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Keyword: archaeology

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  • What's Been Lost to the Islamists' Sledgehammers (historians shocked)

    03/01/2015 12:28:43 PM PST · by NYer · 61 replies
    Aleteia ^ | March 1, 2015 | JOHN BURGER
    Screen Capture A video showing Islamic State militants with sledgehammers and power drills on a rampage inside the Mosul Museum shows the destruction of both reproductions and priceless originals from at least two important eras in the region’s history, said a British expert on Iraqi culture. Paul Collins, of the British Institute for the Study of Iraq, in an email to Aleteia, said it was “distressing” to watch scenes of the destruction of colossal winged bulls of the seventh century BC. “These are certainly the real things and it looks from the video that the sculptures are those situated outside...
  • The secrets of the Santa Priscilla catacombs

    02/25/2015 6:49:58 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 6 replies
    BBC ^ | 25 February 2015 | Amanda Ruggeri
    The frescoes of the Santa Priscilla catacombs in Rome call our knowledge of the past into question and challenge the teachings of the Church. Amanda Ruggeri investigates. When archaeologists in Rome at the end of the 19th Century began to excavate the Catacombs of Santa Priscilla, they hoped to find treasure: intricately carved monuments and vibrant frescoes of the type found in other ancient, underground cemeteries. Instead, they found devastation.
  • Prayers to God in wrong spot? (Temple Mount location 'misplaced'?)

    02/23/2015 9:20:32 PM PST · by Perseverando · 50 replies
    WND ^ | February 23, 2015 | Leo Hohman
    It has been called the most contested plot of land in the world — the fissure at which three major faiths come together, and break apart. There have been holy wars fought over it and holy writ foretelling of battles yet to come. It’s Jerusalem’s Temple Mount. But what if history got it wrong? What if the spot where Solomon built the first Jewish Temple, and Herod built the second, was actually about 600 feet to the south, in a place known as the ancient City of David? Enter Robert Cornuke. He travels the world solving Bible mysteries: Noah’s Ark,...
  • Ancient underwater forest discovered off Norfolk coast

    01/31/2015 4:49:37 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 18 replies
    BBC ^ | 26 January 2015 Last updated at 00:28 GMT | Credit: The underwater diving footage is copyright and courtesy of Rob Spray and Dawn Watson
    Nature experts have discovered a remarkable submerged forest thousands of years old under the sea close to the Norfolk coast. The trees were part of an area known as 'Doggerland' which formed part of a much bigger area before it was flooded by the North Sea. It was once so vast that hunter-gatherers who lived in the vicinity could have walked to Germany across its land mass.
  • Fossil Found In Asia Could Be A New Species Of Human

    01/28/2015 10:26:09 AM PST · by blam · 77 replies
    BI - Livescience ^ | 1-28-2015 | Charles Q. Choi
    Charles Q. Choi, LiveScience January 27, 2015An ancient human fossil discovered from the seafloor near Taiwan reveals that a primitive group of humans, potentially an unknown species, once lived in Asia, researchers say. These findings suggest that multiple lineages of extinct humans may have coexisted in Asia before the arrival of modern humans in the region about 40,000 years ago, the scientists added. Although modern humans, Homo sapiens, are the only surviving human lineage, others once walked the globe. Extinct human lineages once found in Asia include Neanderthals, the closest extinct relatives of modern humans; Denisovans, whose genetic legacy may...
  • Ancient Crash, Epic Wave

    01/26/2015 1:03:44 PM PST · by Sawdring · 35 replies
    New York Times ^ | November 14, 2006 | SANDRA BLAKESLEE
    At the southern end of Madagascar lie four enormous wedge-shaped sediment deposits, called chevrons, that are composed of material from the ocean floor. Each covers twice the area of Manhattan with sediment as deep as the Chrysler Building is high. On close inspection, the chevron deposits contain deep ocean microfossils that are fused with a medley of metals typically formed by cosmic impacts. And all of them point in the same direction — toward the middle of the Indian Ocean where a newly discovered crater, 18 miles in diameter, lies 12,500 feet below the surface. The explanation is obvious to...
  • Papyrus Found in Mummy Mask May Hold Oldest Known Gospel Text

    01/23/2015 9:20:32 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 18 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 01/23/2015 | By James Maynard
    The Gospel of Mark has been discovered written on a tiny fragment of ancient papyrus, found within a mummy mask. During the era when the mask was created, papyrus was expensive, and the religious text was reused to create the decorative wear for the mummy. This discovery could represent the oldest gospel text ever found by archaeologists. The oldest samples of Christian scripture date from the Second Century of the Common Era. Pharaohs and wealthy individuals were often adorned with mummy masks made of gold and precious materials. Masks for people from lower economic classes were often manufactured from papyrus,...
  • Beard on King Tut's burial mask damaged after epoxy gluing

    01/22/2015 8:36:00 AM PST · by C19fan · 29 replies
    AP ^ | January 22, 2014 | Staff
    The blue and gold braided beard on the burial mask of famed pharaoh Tutankhamun was hastily glued back on with epoxy, damaging the relic after it was knocked during cleaning, conservators at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo said Wednesday. The museum is one of the city's main tourist sites, but in some areas, ancient wooden sarcophagi lay unprotected from the public, while pharaonic burial shrouds, mounted on walls, crumble from behind open panels of glass. Tutankhamun's mask, over 3,300 years old, and other contents of his tomb are its top exhibits. Three of the museum's conservators reached by telephone gave...
  • Archaeological Evidence: Exodus and the Trial of Jesus

    01/16/2015 7:29:02 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 5 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 01/16/2015 | Eric Metaxas
    Every year, usually at Christmas time, a so-called "mainstream" magazine takes up the topic of Christianity or the Bible. Often, Christians who believe the Bible get a fair hearing—other times, not so much. This latest time, it was Newsweek and journalist Kurt Eichenwald doing the "honors." Here's the title: "The Bible: So Misunderstood It's a Sin." Actually, this piece is so ill-informed that it's a sin—not just against God but against good journalism. Al Mohler had this to say: "[Eichenwald's] article is a hit-piece that lacks any journalistic balance or credibility. His only sources cited within the article are from...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...
  • Hanukkah dig reveals stunning bracelet: ...1,600-year-old .. menorahs is unearthed in Israel

    12/29/2014 7:02:28 PM PST · by GrandJediMasterYoda · 11 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | 12/29/14 | By ELLIE ZOLFAGHARIFARD
    Hanukkah dig reveals stunning bracelet: Fragment of 1,600-year-old glass embossed with menorahs is unearthed in Israel The bracelet remains were found in Israel's Mount Carmel National Park Area was a settlement during the late Roman or early Byzantine period It was found in ancient box containing glass pieces discarded as waste Researchers say it may have been destined to be exported elsewhere Archaeologists in Israel have unearthed fragments of a glass bracelet stamped with seven-branched menorahs. The bracelet remains were found on the second night of Hanukkah in Mount Carmel National Park - once a large settlement during the late...
  • 6,000-Year-Old Temple Unearthed in Ukraine

    12/28/2014 4:38:03 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 40 replies
    Sci-News ^ | October 22, 2014
    A team of archaeologists led by Dr Mykhailo Videiko of the Kyiv Institute of Archaeology has discovered the remains of a 6,000-year-old temple at a Trypillian culture village near modern-day Nebelivka, Ukraine.Trypillian culture derives its name from the village of Trypillia in Kyiv region, Ukraine, where artifacts of this ancient civilization were first discovered in 1896. Archeological excavations show that Trypillian people lived from about 5400 to 2700 BC on a vast area extending from the Carpathian piedmont, east to the Dnipro River, and south to the shores of the Black sea. The culture is characterized by advanced agriculture, developed...
  • Archaeologists Are Excavating A Synagogue Where Jesus Likely Preached

    12/26/2014 1:49:47 PM PST · by NYer · 21 replies
    io9 ^ | December 25, 2014 | Mark Strauss
    Since 2009, archaeologists have been slowly excavating the ancient town of Magdala—thought to be the home of Mary Magdalene—near the Sea of Galilee. Among their finds has been a first-century synagogue where, experts say, Jesus likely preached. Image: Israel Antiquities Authority Although Jerusalem and Bethlehem are the sites most commonly associated with Jesus, Father Eamon Kelly—vice president of Israel's Magdala Center and vice chargé of the Pontifical Institute Notre Dame of Jerusalem Center—points out that Jesus spent almost his entire life in what is now northern Israel. "Eighty percent of Jesus' public life was here," he tells the Israeli...
  • Archaeologists Unearth Entryway to King Herod's Palace

    12/22/2014 4:13:15 AM PST · by NYer · 12 replies
    NBC News ^ | December 19, 2014 | Alan Boyle
    Workers stand near the newly uncovered monumental entryway to the Herodian Palace in Herodium National Park, outside of Bethlehem in the West Bank. The entry, at right, is a corridor with a complex system of arches on three separate levels. The arches buttressed the corridor's massive side walls, allowing the king and his entourage direct passage into the palace courtyard. Israeli archaeologists are showing off the monumental, many-arched corridor that led to Herod the Great's hilltop palace near Jerusalem in the first century. The corridor in the ancient fortress of Herodium, about 7 miles (12 kilometers) south of Jerusalem,...
  • Shackled Skeletons Found In Ancient Gallo-Roman Cemetery in Southwest France; circa 2nd Century A.D.

    12/05/2014 3:22:15 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 17 replies
    IO9 ^ | December 4, 2014 | George Dvorsky
    • Skeletons Found In Ancient Cemetery Still Have Shackles On Their Necks Archaeologists working in southwest France have discovered hundreds of Gallo-Roman graves dating to the second half of the 2nd century AD, with some of the skeletons featuring shackles still strapped around their necks and ankles. The site, which may have been part of an important Gallo-Roman necropolis, is situated near the amphitheatre of Saintes. The Romans dominated the area during the first and second centuries AD. The amphitheatre, which featured battles between gladiators and wild animals, could hold between 12-18,000 people. The remains of the dead would be...
  • Archaeologists Unearth Three Ancient Greek Mosaics in the Ongoing Excavation in Zeugma, Turkey

    11/20/2014 11:15:08 PM PST · by ApplegateRanch · 18 replies
    Laughing Squid ^ | November 18, 2014 | Rebecca Escamilla
    The Zeugma excavation project conducted by Oxford Archaeology and supported by Packhard Humanities Institute and the Ministry of Culture of Turkey has recently unearthed three ancient Greek mosaics in the Turkish city of Zeugma. Zeugma had received some press and support in 2000 after flooding caused by construction began to bury and damage artifacts in the region. The mosaics, created in the 2nd century BC, are constructed of boldly colored glass and are being covered for protection until excavation is complete. The head of the project, Professor Kutalmis Görkay, recently gave the Hurriyet Daily News more details about the plan...
  • Amazon Warriors Did Indeed Fight and Die Like Men

    11/01/2014 3:18:49 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 44 replies
    National Geographic's Book Talk ^ | October 29, 2014 | Simon Worrall
    Archaeology shows that these fierce women also smoked pot, got tattoos, killed—and loved—men. The Amazons got a bum rap in antiquity. They wore trousers. They smoked pot, covered their skin with tattoos, rode horses, and fought as hard as the guys. Legends sprang up like weeds. They cut off their breasts to fire their bows better! They mutilated or killed their boy children! Modern (mostly male) scholars continued the confabulations. The Amazons were hard-core feminists. Man haters. Delinquent mothers. Lesbians. Drawing on a wealth of textual, artistic, and archaeological evidence, Adrienne Mayor, author of The Amazons, dispels these myths and...
  • Ten years On, Scientists Still Debating The Origins Of Homo Floresiensis—The 'Hobbit'

    10/28/2014 10:53:04 AM PDT · by blam · 22 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Bob Yirka
    Oct 23, 2014Bob Yirka Homo floresiensis adult female - model of head. (Phys.org) —It's been ten years since the bones of Homo floresiensis, aka, the "hobbit" were uncovered in Liang Bua, a cave, on the island of Flores in Indonesia, and scientists still can't agree on the diminutive hominin's origins. This month, the journal Nature has printed a comment piece by Chris Stringer of the Natural History Museum in London and two pieces by Ewen Callaway, one a retrospective with interviews with the central players, and the other a podcast with the four principle scientists involved in the find—Bert Roberts,...
  • Mystery of 4,000-year-old ‘CD-ROM’ is solved

    10/26/2014 7:04:29 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 38 replies
    uk.news.yahoo.com ^ | Fri, Oct 24, 2014 | Rob Waugh –
    A mysterious symbol-covered disc which was found in Greek ruins in 1908 has finally revealed its secrets after archaeologists battled to decode it for more than a century. The Phaistos Disc - described as the ‘first Minoan CD-ROM’ is covered in 241 images, thought to be fragments of 45 mysterious symbols. The language used is unknown, and the technology behind the disc is equally mysterious. The disc was created in 1,700 BC - using pre-printed symbols to press a mysterious message into clay. The disc pre-dates the printing press by thousands of years, but uses a similar technology - which...
  • Archeologists unearth 3,300 year old complex in Israel

    10/17/2014 8:17:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | 10/16/2014 | Bob Yirka
    A team of archeologists working in Israel's Tel Burna dig site have unearthed the remains of a large stone complex dating back approximately 3,300 years. Information about the finding was presented at the recent European Association of Archaeologists' meeting held in Istanbul. Initial examination of the ruins suggests the site was an ancient cult complex—a rather large one at that with side walls measuring up to 52x52 feet. Thus far archeologists have uncovered mask fragments (parts that covered the nose), connected cups (their purpose has yet to be discovered), scarabs (stone representations of the beetle typically used as an amulet)...
  • Archaeologists discover 'industrial scale' wine production at ancient site

    09/21/2014 5:03:38 AM PDT · by RouxStir · 9 replies
    Foxnews.com ^ | September 19, 2014
    <p>"Archaeologists in Israel have discovered a massive compound dating back to the Byzantine era, which was used for “industrial-scale” production of wine and olive oil.</p> <p>The site at Ramat Bet Shemesh about 19 miles west of Jerusalem contains an oil press, wine press and colorful mosaics, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority.</p>
  • Pictograph Photo Gallery

    09/11/2014 2:06:56 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 18 replies
    Geology.com ^ | 9/11/2014 | Staff
    Pictograph Photo Gallery A pictograph is a drawing or painting that is created on a rock. It is not "carved" into the rock - that would be a "petroglyph." This is a series of photographs of pictographs from around the world. There are many links to other galleries.
  • Fever mounts as stunning statues found at ancient Greek tomb (Amphipolis)

    09/07/2014 5:44:48 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 19 replies
    AFP via Yahoo ^ | September 7, 2014
    Athens (AFP) - Two stunning caryatid statues have been unearthed holding up the entrance to the biggest ancient tomb ever found in Greece, archaeologists said. The two female figures in long-sleeved tunics were found standing guard at the opening to the mysterious Alexander The Great-era tomb near Amphipolis in the Macedonia region of northern Greece.
  • Study Claims Cave Art Made By Neanderthals

    09/01/2014 10:46:10 AM PDT · by blam · 31 replies
    SF Gate - AP ^ | 9-1-2014 | FRANK JORDANS, Associated Press
    FRANK JORDANS, Associated PressMonday, September 1, 2014 BERLIN (AP) — A series of lines scratched into rock in a cave near the southwestern tip of Europe could be proof that Neanderthals were more intelligent and creative than previously thought. The cross-hatched engravings inside Gorham's Cave in Gibraltar are the first known examples of Neanderthal rock art, according to a team of scientists who studied the site. The find is significant because it indicates that modern humans and their extinct cousins shared the capacity for abstract expression. The study, released Monday by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,...
  • Oldest Yet Known Metal Object Discovered in the Middle East

    08/22/2014 8:00:53 PM PDT · by fatez · 70 replies
    Live Scient ^ | August 22, 2104 | Charles Q. Choi
    A copper awl is the oldest metal object unearthed to date in the Middle East. The discovery reveals that metals were exchanged across hundreds of miles in this region more than 6,000 years ago, centuries earlier than previously thought, researchers say.
  • As Islamic Militants Destroy Iraq Heritage, a Stunning Find in Kurdistan

    08/10/2014 5:13:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Rudaw ^ | July 22, 2014 | Alexandra Di Stefano Pironti
    While the history of civilization is being demolished by war and religious zealots in the rest of Iraq, in the Kurdistan Region archeologists are marveling at a stunning discovery: the remains of a long-lost temple from the biblical kingdom of Urartu, dating back to the 9th century BC. Kurdish archaeologist Dlshad Marf Zamua, who has studied the columns and other artifacts at the find, told Rudaw these were unearthed piecemeal over the past four decades by villagers going about their lives, digging for cultivation or construction. But only recently, after the discovery of life-size human statues and the unearthed columns,...
  • Mystery over massive Alexander-era tomb unearthed in Greece

    08/13/2014 1:25:20 AM PDT · by ApplegateRanch · 14 replies
    Yahoo ^ | Aug 12, 2014
    Archaeologists have unearthed a funeral mound dating from the time of Alexander the Great and believed to be the largest ever discovered in Greece, but are stumped about who was buried in it. Prime Minister Antonis Samaras on Tuesday described the find as "unique" after he visited the site, which dates to the era following Alexander's death, at the ancient town of Amphipolis in northern Greece. "It is certain that we stand before an exceptionally important find," Samaras said in a statement. "This is a monument with unique characteristics." Hidden under a hill at the ancient town, the Hellenistic-era mound...
  • Archaeology as a vital US strategic interest

    07/12/2014 7:04:55 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 8, 2014 | Sturt W. Manning
    The year 1776 saw both the U.S. Declaration of Independence and publication of Gibbon’s "The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire."Today the United States stands on the top of the podium of world powers: however, does a Roman fate await? A visit to the dramatic Pueblo ruins in the American southwest, former home to a complex civilization that abandoned its settlements in the 12th-13th centuries A.D., warns us that circumstances can change, and dramatically. Archeology offers an education in patterns, possibilities and challenges that the U.S. should value and exploit for its future. For the U.S.,...
  • The Minoans were Caucasian

    07/12/2014 4:58:18 AM PDT · by Renfield · 49 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 5-16-2013 | Damien Gayle
    DNA analysis has debunked the longstanding theory that the Minoans, who some 5,000 years ago established Europe's first advanced Bronze Age culture, were from Africa. The Minoan civilisation arose on the Mediterranean island of Crete in approximately the 27th century BC and flourished for 12 centuries until the 15th century BC. But the culture was lost until British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans unearthed its remains on Crete in 1900, where he found vestiges of a civilisation he believed was formed by refugees from northern Egypt. Modern archaeologists have cast doubt on that version of events, and now DNA tests of...
  • MAJOR NEWS Muslims Destroy The Tomb Of The Prophet Jonah\

    07/07/2014 9:16:33 PM PDT · by Vince Ferrer · 46 replies
    Shoebat.com ^ | July 7, 2014 | Walid Shoebat and Theodore Shoebat
    Muslim devils in Iraq, members of ISIS, destroyed the tomb of the prophet Jonah (called Younas in Arabic). Shoebat.com obtained a video of the destruction: Jonah's Tomb According to one Mid East report: On Friday a local Nineveh official, Zuhair al-Chalabi said that there is information that almost certainly confirms that members of the organization of the Islamic state in Iraq and the Levant dug up the grave of the Prophet Younis in the east of Mosul. Al-Chalabi said in an interview for IraqiNews.com, that “The elements of ISIL controlled the mosque of the Prophet Younis in Mosul since they...
  • The Case of the Missing Ancestor: DNA from Russia adds a mysterious new member to the human family

    07/04/2014 8:40:28 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    National Geographic ^ | July 2013 | Jamie Shreeve
    In the Altay Mountains of southern Siberia, some 200 miles from where Russia touches Mongolia, China, and Kazakhstan, nestled under a rock face about 30 yards above a little river called the Anuy, there is a cave called Denisova. It has long attracted visitors. The name comes from that of a hermit, Denis, who is said to have lived there in the 18th century. Long before that, Neolithic and later Turkic pastoralists took shelter in the cave, gathering their herds around them to ride out the Siberian winters. Thanks to them, the archaeologists who work in Denisova today, surrounded by...
  • Omnivore Ancestors? Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat & vegetables

    06/27/2014 2:46:11 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    The Scientist ^ | June 26, 2014 | Jyoti Madhusoodanan
    Fossilized feces offer new evidence that Neanderthals ate both meat and plants. Chemical analysis confirmed the oldest-known ancient human fecal matter, according to a study published yesterday (June 25) in PLOS ONE. Previous isotope studies of bones suggested Neanderthals were primarily meat-eaters. Analyses of tartar from their teeth have indicated they may have also eaten plants, although some researchers noted that these plant remains could be traces from the stomach contents of herbivore prey. Stool, however, is "the perfect evidence because you’re sure it was consumed," study author Ainara Sistiaga from the University of La Laguna in Spain told BBC...
  • ‘Dracula’s Tomb’ Discovered in Italy (Naples)

    06/17/2014 11:15:54 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 54 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | 6/17/14 | Esma ÇAKIR
    Estonian researchers believe they may have finally discovered the whereabouts of “Dracula’s” grave, which is in Italy and not the Romanian Transylvanian Alps as first thought. The inspiration behind Bram Stoker’s 1897 gothic novel “Dracula” is thought to be Vlad III, the 15th century Prince of Wallachia in Eastern Europe. Known posthumously as Vlad the Impaler, the ruler was known for his brand of cruelty across Europe, which included impaling his enemies. Vlad’s ultimate enemy were the Ottomans. Depictions of his endless cruelty made history books, securing his reputation as one of the biggest villains in Turkey’s collective consciousness, as...
  • 'Incredibly important' medieval find in Wales (convent, cemetery and Tudor mansion)

    06/14/2014 1:52:51 PM PDT · by NYer · 44 replies
    Archaeologynewsnetwork ^ | June 13, 2014
    Archaeologists says they have discovered an "incredibly important" medieval convent, cemetery and Tudor mansion in Ceredigion. Archaeologists working on the Llanllyr nunnery excavation [Credit: BBC] The location of Llanllyr nunnery in the Aeron Valley had been a mystery until now. Dr Jemma Bezant from University of Wales Trinity Saint David (UWTSD) said it offered an unparalleled opportunity to find out more about monastic life. The public were able to view the site on Saturday. Dr Bezant said: "Medieval nunneries like this are incredibly rare with only one other known in Wales." The convent, founded by Lord Rhys ap Gruffudd in...
  • 3000 year old trousers discovered in Chinese grave oldest ever found

    06/12/2014 10:39:48 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    phys.org ^ | Jun 03, 2014 | by Bob Yirka
    (Phys.org) —A team of researchers working in the ancient Yanghai graveyard in China's Tarim Basin has uncovered what appears to be the earliest example of trouser wearing. The research team has published a paper in the journal Quaternary International describing the pants and why they were likely developed to assist with riding horses. The Tarim Basin in western China is host to the famous Yanghai tombs, a large ancient burial ground that dates back thousands of years—thus far over 500 individual gravesites have been excavated. In this latest find, two adult males (believed to be herders and warriors) both approximately...
  • Prehistoric hunting scenes unearthed in Spanish cave

    05/25/2014 8:52:16 AM PDT · by Renfield · 11 replies
    The Art Newspaper ^ | 5-23-2014 | Belén Palanco
    Antiquities and Archaeology Conservation News Spain Prehistoric hunting scenes unearthed in Spanish cave Threat of vandalism puts ancient paintings at risk By Belén Palanco. Web onlyPublished online: 23 May 2014 A cave painting of a bull, with colours accentuated by archaeologists. Credit: Courtesy of Ines Domingo A series of hunting scenes dating from 7,000 years ago have been found by archaeologists on the six-metre long wall of a small cave in the region of Vilafranca in Castellón, eastern Spain—but it is being kept a secret for now. A layer of dust and dirt covered ten figures, including bulls, two...
  • Anatomically Modern Humans Left Africa Earlier Than Previously Thought, Suggests Study

    05/21/2014 12:18:44 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | April 21, 2014
    An international team of scientists conducting an analysis of the genetic diversity and cranial measurements of 10 African and Asian human populations conclude that anatomically modern humans may have dispersed out of Africa earlier than previously thought, and in more than one stage: initially into Asia by taking a southern route through Arabia as much as 130,000 years ago; and later into Northern Eurasia on a more northerly route 50,000 years ago. The timing and nature of early modern human dispersal out of Africa has long been disputed among scholars, with competing theories or models about how and when it...
  • Prehistoric Europeans Took Poppies and Mushrooms in Prayer

    05/17/2014 12:09:18 PM PDT · by Renfield · 24 replies
    It’s not much of a stretch to believe that getting stoned in the Stone Age was as popular among prehistoric Europeans as it is now. However, new evidence suggests that marijuana, mushrooms, alcohol and other mood-altering substances were used for more than zonking with Zonk – they played crucial roles in spiritual practices, especially burial rituals and communications with the after-world.Elisa Guerra-Doce of the Universidad de Valladolid in Spain has documented the cultural contexts in which forms of alcohol and drugs were used in prehistoric Europe. The forms she looked for were fossilized leaves and seeds of psychoactive plants, residues...
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs – a breed twice the size of bulls – predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • Tomb dating back to 1100 B.C. found in Egypt (Images)

    05/09/2014 1:34:37 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 12 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 08, 2014 | by Laura Dean
    Archeologists have found a tomb dating back to around 1100 B.C. south of Cairo, Egypt's Antiquities Ministry said Thursday. Antiquities Minister Mohamed Ibrahim said that the tomb belongs to a guard of the army archives and royal messenger to foreign countries. Ibrahim said the Cairo University Faculty of Archaeology's discovery at Saqqara adds "a chapter to our knowledge about the history of Saqqara." Ola el-Egeizy of Cairo University said the tomb contains "very nice inscriptions" of the funerary procession and the afterlife of the deceased. The tomb was found near another one dating back to the same period belonging to...
  • Israeli Archaeologist Says He Has Found King David's Legendary Citadel

    05/06/2014 6:48:30 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 12 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 05/06/2014 | DANIEL ESTRIN
    JERUSALEM (AP) — An Israeli archaeologist says he has found the legendary citadel captured by King David in his conquest of Jerusalem, rekindling a longstanding debate about using the Bible as a field guide to identifying ancient ruins. The claim by Eli Shukron, like many such claims in the field of biblical archaeology, has run into criticism. It joins a string of announcements by Israeli archaeologists saying they have unearthed palaces of the legendary biblical king, who is revered in Jewish religious tradition for establishing Jerusalem as its central holy city — but who has long eluded historians looking for...
  • Scientists uncover what may be an early image of Christ

    05/01/2014 1:57:07 PM PDT · by NYer · 41 replies
    Deacon's Bench ^ | May 1, 2014 | Deacon Greg Kendra
    Some intriguing news from the world of archeology: Spanish archaeologists have discovered what may be one of the earliest depictions of Jesus in an ancient Egyptian tomb.Painted on the walls of a mysterious underground stone structure in the ancient Egyptian city of Oxyrhynchus, about 100 miles south of Cairo, the image shows a young man with curly hair and dressed in a short tunic.“He raises his hand as if making a blessing,” said Egyptologist Josep Padró, who has spent over 20 years excavating sites in the area.In this expedition, he led a team of archaeologists from the University of Barcelona,...
  • Cold case: Did archaeologists find the last Maccabean king, after all?

    04/30/2014 11:14:08 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    Haaretz ^ | April 29, 2014 | Ariel David
    In 1970, a rock-cut tomb was discovered by workers building a private house in Jerusalem's Givat Hamivtar neighborhood. Inside the two-chambered burial, dating back to the first century BCE, archeologists found a decorated ossuary – a limestone box containing the bones of the deceased – and an enigmatic Aramaic inscription affixed to the wall. "I am Abba, son of Eleazar the priest," proclaimed the 2,000-year-old text. "I am Abba, the oppressed, the persecuted, born in Jerusalem and exiled to Babylon, who brought back Mattathiah son of Judah and buried him in the cave that I purchased." Who was Abba, this...
  • Medieval Siberian mummies baffle archaeologists

    04/15/2014 1:08:43 PM PDT · by Renfield · 29 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 4-10-2014 | Kate Baklitskaya
    Academics restart work to unlock secrets of mystery medieval civilization with links to Persia on edge of the Siberian Arctic. A red-haired man was found, protected from chest to foot by copper plating [Credit: Kate Baklitskaya/Go East] The 34 shallow graves excavated by archaeologists at Zeleniy Yar throw up many more questions than answers. But one thing seems clear: this remote spot, 29 km shy of the Arctic Circle, was a trading crossroads of some importance around one millennium ago. The medieval necropolis include 11 bodies with shattered or missing skulls, and smashed skeletons. Five mummies were found to be shrouded...
  • Is There New Evidence That Jesus Had a Wife?

    04/14/2014 9:05:44 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 213 replies
    Townhall ^ | 04/14/2014 | Michael Brown
    The internet has been abuzz with intriguing headlines announcing that scholars have determined that the so-called “Gospel of Jesus’ Wife” papyrus is “authentic” and that there is “no forgery evidence” in the manuscript. What exactly does this mean? And should Christians be concerned that a new discovery might contradict the biblical account and undermine their faith? Actually, the report from scholars working with the Harvard Divinity School found that the manuscript is much younger than previously thought – in other words, it is even further removed from the time of the New Testament than scholars originally believed – meaning that,...
  • The "Gospel of Jesus' Wife" Is Most Likely Not a Modern Fake

    04/11/2014 6:35:46 AM PDT · by Renfield · 87 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 4-10-2014 | Colin Schultz
    In 2012, Harvard researcher Karen King revealed the "Gospel of Jesus' Wife." A small piece of papyrus, the lightly worn document was written in Coptic Egyptian, with parts missing and ink faded, and didn't say much. But what it did say, wrote Ariel Sabar in Smithsonian Magazine two years ago was enough to “send jolts through the world of biblical scholarship—and beyond.” The fragment’s 33 words, scattered across 14 incomplete lines, leave a good deal to interpretation. But in King’s analysis, and as she argues in a forthcoming article in the Harvard Theological Review, the “wife” Jesus refers to is probably Mary Magdalene, and Jesus...
  • Canaanite Fortress Discovered in the City of David

    04/07/2014 7:21:44 AM PDT · by NYer · 19 replies
    Bible Archaeology ^ | April 7, 2014
    A massive 3,800-year-old fortress that protected the Gihon Spring was uncovered in the City of David. Photo: Eli Mandelbaum, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.Excavations around the Gihon Spring in the City of David have uncovered a massive 3,800-year-old fortress. Called the “Spring Citadel” by archaeologists, the discovery is part of a 15-year excavation led by Professor Ronny Reich of the University of Haifa and Eli Shukrun of the Israel Antiquities Authority. This enormous 18th-century B.C.E. structure that isolates and protects the Gihon Spring is believed to be the fortress described in the Book of Samuel that King David...
  • Historians claim to have recovered Holy Grail

    03/31/2014 11:02:26 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 34 replies
    The New York Post ^ | March 31, 2014 | Bob Fredericks
    Spanish historians say they have discovered what Monty Python could not – the Holy Grail, the legendary cup Jesus supposedly drank from at the Last Supper. The Spaniards – Margarita Torres and José Ortega del Río – believe the 2,000-year-old vessel is in a church in León in northern Spain. The pair spent three years studying the history of the chalice and last week published a book, “The Kings of the Grail,” making their case. The onyx chalice, they explained, was concealed within another antique vessel known as the Chalice of Dońa Urruca, which is located in León’s basilica of...
  • Antiquities Robbers Caught Selling Rare Ancient Burial Chests

    03/31/2014 1:09:05 PM PDT · by BlueDragon · 9 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 3/31/2014 | Ari Yashar
    Some of the 11 Jewish ossuaries from Second Temple period still held bones, featured Hebrew script listing names of those interred. The Antiquities Authority and police cooperated last Friday to arrest suspects who allegedly stole ornate stone ossuary burial chests, which were used by Jews in Israel during the Second Temple period roughly 2,000 years ago. The suspects were caught while in possession of eleven ossuaries, some of them still containing skeletal remains. The suspected grave robbers, who were arrested and brought in for questioning, came from the Arab village of Abadiyah in Judea, located near Bethlehem, as well as...
  • 800-year-old monk found poking out of cliff face

    03/11/2014 1:11:46 PM PDT · by Sawdring · 64 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 10 Mar 2014 | Sarah Knapton
    The legs of an 800-year-old medieval monk have been discovered, poking out of a cliff face in Wales. Although badly damaged and missing their knees, shins and feet, the thigh bones were found after the fierce recent storms caused severe coastal erosion.