Travel (General/Chat)

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Man finds woman with ex-girlfriend's name to join him on free trip around the world

    12/17/2014 4:54:30 PM PST · by Gamecock · 37 replies
    ABC & Chicago ^ | December 17, 2014
    Remember Jordan Axani? He was the man left with an extra ticket for an around-the-world adventure when his girlfriend broke up with him. Undeterred from taking the trip, he set out to find another woman named Elizabeth Gallagher to use his ex's ticket. Fast forward a month...Axani has found his new Elizabeth Gallagher. After the story came out, 28-year-old Axani received thousands of emails, including 18 from women named Elizabeth Gallagher who held Canadian passports. Ultimately, Axani chose 23-year-old Elizabeth "Quinn" Gallagher, a student and former member of the Canadian Coast Guard. The two will meet in New York this...
  • Korean Air to be fined or given flight BAN over 'nut rage' tantrum

    12/17/2014 1:29:45 PM PST · by Gamecock · 12 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 16 December 2014 | Annabel Grossman
    Korean Air will be punished with a flight ban or fines after the daughter of its chief executive delayed a flight with a tantrum over being served macadamia nuts she had not asked for. Cho Hyun-Ah, a former senior executive with the carrier, forced the chief cabin crew member off a New York-Seoul flight after she took exception to the snack - and the fact it was served in a bag rather a bowl. The 'nut rage' incident caused a national uproar in South Korea - and triggered sales of macadamia nuts to soar.
  • ‘Poverty chic FTW': Lefty journo worried that US tourists will destroy Cuban paradise

    12/17/2014 9:35:28 AM PST · by C19fan · 21 replies
    Twitchy ^ | December 17, 2104 | Staff
    “Independent journalist” Jeremy Scahill is a blogger at The Intercept, which was co-founded by Glenn Greenwald. He is also a colossal moron: I'm very glad I was able to visit Cuba several times before US tourists try to turn it into Cancun
  • Evidence of Viking/Norse metalworking in Arctic Canada

    12/17/2014 7:39:36 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | December 15, 2014 | Dawn Peters
    A small stone container found by archaeologists a half-century ago has now been recognized as further evidence of a Viking or Medieval Norse presence in Arctic Canada during the centuries around 1000 A.D. Researchers reporting in the journal Geoarchaeology discovered that the interior of the container, which was found at an archaeological site on southern Baffin Island, contains fragments of bronze as well as small spherules of glass that form when rock is heated to high temperatures. The object is a crucible for melting bronze, likely in order to cast it into small tools or ornaments. Indigenous peoples of northern...
  • Fiat’s Chrysler Group changes its name to FCA US

    12/16/2014 8:42:02 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 31 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Dec 16, 2014 10:59 AM EST
    Chrysler Group LLC has changed its name to FCA US LLC. The change will be largely unnoticed by consumers, affecting mostly corporate and financial communications. Chrysler-branded cars will continue to bear the Chrysler badge, as those branded Fiat will bear the Fiat badge. …
  • Fabiola Santiago: As tolls rise, Florida shorts Miami

    12/16/2014 7:44:24 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 2 replies
    Florida News ^ | December 14, 2014 | Fabiola Santiago
    While Miami-Dade residents were strike recently with new, rare fee hikes on vital east-west arteries, Gov. Rick Scott was rewarding his farming regressive supporters with $9 million to build and urge their toll-free roads. So while down south we compensate a way, a folks adult north who minister reduction to state revenues get a giveaway ride. Poor timing? Irony? A giggle to go with a slap to a pockets of Miami-Dade’s toll-payers? The governor’s proclamation from Tallahassee was all those things — and came by approach of press releases finished with difference of regard from a prolonged register of who’s...
  • France bans rideshare apps like Uber

    12/15/2014 5:14:50 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 23 replies
    Deutsche Welle ^ | 15.12.2014 | Jasper Niels Zimmermann [nz/sb (AFP, dpa)]
    French taxi drivers have succeeded in persuading the French government to ban rideshare apps like Uber and Lyft. A harsh new law takes effect in January. The move is good for taxi drivers, but will cost consumers money. […] Pierre-Henry Brandet, a spokesperson for the French Ministry of the Interior […] said that as of January 1, the operators of mobile apps like UberPOP that connect non-professional drivers and riders would face punishment of up to two years in prison and a fine of €300,000 if convicted. Those provisions were specified under a new law that had been passed earlier...
  • 10 Mysterious Underwater Cities You Haven't Heard Of

    12/14/2014 3:38:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Listverse ^ | August 5, 2013 | Andrew Handley
  • Quileute Tribe celebrates discovery of historic rock carving

    12/13/2014 6:51:28 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Seattle Times ^ | December 11, 2014 | Joseph O'Sullivan
    A fisherman stumbled upon a rock carving that appears to show a legendary battle in Quileute mythology... An old petroglyph found by a fisherman in the Calawah River was celebrated with a ceremony by a group of Quileute tribal members before it was moved to the tribal headquarters in La Push. State archaeologists authenticated the carving and think it may date to around or before the mid-1700s... The rock they stumbled upon appears to be a carving that depicts a legendary battle in Quileute mythology, according to tribal and state officials... The rock -- which could weigh up to 1,000...
  • Israel: 7,500-year-old lost Neolithic village discovered off coast of Haifa

    12/13/2014 6:43:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    IBTimes ^ | December 10, 2014 | Sanskrity Sinha
    A prehistoric water well hinting at the existence of a thriving Neolithic settlement has been excavated under water at Israel's East Mediterranean coast. The 7,500-year-old water well, currently under five metres of water, was submerged following prehistoric rise in sea level. Maritime archaeologist Ehud Galili of the Israel Antiquities Authority led the excavation at Kfar Samir site in collaboration with experts at Flinders University in South Australia and University of Haifa in Israel. Archaeologists said that the well which was a source of fresh water for the village dwellers was abandoned as the sea level rose. "Water wells are valuable...
  • Israeli cave offers clues about when humans mastered fire

    12/13/2014 6:40:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Science ^ | 12 December 2014 | Nala Rogers
    In layers older than roughly 350,000 years, almost none of the flints are burned. But in every layer after that, many flints show signs of exposure to fire: red or black coloration, cracking, and small round depressions where fragments known as pot lids flaked off from the stone. Wildfires are rare in caves, so the fires that burned the Tabun flints were probably controlled by ancestral humans, according to the authors. The scientists argue that the jump in the frequency of burnt flints represents the time when ancestral humans learned to control fire, either by kindling it or by keeping...
  • The Origin of the Number Zero

    12/13/2014 6:32:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | December 2014 | Amir Aczel
    Of all the numerals, "0" -- alone in green on the roulette wheel -- is most significant. Unique in representing absolute nothingness, its role as a placeholder gives our number system its power. It enables the numerals to cycle, acquiring different meanings in different locations (compare 3,000,000 and 30). With the exception of the Mayan system, whose zero glyph never left the Americas, ours is the only one known to have a numeral for zero. Babylonians had a mark for nothingness, say some accounts, but treated it primarily as punctuation. Romans and Egyptians had no such numeral either... Found on...
  • Water's role in the rise and fall of the Roman Empire

    12/13/2014 6:19:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Science Daily ^ | December 11, 2014 | European Geosciences Union
    Smart agricultural practices and an extensive grain-trade network enabled the Romans to thrive in the water-limited environment of the Mediterranean, a new study shows. But the stable food supply brought about by these measures promoted population growth and urbanisation, pushing the Empire closer to the limits of its food resources... Brian Dermody, an environmental scientist from Utrecht University, teamed up with hydrologists from the Netherlands and classicists at Stanford University in the US. The researchers wanted to know how the way Romans managed water for agriculture and traded crops contributed to the longevity of their civilisation. They were also curious...
  • Affluence Explains Rise of Moralizing Religions, Suggests Study

    The ascetic and moralizing movements that spawned the world's major religious traditions -- Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, and Christianity -- all arose around the same time in three different regions... The emergence of world religions, they say, was triggered by the rising standards of living in the great civilizations of Eurasia... It seems almost self-evident today that religion is on the side of spiritual and moral concerns, but that was not always so, Baumard explains. In hunter-gatherer societies and early chiefdoms, for instance, religious tradition focused on rituals, sacrificial offerings, and taboos designed to ward off misfortune and evil. That...
  • Scientists reveal parchment's hidden stories

    12/13/2014 5:59:17 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | Monday, December 8th, 2014 | Thomas Deane, Trinity College Dublin
    The new technique of analyzing DNA found in ancient parchments can shine a focused light on the development of agriculture across the centuries. Millions of documents stored in archives could provide scientists with the key to tracing agricultural development across the centuries... Amazingly, thanks to increasingly progressive genetic sequencing techniques, the all-important historical tales these documents tell are no longer confined to their texts; now, vital information also comes from the DNA of the parchment on which they are written. Researchers used these state-of-the-art scientific techniques to extract ancient DNA and protein from tiny samples of parchment from documents from...
  • Planned Arizona copper mine would put a hole in Apache archaeology

    12/13/2014 5:43:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Science ^ | 10 December 2014 | Zach Zorich
    A site on Apache Mountain, where Apache warriors plunged to their deaths to avoid the U.S. cavalry, may soon overlook a copper mine. Archaeologists and Native American tribes are protesting language in a Senate bill that would approve a controversial land exchange between the federal government and a copper mining company -- a swap that may put Native American archaeological sites at risk. The bill is needed to fund the U.S. military and is considered likely to pass the Senate as early as today. The company Resolution Copper Mining hopes to exploit rich copper deposits beneath 980 hectares of Arizona's...
  • South Dakota pulls driving campaign over innuendo

    12/12/2014 8:29:21 PM PST · by Slings and Arrows · 55 replies
    PIERRE, S.D. — South Dakota officials have canceled a public safety campaign to raise awareness about the dangers of jerking the steering wheel on icy roads, saying it's too risque. The Department of Public Safety has pulled the "Don't Jerk and Drive" ads, which played on the double-meaning of the word "jerk."
  • Does Mark Wahlberg want a 'white privilege' pardon?

    12/12/2014 2:33:25 PM PST · by Citizen Zed · 51 replies
    bbc opinion ^ | 12-11-2014
    According to court records, in 1988 a 16-year-old Mr Wahlberg brutally attacked a Vietnamese man named Thanh Lam with a stick while spewing racial epithets and knocking him unconscious. Seeing police, Mr Wahlberg fled and found Hoa Trinh, another Vietnamese man. He put his hand around Mr Trinh's shoulder and asked the man to help him hide. After the police cars had passed, Mr Wahlberg punched Mr Trinh in the eye, permanently blinding him. According to the police report, during his arrest the future actor used several anti-Asian slurs. He served 45 days of a three-month sentence, all while maintaining...
  • Like low gas prices? So does the station owner

    12/12/2014 2:26:30 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 15 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Dec 12, 2014 3:12 PM EST | Jonathan Fahey
    So you think you are finally getting one over on the gas stations as you pay well under $3 a gallon for the first time in four years? Guess again. Gas stations love low prices too—and not just because customers are nicer when they are paying less. “We’re in the same shoes as the consumer, the cost of fuel is less for us,” says Kevin Beyer, who owns Performance Fuels, a filling station and convenience store in Smithtown, NY. That means profits for Beyer and the nation’s 127,000 filling stations are rising. Before they sell gas to you, station owners...
  • New York Citi Bike program accused of shoddy maintenance and poor cleanliness

    12/12/2014 10:13:45 AM PST · by C19fan · 26 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 12, 2014 | Sadie Whitelocks
    New York Citi Bike riders are at risk according to a new audit exposing spotty maintenance checks, poor cleanliness and defective docking stations. Comptroller Scott Stringer released his report Thursday looking at if New York City Bike Share, which manages the scheme, is in compliance with its Department of Transport contract. According to maintenance data, only 28per cent of the 6,000 two-wheelers in Manhattan and Brooklyn were inspected in November 2013, 34per cent in December 2013 and 38per cent in January 2014.
  • Forget Brooklyn! New York City borough of Queens named best place to visit in US in 2015

    12/12/2014 10:05:56 AM PST · by C19fan · 34 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 12, 2014 | Simon Cable
    The New York borough of Queens has been given top spot in a list of the best places to visit in the US next year. The sprawling suburb, traditionally off the tourist map, has beaten a host of America's most famous destinations in an annual 'Best in the US' ranking compiled by Lonely Planet. The list praised Queens' microbreweries, beaches, global food offerings and ‘world-class’ art scene.
  • A world of trouble for SeaWorld

    12/12/2014 6:30:08 AM PST · by C19fan · 10 replies
    Washington Post ^ | December 12, 2014 | Terrence McCoy
    Under normal circumstances, an institution as big and famous as SeaWorld would be impervious to any number of public assaults on its standing. Like Wal-Mart or Comcast or Disneyland, one would assume it could bear any bad press and keep chugging. But after the release of the documentary “Blackfish” in the summer of 2013, it became clear to onlookers that these were not normal circumstances and not the usual bad press. That became dramatically clear Thursday, when the company’s CEO, Jim Atchison, resigned in a departure many link to the fallout.
  • Dominic di Natale, Fox News Reporter, dead at 43.

    12/11/2014 8:45:49 PM PST · by lee martell · 36 replies
    Dec. 11 2014 | lee martell
    There is very little information available right now, but Fox News reporter, Dominic was found dead in his apartment. The Coroner said his death was due to suicide. Police were alerted by a friend to check on Natale, due to his state of mind attributed most likely to an undisclosed health problem. Dominic, fluent in many languages, had worked at Fox since 2007.
  • ‘This is why we check our shoes’: The horrifying pictures of spiders in footwear.....

    12/11/2014 8:45:18 PM PST · by Morgana · 78 replies
    MAIL ONLINE ^ | 11 December 2014 | Heather Mcnab for Daily Mail Australia
    FULL TITLE: ‘This is why we check our shoes’: The horrifying pictures of spiders in footwear, children’s trampolines and car seats that are turning U.S. travellers off Australia Emerging from shoes, lying undetected in toilets, waiting patiently in cars and on walls, native wildlife has earned Australia the tag of a country brimming with deadly creatures. In many cases, this reputation is well-earned, with countless cases of bites, stings, and close encounters with the nation's creepiest of crawlies. Images of the poisonous and many-legged creatures have started to pack a frightful punch overseas, with many US citizens expressing their fear...
  • 'Star Wars' Theme Park Attractions to Be Based on New Films

    12/11/2014 7:52:10 AM PST · by C19fan · 4 replies
    Variety ^ | December 10, 2014 | Staff
    Two years after buying Lucasfilm for $4 billion, Disney is starting to reveal just how Star Wars will be integrated into the company’s theme parks. Main attractions will be based on new sequels and spinoffs — the first of which, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, bows next year — not the older films in George Lucas’ sci-fi franchise, according to Walt Disney Co. chief Bob Iger. “There will be a much larger Star Wars presence in our parks globally,” Iger said during a Q&A at Variety’s Dealmakers Breakfast on Wednesday, sponsored by Delta Air Lines and Bank of America. “But...
  • The Worst Caribbean Ports of Call for Cruises

    12/11/2014 7:47:47 AM PST · by C19fan · 65 replies
    Yahoo ^ | December 11, 2014 | Melinda Crow
    It’s dreary outside and you find yourself dreaming of an escape to the Caribbean. You long for turquoise water and sugar-sand beaches, with plenty of activities to take your mind off work. Cruises offer the perfect smorgasbord of beaches, shopping, scenery, and fun things that you can’t do at home, all served up with a fruity, umbrella-topped beverage. But not every port lives up to the image in your dreams. To help you choose your next cruise itinerary — or rather, figure out which places to avoid — Yahoo Travel did some digging around and found the Caribbean ports with...
  • How a Greenpeace stunt in Peru drives home the global climate divide

    12/11/2014 6:40:06 AM PST · by Citizen Zed · 36 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 12-10-2014 | Nick Miroff
    When the stunt-planners at Greenpeace sent teams of activists to trespass this week at Peru's Nazca archeological site, they must have thought their bumper-sticker messaging would look good on a Facebook page next to the 2,000-year-old geodesic drawings. After all, the group is known for stringing banners from bridges and skyscrapers to draw attention to its environmental campaigns, and with U.N. climate talks taking place in Lima this week, the activists clearly wanted to make an impact. And so they have. The impact of their footprints on the fragile desert site, in fact, will last "hundreds or thousands of years,"...
  • British man becomes first person to visit all 201 countries... WITHOUT using a plane

    12/10/2014 5:25:35 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 21 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 12/10/2014 | Matt Blake
    Graham Hughes, 33, used buses, taxis, trains and his own two feet to travel 160,000 miles in exactly 1,426 days - all on a shoestring of just $100 a weekYesterday he trudged into Juba, the capital of South Sudan, to end the epic journey that began in his hometown of Liverpool on New Year's Day 2009Spent four days 'in a leaky boat' to reach Cape Verde, was jailed for a week in Congo, and was 'saved from Muslim fundamentalists by a Filipino ladyboy'His lowest point was when his sister, Nicole, died of cancer two years agoHe says: 'I think...
  • BBC theme park deal could bring Doctor Who and Top Gear rides to new £2billion Paramount attraction

    12/10/2014 8:28:47 AM PST · by C19fan · 33 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 10, 2014 | Claire Carter
    Top Gear, In the Night Garden and Doctor Who could all feature in a new £2billion theme park alongside characters from Star Trek and Mission: Impossible. The BBC has signed a deal to allow some of its programmes to feature in the new multi-billion pound resort in Kent. Plans are still being drafted for how the theme park will work, but BBC shows and characters could feature in specific lands, games and rides at the London Paramount Entertainment Resort.
  • Danish Bronze Age glass beads traced to Egypt

    12/09/2014 5:22:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | December 8, 2014 | Jeanette Varberg, Flemming Kaul, Bernard Gratuze, tr by Michael de Laine
    ...The analyses revealed that the glass originate from the same glass workshops in Egypt that supplied the glass that the Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun took with him to his grave in 1323 BC... Globalisation in the Bronze Age Twenty-three glass beads from Denmark were analysed using plasma-spectrometry. Without destroying the fragile beads, this technique makes it possible to compare the chemical composition of trace elements in the beads with reference material from Amarna in Egypt and Nippur in Mesopotamia, about 50 km south east of Baghdad in Iraq. The comparison showed that the chemical composition of the two sets of trace...
  • Discoveries of Polish archaeologists in Armenia [Urartu]

    12/09/2014 5:13:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | December 8, 2014 | PAP - Science and Scholarship in Poland
    Archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw discovered evidence of destruction and capture of the ancient city of Metsamor, one of the most famous archaeological sites in the vicinity of Yerevan. "In the entire area of research we found layers of burning and ash. The city was probably captured by the army of Argishti I, the ruler of Urartu," told PAP Krzysztof Jakubiak, head of the project. Argishti I was the king of Urartu, the biblical Kingdom of Ararat in the Armenian Highlands. During his reign, the boundaries of the state expanded to the Caucasus, the area of...
  • Possible Neanderthal rock engraving in Gorham's Cave

    12/09/2014 5:04:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | September 3, 2014 | Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
    A study of a rock engraving discovered within Gorham's Cave in Gibraltar finds that the cross-hatched impression was likely created by Neanderthals and excluding the possibility of an unintentional or utilitarian origin, would represent Neanderthals' capacity for abstract expression. Previously-discovered cave art has been exclusively attributed to modern humans, who arrived in Western Europe around 40,000 years ago. In July 2012, researchers discovered the abstract pattern engraved in the rock of Gorham's Cave which is located on the southeast face of the Rock of Gibraltar. The cross-hatched pattern was overlain by undisturbed sediment in which Neanderthal artefacts had previously been...
  • Antiquity thieves caught at Cave of Skulls searching for Dead Sea artefacts

    12/09/2014 5:00:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | December 7, 2014 | unattributed
    Members of the Arad Rescue Unit, undergoing early morning routine training, noticed suspicious activity in the northern cliff of Nahal Ze'elim, in the region of the Leopard's Ascent (Judean Desert). After alerting the authorities a group of antiquity thieves searching for Dead Sea scrolls and other potentially valuable artefacts, were caught red-handed. The "The Cave of the Skulls", which is located in the side of a cliff, can only be reached on foot via a narrow goat path on top of rock fall, that passes upright bedrock walls and is extremely precarious. The robbers, who had used climbing gear to...
  • Burt Reynolds' 1978 Trans Am rumbling to auction

    12/09/2014 1:06:29 PM PST · by Impala64ssa · 101 replies
    Fox News ^ | 12/9/14
    <p>Gotta have a new car to block for the truck? A speedy car?</p> <p>A 1978 Pontiac Trans Am once owned by Burt Reynolds will be rumbling across the block at the Mecum Auctions event in Kissimmee, Fla., in January. It’s not one of the cars featured in the “Smokey and The Bandit” films, but was Reynolds’ personal car from 2005-2009.</p>
  • Plane Diverted To LAX After Woman Gives Birth In Flight

    12/09/2014 11:52:13 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 32 replies
    cbs ^ | December 9, 2014 11:08 AM
    Flight 623, bound for Phoenix, had just taken off from San Francisco when an unidentified woman went into labor.
  • UAW gains important recognition at VW Tennessee plant

    12/09/2014 3:31:11 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 8 replies
    Reuters ^ | Mon Dec 8, 2014 6:04pm EST | Bernie Woodall
    The United Auto Workers gained a partial and unconventional recognition from Volkswagen AG after proving to the company that it represents at least 45 percent of workers at the company’s plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee, a company spokesman said on Monday. The union on Monday said membership at its Local 42 in Chattanooga “exceeds a majority of workers at the plant.” It is the first time the UAW has been recognized at a foreign-owned auto assembly plant in the South, but it is short of the UAW’s goal of attaining exclusive bargaining rights for all of the plant’s 1,500 blue-collar workers....
  • 10 Worst Airports for Holiday Travel

    12/08/2014 8:34:00 AM PST · by Vigilanteman · 66 replies
    Bankrate.Com ^ | 8 December 2014 | Chris Kahn
    'Tis the season to see the family, which means you're probably about to spend some quality time -- maybe too much time -- in an airport. The following are the worst airports for holiday flight problems on arrivals, according to a Bankrate analysis. Bankrate determined the frequency of holiday flight problems -- delays, cancellations and diversions -- at the United States' 100 most active airports, using Bureau of Transportation Statistics data for the months of November to January over the past 10 years. The rankings for busiest airports are based on total arrivals over the same time period.
  • Dwindling African tribe may have been most populous group on planet

    12/07/2014 8:52:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Science ^ | 4 December 2014 | Ann Gibbons
    ...for tens of thousands of years, the Khoisan's ancestors were members of "the largest population" on the planet, according to a new study. The Khoisan have long stood apart from other groups within Africa. They look distinct, speak in "click" languages, and have also maintained the greatest genetic diversity known among human populations. Usually, big populations harbor the most diversity. But census counts show that the 100,000 Khoisan speakers in Africa today are far outnumbered by other groups, such as the 45 million Bantu speakers and their 180 million descendants who now speak Swahili and other languages. Researchers have thought...
  • Unearthed: hoard of Roman and Pictish silver found in Aberdeenshire field

    12/07/2014 8:21:58 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Herald Scotland ^ | Wednesday 3 December 2014 | unattributed
    A hoard of Roman and Pictish silver has been unearthed by archaeologists working in a field in Aberdeenshire. The find, which contains more than 100 pieces including coins and jewellery, has been hailed as the most northern of its kind in Europe. The discovery was made earlier this year by archaeologists from National Museums Scotland and the University of Aberdeen's Northern Picts project at an undisclosed location. It will now become the subject of a programme of research involving detailed analysis and cataloguing through the Glenmorangie Research Project - a three-year sponsorship of National Museums Scotland to support the study...
  • Dr. Greg Stanton of Genocide Watch Warns of Crime in South Africa

    12/07/2014 7:29:08 PM PST · by Ironfocus · 9 replies
    Genocide Watch ^ | Dr. Greg Stanton
    Dr. Greg Stanton of Genocide Watch Warns of Crime in South Africa At a press conference at the Transvaal Agricultural Union today, Dr. Gregory Stanton, Founding President of Genocide Watch, warned that early warnings of genocide are still deep in South African society, though genocide has not begun. Dr. Stanton was deeply involved in the Civil Rights Movement in the United States, worked against Apartheid with the United Democratic Front in 1989 – 1990 as a Fulbright Professor of Law at the University of Swaziland, and was the author of the UN Resolutions that created the International Criminal Tribunal for...
  • Ancient Celtic offshore Banking [update to 2012 story]

    12/07/2014 7:21:52 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Guernsey Donkey ^ | August 22, 2014 | Robert
    In June 2012 metal detectorists Reg Mead and Richard Miles uncovered a hoard of a staggering 70,000 late Iron Age and Roman coins. They were searching in Grouville in Jersey when they came across their incredible find that has since turned out to be the largest hoard ever found in the island. The Hoard The coins, which had fused into one solid mass, were found using a deep-scanning metal detector. They were searching the area after Reg and Richard had uncovered a smaller hoard of 120 coins the previous year. As soon as they realised the size of their find,...
  • The Most Disappointing Travel Destinations on Earth

    12/07/2014 10:59:06 AM PST · by Bettyprob · 332 replies
    Yahoo ^ | December 07, 2014 | Fox News
    <p>We’ve all built up a trip in our minds, only to find it’s not remotely like the brochures.</p> <p>1. Los Angeles: ‘The whole city is a lie’</p> <p>LA was one of the biggest let-downs for holiday-makers.</p> <p>Travelers expecting Hollywood glitz and glamour were shocked to find what they called a run-down, dangerous and dirty urban sprawl.</p>
  • More municipal bans on fracking pose setback to domestic energy boom

    12/06/2014 10:46:50 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 8 replies
    Fox News ^ | December 06, 2014 | (With AP)
    The surge in domestic-energy production that has created millions of new jobs and abundant natural gas and oil is now facing a potential setback, cities across the country imposing bans on the widely-used deep-drilling process known as fracking. At least three U.S. cities and two counties in the November elections voted in favor of such a ban. And courts in Pennsylvania and New York have recently ruled in favor of letting cities have some control over the drilling. There is little surprise that Texas is at the forefront of the fight between energy companies and other fracking supporters and critics...
  • US Airways Flight from Israel to Philadelphia Grounded in Rome by Sick Crew, Passengers

    12/06/2014 8:21:54 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 17 replies
    NYDN ^ | December 6 ,2014 | DOYLE MURPHY
    US Airways plane grounded by sick crew, passengers The Philadelphia-bound flight from Israel made an emergency landing in Rome after all 14 crew members, including four pilots, were affected by a mysterious smell. Vomiting crew members and passengers forced a Philadelphia-bound flight to make an emergency landing in Rome, airline officials said. The US Airways Flight US797 was en route from Israel when an odor in the cabin began to sicken the people aboard, NBC News reported. All 14 crew members, including the four pilots, were affected, and the mysterious smell made two passengers ill as well, an airline spokeswoman...
  • "Most People Misunderstand Life."

    12/06/2014 12:34:50 PM PST · by aMorePerfectUnion · 48 replies
    Most people misunderstand life. November 17, 2014 What we can all learn from a 75-year-old sailor building a 10 ft boat to circumnavigate the globe. (nonstop) Sven Yrvind, a 75-year-old Swedish boat builder, designer, sailor and writer, has something to say about life.  He’s chosen to communicate this philosophy through taking on tough challenges. Faced with a future of scraping by on a crap pension, surfing channels in a retirement home, Sven had different ideas.“TV is not for me. I must have something to live for, problems to solve. Most people misunderstand life. Money does not make you happy. Comfort...
  • Opel closes flagship Bochum factory (GM Germany)

    12/05/2014 10:03:29 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 17 replies
    TheLocal.de ^ | 05 Dec 2014 08:56 GMT+01:00 | (DPA/The Local)
    It’s the end of an era as the last car rolls off the production line at Opel’s Bochum factory, making Friday a bitter day for the city and the factory’s 3,000 workers. […] The last vehicle made in Bochum, an Opel Zafira compact van, will not be sold but will be dedicated to social work with details expected to be announced by the company on Friday. Opel, a subsidiary of General Motors, is shutting down its former flagship factory due to overcapacity. In its heyday, the Bochum plant employed 22,000 people. Now, it will only employ 700 to make auto...
  • New York LaGuardia named North America's most frustrating airport

    12/05/2014 9:17:51 AM PST · by C19fan · 31 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 2, 2014 | John Hutchinson
    New York LaGuardia has been named as the most frustrating airport in the US and Canada. Taking into account the time it takes to get there, the security processes, the quality of the terminals and facilities, and how many flights get delayed, LaGuardia takes the crown it doesn't want. Around 3,000 frequent flyers gave their opinions on 36 airports in the US and Canada; the 25 busiest US airports are listed as well as six of the seven busiest in Canada.
  • Free Wi-Fi more important than a good night's sleep when booking a hotel

    12/05/2014 9:15:08 AM PST · by C19fan · 15 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 4, 2014 | Katie Amey
    When looking for the perfect hotel, its Wi-Fi service is the most important factor, according to new research. A survey on important factors when searching for accommodation revealed that 67 per cent of travellers are most concerned with Wi-Fi, above any other factor. The internet connection ranked higher than the hotel's location, a good night's sleep and friendly staff.
  • Mastodons Disappeared From Ancient Beringia Before Humans Arrived

    12/04/2014 6:03:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, December 1, 2014 | press releases
    A re-dating of mastodon bones reveals that the extinct mammals, related to the modern day elephant, disappeared from the area during a glacial period more than 50,000 years earlier than previously thought. Existing age estimates of American mastodon fossils indicate that these extinct relatives of elephants lived in the Arctic and Subarctic when the area was covered by ice caps—a chronology that is at odds with what scientists know about the massive animals' preferred habitat: forests and wetlands abundant with leafy food... Over the course of the late Pleistocene, between about 10,000 and 125,000 years ago, the American mastodon (Mammut...
  • For the First Time in Forever... I Did Not Enjoy My Vacation to Disney World

    12/04/2014 6:36:56 AM PST · by C19fan · 50 replies
    Huffington Post ^ | December 3, 2014 | Christy Heitger-Ewing
    I think Mickey Mouse is adorable. But let me tell you, that little guy no longer holds the entire Disney empire in his white-gloved little hands. It's simply gotten too big, too commercial, too regimented. As a result, to quote Anna from Frozen, "For the first time in forever..." I did not enjoy my vacation to Disney World. Just so we're clear, I've been a humongous Disney fan ever since I was a kid. I've probably visited Mickey's playground three dozen times in the past several decades, and for so long it really did seem like the most magical place...