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‘Tis the Season to Spot Jupiter: A Guide to the 2014 Opposition
universetoday.com ^ | December 23, 2013 | David Dickinson on

Posted on 12/23/2013 9:47:23 AM PST by BenLurkin

Orbiting the Sun once every 11.9 years, oppositions of Jupiter occur about once every 13 months or about 400 days, as the speedy Earth overtakes the gas giant on the inside track. This means that successive oppositions of the planet move roughly one astronomical constellation eastward. In fact, this year’s opposition is it’s northernmost in 12 years, occurring in the constellation Gemini. “Opposition” means that an outer planet is rising “opposite” to the setting Sun. As this opposition of Jupiter occurs just weeks after the southward solstice, Jupiter now lies in the direction that the Sun will occupy six months from now during the June Solstice.

This all means that Jupiter will ride high in the sky for northern hemisphere observers towards local midnight, a boon for astrophotographers looking to catch the planet high in the sky and out of the low horizon murk.

(Excerpt) Read more at universetoday.com ...


TOPICS: Astronomy; Science
KEYWORDS: astronomy; gemini; jupiter; science

1 posted on 12/23/2013 9:47:23 AM PST by BenLurkin
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To: BenLurkin

Thanks. I’ll cast my eyes on the western sky at twilight.


2 posted on 12/23/2013 9:52:26 AM PST by crusty old prospector
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To: BenLurkin

Have you tried the NASA eyes on the solar system program? Its got some neat stuff. It shows the current locations of all the spacecraft, distances, speed etc. Its also got Eyes on the exoplanets which is pretty cool.

Its been out for quite a while but my old computer wouldn’t even open it. The new one runs it flawlessly.


3 posted on 12/23/2013 9:53:44 AM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: BenLurkin

Venus is also very bright now after sunset, and will be so for at least another month. In fact, it is so bright that it can be mistaken for the headlight of an oncoming airplane or helicopter.


4 posted on 12/23/2013 9:54:17 AM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: crusty old prospector
Thanks. I’ll cast my eyes on the western sky at twilight.

Think you mean EASTERN sky if evening twilight, WESTERN if morning twilight.

If you look in the southwestern sky at evening twilight you'll be seeing Venus.
5 posted on 12/23/2013 10:02:12 AM PST by plsvn
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To: BenLurkin
Sillies. Here is a webcam of Jupiter - I am on the jetty fishing. Dang its 83 F.

http://www.evsjupiter.com

ok i cant figure out how to embed a link. Back to html page.

6 posted on 12/23/2013 10:04:37 AM PST by corkoman
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To: cripplecreek
Its got some neat stuff. It shows the current locations of all the spacecraft.
REAL TIME SATELLITE TRACKING AND PREDICTIONS
Set your location, then click on an object to view, like the ISS.
Then click "5 day predictions" and you'll see the best time to observe the object for your location.
7 posted on 12/23/2013 10:06:34 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: BenLurkin

Got a Celestron 130 to observe Ison but that fell apart. Guess I can look at Jupiter, but its going below zero tonight.


8 posted on 12/23/2013 10:07:10 AM PST by Starstruck (If my reply offends, you probably don't understand sarcasm or criticism...or do.)
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To: corkoman

http://www.evsjupiter.com

The trick to get the link to show is to not put any HTML in the post with it.


9 posted on 12/23/2013 10:08:15 AM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: corkoman
I am on the jetty fishing. Dang its 83 F.

Where are you? In Hawaii with the Obamas? :)

10 posted on 12/23/2013 10:08:21 AM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: plsvn

I guess it is the east. The picture said at sunset but there is a red E on it. It doesn’t really look like a sunset facing east but it says it is computer-generated.


11 posted on 12/23/2013 10:10:27 AM PST by crusty old prospector
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To: oh8eleven

Can you see the ISS with a telescope?


12 posted on 12/23/2013 10:14:12 AM PST by Mr. K (If you like your constitution, you can keep it. Period.)
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To: Mr. K

The ISS moves too fast to follow it with a telescope. You can see it with your naked eye. It looks like a bright star moving across the sky in only a few seconds.

And Jupiter is rising in the east at sunset while Venus is setting in the west. Jupiter is next to the two bright “twin” stars in Gemini.


13 posted on 12/23/2013 10:22:48 AM PST by zeebee (There are no coincidences.)
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To: BenLurkin

Jupiter's primary Opposition

(Juno, a/k/a Hera & Mrs. J.)

14 posted on 12/23/2013 10:24:20 AM PST by mikrofon (Astro_o_y BUMP)
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To: zeebee; Mr. K
The ISS moves too fast to follow it with a telescope. You can see it with your naked eye. It looks like a bright star moving across the sky in only a few seconds.

How long the ISS is visible in the night sky, and also how bright it will appear on any given visible pass, depends on how high it is in the sky (ie, angle above the horizon) and how soon after sunset the pass is. When a pass is very high in the sky, say, 60-85 degrees above the horizon, it can be visible for 4 or 5 minutes. And if a particular pass is sufficiently long after sunset, the ISS will fade and ultimately "disappear" mid-pass. This is because the Sun is below the western horizon enough such that the Earth 'gets in the way' and casts a shadow on objects at that general range above Earth. ISS is brightest during high angle passes. And it appears to be moving across the sky at the apparent rate of a high flying airplane. It's actually traveling about 18,000 miles/hr, or 5 miles/sec. 200 or so miles up.

15 posted on 12/23/2013 10:34:26 AM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: ETL; zeebee

if you have a motorized telescope can it be programmed to track it?

how about a good set of binoculars?

it would be cool to spot it if you can make out the shape


16 posted on 12/23/2013 10:38:02 AM PST by Mr. K (If you like your constitution, you can keep it. Period.)
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To: Mr. K

I don’t know if you can program a motorized scope to track a satellite or not, but many have taken amazing long exposure pics of them by tracking their movement by hand. I would imagine this is easiest with a free moving Dobsonian type scope rather than one with a gearing system.

I have a pair of 16x70 Fujinons (binocs) and I can’t make out any detail whatsoever. Very nice for viewing Jupiter and its 4 visible moons though. Also for viewing our moon. It’s tripod mounted.


17 posted on 12/23/2013 10:45:49 AM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: Mr. K
These 4 I believe were all taken by amateur, backyard astronomers

ISS - amateur1

1

hoax - 2

2

hoax - 3

3

ISS - 5

18 posted on 12/23/2013 10:51:04 AM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: Mr. K
Can you see the ISS with a telescope?
Not effectively, it moves across the sky pretty fast. When close to your location, it's very visible with just the naked eye.
Binoculars would help but really just make it a bigger bright spot in the sky.
19 posted on 12/23/2013 10:51:53 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: Mr. K
You would need a pretty powerful telescope to make out the shape. Photos have been taken through telescopes only because the astronomers know exactly where the craft will be and when. I don't believe it can be tracked without a lot of specially programmed computers.

To show the relative size, here is one taken of the Shuttle and the ISS while crossing the sun:


20 posted on 12/23/2013 11:03:10 AM PST by zeebee (There are no coincidences.)
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To: BenLurkin

Here is a page that shows the positions of the largest 4 moons of Jupiter at any time. It’s very cool to watch through a telescope since the moons travel so fast you can often see them orbiting if one passes another or occults or eclipses.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/objects/javascript/jupiter


21 posted on 12/23/2013 11:06:26 AM PST by zeebee (There are no coincidences.)
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To: mikrofon; SunkenCiv

Yes...she did make it her life’s task to give him grief!


22 posted on 12/23/2013 11:13:41 AM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: ETL

Wow!


23 posted on 12/23/2013 11:20:02 AM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: zeebee
Photos have been taken through telescopes only because the astronomers know exactly where the craft will be and when. I don't believe it can be tracked without a lot of specially programmed computers.

Amateurs track them by manually moving the scope. I don't know if it can be done with a scope other than one with a Dobsonian mount. Dob-mounted scopes move freely in any direction.

24 posted on 12/23/2013 11:33:35 AM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: All

A Beginner’s Guide to Photographing The International Space Station (ISS)

by VirtualAstro on February 20, 2012

Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter

Long Exposure Photograph of the ISS Credit: Mark Humpage


If you have seen the International Space Station (ISS) pass over a few times with your own eyes, (here’s our guide on seeing it) you may want to have a go at photographing it.

Photographing the ISS is very worthwhile and gratifying. There are two basic methods; one being easy and the other being a little more difficult. Both methods are incredibly rewarding and good results can be obtained fairly quickly, once you have mastered the basics.

Method 1:

Discovery and ISS pass over the UK on March 7, 2011, captured by Will Gater.

You will need a DSLR camera or another type of camera which is capable taking long exposures. Incredibly important is having a tripod or somewhere you can place your camera without it getting vibrations or movement.

Find out when and where the ISS will be passing over your location and choose a part of the sky the ISS is passing through at which you can point your camera.

Experiment with your camera settings, to get colours and exposures correct beforehand and do a couple of long exposure test shots of anything from 15 to 60 seconds. You can do shorter or longer exposures but this is up to you, depending your equipment and how artistic you want to be.

This method will produce a long white streak or line, which will show the path taken of the International Space Station as it passes over. This is the most common method for amateurs.

Method 2:

The ISS and shuttle Discovery during the STS-131 mission. Credit: Ted Judah

You will need a telescope, a webcam, and a strong mount or tripod. Set up your telescope and mount, along with webcam with a laptop and make sure of the time and where the ISS will be passing over your location.

In this method we will use the telescope to magnify and see the ISS up close while recording a movie (AVI). We will then stack the frames of the recorded movie in a specialist image enhancing program such as Registax.

Insert your WebCam into the telescope focusing tube using an adapter (available from astronomy stores) and connect the cables to your laptop. When the ISS is due, start recording and track the space station using a finder scope or computerized mount.

The difficult part of this method is tracking the ISS and keeping it in the field of view of the telescope while recording the video file. It is recommended that you set your mount in “Alt/ Az” mode or use a Dobsonian telescope so that you have free movement of telescopes optical tube assembly. You will basically be using the telescope as a giant video camera and you need to keep the ISS in shot for as long as possible.

This method is very difficult as the ISS has been magnified highly while moving very quickly and can be easily lost out of the field of view, or there can be too much movement (shaking) in the video. This method requires much practice.

Once you have been able to get a video of the ISS passing over, you can feed your video file into software such as RegiStax and the program will sort each individual frame, removing bad frames and stacking good frames to create a very clear image.

This method is fantastic for creating close up images with detail on the International Space Station; you can also see docked spacecraft. You can also use this method for trying to image other Earth-orbiting satellites, too.

The ISS and shuttle Discovery as captured -- and annotated -- by Thierry Legault

It would be great to see your ISS photographs, so please send them into us via our Flickr site. Good luck!

http://www.universetoday.com/93588/a-beginners-guide-to-photographing-the-international-space-station-iss/


25 posted on 12/23/2013 11:38:23 AM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: All
"This video shows you how to photograph the international space station using a non-computerized, non-tracking, telescope. I am using a 12-inch Dobsonian telescope, but a slightly smaller telescope would work just as well."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eF7LQl0f0c

26 posted on 12/23/2013 11:43:19 AM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: zeebee
Here is a page that shows the positions of the largest 4 moons of Jupiter at any time. It’s very cool to watch through a telescope since the moons travel so fast you can often see them orbiting if one passes another or occults or eclipses.

You never actually 'see' them moving. It can take many minutes to detect the slightest change in position.

27 posted on 12/23/2013 11:54:16 AM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: BenLurkin

I’d like to check it out some night but here in Michigan, the rain and snow clouds don’t go away until spring.....sometimes later.


28 posted on 12/23/2013 12:10:02 PM PST by Hot Tabasco (Miss Muffit suffered from arachnophobia.....)
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To: BenLurkin; SunkenCiv
True, but compared to Jove's splendor, she's not much to look at these days ....


29 posted on 12/23/2013 12:29:57 PM PST by mikrofon (Ceres-ly)
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To: ETL

Au contraire, you can see them moving.

When one is in front moving to the east and another is behind moving to the west and they cross, you can easily watch the distance change.

Some of the moons orbit in less than 2 days (unlike ours which takes a month).


30 posted on 12/23/2013 1:27:35 PM PST by zeebee (There are no coincidences.)
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To: zeebee

Perhaps you can in those special circumstances, but they don’t come around too often, comparatively speaking.


31 posted on 12/23/2013 1:33:18 PM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: zeebee

...and I would imagine that would likely involve very high magnification and a very good scope.


32 posted on 12/23/2013 1:35:22 PM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: ETL

75X magnification is all you need to see the bands across the disk and even the shadows of the moons as they transit the planet. But yes, you need a scope with decent optics. I use this:

http://www.netaxs.com/~mhmyers/camera.html#FS


33 posted on 12/23/2013 4:46:12 PM PST by zeebee (There are no coincidences.)
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To: zeebee

Thanks, but I meant to actually see the moons moving before your eyes it would probably take very high magnification and a very good scope.

I’ll check out the link in a little while.


34 posted on 12/23/2013 4:50:06 PM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: BenLurkin; mikrofon; brytlea; cripplecreek; decimon; bigheadfred; KoRn; Grammy; married21; ...

Thanks BenLurkin and mikrofon, extra to APoD.


35 posted on 12/23/2013 5:01:04 PM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
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