Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $21,455
24%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 24% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: archaeology

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Jericho Arabs loot ancient tombs and desecrate graves

    04/03/2019 2:16:53 PM PDT · by Sheapdog · 12 replies
    Israel National News ^ | April 2, 2019 | Mordechai Sones
    The ancient burial caves on the outskirts of Jericho date back to the Second Temple era, and are apparently part of the extensive burial grounds of the Hasmonean palace uncovered at the site. The cave was recently exposed in the course of landscaping work carried out by local Arab farmers, who bulldozed the site to prepare the ground for agricultural work. Professor Rachel Hachlili of Haifa University's Zinman Institute of Archaeology, who studied this region, identified these caves as the largest Second Temple-era burial ground in Israel. Hikers visiting the site over the weekend were appalled by what they found:...
  • Ancient Jewish village unearthed in Eastern Jerusalem

    03/27/2019 3:23:41 AM PDT · by Patriot777 · 10 replies
    Arutz Sheva.com ^ | Arutz Sheva Staff
    2,000 year-old Jewish town with ritual baths, olive press, and burial estate found in Eastern Jerusalem. Impressive remains of a Jewish village from the Hasmonean period, approximately 2,000 years ago, are currently being uncovered in a salvage escavation conducted by the Israel Antiquities Association in the Sharafat neighborhood of Jerusalem, where an elementary school will be built.
  • Nile Shipwreck Discovery Proves Herodotus Right

    03/23/2019 3:53:54 PM PDT · by wildbill · 36 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 2/23/1918 | Staff
    In the fifth century BC, the Greek historian Herodotus visited Egypt and wrote of unusual river boats on the Nile. Twenty-three lines of his Historia, the ancient world’s first great narrative history, are devoted to the intricate description of the construction of a “baris”. For centuries, scholars have argued over his account because there was no archaeological evidence that such ships ever existed. Now there is. A “fabulously preserved” wreck in the waters around the sunken port city of Thonis-Heracleion has revealed just how accurate the historian was.
  • Found: A Ship Once Described By Herodotus

    03/23/2019 5:34:39 AM PDT · by vannrox · 35 replies
    Atas Obscura ^ | 19mar19 | by Jonathan Carey
    A wreck discovered in the Nile suggests the ancient Greek historian’s description was spot on. by Jonathan CareyMarch 19, 2019 Found: A Ship Once Described By Herodotus The wooden hull of ship 17. Christoph Gerigk@Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation Herodotus is known as the father of history, but some of his writings have created more questions than answers. In his account of a fifth-century B.C. trip to Egypt, included in his most important work The Histories, the ancient Greek historian describes seeing unusual boats called baris sailing down the Nile. However, no physical evidence was discovered of the ships until now.A team...
  • Unknown species found in new treasure trove of fossils found in China

    03/21/2019 4:52:33 PM PDT · by Innovative · 16 replies
    CNN ^ | March 21, 2019 | Ashley Strickland
    A newly discovered fossil site in China that dates back 518 million years contains more than 50% previously unknown species, according to a new study. The well-preserved Qingjiang site is helping scientists to fill gaps in the fossil record and provide a clearer picture of some of the earliest animal ecosystems. The site is unique in that it not only includes well-preserved fossils but soft-bodied organisms as well. Some of the animals include corals, sponges, sea anemones, jellyfish, comb jellies, arthropods and tiny invertebrates called mud dragons, as well as microscopic fossils.
  • Lost cave of 'Jaguar God' rediscovered below Mayan Ruins — and it's full of treasure

    03/08/2019 6:30:34 AM PST · by ETL · 22 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | Mar 8, 2019 | Brandon Specktor Senior Writer | LiveScience
    Shimmying through a maze of dark tunnels below the Mayan ruins of Chichén Itzá on Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula, archaeologists have rediscovered a long-sealed cave brimming with lost treasure. According to an statement from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), the cave is stockpiled with more than 150 artifacts, including incense burners, vases, and decorative plates adorned with the faces of ancient gods and other religious icons. The trove is believed to be just one of seven sacred chambers in a network of tunnels known as Balamku — "Jaguar God" — that sits below Chichén Itzá, a city that...
  • 10 Strange Archaeological Finds Straight Out Of A Horror Story

    03/05/2019 5:42:25 PM PST · by robowombat · 29 replies
    Listverse ^ | MAY 7, 2017 | MARK OLIVER
    10 Strange Archaeological Finds Straight Out Of A Horror Story Scattered under the ground beneath our feet are the remains of history. There are little pieces of the lives of people who lived before us that give us little glimpses into who they were—the things they held dear, the homes they lived in, and the bones of their decaying bodies. But life thousands of years ago wasn’t always gentle and easy. Sometimes, when these remains are uncovered, the stories they reveal are brutal and violent—and sometimes, they’re pulled straight out of a horror story. 10 A Pit Of Amputated Arms10b-amputated-arm-bones-from-pit...
  • Anchor from 'most valuable shipwreck in history' found

    03/05/2019 5:08:55 PM PST · by robowombat · 12 replies
    Fox News ^ | March 5, 2019 | James Rogers
    Anchor from 'most valuable shipwreck in history' found Anchor found off of U.K. coast could be from one of Britain’s richest ship wrecks An anchor brought up in a trawler's fishing nets off the coast of the U.K. is reportedly from a 17th-century shipwreck. The anchor is believed to be from the Merchant Royal, which has been described as one of Britain’s richest wrecks, carrying cargo worth around $10.5 million. SWNS reports that the anchor, believed to be from the Merchant Royal, was brought up in a fishing vessel’s net 20 miles off Land's End, Cornwall. The merchant ship sank...
  • 500-million-year-old worm 'superhighway' discovered in Canada

    03/05/2019 9:57:48 AM PST · by Gamecock · 25 replies
    USASK ^ | 2/26/2019
    The sea bed in the deep ocean during the Cambrian period was thought to have been inhospitable to animal life because it lacked enough oxygen to sustain it. But research published in the scientific journal Geology reveals the existence of fossilized worm tunnels dating back to the Cambrian period­­ 270 million years before the evolution of dinosaurs. The discovery, by USask professor Brian Pratt, suggests that animal life in the sediment at that time was more widespread than previously thought. The worm tunnels—burrows where worms lived and munched through the sediment—are invisible to the naked eye. But Pratt “had a...
  • Maya ritual cave ‘untouched’ for 1,000 years stuns archaeologists

    03/05/2019 10:05:25 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 32 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 03/04/2019 | Gena Steffans
    To access just the first of seven ritual offering chambers identified so far within Balamku, archaeologists must crawl flat on their stomachs through hundreds of feet of tortuously narrow passages. In the original report on the cave (recently located by archaeologist and GAM investigator James Brady of California State University, Los Angeles), Segovia identified 155 artifacts, some with faces of Toltec rain god Tláloc, and others with markings of the sacred ceiba tree, a potent representation of the Maya universe. In comparison, the nearby cave of Balankanché, a ritual site excavated in 1959, contains just 70 of these objects. “Balamku...
  • A black woman who lived in Britannia in Roman times "a lady of ivory bracelet"

    03/04/2019 3:36:25 PM PST · by robowombat · 29 replies
    Gigazine ^ | 14:30 Mar 02, 2010
    Mar 02, 2010 14:30:03 A black woman who lived in Britannia in Roman times "a lady of ivory bracelet" (This article was originally posted in Japanese on 14:30 Mar 02, 2010) Roman EmpireSpeaking of ancient Roman civilizationLatinAnd CaesarGaara's war historyRecord remains inGaulians·GermanicAlthough it tends to embrace the image of a society centered on white people, such as white, the vast empire with the whole region of the Mediterranean coast as a version,Aeeguptus(Now Egypt) toMauretania(Now Morocco) to include the northern African region, there are also many African populations, and it seems that there were many people who moved out of Africa...
  • Quake that battered ancient Rome is traced to its lair

    03/02/2019 1:06:42 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Nature ^ | February 8, 2019 | Tectonics (2019)
    A fault in the Apennine Mountains wreaked damage on structures including the Colosseum. The geological fault responsible for a series of Italian earthquakes in 2016 might also have caused a quake mentioned in ancient accounts of fifth-century Rome. Until 2016, scientists had considered the 30-kilometre-long Mount Vettore fault in the central Apennine Mountains to be dormant. But between August and October that year, it generated three big earthquakes; the first killed nearly 300 people. To explore the fault’s history, a team led by Paolo Galli at the Department of Civil Protection in Rome dug trenches across it to look for...
  • King Hezekiah in the Bible: Royal Seal of Hezekiah Comes to Light

    02/16/2019 11:43:44 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | 01/26/2019 | Robin Ngo
    For the first time, the royal seal of King Hezekiah in the Bible was found in an archaeological excavation. The stamped clay seal, also known as a bulla, was discovered in the Ophel excavations led by Dr. Eilat Mazar at the foot of the southern wall of the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. The discovery was announced in a press release by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Institute of Archaeology, under whose auspices the excavations were conducted. The bulla, which measures just over a centimeter in diameter, bears a seal impression depicting a two-winged sun disk flanked by ankh symbols and...
  • Fossil shark named after 80s video game

    01/21/2019 10:29:25 AM PST · by Red Badger · 23 replies
    BBC ^ | 01/21/2019 | Staff
    A newly discovered species of ancient shark has been named after a 1980s arcade game. The shark swam in the rivers of what is now South Dakota, US, about 67 million years ago, living alongside iconic dinosaur species such as T. rex. It's been named Galagadon, after the 1981 Japanese-US game Galaga, because its teeth resemble the spaceships in the game. The specimen is described in the Journal of Paleontology. "It may seem odd today, but about 67 million years ago, what is now South Dakota was covered in forests, swamps and winding rivers," said co-author Terry Gates, from North...
  • 2000-Year-Old Ring Uncovered in Ancient Jewish Ritual Bath in Old City of Jerusalem

    12/28/2018 5:51:05 AM PST · by SJackson · 11 replies
    A 2,000-year-old ring was uncovered in archaeological excavations in the City of David National Park in Jerusalem, dating back to the Second Temple period. Source: City of David A ring with a solitaire gem stone was found by Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists in what appears to be an ancient Mikveh (ritual bath) on the Pilgrimage Road which dates back to the time of the Second Temple period. The ancient paved road runs up from the Shiloach (Siloam) pool to the Temple Mount and is thought to have been the main thoroughfare taken by pilgrims to the Temple. According to archaeologists...
  • Misplaced 2,000-year-old ring discovered in Jerusalem’s City of David

    12/26/2018 7:02:57 AM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    www.timesofisrael.com ^ | 23 December 2018, 9:14 pm | By Amanda Borschel-Dan
    Unearthed in excavation of the monumental Pilgrims’ Path, the Second Temple-era adornment likely fell after use of a ritual bath, say archaeologists A 2,000-year-old bronze ring with a solitaire gem stone was uncovered in archaeological excavations in the City of David National Park in Jerusalem. (City of David) ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Some 2,000 years ago, a Jewish penitent misplaced a bronze ring during his climb of a 600-meter-long (about 2,000 feet) pilgrims’ thoroughfare leading to the Temple Mount. While the recently recovered ring is today heavily corroded, its central blue semi-precious stone still sparkles. The ring was recently discovered at the City...
  • Bronze ring found in ancient fortress near Bethlehem may have belonged to Pontius Pilate

    12/02/2018 7:59:52 PM PST · by Beowulf9 · 22 replies
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | Nov 30, 2018 | Nick Squires
    A 2,000-year-old bronze ring found near Bethlehem bears the name of Pontius Pilate, the Roman official who ordered Jesus Christ to be crucified, archeologists have revealed.
  • Ring of Pontius Pilate, who ordered Jesus Christ's crucifixion, discovered near Bethlehem

    12/02/2018 6:55:57 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 12/02/2018 | Stoyan Zaimov
    Researchers have deciphered an ancient inscription on a bronze ring first found 50 years ago pointing to Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who ordered Jesus Christ’s crucifixion. Haaretz reported that the ring in question was first discovered at the site of Herodion near the West Bank’s Bethlehem by professor Gideon Forster from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, shortly after the Six-Day War in 1968-69. The owner of the ring had remained a mystery for some 50 years, however, but a recent cleansing and special camera work at the Israel Antiquities Authority labs found Greek writing on the ring, which translates...
  • Pontius Pilate’s ring discovered from site near Bethlehem

    11/29/2018 7:28:32 PM PST · by bkopto · 97 replies
    World Israel News ^ | 11/29/2018 | staff
    The Israeli daily Ha’aretz is reporting that a bronze ring found 50 years ago at the Herodion excavation near Bethlehem has been discovered to bear the name of Pontius Pilate, Roman governor of Jerusalem and the man who ordered the crucifixion of Jesus, according to the New Testament. Ha’aretz reports that the name was discovered on the ring with the use of a special camera at the Israel Antiquities Authority labs. The letters on the ring spelled out in Greek writing “Pilatus.” The words surrounded a picture of a wine vessel. Hebrew University Professor Danny Schwartz told Ha’aretz that Pilatus...
  • Ancient Inscription Identifies Gargilius Antiques as Roman Ruler on Eve of Bar Kochva Revolt

    12/02/2016 4:30:23 AM PST · by SJackson · 19 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | December 1st, 2016
    University of Haifa researchers have made an important discovery underwater: a rare inscription from the period preceding the Bar Kochva revolt offers for the first time the definite identification of Gargilius Antiques as the Roman prefect of Judea at that time. The inscription was found in a University of Haifa underwater excavation at Tel Dor, on Israel’s Mediterranean coast, about 20 miles south of Haifa. “For the first time, we can state with certainty the name of the Roman prefect of Judea during the critical period leading up to the Bar Kochva revolt,” stated Prof. Assaf Yasur-Landau of the University...