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Travel (General/Chat)

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  • The Sinister, Secret History Of A Food That Everybody Loves [the Curse of the Potato]

    05/23/2016 4:55:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Washington Post 'blogs ^ | April 25, 2016 | Jeff Guo
    "The Spaniards were much impressed with the productivity of manioc in Arawak agriculture in the Greater Antilles," historian Jonathan Sauer recounts in his history of crop plants. "[A Spanish historian] calculated that 20 persons working 6 hours a day for a month could plant enough yuca to provide cassava bread for a village of 300 persons for 2 years." By all accounts, the Taíno were prosperous -- "a well-nourished population of over a million people," according to Sauer. And yet... lacked the monumental architecture of the Maya or the mathematical knowledge of the Aztec. And most importantly, they were not organized in...
  • 'Stone Age Art' In Upper Franconian Cave Not An Archaeological Sensation After All

    05/22/2016 9:03:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    FAU News ^ | April 27, 2016 | Julia Blumenrother
    The Mäanderhöhle cave near Bamberg was previously regarded as an archaeological sensation. It was thought to contain some of the oldest cave art in Germany. However, Julia Blumenröther, a former student at FAU's Institute of Prehistory and Early History, has demonstrated in her Master's thesis that the markings discovered inside the cave in 2005 are not fertility symbols carved by humans as previously thought. In fact, these lines occurred as a result of natural processes, the archaeologist says. One of the caverns in the 75-metre long cave is full of spherical deposits of minerals known as cave clouds that form...
  • TSA head: Expect more airport security delays despite funds

    05/22/2016 4:15:11 AM PDT · by C19fan · 21 replies
    AP ^ | May 21, 2016 | Jason Keyser
    The head of the Transportation Security Administration warned travelers Friday to expect long airport security lines to continue during the peak summer travel season despite Congress' shifting of $34 million to the agency. Peter Neffenger briefed officials in Chicago on Friday about efforts to address crushing delays in getting passengers through security checkpoints at major airports around the country. Congress agreed to shift forward the $34 million in TSA funding to let the agency pay overtime to existing staff and hire an extra 768 screeners by June 15. The agency is funneling many of those resources to major hub airports...
  • Huge Roman Villa Found Under Amalfi Church Set To Open

    05/21/2016 5:39:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    The Local ^ | 16 May 2016 | unattributed
    A fresco-covered Roman villa, found underneath a church on Italy's sun-kissed Amalfi coast, is set to open to the public for the first time in July.... Italy's Culture Undersecretary, Antimo Cesaro... told Ansa the ruin was "a perfectly preserved archaeological treasure of enormous artistic value". The enormous villa dates back to the second century BC and was first unearthed eight metres below the church of Santa Maria dell'Assunta in central Positano, Campania, in 2004. Prior to its discovery, the impressive abode had lain hidden since AD 79 when an eruption of Vesuvius buried it under volcanic stone and ash. The...
  • Rome Mulls 'Metro Museum' After New Line Unearths Ruin

    05/21/2016 5:27:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    The Local ^ | 17 May 2016 | Patrick Browne
    Rome authorities are set to build the world's first 'archaeological underground station' around an ancient Roman barracks which came to light during works to build a new underground station. The remains of a second century imperial barracks were found nine metres below street level in November, when construction began on Amba Aradam-Ipponio station on the city's new metro Line C. The 1,753 square-metre ruin contains some 39 rooms, many of which contain original mosaics and frescoes. Lying so deep under the city, it was impossible for modern survey equipment to detect the ruin before work began. But work on the...
  • Elizabeth I dress: Altar cloth may be Queen's gown

    05/21/2016 4:37:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    BBC ^ | May 16, 2016 | unattributed
    The fabric at St Faith's Church in Bacton has been identified by experts as a piece of a 16th Century dress. An examination by Historic Royal Palaces curators has strengthened a theory it formed part of a court dress. The Queen is depicted in the Rainbow Portrait wearing a similar fabric, but no documentary evidence has been found to suggest the dress was worn by her. Historians believe the monarch could have gifted the garment to one of her servants, Blanche Parry. Dating back to the last decades of the 16th Century, the altar cloth that hung in a glass...
  • EgyptAir flight attendant posted picture on Facebook of plane crashing a year before

    05/20/2016 11:49:55 AM PDT · by wtd · 30 replies
    JihadWatch.org ^ | May 20, 2016 2:22 pm | Robert Spencer
    EgyptAir flight attendant posted picture on Facebook of plane crashing a year before she died in flight MS804What a coincidence. Might Samar Ezz Eldin have been part of a jihad cell that worked to take down the plane? The possibility cannot be dismissed out of hand. “EgyptAir cabin crew posted picture of plane crashing on Facebook year before tragic flight MS804,” by Simon Robb, Metro.co.uk, May 20, 2016: A flight attendant on the tragic EgyptAir flight MS804 had posted a picture of a plane crashing, months after she got a job with the airline. Samar Ezz Eldin, 27, uploaded...
  • Germany sets out major cash incentive for electric car buyers

    05/19/2016 7:27:55 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 19 replies
    Deutsche Welle ^ | 18.05.2016 | Ben Knight
    Chancellor Angela Merkel’s cabinet agreed Wednesday to set aside some €600 million ($675 million) of taxpayers’ money to encourage people to buy electric cars — via an “environmental bonus.” The costs of the scheme will be shared with the auto industry, which is also putting up €600 million. New car-buyers stand to get a €4,000 ($4,500) subsidy if they buy a purely electric car, and €3,000 if they opt for a hybrid car, which combines a battery and a small combustion engine. Not only that, electric cars will be exempt from motor vehicle taxes for 10 years. Economy Minister Sigmar...
  • Egypt's tourism industry 'one disaster from being finished' after MS804 crash, say experts

    05/19/2016 7:24:23 AM PDT · by C19fan · 50 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 19, 2016 | Qin Xie
    After a decade of political turmoil and the downing of a holiday jet last year, tourism in Egypt was left in a desperate state - so will the MS804 tragedy sound the death knell for the industry? Figures from February this year show that visitor numbers to Egypt practically halved and the average number of nights spent in the country is down by 67.2 per cent compared to 2015. The country's tourism industry, says one expert, is now one disaster away from being finished altogether.
  • Study Sheds Light On Ancient Roman Water System In Naples

    05/18/2016 1:46:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, May 16, 2016 | editors
    A study suggests that lead isotopes can reveal the history of ancient Roman water distribution systems. The impact of the Vesuvius volcanic eruption in AD 79 on the water supply of Naples and other nearby cities has been a matter of debate. Hugo Delile and colleagues measured lead isotopic compositions of a well-dated sedimentary sequence from the excavated ancient harbor of Naples. The isotopic composition of leachates from the harbor sediments differed from those of lead native to the region, suggesting contamination from imported lead used in the ancient plumbing. The authors observed an abrupt change in isotopic composition in...
  • Discovery of Roman fort built after Boudican revolt

    05/18/2016 1:36:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | May 13, 2016 | editors
    New research published by archaeologists from MOLA reveals a previously unknown Roman fort, built in AD63 as a direct response to the sacking of London by the native tribal Queen of the Iceni, Boudica. The revolt razed the early Roman town to the ground in AD60/61 but until now little was understood about the Roman's response to this devastating uprising. Excavations at Plantation Place for British Land on Fenchurch Street in the City of London exposed a section of a rectangular fort that covered 3.7acres. The timber and earthwork fort had 3metre high banks reinforced with interlacing timbers and faced...
  • Jerusalem Dig Calls for Support

    05/18/2016 1:29:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Sunday, May 15, 2016 | editors
    Just below the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem, a team of archaeologists, scholars and students will soon be busy at work excavating one of Jerusalem's most important archaeological sites... a wealthy residential area that saw its heyday during the time of Herod and Jesus. Directing the operation is Shimon Gibson, a British-born Israeli archaeologist and adjunct professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte... Referred to as the Mount Zion excavation because of its location in the sacred elevated area at the center of ancient Jerusalem near the historical Temple Mount, the work here is important because...
  • Visitors Flock to Yosemite Waterfalls, Thanks to Winter Rains

    05/17/2016 5:09:06 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 14 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | 5/17 | Joe Rosato Jr.
    Michael Peacher stared out at the sprawling Yosemite Valley, stretched out before him like a giant post card. Half Dome bathed in the early May morning sun. El Capitan sat stoically in the shifting shadows. But Peacher’s eyes were locked on Bridalveil Falls, roaring in the distance with a watery abandon. “Since 2011 we haven’t had any water whatsoever,” said Peacher, an avid kayaker. “Just been a horrible drought for the past four years.” California’s stifling drought got so bad Peacher moved to Washington where the rivers were full enough to kayak. But this winter, the rains returned to California...
  • Foodies, Restaurant Writers Make 'Unexpected' Landing in Napa Hot Air Balloon

    05/17/2016 4:06:08 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 12 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | 5/17 | Lisa Fernandez and Edgar Romero
    The morning was supposed to be serene and idyllic with a group of restaurant writers, bloggers and foodies soaring high over Napa’s gorgeous wine country. Instead, Joanne Sasvari, a 40-something freelance writer for the Vancouver Sun, and her group were forced to make what she called an “unexpected” landing, before being rescued by the California Highway Patrol. That's because the winds picked up early Tuesday about 8 a.m., making it difficult for the pilot to land normally. Still, the entire ordeal took all of about 45 minutes, she said, and no one was injured after the balloon got stranded in...
  • Roman-Era Shipwreck Yields Moon Goddess Statue, Coin Stashes

    05/17/2016 2:45:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | May 16, 2016 | Stephanie Pappas
    One civilization's trash is another civilization's treasure. A ship in Israel's Caesarea Harbor was filled with bronze statues headed for recycling when it sank about 1,600 years ago. Now, thanks to a chance discovery by a pair of divers, archaeologists have salvaged a haul of statuary fragments, figurines and coins from the seafloor. The coins found in the wreckage date to the mid-300s A.D. Some show Constantine, who ruled the Western Roman Empire from A.D. 312-324, and who unified the Eastern and Western Roman Empire in A.D. 324; he ruled both until his death in A.D. 337. Other coins show...
  • Bomarzo: Grove of the Monsters

    05/17/2016 1:17:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    The Unmuseum ^ | 2007 | Lee Krystek
    The story starts with a young nobleman named Duke Pierfrancesco "Vicino" Orsini. Orsini was born around 1516 and married a noblewoman named Guilia Farnese in 1544. He worked as a military officer and diplomat until 1553 when he was captured in the same battle that killed his best friend. He was held for ransom for three years and then, shortly after his release, his beloved wife died. Depressed, Orsini retreated to his family's holdings near Bomarzo where he began to plan his strange, melancholy garden. What is known of the garden is mostly just what historians have found by visiting...
  • Mercedes Brakes Stop Working at 190 Kph... But Bow Was It Stopped?

    05/17/2016 11:18:20 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 61 replies
    Emirates 24/7 ^ | Tuesday, 17 May 2016
    Saudi Police cars stop the vehicle safely An Arab man driving a Mercedes at 190 kph (120 mph) in Saudi Arabia got a shock when he could no longer control the brakes because of a malfunction. The man was on a motorway between the Western towns of Makkah and Medina when the brakes of his 1991 model Mercedes stopped working. “He called the police, who sent many vehicles to escort his car along the motorway. Eventually they managed to stop the Mercedes by letting it bang into a police car from behind,” Sada daily said.
  • Chicago Airports Recommend 3-Hour Cushion For Security Lines Tuesday

    05/17/2016 7:15:38 AM PDT · by C19fan · 29 replies
    CBS Chicago ^ | May 17, 2016 | Staff
    While the Transportation Security Administrationhas announced plans to hire 800 new officers, the wait for security at Chicago’s airports could be getting worse. Tuesday morning, the city’s Aviation Department advised anyone flying out of O’Hare or Midway airports to show up three hours before their flight’s scheduled departure time. That’s even longer than the two-hour cushion the TSA has suggested for domestic flights.
  • NASA planning 'suspended animation' cryosleep chamber that lets astronauts hibernate...

    05/16/2016 7:07:18 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    mirror.co.uk ^ | 15:16, 16 May 2016 | Jasper Hamill
    "The idea of suspended animation for interstellar human spaceflight has often been posited as a promising far-term solution for long-duration spaceflight," said Dr John Bradford, CEO of the firm. The cryosleep system works by chilling humans and artificially inducing a state of hypothermia so astronauts can hibernate for up to two weeks. A similar technique is already used to cool the body of someone who has suffered a cardiac arrest in a bid to avoid brain damage. This would allow just one space man or woman to maintain the ship, meaning the spacecraft could be much smaller and travel more...
  • Flying Scotsman, Grand Tour of Scotland

    05/16/2016 3:08:25 PM PDT · by Sparky1776 · 8 replies
    YouTube ^ | May 16, 2016 | jimsheach
    Flying Scotsman's Grand Tour of Scotland May 2016, Borders Railway and Fife Circle crossing the Forth Bridge.
  • Ancient Humans, Dogs Hunted Mastodon in Florida: Early Dogs Helped Humans Hunt Mammoths

    05/16/2016 2:29:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Discovery News ^ | May 13, 2016 | Jennifer Viegas
    The geology of the site, as well as pollen and algae finds, suggest that the hunter-gatherers encountered the mastodon next to a small pond that both humans and animals used as a water source, the researchers believe. Waters said that the prehistoric "people knew how to find game, fresh water and materials for making tools. These people were well adapted to this environment. The site is a slam-dunk pre-Clovis site with unequivocal artifacts, clear stratigraphy and thorough dating." Another research team previously excavated the site and found what they believed were dog remains, so dogs "would most likely have been...
  • Nightmarish Lines Continue At Airport Security Checkpoints

    05/16/2016 10:18:59 AM PDT · by C19fan · 60 replies
    CBS Chicago ^ | May 16, 2016 | Staff
    Travelers flying out of Chicago just can’t catch a break. With increasingly long lines to get through security at the city’s airports, many travelers have been missing their flights, and some ended up sleeping at O’Hare International Airport on Sunday. American Airlines put out cots for fewer than 100 travelers who missed their flights Sunday night due to the long lines at TSA security checkpoints.
  • Driver Stunned When Turtle Comes Crashing Through Her Windshield

    05/14/2016 8:57:56 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 51 replies
    KFOR ^ | MAY 13, 2016 | K. QUERRY
    It’s something that you likely would never expect while driving down the highway. However, Nicole Bjanes says she is lucky to be alive after a freak accident along I-4 in Orlando earlier this week. Bjanes told WESH that a vehicle in front of her ran over a turtle in the middle lane of the highway. Somehow, the turtle ended up crashing through her windshield, hitting the passenger’s seat and coming to rest on the dashboard. Bjanes walked away with just a few cuts. Amazingly, the turtle survived and appeared to be uninjured. Emergency crews looked it over before releasing it...
  • Archaeologists Discover Ancient Bison Bones in Vero Beach

    05/14/2016 11:55:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Florida Atlantic University ^ | May 11, 2016 | Gisele Galoustian
    The bone was found below a layer that contained material from the Pleistocene period when the last ice age was thought to have occurred. The archaeologists identified the bison using an upper molar, which is thought to be representative of a Bison antiquus, a direct ancestor of the American bison that roamed North America until it became extinct. Because bison was a grassland-adapted animal, nearly 100 percent of their bones disintegrated after death unless they were preserved in some way. "This finding is especially significant because of the meticulous documentation that has been involved," said James M. Adovasio, Ph.D., principal...
  • NASA Funding Magnetic Force Field And Other Projects To Improve Space Exploration

    05/14/2016 10:06:38 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 4 replies
    hngn.com ^ | | May 14, 2016 11:32 AM EDT | Jelani James
    A protective magnetic force field, self-assembling space habitat and a deep sleep chamber. These may seem like concepts straight out of science fiction, but they are quite real and are actually three of eight projects that NASA will be working on in order to improve space exploration. NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) is the agency's annual program that is responsible for funding such concepts. According to NASA, the one thing that all of these concepts have in common is their ability to "change the possible." However, it's not enough to change the possible- they actually have to be technically sound....
  • Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India

    05/14/2016 12:23:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 13, 2016 | Australian National University
    An archaeologist studying musical horns from iron-age Ireland has found musical traditions, thought to be long dead, are alive and well in south India. The realisation that modern Indian horns are almost identical to many iron-age European artefacts reveals a rich cultural link between the two regions 2,000 years ago, said PhD student Billy O Foghlu, from The Australian National University (ANU). "Archaeology is usually silent. I was astonished to find what I thought to be dead soundscapes alive and living in Kerala today," said the ANU College of Asia-Pacific student... The findings help show that Europe and India had...
  • Flight logs show Bill Clinton flew on sex offender's jet much more than previously known

    05/13/2016 4:34:27 PM PDT · by ameribbean expat · 35 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | 05.13.2016 | Malia Zimmerman
    Former President Bill Clinton was a much more frequent flyer on a registered sex offender’s infamous jet than previously reported, with flight logs showing the former president taking at least 26 trips aboard the “Lolita Express” -- even apparently ditching his Secret Service detail for at least five of the flights, according to records obtained by FoxNews.com.
  • Paid parking on Vegas Strip starts in June with many rules

    05/13/2016 11:01:28 AM PDT · by C19fan · 23 replies
    AP ^ | May 12. 2016 | Sally Ho
    Drivers were given a long list of rules Thursday involving MGM Resorts International's game-changing move to charge for parking on the Las Vegas Strip. Sin City's largest hotel-casino operator has said the changes will go into effect beginning on June 6 at some properties, with all of its facilities falling in line by June 13.
  • The €1billion floating town is finally delivered: World's biggest cruise ship with 18 decks [tr]

    05/13/2016 7:19:43 AM PDT · by C19fan · 99 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 13, 2016 | Becky Pemberton
    The world's biggest-ever cruise ship, the 227,000-tonne Harmony of the Seas, a luxury home on the waves for 8,500 passengers and crew, was handed over by a French shipyard on Thursday after a 40-month engineering feat. At 218ft, it is the widest cruise ship ever built, while its 1,187ft length makes it 164ft longer than the height of the Eiffel Tower. The immense floating town, which cost close to one billion euros (£800 million), has 18 decks and will be able to carry 6,360 passengers and 2,100 crew members.
  • The Most Beautiful Spot in Every U.S. State

    05/13/2016 7:18:32 AM PDT · by xp38 · 83 replies
    PureWow ^ | May 10 2016 | PureWow
    This country is called America the Beautiful for a reason, so we decided to take a closer look. Here, the most stunning place in every single U.S. state. Cue all of the wanderlust.
  • 3600-year-old Swedish Axes Were Made With Copper From Cyprus

    05/12/2016 8:35:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 66 replies
    Haaretz ^ | May 11, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    Bronze tools found in Sweden dating from 3,600 years ago were made using copper from the Mediterranean, archaeologists have shown. They now also believe that rock carvings of ships found in Bohuslan, Sweden were visual documentation of trade between ancient Scandinavia and the Mediterranean. Most of the copper circulating in Bronze Age Europe apparently originated from Sicily, Sardinia, the Iberian peninsula - and Cyprus, going by isotope analysis... The precious copper was exchanged for Nordic amber, which was as cherished as gold in Mycenaean Greece and in the prehistoric Middle East... The ancient Cypriot copper industry produced relatively pure stuff,...
  • How big is too big? Some theme park riders fear small seats and the "walk of shame"

    05/11/2016 5:14:40 PM PDT · by jeannineinsd · 63 replies
    LA Times ^ | 5/11/2016 | Brady McDonald
    Universal’s Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey has bedeviled many big and tall riders who discover at the last moment that their journey aboard the new attraction is indeed forbidden because they don’t fit in the “enchanted benches.” The uncomfortable scene is a familiar one to anybody who has ever visited a theme park: The overweight rider becomes increasingly embarrassed as the ride attendant pushes and shoves with all his might on the over-the-shoulder restraint that stubbornly refuses to click closed. Everybody waiting in line knows what comes next: the walk of shame. “The walk of shame is an embarrassing...
  • The Truth About Icelandic Happiness

    05/11/2016 4:57:31 PM PDT · by cornfedcowboy · 32 replies
    BBC ^ | May 11, 2016 | Eric Weiner
    Several years back, I visited Iceland in the dead of winter. I was researching a book on global happiness, and the small Nordic nation intrigued me. What was this country, adrift in the freezing North Atlantic, doing perched atop the world’s happiness rankings? In pursuit of answers, I buttonholed anyone willing to talk, dined on harkl (rotten shark), drank excessively, and, of course, took a dip in the Blue Lagoon, the otherworldly geothermal waters that have become synonymous with Icelandic bliss. Shortly after I left, Iceland’s largest banks went belly up and the nation’s economy teetered on the verge of...
  • Traffic Talk: In Los Angeles, the topic is priority Number One.

    05/11/2016 8:42:42 AM PDT · by C19fan · 20 replies
    City Journal ^ | May 11, 2016 | Fred Siegel
    In December, preparing to escape what turned out to be a mild New York winter for the palmy breezes of Southern California, I was stunned when friends suggested that I think twice about coming to Los Angeles. What could be awful enough to keep my wife and me in the Northeast? I soon discovered that, for every Angeleno I spoke with, the answer was the same. It wasn’t homelessness, crime, or El Niño; it wasn’t that Kobe Bryant was retiring. No, it was traffic: the subject of constant calculation and discussion, a matter of negotiation between friends, spouses, and would-be...
  • Archaeologists find world's oldest axe in Australia

    05/10/2016 11:24:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 10, 2016 | Australian National University
    Archaeologists from The Australian National University (ANU) have unearthed fragments from the edge of the world's oldest-known axe, found in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. Lead archeologist Professor Sue O'Connor said the axe dates back between 46,000 and 49,000 years, around the time people first arrived on the continent. "This is the earliest evidence of hafted axes in the world. Nowhere else in the world do you get axes at this date," said Professor O'Connor from the ANU School of Culture, History and Language. "In Japan such axes appear about 35,000 years ago. But in most countries in the...
  • Senators to airlines: Drop bag fees to shorten airport lines

    05/10/2016 4:46:55 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 33 replies
    Associated Press ^ | May 10, 2016 6:32 PM EDT | David Koenig
    Two U.S. senators say one way to reduce long airport security lines this summer is for airlines to drop their fees on checking luggage. […] Massachusetts Democrat Edward Markey and Connecticut Democrat Richard Blumenthal said Tuesday they asked executives at 12 airlines to drop checked-bag fees this summer. The senators say suspending the fees won’t eliminate lines but it’s a start.A spokeswoman for the nation’s largest airlines called the senators’ proposal a misguided attempt to re-regulate airlines and warned it could make airline travel more expensive — fares would rise to offset the loss of income from fees. …
  • PORSCHE REVEALS NEW V-8 ENGINE AT 37TH VIENNA MOTOR SYMPOSIUM

    05/10/2016 4:41:31 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 39 replies
    Motor Trend ^ | 9 May, 2016 | Stefan Ogbac
    Porsche unveiled a new V-8 engine at the 37th Vienna Motor Symposium that will eventually power the range-topping variants of the upcoming second-generation Panamera and the next Cayenne SUV. In addition to powering the larger vehicles in Porsche’s lineup, the new V-8 will also be used by other Volkswagen Group brands including Audi and Bentley. Featuring two twin-scroll turbochargers, the new 4.0-liter V-8 is rated at 550 hp and 568 lb-ft of torque (up from 520 hp and 516 lb-ft), which puts it just shy of the current 4.8-liter twin-turbo V-8 utilized in the 570-hp Porsche Panamera Turbo S. Despite...
  • TSA warned flyers' patience at "breaking point" over long lines

    05/10/2016 11:23:16 AM PDT · by C19fan · 28 replies
    CBS News ^ | May 10, 2016 | Staff
    It's the irony of flying. Planes are the fastest way to travel, but wait times just to get on board keep getting longer, reports CBS News correspondent Michelle Miller. Now airports in New York and New Jersey are joining a growing chorus of complaints about the long wait times at airport security, saying TSA staffing isn't keeping up with increased passenger traffic.
  • Egypt: new archaeological discovery in Matariya

    05/10/2016 5:02:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    ANSA ^ | May 6, 2016 | unattributed
    The Egyptian-German Archaeological Mission to Matariya (Ministry of Antiquities of the Arab Republic of Egypt, Egyptian Museum University of Leipzig, University of Applied Sciences Mainz) has discovered new evidence for a sanctuary of Nectanebo I (380-363 BC) in the temple precinct of Heliopolis, according to Dr. Mahmoud Afify, head of the ancient Egyptian antiquities sector at the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities. Dr. Aiman Ashmawy, head of the Egyptian team at the Mission, said the number of blocks from a limited area proves that the excavation area is the site of the original building built of limestone reliefs and columns, with...
  • Leonardo da Vinci's DNA

    05/10/2016 12:57:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Vol. 22 Spring 2016 | editors
    Born in Vinci, Italy, Leonardo died in 1519, age 67, and was buried in Amboise, southwest of Paris. His creative imagination foresaw and described innovations hundreds of years before their invention, such as the helicopter and armored tank. His artistic legacy includes the iconic Mona Lisa and The Last Supper. The idea behind the Project, founded in 2014, has inspired and united anthropologists, art historians, genealogists, microbiologists, and other experts from leading universities and institutes in France, Italy, Spain, Canada and the USA, including specialists from the J. Craig Venter Institute of California, which pioneered the sequencing of the human...
  • Chinese archaeologists discover 8,000-year-old paddy

    05/10/2016 12:32:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    China Daily ^ | May 6, 2016 | Xinhua
    Chinese archaeologists said they have found a paddy dating back more than 8,000 years, which could be the earliest wet rice farming site in the world. The field, covering less than 100 square meters, was discovered at the neolithic ruins of Hanjing in Sihong county in East China's Jiangsu province in November 2015, according to a spokesman with the archeology institute of Nanjing Museum. At a seminar held in late April to discuss findings at the Hanjing ruins, more than 70 scholars from universities, archeology institutes and museums across the country concluded that the wet rice field was the oldest...
  • Cruise Ship Passengers Helping Themselves To Free Coffee & Donuts At Homeless Shelter

    We get it: Cruises can be expensive, and often the food and drink at ports of call can be pricier than what you pay back home. But that doesn’t mean you have to bogart the free coffee and donuts at the homeless shelter near the dock. For many cruise ships making the trip up the Pacific coastline to Alaska, the small city of Ketchikan is the first stop heading north, allowing travelers to get off the ship for a bit, walk around and do a bit of shopping before moving on to the next port. Earlier this week, at a...
  • Sadiq Khan: There are too many white men on Transport for London

    London's transport authority is far too dominated by white men, Labour's mayoral candidate Sadiq Khan said today. There are currently 13 white men on the Transport for London board and just three women. Khan said he would ensure the board better reflected the "diversity" of Londoners if he becomes mayor. "I will reshape TfL's board," he said during a speech in Brixton this morning. "It needs to better reflect London's diversity in the interest of Londoners."
  • A Slice of the Confederacy in the Interior of Brazil

    05/08/2016 9:43:34 PM PDT · by Theoria · 27 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 08 May 2016 | Simon Romero
    On a stage festooned with Confederate flags, a singer was belting out “Dixieland Delight” by Alabama near an obelisk honoring the Americans who fled to this outpost in the aftermath of the Civil War. “We’re not racists,” said Cícero Carr, 54, an engineer whose great-great-grandfather hailed from Texas. Wearing a fedora featuring the rebel battle flag, he explained in Portuguese, “We’re just revering our ancestors who had the good sense to settle in Brazil.” At the annual celebration of Brazil’s self-described Confederados one scorching Sunday in April, Confederate flags adorned the hoop-skirted gowns of young belles and the trucker caps...
  • Academic questioned by American Airlines officials for doing math on plane

    05/08/2016 11:46:48 AM PDT · by Swordmaker · 23 replies
    CNet ^ | May 7, 20161:26 PM PDT | by Chris Matyszczyk
    Technically Incorrect: An Ivy League expert in search theory says the math he was writing may have been mistaken by a passenger for some sort of code, possibly terroristic. Oh, and he has dark skin. Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives. What does math look like? Would you be able to tell it apart from, say, things that terrorists write while on planes? The question emerges after an Ivy League academic was questioned by American Airlines staff when a flight returned to the gate at Philadelphia airport Thursday, ostensibly because a...
  • 'Dictatorial' HS2 to bar hundreds of victims from objecting (UK high-speed rail)

    05/07/2016 7:22:53 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 7 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 7 May 2016 • 9:58pm | Andrew Gilligan
    HS2 has been accused of “dictator-like arrogance” after demanding that more than 600 people and groups — including the Attorney General, Jeremy Wright, and the Commons Speaker, John Bercow — be banned from objecting to the controversial high-speed rail scheme. In a document slipped out on election day, the Government has applied to bar residents close to the route, anti-HS2 action groups and even MPs on the line from making parliamentary objections as the legislation to build the route passes through the Lords. Eight MPs for seats along the proposed route, four of them ministers, are covered by the ban....
  • Chevrolet banned in Iran

    05/07/2016 5:42:41 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 33 replies
    Left Lane News ^ | Saturday, May 7th, 2016 @ 8:00 am | Ronan Glon
    The Iranian government has suddenly banned imports of all Chevrolet cars, trucks, and SUVs in a bid to give local automakers a much-needed boost. “Even the Americans are not interested in buying such cars because of their weight and high fuel consumption. Why should we import the cars from a bankrupt American factory? This is very odd,” said 76-year old Ali Khamenei, Iran’s Supreme Leader. […] The news comes only a year after Chevrolet was granted a license to sell cars in Iran following a 34-year hiatus. …
  • Birdwatcher Spies Egyptian Scarab Seal at Dor [Middle Kingdom]

    05/07/2016 4:24:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    BAR ^ | Wednesday, May 4, 2016 | Robin Ngo
    Birdwatcher Alexander Ternopolsky made a remarkable discovery one day at the archaeological site of Tel Dor on Israel's Carmel Coast -- not a bird, but a rare Egyptian scarab seal. The stone scarab -- an ancient Egyptian object shaped like a scarab beetle -- belonged to a high-ranking official of the 13th Dynasty (18th-17th centuries B.C.E.) in Middle Kingdom Egypt... The name of the scarab's owner, his position, and ankh and djed symbols (representing eternal life and stability, respectively) are engraved on the Egyptian scarab seal. While the owner's name hasn't been deciphered yet, he is described on the scarab...
  • Ivy League economist ethnically profiled, interrogated for doing math on American Airlines flight

    05/07/2016 9:46:45 AM PDT · by Republic_Venom · 78 replies
    Washington Post ^ | May 7, 2016 | Catherine Rampell
    On Thursday evening, a 40-year-old man — with dark, curly hair, olive skin and an exotic foreign accent — boarded a plane. It was a regional jet making a short, uneventful hop from Philadelphia to nearby Syracuse. Or so dozens of unsuspecting passengers thought. The curly-haired man tried to keep to himself, intently if inscrutably scribbling on a notepad he’d brought aboard. His seatmate, a blond-haired, 30-something woman sporting flip-flops and a red tote bag, looked him over. He was wearing navy Diesel jeans and a red Lacoste sweater – a look he would later describe as “simple elegance” –...
  • Cedar Point debuts newest record-breaking roller coaster

    05/07/2016 7:33:50 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 31 replies
    Valravn gives riders a sweeping view of Lake Erie before dropping them over 200 feet on a 90-degree free fall that hits a top speed of 75 mph. It also turns riders upside down three times. The roller coaster has already broken records. It's now recognized as the tallest, fastest and longest dive coaster. Cedar Point's 18th roller coaster. Only Six Flags Magic Mountain, in Santa Clarita, California, has more roller coasters with 19.