Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $19,571
23%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 23% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: youngerdryas

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Did Ancient Earth-Chilling Meteor Crash Near Quebec?

    09/02/2013 4:43:48 PM PDT · by rjbemsha · 36 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 2 Sep 2013 | Becky Oskin
    A meteor or comet impact near Quebec heaved a rain of hot melted rock along North America's Atlantic Coast about 12,900 years ago, a new study claims. Scientists have traced the geochemical signature of the BB-sized spherules that rained down back to their source, the 1.5-billion-year-old Quebecia terrane in northeastern Canada near the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. At the time of the impact, the region was covered by a continental ice sheet, like Antarctica and Greenland are today. Around this time, a global cooling began and the big animals in North America all vanished. Their human hunters, the Clovis people,...
  • Early Americans faced late Pliestocene climate change

    02/26/2006 3:50:38 PM PST · by redpoll · 19 replies · 906+ views
    Eureka Alert! ^ | Feb. 19, 2006 | no author
    Early Americans faced rapid late Pleistocene climate change and chaotic environments The environment encountered when the first people emigrated into the New World was variable and ever-changing, according to a Penn State geologist. "The New World was not a nice quiet place when humans came," says Dr. Russell Graham, associate professor of geology and director of the Earth & Mineral Sciences Museum. Archaeologists agree that by 11,000 years ago, people were spread across North and South America, but evidence is building for an earlier entry into the New World, a date that would put human population of North and South...
  • Mesopotamian Climate Change (8,000 Years Ago)

    02/15/2004 11:18:28 AM PST · by blam · 71 replies · 5,365+ views
    Geo Times ^ | 2-15-2004
    Mesopotamian climate change Geoscientists are increasingly exploring an interesting trend: Climate change has been affecting human society for thousands of years. At the American Geophysical Union annual meeting in December, one archaeologist presented research that suggests that climate change affected the way cultures developed and collapsed in the cradle of civilization — ancient Mesopotamia — more than 8,000 years ago. Archaeologists have found evidence for a mass migration from the more temperate northern Mesopotamia to the arid southern region around 6400 B.C. For the previous 1,000 years, people had been cultivating the arable land in northern Mesopotamia, using natural rainwater...
  • Bush tucker feeds an ancient mystery

    07/13/2012 7:38:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    HeritageDaily ^ | Tuesday, July 10, 2012 | Contributing Source: UNSW
    As sabre tooth tigers and woolly mammoths were wandering around Europe, unique, giant prehistoric animals were living in Australia -- three metre tall kangaroos and wombat-like creatures, the size of a four-wheel drive, were just some of the curious creatures Down Under. Yet mysteriously, sometime during the last 100,000 years, they disappeared forever. The extinction of these giant animals, known as megafauna, has generated great debate. One group advocates "human blitzkrieg" -- those asserting the first Australians hunted these beasts to extinction. Others, myself included, find there is too little evidence to confidently attribute responsibility to any particular factor. Nonetheless,...
  • SubQuantum Kinetics, wide ranging unifying cosmology theory by Dr. Paul LaViolette

    08/22/2007 12:00:43 PM PDT · by Kevmo · 68 replies · 1,785+ views
    THE STARBURST FOUNDATION ^ | January 2007 | Dr. Paul LaViolette
    Predictions Part I astronomy and climatology http://home.earthlink.net/~gravitics/LaViolette/Predict.html Superwave Theory Predictions and their Subsequent Verification Galactic Core Explosions - prevailing concept (1980): At the time of this prediction, astronomers believed that the cores of galaxies, including our own, become active ("explode") about every 10 to 100 million years and stay active for about a million years. Since our own Galactic core presently appears quiescent, they believed it would likely remain inactive for many tens of millions of years. Although, in 1977, astronomer Jan Oort cited evidence that our Galactic core has been active within the past 10,000 years. Prediction No. 1...
  • Plasma, Solar Outbursts, and the End of the Last Ice Age

    07/15/2011 10:15:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 75 replies
    The Official Website thereof ^ | prior to July 15, 2011 | Dr. Robert M. Schoch
    15,000 to 11,000 years ago Earth experienced a series of climatic fluctuations... there was a short cold spell, known as the Younger Dryas, before the final warming and... end of the last ice age. Based on Greenland ice core data, the Younger Dryas began... 10,900 B.C., and its ending... circa 9700 B.C. and may have occurred within an incredible three years... I once hypothesized that comets were responsible. A comet hitting the land or a shallow ocean, or exploding above the land's surface, scattering dust and debris into the atmosphere, would cause global cooling... This pattern fits well with the...
  • Reindeer Herder Finds Baby Mammoth in Russia Arctic

    08/19/2011 5:44:20 PM PDT · by FrogMom · 78 replies
    Reuters ^ | Aug 19, 2011 | Alissa de Carbonnel
    A reindeer herder in Russia's Arctic has stumbled on the pre-historic remains of a baby woolly mammoth poking out of the permafrost, local officials said on Friday.
  • Terrestrial Evidence of a Nuclear Catastrophe in Paleoindian Times

    07/24/2006 12:03:03 AM PDT · by ForGod'sSake · 276 replies · 7,633+ views
    Mammoth Trumpet ^ | March 2001 | Firestone/Topping
    Terrestrial Evidence of a Nuclear Catastrophe in Paleoindian Times by Richard B. Firestone & William Topping The Paleoindian occupation of North America, theoretically the point of entry of the first people to the Americas, is traditionally assumed to have occurred within a short time span beginning at about 12,000 yr B.P. This is inconsistent with much older South American dates of around 32,000 yr B.P.1 and the similarity of the Paleoindian toolkit to Mousterian traditions that disappeared about 30,000 years ago.2. A pattern of unusually young radiocarbon dates in the Northeast has been noted by Bonnichsen and Will.3,4 Our research...
  • Late Pleostocene Human Population Bottlenecks. . . (Toba)

    12/16/2005 11:33:44 AM PST · by blam · 102 replies · 6,911+ views
    The Bradshaw Foundation ^ | 1998 | Stanley H. Ambrose
    Professor Stanley H. Ambrose Department of Anthropology, University Of Illinois, Urbana, USA Extract from "Journey of Human Evolution" [1998] 34, 623-651 The last glacial period was preceded by 1000 years of the coldest temperatures of the Late Pleistocene, apparently caused by the eruption of the Mount Toba volcano. The six year long volcanic winter and 1000-year-long instant Ice Age that followed Mount Toba's eruption may have decimated Modern Man's entire population. Genetic evidence suggests that Human population size fell to about 10,000 adults between 50 and 100 thousand years ago. The survivors from this global catastrophy would have found refuge...
  • Ice Age coming into Focus!

    06/05/2004 2:32:35 PM PDT · by cureforcancer · 21 replies · 694+ views
    The Neutrino Report ^ | 1995, 2004 | Robert Texas Bailey(Tex)
    “In 1990 they found that the Earth goes through abrupt temperature changes from deep ice samples in Greenland of about 10,000 years ago the Earth’s temperature dropped 19 degrees” (research found by weather channel) taking 5-10 years (weather channel) but from analytical data, I intend to show this could take for the most part one year (Robert T Bailey) and more shocking a large part of the temperature change will happen this year! The End of the World as we known it is coming; an ice Age will change the face of the Earth. We have a crisis here. In...
  • Evidence Aquits Clovis People Of Ancient Killings, Archaeologists Say

    02/25/2003 4:46:54 PM PST · by blam · 98 replies · 1,378+ views
    University Of Washington ^ | 2-25-2003 | Joel Schwartz
    Contact: Joel Schwarz joels@u.washington.edu 206-543-2580 University of Washington Evidence acquits Clovis people of ancient killings, archaeologists say Archaeologists have uncovered another piece of evidence that seems to exonerate some of the earliest humans in North America of charges of exterminating 35 genera of Pleistocene epoch mammals. The Clovis people, who roamed large portions of North America 10,800 to 11,500 years ago and left behind highly distinctive and deadly fluted spear points, have been implicated in the exterminations by some scientists. Now researchers from the University of Washington and Southern Methodist University who examined evidence from all suggested Clovis-age killing sites...
  • The Maunder Minimum and Climate Change: Have Historical Records Aided Current Research?

    04/14/2013 8:27:11 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 22 replies
    stsci.edu ^ | 1998 | John E. Beckman, and Terence J. Mahoney
    John E. Beckman, and Terence J. Mahoney Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain  Abstract:We discuss how, in the 1970's, Eddy took clues from the historical researches of Spörer and Maunder in the 19th century to draw attention to the virtual absence of sunspot activity between 1645 and 1715. This ``Maunder Minimum'' is not only of interest to solar physicists in the context of the theory of solar magnetic activity, and to stellar astrophysicists working on the properties of cool stars, but may also be a vital clue to the influence of the variability of the Sun's...
  • 'Quiet Sun' baffling astronomers [SUN SPOTS HAVE DISAPPEARED]

    04/21/2009 10:28:59 AM PDT · by KayEyeDoubleDee · 136 replies · 4,869+ views
    BBC News ^ | 2009/04/21 05:04:15 GMT | Pallab Ghosh
    Sunspots could be seen by the Soho telescope in 2001 (l), but not this year (r) There are no sunspots, very few solar flares - and our nearest star is the quietest it has been for a very long time. The observations are baffling astronomers, who are due to study new pictures of the Sun, taken from space, at the UK National Astronomy Meeting. The Sun normally undergoes an 11-year cycle of activity. At its peak, it has a tumultuous boiling atmosphere that spits out flares and planet-sized chunks of super-hot gas. This is followed by a calmer period. Last...
  • 17th Century Solar Oddity Believed Linked To Global Cooling Is Rare Among Nearby Stars

    06/03/2004 7:30:42 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 285+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 6-3-2004 | UC Berkeley
    Source: University Of California - Berkeley Date: 2004-06-03 17th Century Solar Oddity Believed Linked To Global Cooling Is Rare Among Nearby Stars Berkeley - A mysterious 17th century solar funk that some have linked to Europe's Little Ice Age and to global climate change, becomes even more of an enigma as a result of new observations by University of California, Berkeley, astronomers. For 70 years, from 1645 until 1714, early astronomers reported almost no sunspot activity. The number of sunspots - cooler areas on the sun that appear dark against the brighter surroundings - dropped a thousandfold, according to some...
  • Ice Cores Unlock Climate Secrets

    06/09/2004 3:27:33 PM PDT · by blam · 76 replies · 487+ views
    BBC ^ | 6-9-2004 | Julianna Kettlewell
    Ice cores unlock climate secrets By Julianna Kettlewell BBC News Online science staff Tiny bubbles of ancient air are locked in the ice Global climate patterns stretching back 740,000 years have been confirmed by a three kilometre long ice core drilled from the Antarctic, Nature reports. Analysis of the ice proves our planet has had eight Ice Ages during that period, punctuated by rather brief warm spells - one of which we enjoy today. If past patterns are followed in the future, we can expect our "mild snap" to last another 15,000 years. The data may also help predict how...
  • North Pole had sub-tropical seas because of global warming

    09/07/2004 8:35:06 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 42 replies · 1,256+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 9/7/04 | AFP - Paris
    PARIS (AFP) - The North Pole once had a balmy, sub-tropical sea because of extreme global warming, according to European scientists who have carried out the world's deepest drilling into ancient sediment on the far northern seabed. Cores retrieved from up to 430 metres (1,397 feet) below the seafloor in waters 1,300 metres (4,550 feet) deep show that, for a brief period which occurred around 55 million years ago, the Arctic Ocean was around 20 C (68 F), compared with today's typical average temperature of minus 1.5 C (29.3 F), they said on Tuesday. "It occurred during a period called...
  • The 'wobble' that wipes out life on Earth every 2.5m years

    10/11/2006 11:43:56 PM PDT · by MadIvan · 87 replies · 3,939+ views
    The Daily Mail ^ | October 12, 2006 | JULIE WHELDON
    If you are the kind of person who worries about the future, this might not make happy reading.Scientists have found that on average mammal species enjoy only 2.5 million years of life before being wiped out because of the Earth's "wobble." They say when the tilt and orbit reach key points it can spark dramatic global cooling - and the last time this happened was 2.6 million years ago. This suggests we are overdue a wave of extinction. However, before you panic, scientists say our planet has changed beyond all recognition in the last 3 million years. The new research...
  • Decipher

    07/25/2003 7:39:05 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 2 replies · 335+ views
    slashdot.org ^ | Friday July 25, @01:00PM | Javed Ikbal
    More Sci-Fi reading for your summer weekend: Javed Ikbal writes "Decipher by Stel Pavlou is a mind-blowing work of science fiction. If you thought Stephenson's Snowcrash did a great job of bringing myth and science together, bite into this. I am still shaking my head over the amount of research that must have gone into this book." Read on for Javed's review. Warning -- spoilers within. What it's about: Tag line: Mankind had 12,000 years to decipher the message. We have one week left ... Let me make something clear. Although this is my first Slashdot review, I do not...
  • Don't blame a comet for Clovis culture demise, scientists say

    03/10/2013 3:10:46 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 30 replies
    nbc ^ | Nola Taylor Redd
    comet crashing into the Earth some 13,000 years ago was thought to have spelled doom to a group of early North American people, and possibly the extinction of ice age beasts in the region. But the space rock was wrongly accused, according to a group of 16 scientists in fields ranging from archaeology to crystallography to physics, who have offered counterevidence to the existence of such a collision. Almost 13,000 years ago, a prehistoric Paleo-Indian group known as the Clovis culture suffered its demise at the same time the region underwent significant climate cooling known as the Younger Dryas. Animals...
  • Comet May Have Collided With Earth 13,000 Years Ago(MEXICO)

    07/15/2012 5:03:34 PM PDT · by ForGod'sSake · 49 replies
    Spacedotcom ^ | March 6, 2012 | Clara Moskowitz
    Central Mexico’s Lake Cuitzeo contains melted rock formations and nanodiamonds that suggest a comet impacted Earth around 12,900 years ago, scientists say. CREDIT: Israde et al. (2012) New evidence supports the idea that a huge space rock collided with our planet about 13,000 years ago and broke up in Earth's atmosphere, a new study suggests. This impact would have been powerful enough to melt the ground, and could have killed off many large mammals and humans. It may even have set off a period of unusual cold called the Younger Dryas that began at that time, researchers say. The...
  • Younger Dryas -The Rest of the Story!

    06/21/2012 2:16:17 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 8 replies
    watts Up With That? ^ | June 16, 2012 | Guest Post By: Rodney Chilton
    Posted on June 16, 2012 by Anthony Watts WUWT readers may recall this recent story: New evidence of Younger Dryas extraterrestrial impact The story below provides much more detail about the Younger Dryas event and the split that has developed in the scientific community over the cause. I’ve added this graph below from NCDC to give readers a sense of time and magnitude of the event. – Anthony The Younger Dryas cold interval as viewed from central Greenland. From:Quaternary Science Reviews Volume 19, Issues 1-5, 1 January 2000, Richard B. AlleyGuest Post By: Rodney Chilton www.bcclimate.com A consideration of many...
  • The Intriguing Problem Of The Younger Dryas—What Does It Mean And What Caused It?

    06/21/2012 10:11:38 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 45 replies
    watts Up With That? ^ | June 19, 2012 | Guest post by Don J. Easterbrook
    This is a follow up posting to Younger Dryas -The Rest of the Story!Guest post by Don J. Easterbrook Dept. of Geology, Western Washington University.The Younger Dryas was a period of rapid cooling in the late Pleistocene 12,800 to 11,500 calendar years ago. It followed closely on the heels of a dramatically abrupt warming that brought the last Ice Age to a close (17,500 calendar years ago), lasted for about 1,300 years, then ended as abruptly as it started. The cause of these remarkably sudden climate changes has puzzled geologists and climatologists for decades and despite much effort to find...
  • Clovis Comet Gets Second Look

    04/06/2012 9:21:52 AM PDT · by baynut · 17 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | March 16, 2012 | Matt Ridley
    Scientists, it's said, behave more like lawyers than philosophers. They do not so much test their theories as prosecute their cases, seeking supportive evidence and ignoring data that do not fit—a failing known as confirmation bias. They then accuse their opponents of doing the same thing. This is what makes debates over nature and nurture, dietary fat and climate change so polarized. But just because the prosecutor is biased in favor of his case does not mean the defendant is innocent. Sometimes biased advocates are right. An example of this phenomenon is now being played out in geology over the...
  • New evidence supporting extraterrestrial impact at the start of the Younger Dryas

    03/12/2012 4:54:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 1+ views
    Watts Up With That 'blog ^ | Monday, March 12, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    We report the discovery in Lake Cuitzeo in central Mexico of a black, carbon-rich, lacustrine layer, containing nanodiamonds, microspherules, and other unusual materials that date to the early Younger Dryas and are interpreted to result from an extraterrestrial impact. These proxies were found in a 27-m-long core as part of an interdisciplinary effort to extract a paleoclimate record back through the previous interglacial. Our attention focused early on an anomalous, 10-cm-thick, carbon-rich layer at a depth of 2.8 m that dates to 12.9 ka and coincides with a suite of anomalous coeval environmental and biotic changes independently recognized in other...
  • Hour-long hailstorm may have caused 1,000-year freeze, say scientists

    04/02/2010 4:06:27 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 77 replies · 1,652+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 04/02/10
    Hour-long hailstorm may have caused 1,000-year freeze, say scientists An hour-long hailstorm from space may have changed the climate of the Earth in 11,000 BC, leading to a freeze lasting more than 1,000 years, scientists say. Published: 8:00AM BST 02 Apr 2010 An hour-long hailstorm from space may have changed the climate of the Earth in 11,000 BC, leading to a freeze lasting more than 1,000 years, scientists say. A comet may well have caused the earth to freeze for over 1,000 years Photo: GETTY The catastrophe, caused by a disintegrating comet, wiped out large numbers of animal species and...
  • Did a Comet Hit Earth 12,000 Years Ago?

    01/02/2009 6:02:32 PM PST · by neverdem · 35 replies · 2,014+ views
    Scientific American ^ | January 2, 2009 | David Biello
    Nanodiamonds found across North America suggest that major climate change could have been cosmically instigatedRoughly 12,900 years ago, massive global cooling kicked in abruptly, along with the end of the line for some 35 different mammal species, including the mammoth, as well as the so-called Clovis culture of prehistoric North Americans. Various theories have been proposed for the die-off, ranging from abrupt climate change to overhunting once humans were let loose on the wilds of North America. But now nanodiamonds found in the sediments from this time period point to an alternative: a massive explosion or explosions by a fragmentary...