monday, will announce that cutting-edge airborne laser scanning technology has revealed multiple cities between 900 and 1,400 years old beneath the tropical forest floor, some of which rival the size of Cambodia’s capital, Phnom Penh.
  • New Fossils Hint 'Hobbit' Humans Are Older Than Thought

    06/08/2016 7:56:06 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    National Geographic ^ | June 8, 2016 | Adam Hoffman
    For the past decade, a fossil human relative about the size of a toddler has loomed large in the story of our evolutionary history. This mysterious creature—found on the Indonesian island of Flores—has sparked a heated debate about its origins, including questions over its classification as a unique species. But now, a scattering of teeth and bone may at last unlock the mystery of the “hobbits,” also known as Homo floresiensis. The 700,000-year-old human remains are the first found outside Liang Bua cave, the site on Flores that yielded the original hobbit fossils. The much older samples show intriguing similarities...
  • The Lost City of Cambodia

    06/02/2016 6:44:29 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 10 replies
    The Smithsonian ^ | April 2016 | Joshua Hammer
    Jean-Baptiste Chevance senses that we’re closing in on our target. Paused in a jungle clearing in northwestern Cambodia, the French archaeologist studies his GPS and mops the sweat from his forehead with a bandanna. The temperature is pushing 95, and the equatorial sun beats down through the forest canopy. For two hours, Chevance, known to everyone as JB, has been leading me, along with a two-man Cambodian research team, on a grueling trek. We’ve ripped our arms and faces on six-foot shrubs studded with thorns, been savaged by red biting ants, and stumbled over vines that stretch at ankle height...
  • Indus Valley civilisation may pre-date Egypt's pharoahs: Ancient society is 2,500 years older [tr]

    06/02/2016 6:41:38 AM PDT · by C19fan · 34 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | June 2, 2016 | Sarah Griffiths
    With its impressive pyramids and complex rules, Ancient Egypt may seem to many the epitome of an advanced early civilisation. But new evidence suggests the Indus Valley Civilisation in India and Pakistan, famed for its well-planned cities and impressive crafts, predates Egypt and Mesopotamia. Already considered one of the oldest civilisations in the world, experts now believe it is 8,000 years old - 2,500 years older than previously thought.
  • Dagger in King Tut's tomb was made with iron from a meteorite

    06/01/2016 5:59:32 PM PDT · by ameribbean expat · 22 replies
    Italian and Egyptian researchers analyzed the metal with an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to determine its chemical composition, and found its high nickel content, along with its levels of cobalt, “strongly suggests an extraterrestrial origin”. They compared the composition to known meteorites within 2,000km around the Red Sea coast of Egypt, and found similar levels in one meteorite.
  • Prehistoric Site in Florida Confirms Pre-Clovis Peopling of the Americas

    05/31/2016 4:14:27 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | May 13, 2016
    Radiocarbon dating of a prehistoric archeological site in Florida suggests that 14,550 years ago, hunter-gatherers, possibly accompanied by dogs, butchered or scavenged a mastodon next to a small pond. The findings, based on a four-year study of the Page-Ladson archaeological site in the Aucilla River, about 45 minutes from Tallahassee, Florida, provide a rare glimpse of the earliest human occupation in the southeastern United States, and offer clues to the timing of the disappearance of large animals like the mastodon and camel that roamed the American Southeast during the Late Pleistocene. Additionally, the artifacts at Page-Ladson highlight that much of...
  • Grim reality of life in ancient Rome revealed: Average worker was DEAD by 30 [tr]

    05/28/2016 5:01:59 AM PDT · by C19fan · 35 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 28, 2016 | Ekin Karasin
    The average ancient Roman worker was riddled with arthritis, suffered broken bones and was dead by 30 thanks to a diet of rotting grains and a lifetime of hard labour. The grim realities of the Eternal City were revealed in a study carried out by an Italian team of specialists that used modern-scanning techniques to analyse 2,000 ancient skeletons. The majority of the skeletons from the first and third century AD, found in the suburbs of the ancient city, had broken collar bones, noses and hand bones.
  • Is this Aristotle's Tomb?

    05/27/2016 8:35:19 AM PDT · by ek_hornbeck · 27 replies
    CNN ^ | 5/2716 | Blanca Britton
    A Greek archaeologist believes he has discovered the tomb of Aristotle. Konstantinos Sismanidis, who has been painstakingly excavating the ruins of Stagira since 1990, told CNN his team has very strong evidence the 2,400-year-old tomb belongs to the great philosopher. Sismanidis said the structure, about 40 miles east of Thessaloniki, was built to honor Aristotle's death in 322 B.C.
  • Space Impact 'Saved Christianity'

    06/25/2003 8:26:22 PM PDT · by Davea · 33 replies · 99+ views
    BBC | 06/25/03
    Space impact 'saved Christianity' By Dr David Whitehouse BBC News Online science editor Did a meteor over central Italy in AD 312 change the course of Roman and Christian history? About the size of a football field: The impact crater left behind A team of geologists believes it has found the incoming space rock's impact crater, and dating suggests its formation coincided with the celestial vision said to have converted a future Roman emperor to Christianity. It was just before a decisive battle for control of Rome and the empire that Constantine saw a blazing light cross the sky and...
  • Director posits proof of biblical Exodus

    04/14/2006 5:58:16 AM PDT · by timsbella · 157 replies · 3,529+ views
    The Globe and Mail ^ | 14 April 2006 | Michael Posner
    A provocative $4-million documentary by Toronto filmmaker Simcha Jacobovici claims to have found archeological evidence verifying the story of the biblical Exodus from Egypt, 3,500 years ago. Religious Jews consider the biblical account incontrovertible — the foundation story of the creation of the nation of Israel. Indeed, they celebrated the Exodus Wednesday night and last night with the annual Passover recitation of the Haggadah. But among scholars, the question of if and when Moses led an estimated two million Israelite slaves out of pharaonic Egypt, miraculously crossed the Red Sea ahead of the pursuing Egyptian army and received the Ten...
  • Chauvet Cave: The Most Accurate Timeline Yet Of Who Used The Cave And When

    04/18/2016 8:22:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Science Now ^ | Tuesday, April 12, 2016 | Deborah Netburn
    The cave, declared a UNESCO World Heritage site two years ago, was discovered in the south of France in 1994... Now, scientists have assembled more than 250 radiocarbon dates made from rock art samples, animal bones and the remains of charcoal used by humans... The newly synthesized data suggest the first period of human occupation lasted from 37,000 to 33,500 years ago. The second prehistoric occupation began 31,000 to 28,000 years ago and lasted for 2,000 to 3,000 years, the researchers wrote... The two groups, separated by millenniums, had no connection with each other, they said. The first round of...
  • Death of the West: Stanford Students Reject Western Civilization By A 6-To-1 Margin

    04/11/2016 8:34:03 PM PDT · by Art in Idaho · 59 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | April 11, 2016 | Blake Neff
    An effort by a group of Stanford University students to restore a Western Civilization class requirement has been decisively rejected by the student body, with voting results released Monday showing it mustering less than 15 percent support. The ballot initiative was promoted by members of the school’s conservative-leaning Stanford Review. If passed, it would have called for Stanford to require that all freshmen complete a two-quarter course covering “the politics, history, philosophy, and culture of the Western world.” Stanford once possessed a similar requirement, but eliminated it after a student campaign in the 1980s that denounced it as fostering racism,...
  • You Seek a Sign? Behold it: The Sign of Jonah

    07/24/2014 8:20:19 PM PDT · by NYer · 33 replies
    Rorate-caeli ^ | July 24, 2014
    Our Lord Jesus Christ: "An evil and adulterous generation seeketh a sign: and a sign shall not be given it, but the sign of Jonah the prophet." St. Matthew 12:39 And He repeats: "A wicked and adulterous generation seeketh after a sign: and a sign shall not be given it, but the sign of Jonah the prophet." St. Matthew 16:4 The Tomb of Saint Jonah the Prophet in Nineveh (Mosul) VIDEOOnce an Assyrian Church, converted into a mosque after the Muslim invasions, the tomb of the famous Old Testament Prophet who made the Ninevites do penance and recognize the...
  • ISIS barbarians destroy 2,000-year-old 'Gate of God' close to their Iraqi stronghold

    04/17/2016 6:22:45 PM PDT · by DeathBeforeDishonor1 · 24 replies
    Mirror UK ^ | 4/17/16 | JEREMY ARMSTRONG
    ISIS barbarians have destroyed a 2,000-year-old gate close to their Iraqi stronghold of Mosul. The breathtaking structure is known as the Gate of God, and used to guard the ancient Assyrian city Nineveh. The destruction of the ancient structure, also called the Mashki Gate, has been confirmed by the British Institute for the Study of Iraq, and the Antiquities Department in Baghdad has not denied the demolition. The terrorists demolished the ancient gate using military equipment, according to activists in Mosul. ISIS thugs have destroyed many of Iraqi historic sites and monuments, including the Assyrian city of Nimrud, the Winged...
  • Amazing 6th Century Church Uncovered in Rome

    04/02/2016 3:58:56 PM PDT · by NYer · 54 replies
    Onepeterfive ^ | March 30, 2016 | STEVE SKOJEC
    After 30 years and millions of dollars of restoration, 1500-year-old Santa Maria Antiqua, buried beneath the Roman Forum by an earthquake in 847, has finally reopened to the public, and it is stunning: “This church is the Sistine Chapel of the early Middle Ages,” Maria Andaloro, an art historian involved in the project, told Reuters. “It collected the very best of figurative culture of the Christian world between Rome and Byzantium.” Being buried by the earthquake saved the church from being altered in later centuries, particularly during the Counter-Reformation, said Prof Andaloro. Among the most significant frescoes is a depiction...
  • View From Space Hints at a New Viking Site in North America

    04/01/2016 9:28:40 AM PDT · by zeestephen · 43 replies
    MSN.com ^ | 31 March 2016 | Ralph Blumenthal
    A thousand years after the Vikings braved the icy seas from Greenland to the New World in search of timber and plunder, satellite technology has found intriguing evidence of a long-elusive prize in archaeology — a second Norse settlement in North America, further south than ever known.
  • Text in lost language may reveal god or goddess worshipped by Etruscans at ancient temple:

    03/29/2016 5:41:03 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 46 replies
    SMU Research Home ^ | 3/28/2016 | SMU
    Archaeologists in Italy have discovered what may be a rare sacred text in the Etruscan language that is likely to yield rich details about Etruscan worship of a god or goddess. The lengthy text is inscribed on a large 6th century BCE sandstone slab that was uncovered from an Etruscan temple. A new religious artifact is rare. Most Etruscan discoveries typically have been grave and funeral objects. “This is probably going to be a sacred text, and will be remarkable for telling us about the early belief system of a lost culture that is fundamental to western traditions,” said archaeologist...
  • Mystery invaders conquered Europe at the end of last ice age

    03/23/2016 6:35:44 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 36 replies
    New Scientist ^ | February 4, 2016 | Colin Barras
    Europe went through a major population upheaval about 14,500 years ago, at the end of the last ice age, according to DNA from the bones of hunter-gatherers. Ancient DNA studies published in the last five years have transformed what we know about the early peopling of Europe. The picture they paint is one in which successive waves of immigration wash over the continent, bringing in new people, new genes and new technologies. These studies helped confirm that Europe's early hunter-gatherers - who arrived about 40,000 years ago - were largely replaced by farmers arriving from the Middle East about 8000...
  • King Richard III's grave

    03/22/2016 3:16:40 PM PDT · by ameribbean expat · 104 replies
    Sketchfab ^ | 03.16.2016
    Credit: University of Leicester. This model of King Richard III’s grave shows the king’s remains in-situ shortly after their discovery by University of Leicester archaeologists beneath a car park in Leicester in 2012. The model has been generated using Agisoft’s Photoscan from photographs taken during the excavation. If you would like to learn more about the search for King Richard III please visit www.le.ac.uk/richardiii.
  • Archaeology Discovery: Rare Artifacts From Jesus' Time Found at Orphanage in Jerusalem

    03/21/2016 4:32:56 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    Christian Post ^ | March 4, 2016 | Katherine Weber
    Archaeologists in Israel are "astonished and surprised" after finding artifacts dating back to Jesus' time at a local orphanage and military complex in Jerusalem. The Israel Antiquities Authority said this week that it has found numerous rare and important artifacts, some dating back to the Second Temple period, buried deep beneath the Schneller compound in Jerusalem, which had previously served as a orphanage and later an Israeli army base. The Schneller compound first served as an orphanage in the 1800's, and then as an occupation area for German soldiers during World Wars I and II. It later became a base...
  • Earliest evidence of humans in Ireland

    03/21/2016 7:57:11 AM PDT · by rdl6989 · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | March 21, 2016
    A bear bone found in a cave may push back dates for the earliest human settlement of Ireland by 2,500 years. The bone shows clear signs of cut marks with stone tools, and has been radiocarbon dated to 12,500 years ago. This places humans in Ireland in the Palaeolithic era; previously, the earliest evidence of people came from the Mesolithic, after 10,000 years ago. The brown bear bone had been stored in a cardboard box at the National Museum of Ireland for almost a century.
  • Scans of King Tut's Tomb Reveal Hidden Rooms, Egypt's Antiquities Ministry Says

    03/17/2016 10:05:17 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 57 replies
    NBC News ^ | Mar 17 2016, 8:03 am ET | by Charlene Gubash, Cassandra Vinograd and F. Brinley Bruton
    CAIRO — Radar scans of King Tut's tomb have revealed two spaces on the north and east chambers of the pharaonic mausoleum that could contain the "discovery of the century," Egypt's antiquities ministry said Thursday. Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damaty told a press conference that metal and organic masses were revealed by the scans, signaling that the rooms could possibly contain funerary objects. "It could be the discovery of the century. It's very important for Egyptian history and the history of the world," he said, adding that the chambers may well have belonged to a king or queen. Further tests will...
  • Early human habitat, recreated for first time, shows life was no picnic

    03/10/2016 9:42:39 AM PST · by JimSEA · 33 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 3/10/16 | Rutgers University
    Scientists have pieced together an early human habitat for the first time, and life was no picnic 1.8 million years ago. Our human ancestors, who looked like a cross between apes and modern humans, had access to food, water and shady shelter at a site in Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. They even had lots of stone tools with sharp edges, said Gail M. Ashley, a professor in the Rutgers Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences in the School of Arts and Sciences. But "it was tough living," she said. "It was a very stressful life because they were in continual competition...
  • Rare First Temple-era seal found in City of David

    03/07/2016 8:09:02 PM PST · by Lera · 20 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 3/7/16
    Archaeologists discover First Temple-era seals, one with a woman's name. Rare find that sheds significant light on owner's life. Archaeologists have found two ancient seals with Hebrew names, dating back to the time of the First Temple, in Jerusalem's City of David. The objects belonged to a woman and a man, Elihana bat Gael and Sa'aryahu ben Shabenyahu. "Finding seals that bear names from the time of the First Temple is hardly a commonplace occurrence, and finding a seal that belonged to a woman is an even rarer phenomenon," said a researcher with the project. The artifacts were discovered in...
  • 4,000-Year-Old Necropolis with more than 100 Tombs Discovered Near Bethlehem

    03/07/2016 4:26:38 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | March 8, 2016 | M.R. Reese
    By studying and excavating ancient burial grounds, we can learn about how final respects were paid when people died during ancient times. The artifacts located alongside these remains also provide insight into what items people valued and what they believed about the afterlife. A 2013 discovery of an ancient burial ground near Bethlehem is providing new information about one civilization that lived approximately 4000 years ago. In 2013, efforts began to build an industrial park near Bethlehem, leading to a discovery that may prove to offer fresh insights about the ancient world. The area where the industrial park was to...
  • Mysterious artifact discovered at Bethlehem's Church of the Nativity

    02/25/2016 3:19:37 PM PST · by NYer · 32 replies
    Fox News ^ | February 24, 2016
    According to the Times of Israel, the artifact is made of brass, silver, shells and stones. It was covered in plaster and found near a window in the church that reportedly was built by Emperor Constantine and his mother Helena in the fourth century. Although officials confirmed that the artifact has been cleaned up, it is not on display, and there are no images of it as yet.Ziad al-Bandak, a Palestinian presidential adviser for Christian Affairs, said the artifact is, “of great religious and historical value.” The church itself is built over the cave where the birth of Jesus...
  • Lost settlement of doomed 1559 expedition discovered in Florida Panhandle

    02/17/2016 12:40:01 PM PST · by Bodleian_Girl · 88 replies
    Al.com ^ | 2/17/2016 | Ap
    Amateur archaeologist Tom Garner had time to kill and took a drive along Pensacola Bay in the Florida Panhandle. Spying a newly cleared lot, he poked about, hoping to find artifacts from the city's rich history dating back centuries to the Spanish explorers. Garner stumbled upon some shards of 16th Spanish pottery. "There it was, artifacts from the 16th century lying on the ground," said Garner, a history buff whose discovery has made him a celebrity in archaeological circles. Experts have confirmed the find as the site of the long-lost land settlement of a doomed 1559 Spanish expedition to the...
  • Archaeologists Unearth More—a Lot More—of a Massive Underground City (Turkey)

    02/05/2016 8:34:49 PM PST · by aimhigh · 30 replies
    Mental Floss ^ | 02/05/2016 | jen pinkowski
    It's not the first underground city to be discovered in the region; there are some 250 known subterranean dwellings of various sizes hidden within the fantastical landscape. The two biggest are Kaymakli and Derinkuyu; the latter is estimated to have been able to house up to 20,000 people. Both cities have been known for decades. But this new underground town, hiding beneath a centuries-old castle on a hilltop right in NevĹźehir, just might be the biggest. One early estimate by geophysicists put its area at nearly five million square feet and its depth at 371 feet. If those estimates are...
  • Remains of earliest known massacre victims uncovered in Kenya

    01/21/2016 2:13:42 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 23 replies
    Fox News ^ | January 21, 2016 | Fox News
    Scientists say they have uncovered the remains of the earliest known massacre victims, dating from approximately 10,000 years ago. Archaeologists believe the victims were members of an extended family group of hunter-gatherers who were slaughtered by a rival group.
  • 'A bronze age Pompeii': archaeologists hail discovery of Peterborough site

    01/13/2016 8:02:10 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    The Manchester Guardian ^ | January 12, 2016 | Maev Kennedy
    Silty fen preserved burning houses and domestic objects inside them to reveal unprecedented view of life 3,000 years ago. Almost 3,000 years after being destroyed by fire, the astonishingly well preserved remains of two Bronze Age houses and their contents have been discovered at a quarry site in Peterborough. The artefacts include a collection of everyday domestic objects unprecedented from any site in Britain, including jewellery, spears, daggers, giant food storage jars and delicate drinking cups, glass beads, textiles and a copper spindle with thread still wound around it. The remains of the large wooden houses, built on stilts in...
  • Honduras to make archeological dig for mysterious 'White City'

    01/09/2016 3:03:59 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | January 7, 2016 | AFP, editors
    A view of the Rio Platano biosphere reserve in Honduras, where explorers over the past century have claimed several times to have spotted the White City Honduras said Thursday it was starting a major archeological dig for a mysterious, ancient "White City" supposedly hidden in jungle in its northeast that explorers and legends have spoken of for centuries. "Today a group of archeologists and scientists is traveling to the White City to start excavations in coming days," President Juan Orlando Hernandez said in a speech to private universities. The hope is that they will uncover incontrovertible proof of the existence...
  • Archaeologists Return to Neanderthal Cave as ISIS Pushed from Iraq

    01/05/2016 10:53:29 AM PST · by presidio9 · 9 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 04, 2016 | Owen Jarus
    As the terrorist group ISIS is pushed out of northern Iraq, archaeologists are resuming work in the region, making new discoveries and figuring out how to conserve archaeological sites and reclaim looted antiquities. Several discoveries, including new Neanderthal skeletal remains, have been made at Shanidar Cave, a site in Iraqi Kurdistan that was inhabited by Neanderthals more than 40,000 years ago. Additionally, though ISIS did destroy and loot a great number of sites, there are several ways for archaeologists, scientific institutions, governments and law enforcement agencies in North America and Europe to help save the region's heritage, said Dlshad Marf...