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Keyword: zymurgy

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  • Chemistry Used to Unlock Secrets in Archeological Remains

    04/30/2002 6:10:04 PM PDT · by vannrox · 5 replies · 1,037+ views
    VOA News ^ | 27 Apr 2002 12:35 UTC | Written by Laszlo Dosa , Voiced by Faith Lapidus
    Patrick McGovern "The site is very rich archeologically, has been excavated for the last 50 years by the University of Pennsylvania Museum. It has a large palace area with rooms, some of which are thought to have been kitchens for making the food for the palace, with jars of barley and other goods. Also, it has a whole series of tombs in which the burial was done in a special wooden chamber beneath a very large mound. It's almost as if you cut it yesterday and put the structure together. It is the earliest intact human building made of...
  • King Midas' Modern Mourners

    11/28/2004 6:23:26 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 618+ views
    Science News ^ | Nov. 4, 2000; Vol. 158, No. 19 , p. 296 | Jessica Gorman
    The modern diners sitting before Sams were about to eat the first reconstruction of that feast—a celebration that had remained undiscovered for decades after archaeologist Rodney S. Young first excavated Midas' tomb in 1957. Ancient Roman, Greek, or even Maya banquets had been re-created previously, but generally from texts and ancient recipes. Not so with the Midas feast. "It's the first time that somebody tried to do it working just from the chemical evidence," says Patrick E. McGovern, the museum's molecular archaeologist who led the analyses. In other words, from the pan scrapings.
  • Making merry at Knossos

    05/15/2009 7:44:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 637+ views
    The Economist ^ | May 14th 2009 | unattributed
    Archaeology is an inexact science, as Sir Arthur Evans, a flamboyant early practitioner, knew... an excavator can always promote an extravagant theory under the guise of interpreting the finds. As he started to unearth a prehistoric mound at Knossos in Crete at the turn of the 20th century, Evans put his imagination into high gear. He rebuilt parts of a 3,500-year-old palace in modernist style using cement and reconstructed fragmentary frescoes to suit his views on Bronze Age religion and politics. Evans boldly argued that the Minoans, as he called the early islanders, shunned warfare, conveniently forgetting about the ruined...
  • Mint Juleps with Teddy Roosevelt: The Complete History of Presidential Drinking

    10/19/2014 3:57:28 PM PDT · by skeptoid · 24 replies
    Amazon.com ^ | 10/19/2014 | Mark Will-Weber
    “Far too often, what passes for history is nothing more than rehashed, undocumented folklore and myth, and this is especially true with ‘cocktail history.’ Not so with this fine book, Mint Juleps with Teddy Roosevelt. It is well-researched and documented, while also immensely enjoyable to read.” —Philip Greene, vice president, co-founder, and legal counsel of the Museum of the American Cocktail and author of To Have and Have Another: A Hemingway Cocktail Companion “This charming and erudite book is full of surprises. I never dreamed that the presidents were such boozers! Pour yourself a toddy and ponder a vexing question:...
  • Remembering the Deadly London Beer Flood of 1814

    10/19/2014 4:14:23 PM PDT · by Slings and Arrows · 45 replies
    Mental Floss ^ | October 17, 2014 | Nick Greene
    200 years ago today, one of history's most bizarre disasters befell London when a 15-foot wave of beer flooded an entire neighborhood and left eight people dead.The Horse Shoe Brewery on Tottenham Court Road in London boasted a massive 22-foot-tall vat that held some 160,000 gallons of dark porter. On October 17, 1814, one of the metal hoops meant to secure it snapped, and the wooden vat succumbed to the immense pressure of all that fermenting brew. The gushing beer smashed open the brewery's other vats, resulting in a raging sea of beer that burst forth from the building.Over one...
  • Fidel Castro for Stroh's Light (ALL-TIME GREATEST BEER COMMERCIAL)

    01/06/2007 5:40:25 PM PST · by Chi-townChief · 16 replies · 838+ views
    YouTube ^ | February 10, 2006 | Stroh's Beer
    I was watching the ballgame today, complaining to my wife about the lame commercials, and this one came to mind. It's still the best.
  • Member of Stroh beer family plummets to death in Texas hotel (Hold Muh Beer)

    07/10/2003 5:24:07 AM PDT · by Dog Gone · 35 replies · 423+ views
    Associated Press ^ | July 10, 2003
    GRAPEVINE, Texas— A member of the Stroh beer family plummeted to his death early Wednesday when a rope of sheets he had fashioned to climb down from a 10th-story hotel balcony failed to hold, police said.Charles Suddards Stroh, 43, of Addison died about 3:30 a.m. at Harris Methodist Fort Worth Hospital, the Tarrant County Medical Examiner's Office reported.Police said Stroh had been staying at the Embassy Suites Outdoor World in Grapevine since early July, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported in its online edition Wednesday. Bill Bretches, general manager for the hotel, declined to comment.Stroh was a member of the family...
  • Pabst Is Sold to Russian Beverage Company

    09/18/2014 11:38:14 PM PDT · by RightGeek · 119 replies
    NY Times ^ | 9/18/2014 | David Gelles
    A Russian beverage company said on Thursday that it was acquiring the Pabst Brewing Company, which makes the Pabst Blue Ribbon beer popular with barflies and hipsters alike and other brands like Colt 45 and Old Milwaukee. [snip] The buyer is Oasis Beverages, a Russian brewer and beverages distributor. Backing Oasis is TSG Consumer Partners, an American private equity firm focused on consumer goods, which will take a minority stake. “Pabst Blue Ribbon is the quintessential American brand – it represents individualism, egalitarianism and freedom of expression – all the things that make this country great,” Eugene Kashper, the chairman...
  • Archaeologists discover 'industrial scale' wine production at ancient site

    09/21/2014 5:03:38 AM PDT · by RouxStir · 9 replies
    Foxnews.com ^ | September 19, 2014
    <p>"Archaeologists in Israel have discovered a massive compound dating back to the Byzantine era, which was used for “industrial-scale” production of wine and olive oil.</p> <p>The site at Ramat Bet Shemesh about 19 miles west of Jerusalem contains an oil press, wine press and colorful mosaics, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority.</p>
  • 200-year-old booze found in shipwreck -- and it's still drinkable

    08/15/2014 5:24:51 PM PDT · by ButThreeLeftsDo · 29 replies
    CBSNews.com ^ | 8/15/14 | Agata Blaszczak-Boxe/
    A 200-year-old stoneware seltzer bottle that was recently recovered from a shipwreck at the bottom of the Baltic Sea contains alcohol, according to the results of a preliminary analysis. Researchers discovered the well-preserved and sealed bottle in June, while exploring the so-called F53.31 shipwreck in Gdańsk Bay, close to the Polish coast. Preliminary laboratory tests have now shown the bottle contains a 14-percent alcohol distillate, which may be vodka or a type of gin called jenever, most likely diluted with water. The chemical composition of the alcohol corresponds to that of the original brand of "Selters" water that is engraved...
  • Tomb of ancient Egyptian beer brewer unearthed

    05/09/2014 1:39:22 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Jan 03, 2014 | Staff
    Egypt's minister of antiquities says Japanese archeologists have unearthed the tomb of an ancient beer brewer in the city of Luxor that is more than 3,000 years old. Mohammed Ibrahim says Friday the tomb dates back to the Ramesside period and belongs to the chief "maker of beer for gods of the dead" who was also the head of a warehouse. He added that the walls of the tomb's chambers contain "fabulous designs and colors, reflecting details of daily life ... along with their religious rituals." The head of the Japanese team, Jiro Kondo, says the tomb was discovered during...
  • 'Paleo Ale' Brewed From Yeast Found On A 40-Million-Year-Old Whale Fossil

    04/19/2014 2:41:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Popular Science ^ | April Fools' Day, 2014 | Francie Diep
    The beer will be called Bone Dusters Paleo Ale (Hardy har har [Okay, actually, "paleo ale" is pretty good]). The yeast come from the surface of one of the oldest marine mammal fossils ever discovered in the western hemisphere. The idea for the beer came from Jason Osborne, who co-directs a nonprofit dedicated to advancing paleontology and geology. A paleo beer, Osborne thought, would be a great hook to interest non-scientists in fossils. I think many non-scientists are quite interested in fossils already, but I cannot argue against a paleo beer. Will whale-fossil beer really taste that different from other...
  • Moderate beer drinking could have the same health benefits as wine

    11/15/2011 7:55:33 PM PST · by Kartographer · 31 replies
    i o 9 ^ | 11/15/11
    We've known for a while now that moderate wine-drinking can confer some health benefits. Now a new study reveals moderate beer consumption can also reduce the risk of heart disease by 31%. So what's behind this unexpected health benefit? Researchers at Italy's Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura combined several different studies conducted in the last few years that allowed them to explore the possible link between beer drinking and cardiovascular disease, with a data set of over 200,000 people. They found that regular, moderate beer drinking carries almost exactly the same health benefit that has previously been demonstrated for wine...
  • Beer lovers say there's nothing better than making it yourself

    03/27/2009 3:22:53 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 76 replies · 1,605+ views
    sj-r ^ | Mar 27, 2009
    If 10 guys gather in a garage on a Sunday afternoon, it’s a good bet that beer will be involved. What made the gathering March 9 at Mark Sheftick’s home in west Springfield unusual is they weren’t there just to drink beer. The guys were there to make it. Like the car enthusiast who just can’t help but tinker under the hood, these home-brewers have figured out what goes into a good beer, and now they’re concocting their own. They’re equal parts chemist, chef and regular ol’ beer lover. Homemade alcoholic beverages make many people think of moonshining. But those...
  • Local Beer Only at Oktoberfest, Unless It's Belgian, of Course

    09/20/2003 11:18:30 AM PDT · by Archangelsk · 30 replies · 401+ views
    The NY Times ^ | 091903 | Mark Landler
    Local Beer Only at Oktoberfest, Unless It's Belgian, of Course By MARK LANDLER MUNICH (MUNCHEN), Sept. 19 — The Oktoberfest starts here this weekend, and even before noon today, the vaulted main hall of the Hofbräuhaus was teeming with tourists in boisterous training. But in Bavaria's breweries, bitterness is spoiling the season. Some of Germany's leading beers have been sold into foreign hands, and to defenders of national pride, something of Germany's birthright has been sold with them. Earlier this week, one of Germany's oldest breweries, Gabriel Sedlmayr, announced it would sell its famous beers, which include Löwenbräu, to Interbrew,...
  • What’s the most expensive ingredient in beer? Taxes! (VIDEO)

    04/01/2014 3:38:43 PM PDT · by TheProducer · 2 replies
    The Libertarian Republic ^ | 4/1/2014 | Ian Huyett
    Obama's & His Dark Sayings; The Wrath of God On America http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rrp6wUkTGjY
  • Beer brewers push back against proposed FDA rule restricting use of old grains

    04/01/2014 5:06:39 AM PDT · by workerbee · 21 replies
    Fox ^ | 4/1/14
    <p>Beer brewers are objecting to a proposed federal rule that would make it harder for breweries to sell leftover grains as animal feed instead of throwing them away.</p> <p>The Food and Drug Administration rule change would mean brewers would have to meet the same standards as livestock and pet-food manufacturers, imposing new sanitary handling procedures, record keeping and other food safety processes on brewers.</p>
  • Researchers find marinading meat in beer before grilling can reduce cancer-causing chemicals

    03/27/2014 1:10:52 PM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 47 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 3-25-14 | Mark Prigg
    As barbecue season approaches, researchers have discovered an unlikely ingredient that could improve the safety of your meat - letting it swill in beer. They say that letting meat marindade in pilsner can help reduce the formation of potentially harmful cancer-causing substances in grilled meats. They say pilsner and black beer are most effective, halving the amount of Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which have been linked to colorectal cancer.
  • Researchers say red wine reduces risk of Alzheimer's Disease - Beer doubles risk

    11/12/2002 10:20:34 AM PST · by HAL9000 · 60 replies · 754+ views
    The red wine reduced the risks of insanity, the beer increases these risks Tuesday November 12, 2002 - 16h39 GMT WASHINGTON, Nov. 12 (AFP) - To regularly drink red wine reduced of more than half the risks of insanity while the beer has the opposite effect, doubling the probabilities of being touched in particular by the disease of Alzheimer, according to a study carried out in Denmark and published Tuesday in the United States. "These results are interesting because they could mean that certain substances of the wine reduce the supervening of the insanity", the author of the study...
  • Wine drinkers walk, beer drinkers walk to pub

    10/29/2003 6:42:31 AM PST · by Loyalist · 41 replies · 1,306+ views
    National Post ^ | October 29, 2003 | Tom Blackwell
    From the more reserved wine drinker to the A-type beer swiller, the kind of alcohol someone quaffs often indicates a certain personality type, a new study by researchers in Winnipeg concludes. The scientists at the University of Manitoba's Alcohol and Tobacco Research Unit found relatively distinct psychological traits when they surveyed hundreds of beer, wine and liquor afficionados. Beer drinkers tended to be more extroverted and ego-driven, the wine drinkers less so, and spirits drinkers fell somewhere in between the two, the study found. The findings may shed some light on conflicting evidence about the health benefits of certain types...
  • Beer has same benefits as red wine, study finds; moderation advised

    09/15/2004 1:05:19 AM PDT · by MadIvan · 52 replies · 2,888+ views
    Canada.com ^ | September 14, 2004 | Mike Fuhrmann
    TORONTO (CP) - There's good news for beer drinkers: turns out the stuff is good for you - in moderation, according to a new study.The study, done at the University of Western Ontario in London, Ont., indicates that the polyphenols in beer - substances derived from barley - boost antioxidant activity in the blood. "Antioxidant activity ... helps prevent the oxidation of blood plasma by toxic free radicals that trigger many aging diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease and cataracts," according to a news release on the study. And you thought beer just tasted good. Biochemist John Trevithick, one...
  • The Claim: Alcohol Kills Brain Cells

    11/27/2004 7:05:27 PM PST · by neverdem · 119 replies · 9,071+ views
    NY Times ^ | November 23, 2004 | ANAHAD O'CONNOR
    REALLY? THE FACTS When ancient Greeks wanted to reassure guests that their wine had not been spiked with poison, they toasted to good health. While that may be less of a worry today, there remain hazards from indulging in too much alcohol - including, of course, hangovers. But one thing people who drink socially probably don't need to worry about is sacrificing brain cells in the process. The research indicates that adults who drink in moderation are not in danger of losing brain cells. The notion that alcohol snuffs out brain cells has been around for years. Many studies have...
  • Is beer less fattening than wine?

    03/16/2005 2:16:25 PM PST · by quantim · 16 replies · 2,772+ views
    BBC News UK ^ | Tuesday, 8 March, 2005, 13:24 GMT
    Brewers are hoping to appeal to women drinkers by offering beer in third-of-a-pint glasses. But first they tackle the belief that beer is more fattening than wine. Is it true?Stroll through the doors of a traditional British hostelry and the scene that presents itself would no doubt jar with the slogan for a new campaign by pub operators: Beautiful Beer. The sight of burly, whiskery men propping up the bar with a pint in one hand and a gravity-affirming paunch may conjure many descriptions, but "beautiful" is probably not one of them. Yet, with its campaign, the British Beer and...
  • Wine Drinkers Have Healthier Diets Than Beer Drinkers

    01/22/2006 10:49:32 AM PST · by Cagey · 78 replies · 1,686+ views
    NBC4-TV NEWS ^ | 1-20-2006
    Do you prefer wine or beer? Your preference may shed some insight into the rest of your diet, according to a new study. Researchers in Denmark found that people who buy wine also buy healthier food and therefore have healthier diets than people who buy beer. The findings are published in the online edition of the British Medical Journal. Studies have shown that drinking wine is associated with lower risk of death from some causes. Some studies have also suggested that wine drinkers have healthier diets than beer or spirits drinkers, and this may explain wine's beneficial effect on health....
  • Guarding grapes and other tales from papyri

    03/24/2014 12:48:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    Phys dot org, University of Cincinnati ^ | Monday, March 24, 2014 | Tom Robinette
    If you weren't careful, you might end up beaten by grape thieves skulking in the darkness. A University of Cincinnati graduate student writes about the contractual obligations of vineyard guards and researchers from around the world contribute more stories from ancient times in the most recent volumes of the Bulletin of the American Society of Papyrologists (BASP)... The latest volume of BASP is the 50th in the series and the eighth to have been edited at UC. The recently published journal features 35 contributions from 26 writers from 11 countries. The previous year's volume features 44 contributions from 41 writers...
  • China Drinks the Most Red Wine in the World: Report

    01/30/2014 9:36:41 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 27 replies
    More than even Italy or France, China guzzled almost 2 billion bottles of red wine last year. Red wine consumption has skyrocketed in the country since 2007, partially because the color red signals good fortune, experts say.China has surpassed France and Italy to become the biggest consumer of red wine in the world. According to a joint report out of Vinexpo and The International Wine and Spirits Research (IWSR), Chinese oenophiles tipped back the equivalent of 1.865 billion bottles last year (or 155 million 9-liter cases).
  • Nordic Grog Is Latest of Dogfish Head's Ancient Brews

    12/25/2013 2:50:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, December 23, 2013 | editors
    Residues of pottery sherds from ancient Scandinavian settlements dating as far back as 1200 B.C. are the inspiration for Delaware-based brewey Dogfish Head's latest ancient ale, Kvasir. Patrick McGovern, a bioarchaeolgist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and frequent collaborator with Dogfish Head on these brews calls the drink a Nordic grog. The recipe for Kvasir, which is available in limited quantities now, involves yarrow, lingonberries, cranberries, bog myrtle, and birch syrup. Prior to Kvasir, Dogfish Head brewed Midas Touch, influenced by residues taken from 2,700-year-old pottery found in Turkey, and Chateau Jiahu, an ale that traces its history back...
  • Did BEER create modern society? Ancient man developed agriculture to brew alcohol and not to bake...

    12/20/2013 10:57:34 AM PST · by Teotwawki · 35 replies
    Daily Mail Online ^ | December 20, 2013 | Sam Webb
    Full Title: Did Beer create modern society? Ancient man developed agriculture to brew alcohol and not to bake bread, claims scientist Some scientists claim beer - not bread - is the reason early man adopted a society based on farming around 10,000 years ago, a key moment in our evolution. The cultivation of grain saw the transition away from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle and a widely-accepted theory is that the crops were used to bake bread, but experts claim it was the prospect of a brew that drove the desire to settle down and start a farm.
  • Beer Domesticated Man

    12/19/2013 5:54:42 AM PST · by Second Amendment First · 35 replies
    Nautilus ^ | December 19, 2013 | Gloria Dawson
    The domestication of wild grains has played a major role in human evolution, facilitating the transition from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to one based on agriculture. You might think that the grains were used for bread, which today represents a basic staple. But some scientists argue that it wasn’t bread that motivated our ancestors to start grain farming. It was beer. Man, they say, chose pints over pastry. Beer has plenty to recommend it over bread. First, and most obviously, it is pleasant to drink. “Beer had all the same nutrients as bread, and it had one additional advantage,” argues Solomon...
  • Neolithic Death Ritual Includes Earliest Evidence for European Beer

    11/23/2013 11:35:49 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Saturday, November 23, 2013 | University of Barcelona
    Spanish excavations in Can Sadurní cave (Begues, Barcelona) have discovered four human skeletons dated to about 6,400 years ago. The skeletal remains of the individuals are particularly important as they are in a very good state of preservation. An archaeological campaign carried out previously identified other individuals which were not so well preserved but belong to the same stratigraphic layer. Archaeologists excavating in 1999, also discovered within the cave, evidence for the earliest European beer, which may have been included as part of the death ritual... A small landslip from the outer part of the cave must have taken place...
  • Wine Cellar, Well Aged, Is Revealed in Israel

    11/23/2013 6:03:17 AM PST · by NYer · 21 replies
    NY Times ^ | November 22, 2013 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    Digging this summer at the ruins of a 1700 B.C. Canaanite palace in northern Israel, archaeologists struck wine. Near the banquet hall where rulers of a Middle Bronze Age city-state and their guests feasted, a team of American and Israeli researchers broke through to a storage room holding the remains of 40 large ceramic jars. The vessels were broken, their liquid contents long since vanished — but not without a trace. A chemical analysis of residues left in the three-foot-tall jars detected organic traces of acids that are common components of all wine, as well as ingredients popular in ancient...
  • The Physics is Clear on Foamy Beer [BOTH HUGH AND SERIES!]

    10/24/2013 6:26:12 PM PDT · by markomalley · 26 replies
    Physics Central ^ | 10/22/2013
    A team of three international scientists has explained the physics behind why beer in a bottle transforms into an overflowing mass of foam when the bottle receives a vertical tap on the mouth, as shown in the video. They will present their work and its applications outside of the bottle at the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics. (video at link) The act is colloquially referred to as “beer tapping”: Someone hits a beer bottle on the head, often with the bottom of their own bottle, and within seconds the victim of the prank is left...
  • Bulgaria archaeologists find ancient wine cellar

    10/19/2013 6:17:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    FOCUS News Agency ^ | October 17, 2013 | unattributed
    A team of archaeologists, headed by Associate Professor Aneliya Bozhkova with the National Archaeological Institute with Museum with the Bulgarian Academy of Science, and Petya Kiyashkina with the Ancient Nesebar Museum, discovered a perfectly preserved cellar with amphorae from the V BC, over the last days of the archaeological excavations in the Bulgarian coastal town of Nesebar, the press office of Nesebar Municipality announced. The research is organised under a project of the Ancient Nesebar Museum, financed by the Ministry of Culture, with the participation of experts in archaeology. The ancient amphorae warehouse was dug in deep into the ground...
  • Archaeologists make startling discovery at ancient Sussita: A beer bottlecap

    09/28/2013 7:15:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Haaretz ^ | September 24, 2013 | Ran Shapira
    An unexpected discovery awaited a team of Israeli archaeologists in a drainage canal dating from roughly 2,000 years ago: an aluminum bottlecap. From a beer bottle. No, the good people of ancient Sussita weren't producing aluminum metal. The meaning of the startling discovery is that millennia after its construction, the drainage canal was still working, centuries after the city's final destruction by earthquake. Made of aluminum and feather-light, the bottle-cap floated on rainwater that washed into the canal, says Dr. Michael Eisenberg, head of an Israeli archaeological team digging the site. This canal, or less romantically -- a sewer, passed...
  • Scientists Invent Hydrating, Hangover-Free Beer

    08/27/2013 4:11:42 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 28 replies
    New York Daily News ^ | THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2013 | JEANETTE SETTEMBRE
    Australian scientists have created an electrolyte-charged ale that hydrates three times more than regular beer and prevents symptoms related to hangovers.Sunglasses and Advil might not be the only cure for a hangover these days. Australian scientists have brewed up a hangover-free beer, allowing drinkers to keep sipping while avoiding dehydration that leads to next-day hangover symptoms. Nutrition researchers at Griffith University's Health Institute added electrolytes to two commercial beers — one regular strength and light beer — before giving it to participants who had just exercised. While researchers don't suggest drinking beer after working out, the study showed that the...
  • Archaeologists Virtually Recreate Ancient Egyptian Brewery

    08/11/2013 10:37:07 AM PDT · by Renfield · 13 replies
    ancient-origins.net ^ | 8-7-2013 | April Holloway
    A Polish archaeologist at the Jagiellonian University Institute of Archaeology has made a 3D reconstruction of a 5,500-year-old brewing installation which was found at Tell el-Farcha, an archaeological site in Egypt dating back to approximately 3700 BC when it functioned as a centre of local Lower Egyptian Culture. The virtual reconstruction has brought to life the ancient scene in which Egyptians practiced a traditional form of beer making. The reconstruction was created based on preserved structures of similar analogous buildings at both Tell el-Farcha and other brewing centres in Upper Egypt. The Tell el-Farcha brewery, the oldest ever brewery found...
  • Was 0 A Good Year?

    06/22/2003 8:55:04 AM PDT · by blam · 16 replies · 222+ views
    IOL ^ | 6-21-2003
    Was 0 a good year? June 21 2003 at 09:45AM Beijing - Aged wines don't get much older than this. Archaeologists in western China discovered five earthenware jars of 2 000-year-old rice wine in an ancient tomb and its bouquet was still strong enough to perk up the nose, the official Xinhua News Agency reported Saturday. Xinhua said five litres of the almost clear blue-tinged liquor was found, enough to allow researchers their best opportunity yet to study ancient distilling techniques. Archaeologist Sun Fuzhi was quoted saying the tomb dated from the early Western Han dynasty, which held sway over...
  • French wine 'has Italian origins' [Etruscans]

    06/08/2013 7:40:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    BBC News ^ | Monday, June 3, 2013 | Jason Palmer
    The earliest known examples of wine-making as we know it are in the regions of modern-day Iran, Georgia, and Armenia -- and researchers believe that modern winemaking slowly spread westward from there to Europe... The Etruscans, a pre-Roman civilisation in Italy, are thought to have gained wine culture from the Phoenicians -- who spread throughout the Mediterranean from the early Iron Age onward -- because they used similarly shaped amphoras... Dr McGovern's team focused on the coastal site of Lattara, near the town of Lattes south of Montpellier, where the importation of amphoras continued up until the period 525-475 BC....
  • A serving of Philistine culture: Boar, dog and fine wine

    09/03/2007 8:38:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 259+ views
    Ha'aretz ^ | Monday, September 3, 2007 | Ofri Ilani
    Research into the dispersal of Philistine cooking methods among various populations in Israel shows that the Philistines spread their culture beyond the areas under their control... Unlike most of the peoples living in the region in the biblical era, the Philistines were not Semites... They prepared meals in a characteristic sealed pottery vessel suited to long cooking times at low heat, while most inhabitants of Canaan at the time used open pots and faster cooking methods. The bones found at the Philistine cities showed that... the Philistines ate mainly pork, with an occasional meal of dog meat. The Philistines' wine...
  • Brewing Stone Age beer

    08/05/2012 7:33:03 AM PDT · by Renfield · 50 replies
    sciencenordic.com ^ | 7-20-2012 | Asle Rønning
    Beer enthusiasts are using a barn in Norway’s Akershus County to brew a special ale which has scientific pretensions and roots back to the dawn of human culture. The beer is made from einkorn wheat, a single-grain species that has followed humankind since we first started tilling the soil, but which has been neglected for the last 2,500 years. “This is fun − really thrilling. It’s hard to say whether this has ever been tried before in Norway,” says Jørn Kragtorp. He started brewing as a hobby four years ago. He represents the fourth generation on the family farm of...
  • Paphos excavation reveals Bronze Age malting kiln

    12/01/2012 3:41:09 PM PST · by Renfield · 95 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 11-29-2012
    Between 2007 and 2012 a team led by Dr Lindy Crewe from the University of Manchester have been excavating a Cypriot Bronze Age site at the south-western settlement of Kissonerga-Skalia near Paphos.Excavation of a malting kiln The team excavated a two by two metre domed mud-plastered structure and have now demonstrated by means of experimental archaeology and various other evidence that it was used as a kiln to dry malt for beer making three-and-a half-thousand years ago.The form of this construction suggests that the most likely function was as a drying-kiln, and that one of the primary uses of this...
  • Did early Southwestern Indians ferment corn and make beer?

    12/04/2007 12:35:33 PM PST · by Red Badger · 50 replies · 970+ views
    www.physorg.com ^ | 12/04/07 | Sandia National Laboratory
    Sandia researcher Ted Borek used gas chromatography and mass spectrometry to analyze vapors produced by mild heating of pot samples. (Photo by Randy Montoya) The belief among some archeologists that Europeans introduced alcohol to the Indians of the American Southwest may be faulty. Ancient and modern pot sherds collected by New Mexico state archeologist Glenna Dean, in conjunction with analyses by Sandia National Laboratories researcher Ted Borek, open the possibility that food or beverages made from fermenting corn were consumed by native inhabitants centuries before the Spanish arrived. Dean, researching through her small business Archeobotanical Services, says, “There’s been...
  • 500 years ago, yeast's epic journey gave rise to lager beer

    08/22/2011 8:03:21 PM PDT · by allmost · 30 replies
    Physorg.com ^ | August 22, 201 | Terry Devitt
    In the 15th century, when Europeans first began moving people and goods across the Atlantic, a microscopic stowaway somehow made its way to the caves and monasteries of Bavaria. The stowaway, a yeast that may have been transported from a distant shore on a piece of wood or in the stomach of a fruit fly, was destined for great things. In the dank caves and monastery cellars where 15th century brewmeisters stored their product, the newly arrived yeast fused with a distant relative, the domesticated yeast used for millennia to make leavened bread and ferment wine and ale. The resulting...
  • Ancient Brewery Discovered On Mountain Top In Peru

    07/28/2004 7:51:19 PM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 543+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | 7-27-2004 | Greg Borzo
    Public release date: 27-Jul-2004 Contact: Greg Borzo gborzo@fieldmuseum.org 312-665-7106 Field Museum Ancient brewery discovered on mountain top in Peru Field Museum online expedition still in progress describes discovery of 'Beer of Kings' Archaeologists discover a 1,000-year-old brewery from the Wari Empire's occupation of Cerro Baúl, a mountaintop city in the Andes. Remains of the brewery were well preserved because a fire set when the brewery was closed made the walls collapse over the materials. Photo by Patrick Ryan Williams, courtesy of The Field Museum CHICAGO--Archaeologists working in southern Peru found an ancient brewery more than 1,000 years old. Remains of...
  • Unraveling the Etruscan Enigma

    10/15/2010 10:02:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Archaeology mag ^ | November/December 2010 | Rossella Lorenzi
    They taught the French to make wine and the Romans to build roads, and they introduced writing to Europe, but the Etruscans have long been considered one of antiquity's great enigmas. No one knew exactly where they came from. Their language was alien to their neighbors. Their religion included the practice of divination, performed by priests who examined animals' entrails to predict the future. Much of our knowledge about Etruscan civilization comes from ancient literary sources and from tomb excavations, many of which were carried out decades ago. But all across Italy, archaeologists are now creating a much richer picture...
  • Home Away From Rome: Excavations of villas where Roman emperors escaped the office...

    06/02/2010 5:36:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 502+ views
    Smithsonian magazine ^ | June 2010 | Paul Bennett
    We know what became of Marcus Aurelius -- considered the last of the "Five Good Emperors." He ruled for nearly two decades from A.D. 161 to his death in A.D. 180, a tenure marked by wars in Asia and what is now Germany. As for the Villa Magna, it faded into neglect. Documents from the Middle Ages and later mention a church "at Villa Magna" lying southeast of Rome near the town of Anagni, in the region of Lazio. There, on privately owned land, remains of Roman walls are partially covered by a 19th-century farmhouse and a long-ruined medieval monastery....
  • Rare Pre-Greek Site To Be Explored (Italy)

    03/23/2006 3:12:34 PM PST · by blam · 1 replies · 224+ views
    Ansa ^ | 3-23-2006
    Rare pre-Greek site to be exploredEnotrians ('wine lovers') renamed their kingdom 'Italia' (ANSA) - Palinuro, March 20 - A very rare example of surviving pre-Greek settlement in southern Italy is to be excavated and explored. The site, at Molpa in the hills above Palinuro south of Naples, is believed to contain the remains of a large village of the Enotrians, the earliest known inhabitants of Calabria and southern Campania. The Greeks who settled across southern Italy from 700BC to create Magna Graecia had an idealised vision of the Enotrians ("wine lovers") as coming from the Eden-like land of Arcadia ....
  • Czech Archaeologists Excavate Ancient Greek Town Flattened By Bohemian Celts

    09/24/2005 6:50:32 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 804+ views
    Radio Czech ^ | 9-23-2005
    Czech archaeologists excavate Ancient Greek town flattened by Bohemian Celts [20-09-2005] By Pavla Horakova Listen 16kb/s ~ 32kb/s For twelve years, Czech archaeologists have been helping their Bulgarian colleagues in the excavations of an Ancient Greek market town in central Bulgaria. The twelve years of work has yielded valuable results, including a hoard of coins, and discovered a surprising connection between the ancient town and the Czech Lands. PistirosThe river port of Pistiros was founded in the 5th century BC by a local Thracian ruler. From the excavations we know that wine from Greece was imported to the town in...
  • Scientists discover Neolithic wine-making

    11/29/2005 3:38:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 671+ views
    UNLV Rebel Yell ^ | 11/28/2005 | Lora Griffin
    The discovery that Stone Age humans were interested in growing fruit and developing fermentation processes provides many clues into the lifestyle of early Homo sapiens. The production of wine requires a relatively "stable base of operations," McGovern stated. His research suggests that these early Near East and Egyptian communities would have been more permanent cultures with a stable food supply and domesticated animals and plants. With this abundance of food came the need for containers that were durable and made from a material that was easily pliable—like clay. The porous structure of these clay vessels is what has made it...
  • Brewers Concoct Ancient Egyptian Ale ("..tastes very different from today's beer.")

    08/03/2002 8:09:31 AM PDT · by yankeedame · 19 replies · 587+ views
    BBC On-Line | Saturday, 3 August, 2002 | staff writer
    Saturday, 3 August, 2002, 10:06 GMT 11:06 UK Brewers concoct ancient Egyptian aleDid King Tut sup on the Old Kingdom recipe?A Japanese beer maker has taken a 4,400-year-old recipe from Egyptian hieroglyphics and produced what it claims is a brew fit for the Pharaohs. The Kirin Brewery Co. has called the concoction Old Kingdom Beer. It has no froth, is the colour of dark tea and carries an alcohol content of 10% - about double most contemporary beers. Sakuji Yoshimura, an Egyptologist at Waseda University in Tokyo, helped transcribe the recipe from Egyptian wall paintings. Kirin spokesman Takaomi Ishii said:...