Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $32,293
36%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 36% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: 3dprinting

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • The World’s Biggest Free Form 3D Printer Is Being Used to Build Houses

    07/30/2015 6:40:28 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 10 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | July 30, 2015 | Adam Clark Estes
    The dream of 3D printing buildings is not a new one and, typically, it’s not a pretty one either. However, the visionaries at Branch Technology, a startup founded by architects in Chattanooga, Tennessee, want to change that—and they’ve built the world’s largest free form 3D printer to do it. The Chattanooga Chamber of Commerce flew me down to Tennessee to check out its gigabit internet and innovative startups. They paid for my hotel and fed me candied bacon.Branch’s mission is simple: Use 3D printing technology to create walls of any shape out of conventional construction materials. Building houses like this...
  • Micron3DP Unveils Breakthrough Glass 3D Printing Technique

    07/29/2015 4:50:45 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 1 replies
    3D Print ^ | June 22, 2015 | Brian Krassenstein
    Over the last couple of years we have seen 3D printing progress at an incredibly rapid rate. One of the areas which excites us the most is the 3D printing materialÂ’s space where new materials are being utilized as a print medium nearly every week. What started out as ABS and PLA, a few different types of metal powders, and ordinary photosensitive resin, has quickly grown to include hundreds of new, interesting, innovative materials. From wood and metal composites, gl8to clay, food, and everything in between, new materials are what will drive 3D printing towards mainstream adoption. When printing with...
  • Experts address promises and problems of 3D printing large structures

    07/26/2015 4:31:46 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    Vanderbilt University Research ^ | July 24, 2015 | David Salisbury
    Experts gather at Vanderbilt to discuss the future of 3D printing with concrete.Every month or so an article comes out reporting that some new object has been made using 3D printing: Everything from jewelry to prosthetic devices to electronic circuit boards to assault rifles to automobiles has now been created in this fashion. The prospect that this revolutionary manufacturing method will have a major impact on how we construct the various concrete structures that dominate the modern built environment brought almost three dozen experts to the Vanderbilt University campus July 16-17 to identify the areas of research required to realize...
  • Chinese company ‘builds’ 3D-printed villa in less than 3 hours

    07/24/2015 5:05:06 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 42 replies
    Inhabit ^ | July 22, 2015 | Lucy Wang
    (SLIDE-SHOW-AT-LINK)A pioneering 3D-printed house just popped up in Xian, China - and Chinese company ZhuoDa “built” the two-story villa in less than three hours. Made up of six 3D-printed modules, the house was assembled like LEGO bricks before a live audience who were then invited to explore the interior. The modular fireproof home can withstand a magnitude-9 earthquake and is made from a special construction material the company is keeping secret. The company completed approximately 90 percent of the construction in an off-site factory before shipping the modular pieces to the installation site. The company completed approximately 90 percent of...
  • Mille 3D Printer Unveiled – Turns Shipping Containers into Large 3D Printers, Shredders & Extruders

    07/13/2015 9:01:31 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    3DPrint ^ | July 8, 2015 | Eddie Krassenstein
    A few months ago, I had an opportunity to take the one hour drive from my home in Cape Coral, Florida, down I-75 to Naples, where I met a man named Andy Tran. Tran, who is the founder of Southwest FL 3D, peaked my interest with some of his 3D printing related posts on social media sites such as Instagram. Upon meeting Tran, I got a feel for his extraordinary passion when it comes to 3D printing, and left Naples knowing that it wouldn’t be the last I heard from him. Tran’s innovative mind has led him to come up...
  • 5 Incredible Trends That Will Shape Our 3D Printed Future

    07/08/2015 12:04:55 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 2 replies
    Forbes ^ | July 7, 2015 | Rick Smith
    Self-repairing pipes. Printed organs. Bulletproof t-shirts. Seriously?In April I was asked to speak at the annual TED conference in Vancouver (following Bill Gates…gulp) on the topic of 3D printing production and its implications. I have detailed my thoughts on why the shift to 3D printing production is not only likely but inevitable in articles one, two and three in this series for Forbes. Now, let’s take a step into a fascinating future, where daily life will be shaped by several powerful forces directly related to 3D printing production. What it will be like to live in a 3D-printed world? Imagine...
  • Organovo CEO: 3D bioprinting organs will help us get people off transplant waiting lists

    07/03/2015 8:53:38 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    US-based 3D bioprinting firm Organovo has set itself a challenge that could transform the future of medicine, and although the technology is still in its infancy and the challenges complex, the company's founder and CEO Keith Murphy says his firm is in it for the long haul. "Biotechnology is a very compelling space as you have the ability to impact people's lives," Murphy tells IBTimes UK. "I want to see patients benefiting. We want to help drugs get to patients faster, to get liver tissues [to prolong liver function] and to help people with chronic liver problems." While 3D printing...
  • 3D Printing And The New Economics Of Manufacturing

    06/28/2015 4:26:34 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 29 replies
    Forbes Leadership ^ | June 22, 2015 | Rick Smith
    3D printing production is just scratching the surface of the multi-trillion dollar global manufacturing industry. But its dominance is already inevitable.ď„żď„ż This is because modern manufacturing, despite numerous technological and process advances over the last century, is still a very inefficient global system. TodayÂ’s world of mass production is based on one simple rule: the more things you make, the lower the cost of each of those things. We have literally pushed this equation to its extreme limits. This approach was dramatically accelerated by Henry Ford, arguably the most impactful character in the industrial revolution. For starters, Ford proved out...
  • World’s 1st 3D-Printed Supercar Unveiled– 0-60 in 2.2 Seconds, 700 HP, Built from Unique Node System

    06/28/2015 4:11:37 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    3D Print ^ | June 24, 2015 | Eddie Krassenstein
    The automobile industry has been relatively stagnant for the past several decades. While new car designs are released annually, and computer technology has advanced by leaps and bounds, the manufacturing processes and the effects that these processes have on our environment have remain relatively unchanged. Over the past decade or so, 3D printing has shown some promise in the manufacturing of automobiles, yet it has not quite lived up to its potential, at least according to Kevin Czinger, founder and CEO of a company called Divergent Microfactories (DM). Today, at the OÂ’Reilly Solid Conference in San Francisco, Kevin Czinger...
  • Finnish startup Fimatec unveils concept for ready-built 3D printed walls for modular apartments

    06/26/2015 11:32:58 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet
    3Ders.org ^ | June 24, 2015 | "Simon"
    While there are currently many developments being made across the entire additive manufacturing industry, among others that have been standing out as of late have consisted of 3D printing applications that are of either very large scale or very small scale applications. So far, the smaller applications have mainly consisted of research into nanoscale 3D printing for purposes such as biomedical engineering applications including cell scaffolding while the larger applications have been focused on creating architectural structures such as those that can be created in any geographical area using found materials. Needless to say, the developments surrounding these scaled applications...
  • Opinion: 3D printing could fundamentally change our relationship with food

    06/19/2015 5:38:26 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 22 replies
    The Montreal Gazette ^ | June 18, 2015 | Sylvain Charlebois, Special to Montreal Gazette
    A few weeks ago, Londoners were able to eat at the world’s first 3D printed, pop-up restaurant. In early June, a German-based company introduced the word’s first plug-and-play food printer, which may be ready for shipping as early as 2016. With the lowering cost to produce this technology, making it increasingly accessible, 3D printing could fundamentally change our relationship with food. Simply put, the process uses ingredients to generate three-dimensional meals by placing layers of compounded food on top of each other. Since 2012, the food industry has used this technology to produce ubiquitous products like candy, chocolate, pizza, noodles...
  • Robot to 3D-print steel canal bridge in Amsterdam

    06/17/2015 9:36:21 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    www.spacedaily.com ^ | June 16, 2015 | by Staff Writers
    The Hague (AFP) June 16, 2015 A Dutch startup has unveiled plans to build the world's first 3D-printed bridge across an Amsterdam canal, a technique that could become standard on future construction sites. Using robotic printers "that can 'draw' steel structures in 3D, we will print a (pedestrian) bridge over water in the centre of Amsterdam," engineering startup company MX3D said in a statement, hoping to kick off the project by September. The plan involves robotic arm printers 'walking' across the canal as it slides along the bridge's edges, essentially printing its own support structure out of thin air as...
  • A Different Kind of Plastic Shredder for 3D Filament Making

    06/14/2015 1:59:55 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    Hackaday ^ | June 14, 2015 | James Hobson
    Haven’t you heard? You can make your own 3D filament nowadays from plastic granules (10X cheaper than filament), or even by recycling old plastic! Except if you’re recycling plastic you will have to shred it first… [David Watkins] came up with a different way of shredding plastic. Typically we’ve seen shrunken versions of giant metal shredders used to dice up plastic into granules that can be melted down and then extruded back into filament. These work with a series of sharp toothed gears that kind of look like a stack of circular saw blades put together inside of a housing....
  • 3-D printing with metals achieved (kinda)

    06/10/2015 1:19:23 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 19 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 06-10-2015 | Provided by University of Twente
    A team of researchers from the University of Twente has found a way to 3D print structures of copper and gold, by stacking microscopically small metal droplets. These droplets are made by melting a thin metal film using a pulsed laser. Their work is published on Advanced Materials. 3D printing is a rapidly advancing field, that is sometimes referred to as the 'new cornerstone of the manufacturing industry'. However, at present, 3D printing is mostly limited to plastics. If metals could be used for 3D printing as well, this would open a wide new range of possibilities. Metals conduct electricity...
  • A $77 3D Printer is Unveiled! Say Hello to the Lewihe Play

    05/22/2015 8:37:01 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    3DPrint ^ | May 21, 2015 | Eddie Krassenstein
    With all technology, prices tend to come down as time goes on. This was seen within the personal computer market and the 2-dimensional printer market, and now we are starting to really see this happen within the 3D printing space as well. Whether you are a consumer and you love the fact that prices continue to drop, or if you are a manufacturer and you hate it, we can probably expect this trend to continue at least a little bit longer. Just 2 years ago, if you wanted a desktop 3D printer, you were looking at spending four figures. There...
  • GE ENGINEERS JUST MADE A FULLY-FUNCTIONAL 3D PRINTED JET ENGINE

    05/14/2015 3:35:57 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | 05/14/2015 | Mike Murphy
    If you needed any more proof that you can make absolutely anything with a 3D printer, check out this video from GE. To showcase the versatility of 3D printing as a manufacturing process, a team of engineers at GE recently built a fully-functional, backpack-sized jet engine made entirely from 3D-printed parts. And it’s not just for show either — the team actually fired the engine up and took it up to 33,000 RPMs to demonstrate how robust the parts are. Now, obviously, since this is a jet turbine we’re talking about here, it wasn’t printed in ABS with the latest...
  • The Time to Think About the 3D-Printed Future Is Now

    05/09/2015 3:16:44 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    The Harvard Business Review ^ | May 6, 2015 | Professor Richard D’Aveni
    3-D printing, or additive manufacturing, is likely to revolutionize business in the next several years. Often dismissed in the popular mindset as a tool for home-based “makers” of toys and trinkets, the technology is gaining momentum in large-scale industry. Already it has moved well beyond prototyping and, as I explain in a new HBR article, it will increasingly be used to produce high-volume parts and products in several industries. Since I prepared that article, new developments have only strengthened the case for a 3-D future – and heightened the urgency for management teams to adjust their strategies. Impressive next-generation technologies...
  • 3D printers are churning out made-to-order bones and rudimentary organs

    05/04/2015 4:15:07 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    Next Big Future ^ | April 20, 2015 | Brian Wang
    The advent of three-dimensional (3D) printing has generated a swell of interest in artificial organs meant to replace, or even enhance, human machinery. Printed organs, such as a proto­type outer ear developed by researchers at Princeton University in New Jersey and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, was on the agenda at the Inside 3D Printing conference in New York on 15–17 April. The ear is printed from a range of materials: a hydrogel to form an ear-shaped scaffold, cells that will grow to form cartilage, and silver nanoparticles to form an antenna. Printed body parts brought in US$537 million...
  • New 3D Printable Hydrogel Composites Created — Possible Breakthrough in Human Body Part Replacement

    05/01/2015 11:22:09 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    3DPrint ^ | April 29, 2015 | Brian Krassenstein
    There is tremendous progress being made within the area of 3D bioprinting. In fact, there are companies working to print human organs as we speak, and within the next decade such organs may, if we are lucky, be available for human transplantation. With that said we still are a ways away from such an accomplishment. There are multiple obstacles researchers must first overcome. When considering the organ printing space in general, the printing of complicated vascular networks is the main obstacle currently preventing progress. On the other hand, when printing cellular musculoskeletal tissues the main obstacle in this space is...
  • Graphene 3D Lab Announces Water-Soluble 3D Printer Filament

    05/01/2015 3:06:18 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    TenLinks ^ | April 29, 2015
    NEW YORK, NY, Apr 29, 2015 – Graphene 3D Lab Inc. will announce details of a newly-developed water-soluble 3D filament at the Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters’ (CME) Canada Makes: Additive Manufacturing Forum at Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario on April 30, 2015. The water-soluble filament is the latest in a line of specialty-functional filaments that Graphene 3D is introducing to the 3D printing industry. Elena Polyakova, chief operating officer of Graphene 3D, will present details on the new water-soluble filament and discuss the effect of graphene-enhanced materials for the 3D printing industry. Water-soluble filaments are primarily used to occupy negative...
  • How will 3D printing alter the building industry?

    04/08/2015 1:29:39 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    Construction DIVE ^ | April 6, 2015 | Sharon O'Malley
    A Chinese engineering firm that claims it built 10 houses in less than 24 hours last year using a 3D printer has unveiled the world’s tallest “printed” building. The five-story apartment building is on display next to a 1,100-square-foot mansion—also created on a 3D printer—in Suzhou Industrial Park in Jiangsu province. The mansion’s furniture and decorations also were made on a 6.6- by-10-meter tall printer, which uses an "ink" composed of glass fibers, steel, cement, hardening agents, and recycled construction waste to build one layer at a time for builders to assemble. The apartment building took a day to print...
  • This next-gen 3D printer spits out fully assembled products

    04/07/2015 8:02:46 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    inhabit ^ | April 7, 2015 | Charley Cameron
    The not-especially-modestly titled Industrial Revolution III (IR3) is a next-gen 3D printer that will not only print out your designs, but will assemble them with your non-printable components to create fully functional, sophisticated products in one streamlined process. Creator Buzz Technology claims that this will encourage the reuse of neglected household items and electronics into new, useful items while advancing the development of 3D printing in professional and at-home maker scenes. According to the IR3′s creators, UK-based Buzz Technology, the 3D printer features a pick and place head that “enables it to produce fully assembled, working products incorporating electronics, motors,...
  • New York Congressman Steve Israel to Propose New Bill to Ban 3D Printed Firearms

    04/06/2015 8:11:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 45 replies
    3D Print ^ | April 6, 2015 | T.E. Edwards
    New York Congressman Steve Israel and a photo of an AR-15 which includes 3D printed parts.Gun rights groups from Defense Distributed to the NRA to Come and Take It Texas will not be pleased with the latest piece of proposed legislation from Congressman Steve Israel. Israel, a representative from New York state, first called for legislation to ban 3D printed guns. Israel’s bill has gotten little traction at this point, but he says he’s not about to give up the fight.In fact, Israel says he’ll be reintroducing legislation aimed at banning 3D printed, or for that matter, all fully-plastic firearms....
  • 3D printing will have a bigger economic impact than the internet, technology specialist says

    04/01/2015 3:11:38 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 49 replies
    The Australian Broadcating Company's The World Today ^ | April 1, 2015 | Sarah Sedghi and Eleanor Hall
    Manufacturing industries need to embrace 3D printing, which will have an even bigger impact on economies and society than the internet, an Australian technology specialist says. Steve Sammartino is a digital entrepreneur and venture capitalist who advises business on how to adjust to disruptive technologies and the digital revolution. While most of us have heard about 3D printing and its potential to improve medical treatments and manufacturing processes, Mr Sammartino says 3D printing will be far more than a niche tool. He says it will transform everything about the way we live within a matter of years. Speaking to The...
  • ‘A Very, Very Good Day': Lakewood Girl Gets New Hand From 3-D Printer

    03/31/2015 4:36:36 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    ktla.com ^ | Melissa Pamer and Nerissa Knight,
    Faith’s left forearm and hand were amputated when she was 9 months old, according to Build It Workspace, where her new limb was printed in 24 hours. It took less than a month to design and plan for the hand, and the final pieces were printed Tuesday morning. The family was put in touch with Build It Workspace President Mark Lengsfeld through the Lucky Fin Project, a nonprofit devoted to children with different abilities related to their limbs. Lengsfeld authorized full use of the facility to make Faith’s hand. “It’s just an amazing opportunity to be here just to help...
  • Designer Creates a DIY SLA 3D Printer for Under $30 (Minus the Projector)

    03/27/2015 9:59:12 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 25, 2015 | Bridget Butler Millsaps
    Most of us are aware of the KISS principle: Keep it simple, stupid! And while simplicity is certainly a theme in many 3D printers, they are anything but stupid—and created by those who are the polar opposite—with ingenuity in abundance—which they use to share new innovations with the world. One quite simply has to give up with wondering what the collective ‘they’ will come up with next and just roll with the idea that the possibilities in 3D printing are infinite. And as progress in the industry and the community of makers marches on daily and hourly, it’s hard not...
  • Some Guys Just Made a Heavier-Caliber 3D-Printed Gun

    03/27/2015 12:34:36 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    War Is Boring ^ | March 26, 2015 | Kyle Mizokami
    In March, a Website dedicated to 3D-printing firearms announced one of its members had developed a lower receiver for a Colt CM901 rifle. It’s a small — but evolutionary — step toward the development of firearms that pretty much anyone can download off the Internet. The CM901 is the bigger, badder brother of the ubiquitous AR-15. The CM901 has a similar design, but fires the heavier and more powerful 7.62-millimeter bullet, resulting in greater range and killing power. A group of gunsmiths associated with PrintedFirearm.com developed the CM901 lower receiver and uploaded an animated gif of a live-fire test. The clip is five seconds...
  • Italian Researchers Expect 3D Printed Eyes by 2027, Providing Enhanced Vision & WiFi Connection

    03/21/2015 8:34:15 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 20, 2015 | Bridget Butler Millsaps
    There’s one thing you may have begun to notice about digital design and 3D printing: whatever you think might happen in the future is probably going to advance far beyond whatever you envisioned or thought might be a cool idea. And literally, one day you may be envisioning your entire world, and recording it as well, through completely artificially constructed, 3D printed eyeballs. You may be able to say goodbye to prescription glasses and contact lenses — and even your camera, as your original retina is replaced by a new and digital network contained inside your head, and even able...
  • How Will 3D Printing Affect Trucking?

    03/19/2015 12:35:02 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    HDT's TruckingInfo ^ | March 18, 2015 | Deborah Lockridge, Editor in Chief
    Business is booming, fuel prices are down. So it’s time to start thinking about the next threat to the industry: 3D printing. Advocates of 3D printing have said it can transform manufacturing. This week, a new startup company announced a new 3D printing technique it says may actually deliver on that promise. In traditional 3D printing, the machine "prints" layers of material to create a 3D object. This takes time and leaves ripples showing where those layers were laid down. But what if you could "grow" an object out of a pool of liquid, much like the T-1000 rising from...
  • Carbon3D Unveils Breakthrough CLIP 3D Printing Technology, 25-100X Faster

    03/17/2015 11:21:18 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 3 replies
    3D Print.com ^ | March 16, 2015 | Brian Krassenstein
    In what may be one of the biggest stories we have covered this year, a new company, Carbon3D has just emerged out of stealth mode, unveiling an entirely new breakthrough 3D printing process, which is anywhere between 25 and 100 times faster than what’s available on the market today.The privately-held Redwood City, California-based company, Carbon3D, was founded in 2013, and since then has been secretly perfecting a new 3D printing technology which promises to change the industry forever. The technology that the company calls Continuous Liquid Interface Production technology (CLIP) works by harnessing the power of light and oxygen to...
  • Answers to Some of the Biggest 3D Printing Skeptics

    03/16/2015 8:48:22 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 16, 2015 | Brian Krassenstein
    If you’ve been reading our site for longer than a couple of weeks, then you likely have figured out that we are obsessed with 3D printing. Why are we so obsessed with this technology? Because we truly believe that 3D printing will change the world we all live in, mostly for the better, and the quicker this happens the better off we all will be. Although I, personally, became aware of 3D printing about half a decade ago, I didn’t really understand it or venture to explore the various applications of the technology until only about two years ago. Soon...
  • Alphaseed Project Looks to 3D Print Entire Ocean Cities in International Waters (Sovereign States)

    03/15/2015 1:55:50 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 11, 2015 | Eddie Krassenstein
    In the short amount time that we have been covering this industry, we have reported on many amazing 3D printing related projects being undertaken by various individuals and companies around the globe. There have been 3D printed cars, 3D printed apartment buildings, and even an entire 3D printed estate that is expected to be erected in New York sometime this year. However, when we were contacted by a man named Tops Nicol, the research founder of the Alphaseed project, we were truly blown away.  “Science is fascinating and its latest growth in all branches of scientific research has helped...
  • Making 3 D Weapons at Home, a Serious Security Risk! (To the fainting couch, Robin!)

    03/14/2015 10:11:14 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    The New Delhi Times ^ | March 14, 2015
    The wonders of 3D printing, and the technology’s potential to revolutionize the world of manufacturing, have thrilled entrepreneurs, tinkerers, government officials and the business community. However, the 3D technology has a potential dark side too in the form of 3D printing of weapons, not only is there a threat of fanatic element making use of the technology to procure 3D weapons, but on a more concerning note, there are strong chances that such weapons may easily escape the various security detection tests and could be used to devastating effect in public places. In 2013, a United States Department of Homeland...
  • Breakthrough Molecular 3D Printer Can Print Billions of Possible Compounds

    03/14/2015 9:58:12 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 13, 2015 | Brian Krassenstein
    What will 3D printers ultimately evolve into? No one has a functioning crystal ball in front of them I assume, but a good guess would be a machine which can practically build anything its user desire, all on the molecular, and eventually atomic levels. Sure we are likely multiple decades away from widespread molecular manufacturing, but a group of chemists led by medical doctor Martin D. Burke at the University of Illinois may have already taken a major step in that direction. Burke, who joined the Department of Chemistry at the university in 2005, heads up Burke Laboratories where he...
  • This Chemistry 3D Printer Can Synthesize Molecules From Scratch

    03/13/2015 5:55:35 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | March 12, 2015 | William Herkewitz
    Need an obscure medicinal compound found only in a jungle plant? Just print it.Say you're a medical researcher interested in a rare chemical produced in the roots of a little-known Peruvian flower. It's called ratanhine, and it's valuable because it has some fascinating anti-fungal properties that might make for great medicines. Getting your hands on the rare plant is hard, and no chemical supplier is or has ever sold it. But maybe, thanks to the work of University of Illinois chemist Martin Burke, you could print it right in the lab. In a new study published in the journal Science...
  • Mechanical Engineer 3D Prints a Working 5-Speed Transmission for a Toyota 22RE Engine

    03/12/2015 10:48:35 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    3dprint.com ^ | 03-12-2015 | by Whitney Hipolite
    Who says that you can’t make anything useful on a desktop 3D printer? Sure, there are plenty of designs that you can find on 3D printing repository websites which make you question the motive of the designers — but at the same time, there are engineers and designers creating things that make you just stop and say, “WOW!” One of these latter instances comes in the form of a 3D printed 5-speed transmission for a Toyota 22RE engine, created by a mechanical engineer named Eric Harrell of Santa Cruz, California. Not only does it look legitimate, but it also is...
  • Video: 3D-printed Lower Receiver for a Škorpion vz. 61

    03/11/2015 5:17:27 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    OutdoorHub ^ | March 11, 2015 | Daniel Xu
    The Škorpion vz. 61 is a very recognizable submachine gun that garnered a following due to its representation in video games and movies. First designed in 1959, this Czechoslovak firearm is also available in semiautomatic versions. However, the semiautomatic variants can be a bit hard to find, and unless you are capable of milling your own lower receiver for one, many fans will have a difficult time getting their hands on a working Škorpion. That is, unless you know how to work a 3D printer. The enthusiasts in this video used a demilled receiver to design their blueprint for this...
  • Inside the Weird World of 3D Printed Body Parts

    03/09/2015 7:11:54 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    Back Channel ^ | March 4, 2015 | Andrew Leonard
    Laura Bosworth wants to 3D print breast nipples on demand. The CEO of the Texas startup TeVido Biodevices is betting on a future in which survivors of breast cancer who have undergone mastectomies will be able to order up new breasts printed from their own living cells. “Everyone,” she says, “knows a woman who has had breast cancer.” Right now their options are limited. Reconstructed nipples using state-of-the-art plastic surgery techniques, she says, “tend to flatten and fade and don’t last very long.” A living nipple built from the patient’s own fat cells, and reconstructed to the precise specification of...
  • Students design plastic recycler to make 3D-printing super cheap

    03/07/2015 12:44:10 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    VR-Zone ^ | March 7, 2015 | Kenny Doan
    A couple of forward-thinking engineering students from the University of British Columbia have put together a little machine that grinds up used plastics and turn them into usable filaments for 3D-printing. It’s called the ProtoCycler, and it’ll generate a kilogram spool of filament for free (negating the cost of electricity of course) if you have some soda pop bottles lying around. The concept behind the 3D-printer add-on was simple—combine a filament extruder and plastic grinder into one contraption. (COMPARISON-CHART-AT-LINK)The ProtoCycler can churn out 10 feet of filament a minute, which makes it the fastest extruder on the market according to...
  • The CIA Is Investing In 3D Printers That Can Build Electronics

    03/06/2015 1:10:10 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 4 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | March 5, 2015 | Matt Novak
    The 3D printing industry is still very much in its infancy. But that could change if the CIA has its way. The intelligence agency's venture capital firm just invested in Voxel8, the company behind the first multi-material, 3D electronics printer. What does the CIA want with 3D printing? We can only guess at this point, but we may hear stories one day of how some futuristic James Bond 3D-printed his own gadgets in the field. What's the potential impact for consumers? The move might just jumpstart a field that has so far been struggling to find its footing. Voxel8 says...
  • How 3D Printing Could End The Deadly Shortage Of Donor Organs

    03/04/2015 6:05:13 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    The Huffington Post ^ | March 2, 2015 | Macrina Cooper-White
    Three-dimensional printing has been used to make everything from pizza to prostheses, and now researchers are working on using the emerging technology to fabricate hearts, kidneys, and other vital human organs. That would be very big news, as the number of people who desperately need an organ transplant far outstrips the number of donor organs available. On average, about 21 Americans die every day because a needed organ was unavailable. What exactly is the promise of 3D printing organs and tissues, or "bioprinting?" How does the technology work, and when might it start saving lives? For answers to these and...
  • Engineer Creates a Unique 3D Metal Printer for Just $2 — Prints in Gold, Platinum, Iron & More

    02/28/2015 11:00:16 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    3D Print ^ | February 26, 2015 | Eddie Krassenstein
    It isnÂ’t often that you come across new 3D printers that utilize an entirely new concept which hasnÂ’t been seen within this industry as of yet. With todayÂ’s technology, we are able to 3D print objects in hundreds of different materials, but when it comes to printing with metals, most of these machines are out our price ranges. 3D metal printers are mainly reserved for large corporations, as they come with price tags in excess of $250,000. However, as technology advances, we may one day soon be able to 3D print metal objects from the comfort of our own homes,...
  • A Room-Sized 3D Printer Will Make Freeform Concrete Design Easy

    02/28/2015 12:24:24 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 10 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | February 26, 2015 | Jamie Condliffie
    Concrete is an amazing building material: cheap to create, strong when used correctly, and hard-wearing, too. But turning it into exotic and shapely forms can be prohibitively complex and expensive. Now, a 3D printer capable of producing one-off moulds as large as a phone booth could help turn architectural dreamw into affordable reality. The Engineer reports that a collaboration between 3Dealise, a 3D engineering company, and Bruil, a construction company, has spawned the new device. The pair claim that the machine—pictured below—can "create irregularly curved surfaces, lightweight half-open mesh or honeycomb structures, and even ornamental craftwork." The printer is used...
  • Australian researchers 3-D print two jet engines

    02/26/2015 1:47:29 PM PST · by E. Pluribus Unum · 8 replies
    Breitbart.com ^ | 02/26/2015 | UPI
    MELBOURNE, Feb. 26 (UPI) — Researchers have 3-D printed everything from animal prosthetics and human teeth to whole cars, but now a university in Australia has tackled printing two jet engines. A group of researchers at Melbourne’s Monash University, in conjunction with Deakin University and Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), used a large 3-D printer to manufacture the two engines.
  • How 3D printing has advanced from product prototyping to making human organs

    02/22/2015 8:20:39 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 10 replies
    The International Business Times ^ | January 12, 2015 | Jayalakshmi K
    A printer was once just a printer, dispensing paper sheets with printed material made from the ink stored within. But today, a printer has evolved to becoming a small-scale manufacturer that 'prints' out anything from human organs to affordable meals to guns. For instance, the XYZPrinting 3D Food Printer, exhibited at the recent CES 2015 in Las Vegas, is expected to print any style of uncooked cookies and other dough-based pastries in minutes. Not exactly as affordable as any other food processor, the printer ranges between $500 and $1,900 and prints food that measures around 5000 cubic cm by volume....
  • 3HTi Signs Deal with MarkForged to Sell the Mark One 3D Printer (Carbon fiber, Kevlar, fiberglass)

    02/22/2015 1:19:58 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    3D Printing ^ | February 19, 2015 | TE Edwards
    The Mark One 3D printer from MarkForged caused a bit of a sensation last January when it was announced that it could extrude continuous fiber using the FFF process.The Mark One 3D printer, featuring a build volume of 320 x 132 x 160 mm, can print using carbon fiber, Kevlar, fiberglass, and nylon, and in doing so creates very strong parts. Now 3 HTi has announced they’ll be offering, through a partnership with the Cambridge, MA-based MarkForged, the Mark One 3D printer as one of the first companies authorized to sell the revolutionary technology. 3 HTi is a technology solutions...
  • Elon Musk says he lost a multi-billion-dollar contract when SpaceX didn’t hire a public official

    05/24/2014 7:40:53 AM PDT · by Corporate Democrat · 18 replies
    Quartz ^ | May 23, 2014 | Tim Fernholz
    Elon Musk isn’t afraid to shake things up, and he did so again with accusations that US defense contracts awarded to a competitor were the product of corruption. SpaceX, Musk’s orbital transport firm, has been competing for a major contract to put US Air Force satellites in orbit. With a dearth of private investment in space and the end of the US space shuttle program, SpaceX has quickly leapt to the fore of aerospace firms with the help of contracts from NASA to provide re-supply missions to the International Space Station and develop a manned spacecraft to fly astronauts there....
  • Former SpaceX Exec Explains How Elon Musk Taught Himself Rocket Science

    10/23/2014 2:14:54 PM PDT · by Jack Hydrazine · 11 replies
    Yahoo Finance ^ | 23OCt2014 | Richard Feloni
    Mario Anzuoni/Reuters Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla. While it's certainly impressive that Elon Musk has bachelor's degrees in physics and economics from the University of Pennsylvania, it's an absurd understatement to say that prepared him to run SpaceX, his spacecraft company. Jim Cantrell, who was an aerospace consultant at the time, became SpaceX's first VP of business development and Musk's industry mentor when the company launched in 2002. He says that Musk literally taught himself rocket science by reading textbooks and talking to industry heavyweights.
  • ICL Researchers Figure out How to 3D Print Pure Graphene

    02/18/2015 6:04:28 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 23 replies
    3D Printing ^ | February 13, 2015 | Brian Krassenstein
    We’ve seen an incredible amount of research hours and dollars being poured into an area where the ‘miracle material’ graphene converges with what some may call a ‘miracle technology’ in 3D printing. In this space, a whole slew of groundbreaking applications and processes may emerge as a better understanding of graphene, and how to 3D print it come about. We’ve discussed a company called Graphene 3D Lab in the past. They have been producing a graphene nanocomposite filament for typical FDM/FFF 3d printers. The problem with this filament, however, is the fact that most of the desirable properties of graphene,...
  • Houses hot off the 3D printer

    02/14/2015 4:46:48 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    Yahoo! Homes ^ | February 11, 2015 | Ilyce R. Glink
    Robotic building by Contour Crafting won the grand prize in a NASA magazine's Create the Future contest.In the not-too-distant future, building a new home may be as simple as printing it out. The process of wielding 3D printers to make homes is in its infancy today, but someday soon you may look out your window at a large-scale printer, swiftly spitting out a whole home under the instruction of just one operator. "Generally, they'll be much cheaper, much faster, much safer and with much nicer architectural features [than traditional homes]," says Dr. Behrokh Khoshnevis, creator of and lead researcher for...