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1 posted on 09/20/2008 10:38:37 PM PDT by Roger W. Gardner
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To: Roger W. Gardner
Almost all of the major players in WWII were working on an atomic bomb program. Britain, Germany and Japan all had programs in place, furiously driven to be the first to achieve an actual atomic weapon.

This is the only thing in the article I would take issue with. Japan really had no program in place. As far as I know, a few Japanese intellectuals had theorized about the bomb, and uranium deposits were available in Manchuria. But there was certainly nothing that could be described as "furiously driven", and nothing remotely resembling the scale of the Manhattan Project. The odd thing is, the Japanese did developed almost no new military technology of any kind during the war. The weapons they had at the end of the war were basically the same as those at the beginning, which were more suited to colonial domination than fighting a major power. After we dropped the bomb on Hiroshima, those Japanese scientists knew what had hit them, and urged the Emperor to develop them. But American submarines had virtually destroyed the ability to move uranium ore from Manchuria, and in any case it was far too late to start. The second bomb killed the idea.

Germany did make some more substantial efforts in the direction of a nuclear bomb, but again not on the scale needed, and nothing that could be described as "furious". For one thing, Hitler distrusted what he termed "damned Jewish physics", and preferred to see Germany's efforts put into bigger, better tanks, airplanes, submarines, and especially his "wonder weapons" the V1 and V2 rockets. What was done in terms of developing nuclear weapons was on a shoestring, and often went down dead ends. For example, a great deal of the effort was put towards fusion (hydrogen bombs), which first needs a fission bomb to set it off. In any case, allied bombing destroyed most of the facilities, and no major effort was made to build new ones.

2 posted on 09/20/2008 11:06:51 PM PDT by Hugin (Mecca delenda est!)
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To: Roger W. Gardner

I would disagree with any justification for locking up all Japanese Americans during WWII. They were Americans and unless one could prove they were supporting Japan it was clearly unconstitutional to lock up a group of people because you think a few might be your enemy. In fact, the Japanese American soldiers proved they were as patriotic as anyone. It was clearly a dark chapter in our history.


4 posted on 09/21/2008 8:34:28 AM PDT by yazoo
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