Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $54,920
62%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 62%!! Thank you all very much for your continuing support!

Keyword: zymurgy

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Venezuela’s Empresas Polar May Have to Stop Making Beer Because of Dollar Shortage

    04/22/2016 12:11:44 PM PDT · by PJ-Comix · 20 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | April 21, 2016 | JUAN FORERO
    Venezuelans grumbling over the scarcity of food and toilet paper may soon face another shortage, beer produced by Empresas Polar SA., the country’s largest private company and biggest beer maker. Polar said on Thursday that it will be forced to stop producing beer next week because it cannot get the U.S. dollars, which are controlled by the government, to import the malted barley needed to brew. Under Venezuela’s stringent currency exchange system, only the government can legally control dollars, which companies need to import raw materials, food, machine parts and other supplies.
  • Venezuela Runs Out of Beer

    05/01/2016 6:12:45 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 50 replies
    Reason ^ | 04/30/2016 | Ed Krayewski|
    Venezuela's largest privately-owned beer company has stopped producing beer after running out of malted barley (or, more specifically, running out of foreign currency with which to buy malted barley). The company, Empresas Polar, stopped production yesterday—it warned last week that it would run out of malted barley by then. Polar is putting "your drunk uncle's favorite political forecast to the test," Francisco Toro of the Caracas Chronicles wrote. "You know the one I'm talking about, right? That one uncle of yours who gets drunk at every family gathering and starts to rant about how the only way we're going to...
  • The 900 Billion dollar fungus

    03/14/2018 7:58:50 PM PDT · by Fungi · 47 replies
    Blog.oup ^ | February, 2018 | Nicholas Money
    I never post, but this is noteworthy. Brewer's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is responsible for five percent of our gross domestic product. From bread to beer and beyond, this fungus has an incredible impact on our lives. Fungi are important!
  • We are evolving an 'ultimate hangover' gene that may stop us from becoming addicted to alcohol

    02/23/2018 5:13:39 AM PST · by C19fan · 17 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | February 20, 2018 | Cecile Borkhararia
    Humans may be evolving an 'ultimate hangover' gene to protect against alcoholism. That's according to a new study that looked at a variant of a gene that makes booze intolerable to the body. Scientists claim this gene variant is being favoured by evolution - and, in time, could stop us from drinking alcohol in the future.
  • Ben Franklin made up 200 terms for being wasted

    01/16/2018 3:00:35 AM PST · by beaversmom · 17 replies
    The NY Post ^ | December 30, 2017 | Larry Getlen
    Ben Franklin is often quoted as having said, “Beer is proof God loves us and wants us to be happy.” But he was actually talking about wine. In a 1779 letter to French artist Francois Morellet, Franklin began by stating, “In vino veritas . . . Truth is in wine.” He then continued to wax lyrical: “Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards. There it enters the roots of the vines, to be changed into wine; a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy.” The new book, “Stirring the Pot with Benjamin Franklin,” by...
  • Massive Scribal Hangovers: One Ninth Century Confession

    12/17/2017 8:40:13 PM PST · by ameribbean expat · 6 replies
    Medieval Irish scribes were habitually recording their emotional and physical state as they labored at the task of copying manuscripts. These scribal glosses range from pious prayers ("God bless my hands today" Laon MS 26, f18v) to curses on pens, parchment, and careless work by fellow scribes. ***** One Irish ninth century copy of a Latin grammar, the Institutiones grammaticae by Priscian (c. 500), contains alongside the usual prayers and complaints a curious marginal gloss in ogham script. Ogham script was used by the Irish possibly as early as the fourth century AD, mainly in grave monuments scattered over Ireland...
  • World’s earliest evidence of wine-making found in Georgia

    11/14/2017 6:38:30 AM PST · by C19fan · 20 replies
    AFP ^ | November 14, 2017 | Staff
    he world's earliest evidence of grape wine-making has been detected in 8,000-year-old pottery jars unearthed in Georgia, making the tradition almost 1,000 years older than previously thought, researchers said Monday. Before, the oldest chemical evidence of wine in the Near East dated to 5,400-5,000 BC (about 7,000 years ago) and was from the Zagros Mountains of Iran, said the report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a peer-reviewed US journal.
  • Earliest Roman Restaurant Found in France: Night Life Featured Heavy Drinking

    07/03/2016 8:14:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Haaretz ^ | February 23, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    An ancient tavern believed to be more then 2,100 years old has been found in the town of Lattes, southern France, making it the oldest Roman restaurant found in the Mediterranean. They also found evidence that while Romanization changed the locals' dining habits, it didn't do much for the cuisine. Evidently some things never change, though. The excavators in the town of Lattes found indoor gristmills and ovens for baking pita, each about one meter across. This oven, called a tabouna or taboon, is still used throughout the Middle East and Israel. In another room, across the courtyard from the...
  • Now that really would be vintage vodka!Builders stumble on Russian beer tavern that has lain untouch

    06/30/2016 10:27:15 AM PDT · by dware · 10 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 30 June 2016 | Abigail Beall
    With broken beer mugs and copper coins that had slipped through the floorboards, you could be forgiven for thinking its customers had stepped out a few moments ago. But this tavern in the heart of the Russian capital Moscow last served beer nearly 300 years ago. Now the ancient beer bar has been unearthed, revealing broken plates and tankards dating back to the 16th century.
  • Builders stumble on Russian beer tavern that has lain untouched for 300 years (tr)

    06/30/2016 10:31:55 AM PDT · by dware · 19 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 06.30.2016 | Abigail Beall
    With broken beer mugs and copper coins that had slipped through the floorboards, you could be forgiven for thinking its customers had stepped out a few moments ago. But this tavern in the heart of the Russian capital Moscow last served beer nearly 300 years ago. Now the ancient beer bar has been unearthed, revealing broken plates and tankards dating back to the 16th century.
  • The world’s oldest paycheck was cashed in beer

    06/29/2016 7:23:28 PM PDT · by ameribbean expat · 30 replies
    On one tablet excavated from the area we can see a human head eating from a bowl, meaning “ration”, and a conical vessel, meaning “beer”. Scattered around are scratches recording the amount of beer for a particular worker. It’s the world’s oldest known payslip.
  • Wine Used In Ritual Ceremonies 5000 Years Ago In Georgia, The Cradle Of Viticulture

    06/19/2016 5:23:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Science Daily ^ | Ca' Foscari University of Venice
    Georgian-Italian archaeological expedition of Ca' Foscari University of Venice in collaboration with the Georgian Museum of Tbilisi has discovered vine pollen in a zoomorphic vessel used in ritual ceremonies by the Kura-Araxes population. In the archeological site of Aradetis Orgora, 100 kilometers to the west of the Georgian capital Tbilisi, Ca' Foscari's expedition led by Elena Rova (Ca' Foscari University of Venice) and Iulon Gagoshidze (Georgian National Museum Tbilisi) has discovered traces of wine inside an animal-shaped ceramic vessel (circa 3,000 BC), probably used for cultic activities. The vessel has an animal-shaped body with three small feet and a pouring...
  • 5,000-Year-Old Beer Recipe Had Secret Ingredient

    05/24/2016 7:14:00 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    discovery.com ^ | May 24, 2016 09:42 AM ET | Tom Metcalfe, Live Science
    Scientists conducted tests on ancient pottery jars and funnels found at the Mijiaya archaeological site in China’s Shaanxi province. The analyses revealed traces of oxalate — a beer-making byproduct that forms a scale called “beerstone” in brewing equipment — as well as residues from a variety of ancient grains and plants. These grains included broomcorn millets, an Asian wild grain known as “Job’s tears,” tubers from plant roots, and barley. Barley is used to make beer because it has high levels of amylase enzymes that promote the conversion of starches into sugars during the fermenting process. It was first cultivated...
  • Winston Churchill's Doctor's Note Allowing Him to Drink "Unlimited" Alcohol in Prohibition America

    05/18/2016 4:54:22 AM PDT · by harpygoddess · 24 replies
    VA Viper ^ | 05/17/2016 | HarpyGoddess
    Winston Churchill arrived in the United States for a long (40 stop) lecture tour in December of 1931, and shortly after his arrival was struck by a car while crossing the street. A cab carried him off to Lenox Hill Hospital where he was treated for a deep gash to the head, a fractured nose, fractured ribs, and severe shock. He spent two weeks in the hospital, where he also developed pleurisy. Six weeks after the accident, he resumed an reduced 14-stop version of the tour, despite his fears that he would prove unfit. Dr. Otto Pickhardt, Lenox Hill’s admitting...
  • Is wine good for you or is it not?

    04/09/2016 7:53:28 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 34 replies
    The Economist ^ | 8 Apr, 2016
    FEW things arouse such warm adulation and sharp denunciation as alcohol. It is beloved by some and despised by others, and its consumption is governed by legal and religious rules. Wine is central to Christian rites but is widely considered by Muslims to be forbidden by the Quran. It is also the subject of debate within the scientific community: some researchers contend that alcohol, particularly wine, has health benefits, but others disagree. Pro-oenological forces point to a large body of evidence demonstrating wine’s positive effect on both the cardiovascular system and longevity. This viewpoint was given additional support this week...
  • Archaeobeer (Brewers and Vintner's thread)

    04/08/2016 2:04:46 PM PDT · by taxcontrol · 20 replies
    Brew your own ^ | September 2007 | Dan Mouer
    Back in the day - we're talking WAY back in the day - beer was brewed with malt, and bread, and honey and wine . . . and just about anything that could be fermented. How the ancients brewed - and how you can too! Archaeology and beer seem to go together, and it’s not just because a cold brew helps wash the dust from your teeth after a long day on the digs. I’m an archaeologist by profession and a homebrewer by avocation. Lots of archaeologists brew their own, and those who don’t often have a passion for more...
  • When vineyards bloomed in Sudan...

    03/29/2016 12:25:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Science and Scholarship in Poland ^ | March 25, 2016 | Szymon Zdziebłowski
    In the mid-seventh century, Egypt was conquered by Muslim armies. The pressure of the invading army, advancing south along the Nile Valley, stopped the Christian kingdom of Makuria. The relics of this civilization have been discovered by Poznań archaeologists in the area of the Letti Basin, about 350 km north of Khartoum. Makuria was a powerful kingdom, which existed from the sixth to the fourteenth century between II and V cataracts of the Nile. For several centuries its power reached even farther north almost to the modern Aswan... Now archaeologists confirmed the presence of previously known sites, but also discovered...
  • How lager conquered the world: Food historian argues it globally dominated because it’s ‘clean’

    03/12/2016 6:05:35 PM PST · by rickmichaels · 39 replies
    National Post ^ | March 11, 2016 | Joseph Brean
    Like a Big Mac or a Coke, a Budweiser is one of the global economy’s more reliable pleasures, cheaply available almost everywhere. Historically, like the double-pattie burger and the iconic cola, the global dominance of light, fizzy, relatively bland, central European-style lager — from Budweiser to Molson and Corona — relied as much on cleanliness and consistency as it did on taste, as anyone who has tasted a Bud can tell you. In a talk to a gastronomy conference at the University of Toronto Mississauga this weekend, food historian Jeffrey Pilcher will argue that lager conquered the world, after first...
  • How Pompeii brought ancient Roman wine back to life

    02/27/2016 12:39:22 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    The Local (Italy) ^ | February 25, 2016 | Patrick Browne
    Made from ancient grape varieties grown in Pompeii, 'Villa dei Misteri' has to be one of the world's most exclusive wines. The grapes are planted in exactly the same position, grown using identical techniques and grow from the same soil the city's wine-makers exploited until Vesuvius buried the city and its inhabitants in AD 79. In the late 1800s, archaeologist Giuseppe Fiorelli first excavated some of the city's vineyards from beneath three metres of solid ash. The digs turned up an almost perfect snapshot of ancient wine-growing - and thirteen petrified corpses, huddled against a wall. Casts were made of...
  • Mead, drink of vikings, comes out of the Dark Ages

    12/29/2010 10:09:41 AM PST · by JoeProBono · 67 replies · 3+ views
    hosted ^ | Dec 29 | ALLEN G. BREED
    PITTSBORO, N.C. (AP) -- Mead, that drink of viking saga and medieval verse, is making a comeback. But this ain't your ancestors' honey wine. "It's not just for the Renaissance fair anymore," says Becky Starr, co-owner of Starrlight Mead, which recently opened in an old woven label mill in this little North Carolina town. In fact, this most ancient of alcoholic libations hasn't been this hot since Beowulf slew Grendel's dam and Geoffrey Chaucer fell in with the Canterbury pilgrims at the Tabard.