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  • Here's Another Horrific Reminder Of Why The Moose Test Is A Thing

    06/28/2016 11:13:10 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 19 replies
    Jalopnik ^ | 6/28
    The infamous Swedish Moose Test can make or break sales in certain parts of the world. It aims to re-create what could happen if a moose suddenly appeared in your path, and you needed to make an emergency maneuver. We’ve already seen this sort of thing once before, but in case you missed it the first time, here’s another reminder of why it’s so important. It’s mainly because moose tend to be so large that they crush the car, imperiling the lives of the human occupants inside. And also, the poor moose is dead. There was a child in the...
  • Here come the girls! Michelle, Sasha and Malia Obama touch down in Liberia to begin six-day trip

    06/27/2016 2:01:23 PM PDT · by traumer · 81 replies
    Michelle Obama urged young girls to fight to stay in school after she touched down in Liberia with daughters Sasha and Malia. The first lady led the teenagers and her mother, Marian Robinson, along a red carpet as they began a six-day trip to Africa and Spain, after she touched down on Monday morning. During the tour, they will be promoting education during the trip, which also has a stop in Morocco and ends in the Spanish capital, Madrid. On her first day she urged Liberian girls to stay in school. Most drop out due to financial pressures. She launched...
  • Archaeologists discover layers of Indo-Greek city in Swat

    06/26/2016 6:51:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    Dawn News ^ | Sunday, June 26, 2016 | Fazal Khaliq
    Archaeologists excavate Indo-Greek and Saka-Parthian structures at Bazira, Swat. -- Dawn photo Indo-Greek coins discovered during the recent excavation at Bazira, Barikot, Swat. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat Indo-Greek coins discovered during the recent excavation at Bazira, Barikot, Swat. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat Terracotta baroque female figurine, circa 3rd-2nd BC. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat Indo-Greek coins discovered during the recent excavation at Bazira, Barikot, Swat. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat
  • Rare Skull From Korea's Silla Kingdom Reconstructed

    06/26/2016 6:11:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Scientists have studied a rare skeleton from the Silla culture, which ruled over part of the Korean Peninsula from 57 B.C. to A.D. 935. “The skeletons are not preserved well in the soil of Korea,” bioanthropologist Dong Hoon Shin of Seoul National University College of Medicine told Live Science. The skeleton, of a woman in her late 30s, was found in a traditional coffin that had been buried near the historic capital of the Silla Kingdom, Gyeongju. Analysis of her mitochondrial DNA suggests that she belonged to a genetic lineage that is present in East Asia today. Carbon isotopes in...
  • Monastery new discovery in underground city in Cappadocia

    06/26/2016 6:02:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | June 23, 2016 | Anadolu Agency
    A monastery hewn from the rock has been found during excavations and cleaning works in an underground city that was discovered in 2014 in the Central Anatolian province of Nevsehir... Excavation and cleaning works have been continuing on an area of 400,000 square meters that includes 11 neighborhoods around Nevsehir Castle, which is situated in the city center and has been declared a third-degree archaeological area. At the beginning of the year, a historic church was discovered in the underground city. The church features frescoes depicting the ascension of Jesus to heaven as well as other important objects for the...
  • List of Possible Zika Birth Defects Grows Longer

    06/25/2016 3:58:57 PM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 15 replies
    Scientific American ^ | June 24, 2016 | Dina Fine Maron
    Even without microcephaly, seizures and developmental delays may appear in the months following birth The full scope of Zika-related birth defects may extend far beyond abnormally small heads and brain damage. Research to be presented next week at a teratology conference in San Antonio, Texas, suggests that serious joint problems, seizures, vision impairment, trouble feeding and persistent crying can be added to the list of risks from Zika exposure in the womb. The new findings confirm doctors’ concerns that even when Zika-exposed babies are born without microcephaly and appear largely normal at birth they can go on to have health...
  • The Luxury Yacht Charter Experience - I Want THIS!!!

    06/25/2016 7:55:26 AM PDT · by truthnomatterwhat · 47 replies
    MGM Yachts ^ | April 10, 2016 | Melanie Burke
    If you value exceptional service and the personal customization that luxury yacht chartersl affords, if you enjoy tropical destinations, and appreciate the treatment you receive at five star hotels, then a luxury yacht charter will lift you to the pinnacle of your desires. On a professionally staffed luxury charter yacht you’ll enjoy the luxury service and pampering that's beyond a fine luxury resort. With the added benefit of visiting beautiful, remote destinations, many of which can only be reached by boat. Bask in the sheer joy of swimming in crystal clear turquoise waters, strolling on remote powdery white beaches as...
  • Wealthy 3,600-year-old Trading Hub Found in Gaza

    06/25/2016 6:29:28 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Haaretz ^ | May 20, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The remains of a vast Bronze Age town... has been discovered in Gaza, and has now been shown to be a rich trading hub. The prosperity of its Canaanite inhabitants is evident in discoveries of elaborate gold jewelry, vast amounts of imported pottery and an unprecedented number of scarabs... trade between the seaside Canaanite town and other Mediterranean peoples, notably the ancient Cypriots. Among the clay sherds discovered were over 200 of white slip I type of pottery, a type of ware rarely found outside of Cyprus. Tell el-Ajjul, which lies right on the Gazan coast, was first explored by...
  • Ancient Canaanites Imported Animals from Egypt

    06/25/2016 5:03:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 21, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The ancient Canaanites living in Gath some 5,000 years ago weren't sacrificing their own livestock to appease the gods. They were importing animals from ancient Egypt, archaeologists have now proven. A donkey, as well as some sheep and goats whose remains were found in Early Bronze Age layers at Gath dating to 4900 years ago turn out to have been born and bred in the Nile valley.The discovery at the archaeological site of Tell el-Safi shows that animals were part of the extensive trading relations between the Old Kingdom of Egypt and Early Bronze Age Canaan (circa 2900-2500 BCE).... Until...
  • Campsite dating back 12,000 years unearthed by Route 8 [New Brunswick, Canada]

    06/24/2016 10:51:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    CBC News ^ | June 23, 2016 | Alan White, Shane Fowler
    Archaeologists say a campsite unearthed just metres from a new highway in Fredericton could be more than 12,000 years old. The campsite held 600 artifacts, most of which were from tool making, as well as a fire pit containing ancient charcoal... Artifacts including stone tool fragments and arrowheads that would have been attached to rods to make spears have been found at the site. No ceremonial objects were found at the site. The campsite is located just metres from the shoulder of a stretch of Route 8. Suttie estimated the site to be between 11,600 and 12,200 years old. The...
  • Skeletons and Gold Coins Found in Pompeii Shop

    06/24/2016 10:31:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, June 24, 2016 | editors
    Archaeologists excavating a shop on the outskirts of Pompeii have found four skeletons, several gold coins, and a necklace pendant, according to an Associated Press report. The skeletons belonged to young people who died in the back of the shop when nearby Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79. There was an oven in the shop that the archaeologists believe may have been used to make bronze objects. There is evidence that the shop was targeted by looters seeking treasure after the eruption, but they apparently missed the gold coins and the gold-leaf-foil, flower-shaped pendant. Archaeologists have been excavating a second...
  • Marshals: Innocent People Placed On 'Watch List' To Meet Quota

    06/24/2016 7:50:11 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 20 replies
    The Denver Channel ^ | 21 Jun, 2016
    You could be on a secret government database or watch list for simply taking a picture on an airplane. Some federal air marshals say they're reporting your actions to meet a quota, even though some top officials deny it. The air marshals, whose identities are being concealed, told 7NEWS that they're required to submit at least one report a month. If they don't, there's no raise, no bonus, no awards and no special assignments. "Innocent passengers are being entered into an international intelligence database as suspicious persons, acting in a suspicious manner on an aircraft ... and they did nothing...
  • Man Gets Entire Plane To Himself After Fellow Travelers Catch Other Flights

    06/24/2016 3:07:50 AM PDT · by SMGFan · 74 replies
    Consumerist ^ | June 23, 2016
    It’s not every day that the average traveler has an entire row of seats to take over, much less an entire plane. But one Delta passenger flying home this week got to experience the sweet sensation of being the only person on his flight when his fellow travelers opted to take other flights. Everything worked out perfectly for the Atlanta man, despite his initial worries when he showed up to an empty gate area at the airport in New Orleans earlier this week. “I was so nervous,” he told WSB-TV. “I couldn’t believe it. I felt like I missed my...
  • Archaeologist: Many thousands of years ago life flourished in the Gobi desert

    06/23/2016 11:33:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Science & Scholarship in Poland ^ | June 10, 2016 | Szymon Zdziebiowski (PAP) [szz/zan/mrt]
    Many thousands of years ago life flourished in the Mongolian Gobi desert... Archaeologists found many traces of old camps... located on the shores of lakes - now dried. Based on the findings, researchers concluded that thousands of years ago richness of species of animals lived in the study area, benefiting the ancient inhabitants of the desert. Archaeologists discovered mainly stone tools and the waste associated with their production... The oldest finds are represented by a massive stone tools made by the Middle Palaeolithic communities (200 thousand - 40 thousand years ago). Archaeologists have also discovered smaller stone products from later...
  • Farming Invented Twice In Middle East, Genomes Study Reveals

    06/22/2016 11:55:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Nature ^ | June 20, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Study of 44 ancient Middle Eastern genomes supports idea of independent farming revolutions in the Fertile Crescent. Two Middle Eastern populations independently developed farming and then spread the technology to Europe, Africa and Asia, according to the genomes of 44 people who lived thousands of years ago in present-day Armenia, Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Iran. ...the research supports archaeological evidence about the multiple origins of farming, and represents the first detailed look at the ancestry of the individuals behind one of the most important periods in human history — the Neolithic revolution. Some 11,000 years ago, humans living in the...
  • Discovery Of Roman Coins In Devon Redraws Map Of Empire

    06/22/2016 11:47:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Wednesday, June 22, 2016 | Steven Morris
    The discovery of a few muddy coins in a Devon paddock by a pair of amateur metal detector enthusiasts has led to the redrawing of the boundary of the Roman empire in south-west Britain. Previously it had been thought that Ancient Rome’s influence did not stretch beyond Exeter but the find has resulted in a major archaeological dig that has unearthed more coins, a stretch of Roman road and the remnants of vessels from France and the Mediterranean once full of wine, olive oil and garum -- fish sauce. The far south-west of Britain has long been seen as an...
  • Make It So! Sayeth Cleopatra

    06/21/2016 6:35:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Archaeology, Volume 54 Number 1 ^ | January/February 2001 | Angela M. H. Schuster
    A single Greek word, ginesthoi, or "make it so," written at the bottom of a Ptolemaic papyrus may have been written by the Egyptian queen Cleopatra VII herself, says Dutch papyrologist Peter van Minnen of the University of Groningen. Received in Alexandria on Mecheir 26 (February 23, 33 B.C.), the papyrus text, recycled for use in the construction of a cartonnage mummy case found by a German expedition at Abusir in 1904, appears to be a royal ordinance granting tax exemption to one Publius Canidius, an associate of Mark Antony's who would command his land army during the Battle of...
  • No signs of Zika or West Nile in Cochise County so far

    06/20/2016 3:40:00 PM PDT · by SandRat
    Sierra Vista Herald ^ | Andrew Paxton
    SIERRA VISTA — Cochise County has not seen a case of either the Zika or West Nile virus this season, but conditions will soon be changing which will bring more chances for mosquitos to flourish, and health officials are responding. County health officials have been trapping mosquitoes and sending them to state labs for testing, which have so far yielded no positive cases, said county Public Health Emergency Preparedness Director Elizabeth Lueck. “The main point here is that right now, we don’t have Zika or West Nile in Cochise County,” she
  • Archaeologists Discover 6,500-Year-Old Grave of Man Holding Stone Ax Scepter... [Bulgaria]

    06/19/2016 5:30:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Archaeology In Bulgaria ^ | June 14, 2016 | Ivan Dikov
    A 6,500-year-old grave of a man holding in his hands a stone ax scepter has been discovered by archaeologists excavating a recently found necropolis from from the Chalcolithic (Aeneolithic, Copper Age) in the town of Kamenovo, Kubrat Municipality, Razgrad District, in Northeast Bulgaria. A total of seven graves were found in the Chalcolithic necropolis in Kamenovo when it was first discovered back in September 2015. However, these were all graves of women and children (of the Mediterranean anthropological type), with the newly discovered grave being the first male grave to be found there to date, reports local news site Darik...
  • Wine Used In Ritual Ceremonies 5000 Years Ago In Georgia, The Cradle Of Viticulture

    06/19/2016 5:23:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Science Daily ^ | Ca' Foscari University of Venice
    Georgian-Italian archaeological expedition of Ca' Foscari University of Venice in collaboration with the Georgian Museum of Tbilisi has discovered vine pollen in a zoomorphic vessel used in ritual ceremonies by the Kura-Araxes population. In the archeological site of Aradetis Orgora, 100 kilometers to the west of the Georgian capital Tbilisi, Ca' Foscari's expedition led by Elena Rova (Ca' Foscari University of Venice) and Iulon Gagoshidze (Georgian National Museum Tbilisi) has discovered traces of wine inside an animal-shaped ceramic vessel (circa 3,000 BC), probably used for cultic activities. The vessel has an animal-shaped body with three small feet and a pouring...
  • High Altitude Archaeology: Prehistoric Paintings Revealed

    06/19/2016 5:20:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Wednesday, May 25, 2016 | University of York
    Archaeologists at the University of York have undertaken pioneering scans of the highest prehistoric paintings of animals in Europe. Studying the rock paintings of Abri Faravel, a rock shelter in the Southern French Alps 2,133m above sea level, archaeologists used car batteries to power laser and white-light scanners in a logistically complex operation. Producing virtual models of the archaeological landscape, researchers have now published the scans in Internet Archaeology - an online, open-access journal. Abri Faravel was discovered fortuitously in 2010. The rock shelter has seen phases of human activity from the Mesolithic to the medieval period, with its prehistoric...
  • 'Eye-watering' Scale Of Black Death's Impact On England Revealed

    06/19/2016 5:11:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Last modified on Thursday 26 May 2016 | Maev Kennedy
    Scraps of broken pottery from test pits dug by thousands of members of the public have revealed the devastating impact of the Black Death in England, not just in the years 1346 to 1351 when the epidemic ripped Europe apart, but for decades or even centuries afterwards. The quantity of sherds of everyday domestic pottery -- the most common of archaeological finds -- is a good indicator of the human population because of its widespread daily use, and the ease with which it can be broken and thrown away. By digging standard-sized test pits, then counting and comparing the broken...
  • Lucy Had Neighbors: a Review Of African Fossils

    06/18/2016 3:47:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | June 6, 2016 | Cleveland Museum of Natural History
    The researchers trace the fossil record, which illustrates a timeline placing multiple species overlapping in time and geographic space. Their insights spur further questions about how these early human ancestors were related and shared resources... The 1974 discovery of Australopithecus afarensis, which lived from 3.8 to 2.9 million years ago, was a major milestone in paleoanthropology that pushed the record of hominins earlier than 3 million years ago and demonstrated the antiquity of human-like walking. Scientists have long argued that there was only one pre-human species at any given time before 3 million years ago that gave rise to another...
  • Current Diversity Pattern Of North American Mammals A 'Recent' Trend, Study Finds

    06/18/2016 3:05:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | June 13, 2016 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    It's called the latitudinal diversity gradient, a phenomenon seen today in most plant and animal species around the world: Biodiversity decreases from the equator to higher latitudes. A new study of fossils representing 63 million of the past 65 million years reveals that -- for North American mammals, at least -- the modern LDG is the exception rather than the rule. The findings, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, point to the importance of not assuming that the way things are today is the way they've always been, the researchers say... It may seem obvious that...
  • Ancient DNA Shows Perfect Storm Felled Ice Age Giants

    06/18/2016 2:53:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Friday, June 17, 2016 | University of Adelaide, Alan Cooper et al
    "Patagonia turns out to be the Rosetta Stone - it shows that human colonisation didn't immediately result in extinctions, but only as long as it stayed cold," says study leader Professor Alan Cooper, ACAD Director. "Instead, more than 1000 years of human occupation passed before a rapid warming event occurred, and then the megafauna were extinct within a hundred years." The researchers, including from the University of Colorado Boulder, University of New South Wales and University of Magallanes in Patagonia, studied ancient DNA extracted from radiocarbon-dated bones and teeth found in caves across Patagonia, and Tierra del Fuego, to trace...
  • 'Pristine' Landscapes Haven't Existed For Thousands Of Years Due To Human Activity

    06/18/2016 2:47:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | June 6th, 2016 | University of Oxford
    It draws on fossil evidence showing Homo sapiens was present in East Africa around 195,000 years ago and that our species had dispersed to the far corners of Eurasia, Australia, and the Americas by 12,000 years ago. This increase in global human populations is linked with a variety of species extinctions, one of the most significant being the reduction by around two-thirds of 150 species of 'megafauna' or big beasts between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, says the paper, with their disappearance having 'dramatic effects' on the structure of the ecosystem and seed dispersal. ...second... the advent of agriculture worldwide,...
  • How Southeastern Mayan People Overcame The Catastrophic Eruption Of Ilopango?

    06/18/2016 2:41:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Nagoya University
    A Nagoya University researcher and his leading international research group discovered a Great Platform built with different kinds of stone at the archeological site of San Andrés, El Salvador, and challenged the prevailing theory regarding the sociocultural development of Southeastern Maya frontier... Archaeological investigation conducted during 40's and 90's has shown that San Andrés had long human occupation beginning from the Middle Preclassic (ca. 600 BC) until the Early Postclassic (ca. AD 1200), in which had role as political, economic and religious center during the Late Classic period (AD 600-900)... Between February and May of 2016, the research group led...
  • New Cretaceous Fossils Shed Light On The Early Evolution Of Ants

    06/18/2016 2:33:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | May 30, 2016 | Current Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
    The vast majority of Cretaceous ants belong to stem-group Formicidae and comprise workers and reproductives of largely generalized morphologies... recent discoveries from the Cretaceous suggest relatively advanced social levels. Remarkable exceptions to this pattern of generalized morphologies are ants with bizarre mouthparts in which both female castes have modified heads and bladelike mandibles that uniquely move in a horizontal rather than vertical plane... with the mandibles apparently acting as traps triggered by sensory hairs in a way distinct from that of modern trap-jaw ants... some of the most effective predatory ants are solitary hunters with powerful trap jaws... Dr. WANG...
  • Roman Silver Hoard Discovered in Scotland

    06/18/2016 12:53:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, June 14, 2016 | editors
    Researchers led by Gordon Noble of the University of Aberdeen returned to a farmer’s field in northeastern Scotland where a hand pin, chain, and spiral bangle all made of silver in the fourth or fifth centuries A.D. had been found more than 170 years ago. According to a report in Live Science, on the second day of the investigation, the team, which had the assistance of metal detectorists, found three Roman silver coins, a silver strap end, a piece of a silver bracelet, and pieces of hack silver. Over a period of 18 months, they gathered a total of 100...
  • Italian team finds earliest footprints of Homo Erectus

    06/18/2016 12:42:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    The Local (Italy) ^ | June 16, 2016 | unattributed
    A team of Italian researchers have possibly uncovered the oldest ever fossilized footprint left behind by modern man's ancestor, Homo Erectus. The prints are thought to date back some 800,000 years and were unearthed in the desert of south eastern Eritrea... Alfredo Coppa... from Rome's Sapienza university... and his Italian colleagues were working with researchers from Eritrea's National Museum when they unearthed the 26 m2 slab of stone containing the footprints. Today, the area lies in the middle of an arid desert, but 800,000 years ago the environment was very different. The fossilized footprints, which are almost indistinguishable to those...
  • Throne of Homer’s hero is unearthed

    06/18/2016 2:45:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    The Times of London ^ | June 18 2016 | Anthee Carassava
    A chunk of worked limestone unearthed at a dig came from to the lost throne of Agamemnon, the ancient Greek hero revered by Homer in The Iliad, his epic story of the Trojan War, according to an archaeologist. Christofilis Maggidis, who leads excavations in Mycenae, in the north-eastern Peloponnese, said that the 110lb (50kg) slab was found two years ago in a streambed metres from a palace that collapsed during an earthquake in about 1200 BC. “This is one of the most emblematic and significant finds from the Mycenaean era,” Mr Maggidis said after an elaborate, year-long study of the...
  • Tools that may be a million years old discovered near Tarragona

    06/18/2016 2:34:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 113 replies
    Catalan News Agency (CNA) ^ | Monday, 13 June 2016 | unattributed
    A set of 50 flint tools has been discovered in Barranc de la Boella, near Tarragona, a city 80 kilometres south of Barcelona. The tools are estimated to be between 800,000 and a million years old... Co-director of the excavation and researcher at IPHES, Josep Vallverdú, stated that the site “contains the oldest files on human evolution in Catalonia and on the Iberian Peninsula”, of which the potential is still unknown. These tools were found in an area known as La Mina, and are supposedly very well preserved, along with animal skeletal remains and coprolites, most notably related to deer,...
  • Study aims to uncover mystery of Luxor's tomb KV55

    06/17/2016 11:10:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    al-Ahram (English) ^ | Tuesday, June 14, 2016 | Nevine El-Aref
    This week, the Ministry of Antiquities will start the second phase of a study aimed at uncovering the mystery behind an unidentified sarcophagus found in 1906 inside tomb KV55 at the Valley of the Kings on Luxor’s west bank. The study is being operated with a grant of $28,500 from the American Research Centre in Egypt (ARCE) Endowment Fund. This tomb was thought to hold the body of the monotheistic king Akhenaten, though no definitive evidence has been presented to back up this speculation. Elham Salah, head of the ministry’s Museums Department, told Ahram Online that the study is being...
  • Zika, other Brazilian problems dull U.S. appetite for Olympics travel

    06/16/2016 11:37:03 AM PDT · by C19fan · 13 replies
    Cleveland.com ^ | June 16, 2016 | Sabrina Eaton
    Problems like the Zika virus, crime and political turmoil are giving tourists second thoughts about travel to Brazil for the 2016 Olympic games, tourism experts say. University of Florida tourism professor Lori Pennington-Gray says advance travel bookings are down from what they were for previous Olympics.
  • 1 Killed, 2 Injured by Lightning in Manatee Co.

    06/15/2016 1:49:01 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    ABC Action News ^ | 6:06 AM, Jun 14, 2016
    Three farm workers were struck by lightning Monday in Manatee County, leaving one of them dead, deputies said. The workers with Falkner Farms at 35100 S.R. 64 in Myakka City were loading a truck about 5:10 p.m. when they were struck, according to Manatee County Sheriff’s Office. One of the workers was pronounced dead at the hospital. Two others were treated and released. No further details have been released
  • Archaeologists Find Ancient Collector's Hoard of Hasmonean Coins

    06/14/2016 12:54:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 10, 2016 | Nir Hasson
    A rare cache of silver coins dating to the Hasmonean period, some 2,140 years ago, has been discovered in a salvage excavation in central Israel. The 16 coins, shekels and half-shekels (tetradrachms and didrachms), date from around 126 BCE. They had been minted farther north, in the city of Tyre, and bear the images of the king, Antiochus VII and his brother Demetrius Israeli, stated Avraham Tendler, director of the excavation on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority... Closer analysis of the coins showed that the cache contains one or two coins from every year between 135 to 126 BCE... Aside...
  • French archaeologists unearth bones from 6,000-year-old massacre

    06/13/2016 11:18:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Tuesday 7 June 2016 | unattributed
    Neolithic group found in silo appeared to have suffered violent deaths, with multiple injuries to legs, hands and skulls. Archaeologists have discovered the remains of a 6,000-year-old massacre that took place in Alsace, in north-eastern France. The corpses of 10 individuals were found in one of 300 ancient silos, used to store grain and other food... The Neolithic group appeared to have had violent deaths, with multiple injuries to their legs, hands and skulls. The way in which the bodies were piled on top of each other suggested they had been killed together and dumped in the silo. “They were...
  • Monumental Ancient Naval Bases Discovered in Athens' Piraeus Harbor

    06/13/2016 11:01:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 08, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    After the Battle of Marathon ten years earlier, in 490 BCE, the Athenian statesman Themistocles outlined a military defensive program against the Persian invaders that was based entirely on sea power. As Plato put it, "Themistocles robbed his fellow-citizens of spear and shield, and degraded the people of Athens to the rowing-pad and the oar." Construction work in Piraeus had already begun in 493 BCE (also on Themistocles advice).  Now, recent underwater excavations conducted by ZHP Project, which combines land and underwater archaeology of the ancient Zea and Mounichia harbors in Piraeus, have uncovered naval bases and huge fortifications that...
  • London’s Muslim Mayor Bans Sexy Women In Advertisements

    06/13/2016 6:49:00 PM PDT · by Beave Meister · 72 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | 6/13/2016 | Alex Pfeiffer
    Sadiq Khan, London’s first Muslim mayor, announced Monday that “body shaming” advertisements will no longer be allowed in London’s public transport. “As the father of two teenage girls, I am extremely concerned about this kind of advertising which can demean people, particularly women, and make them ashamed of their bodies. It is high time it came to an end,” Khan said. The mayor added, “Nobody should feel pressurised, while they travel on the Tube or bus, into unrealistic expectations surrounding their bodies and I want to send a clear message to the advertising industry about this.” Khan was not clear...
  • Thailand's Nok Air sorry for pilot joke about crashing plane carrying ousted PM Yingluck

    06/13/2016 3:49:36 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 1 replies
    straitstimes.com ^ | Jun 13, 2016, 5:00 pm SGT | afp
    The pilot's comments were made in a social media chat group used by Nok Air pilots that was later leaked. In it a pilot posted a picture of Yingluck about to board their Nok Air flight over the weekend. One chat member responded with "We have prey on board". Another then added "CFIT". CFIT is an aviation acronym for "controlled flight into terrain", a term used to describe when a pilot unintentionally crashes a plane that has no technical problems. Panthongtae Shinawatra - the son of Yingluck's brother Thaksin Shinawatra, who was toppled as premier by a 2006 coup -...
  • Russia Says Its New Commercial Airliner Is as Good as Any Boeing or Airbus

    06/13/2016 11:44:28 AM PDT · by C19fan · 42 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | June 9, 2016 | David Grossman
    The Russian government is getting into the business of commercial planes. The Russian United Aircraft Corporation (UAC), which is majority owned by the government, has just unveiled the MC-21 300, which it boasts will be a rival to the best planes coming out of commercial aerospace, like the Airbus A320neo and the Boeing 737Max.
  • Orlando Nightclub Gunman Scouted Walt Disney World as Potential Target: Source

    06/13/2016 11:13:26 AM PDT · by C19fan · 47 replies
    People ^ | June 13, 2016 | Stephanie Petit
    he gunman behind the Orlando nightclub shootings, the deadliest mass shooting in American history, recently scouted Walt Disney World as a potential target, a federal law enforcement source tells PEOPLE. Omar Mateen and his wife, Noor Zahi Salman, visited Walt Disney World in April, the source says. Salman told federal authorities on Sunday that her husband had more recently been "scouting Downtown Disney and Pulse [nightclub] for attacks."
  • Body In Well Confirms Viking Saga

    06/12/2016 6:41:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 65 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | June 10, 2016 | editors
    Archaeologists working in Trondheim in Norway are amazed by the discovery of a human skeleton in the bottom of an abandoned castle well. The skeleton provides evidence that confirms dramatic historical events mentioned in the Sagas. The location and contents of the well are mentioned in Sverre's Saga, a chronicle of one of the kings of Norway, and one of very few historical manuscripts describing events in the Norwegian Viking age and medieval period. Scholars have questioned the chronicle's trustworthiness as a historical document. But now, at least one part of the saga seems to hold truth -- down to...
  • Turf Cutters Unearth Prehistoric Lump Of Bog Butter [Ireland]

    06/12/2016 5:52:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    Belfast Telegraph ^ | June 9, 2016 | unattributed
    A prehistoric 10 kilo lump of bog butter thought to have been a gift to the gods has been found by turf cutters. The creamy white dairy product, which smells like a strong cheese and is believed to be about 2,000 years old, was unearthed by Jack Conway, from Maghera, Co Cavan, while he worked on Emlagh bog in Co Meath last week. The find, while not unusual, has been given to the National Museum where it will be preserved. Andy Halpin, assistant keeper in the museum's Irish Antiquities Division, said the discovery was significant because it was found in...
  • Chinese archaeologists find evidence of the fabled imperial home of Kublai Khan's Yuan dynasty

    06/12/2016 5:24:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    South China Morning Post ^ | Thursday, June 9, 2016, updated Friday, June 10, 2016 | Laura Zhou
    After the dynasty collapsed, there were no clues as to where it was and it lived on only in legend through writings such as those of 13th century Venetian merchant Marco Polo. If Polo is to be believed, the walls of "the greatest palace that ever was" were covered with gold and silver and the main hall was so large that it could easily seat 6,000 people for dinner. "The palace was made of cane supported by 200 silk cords, which could be taken to pieces and transported easily when the emperor moved," he wrote in his travel journal. It...
  • Here's why New York City smells so rancid in the summer

    06/11/2016 7:18:17 AM PDT · by C19fan · 76 replies
    Business Insider ^ | June 7, 2016 | Molly Sequin
    For travelers with the gleam of the Big Apple in their eye, nothing seems better than New York City in the summertime. Restaurants have outdoor seating, there are festivals all over town, and you don't have to worry about bringing your jacket to Top of the Rock.
  • First U.S. testing of a man-carrying drone planned for later this year in Nevada

    06/11/2016 7:06:59 AM PDT · by KeyLargo · 32 replies
    ZME Science ^ | June 8, 2016 | Elaine Kauh
    First U.S. testing of a man-carrying drone planned for later this year in Nevada Alexandru Micu June 8, 2016 The Nevada Institute for Autonomous Systems has granted permission to Chinese drone company EHang to test its on-demand, passenger-carrying aerial vehicle inside state boundaries. This marks the first time a passenger-carrying drone has ever been tested anywhere in the United States. Chinese company EHang received testing rights for its EHang 184 model inside the state of Nevada on Monday, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reports. The vehicle is an autonomous human sized drone, which EHang was very happy to hail as the...
  • Exclusive: Studies find 'super bacteria' in Rio's Olympic venues, top beaches

    06/10/2016 7:57:12 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 43 replies
    reuters.com ^ | 06/10/2016 | Brad Brooks
    Scientists have found dangerous drug-resistant "super bacteria" off beaches in Rio de Janeiro that will host Olympic swimming events and in a lagoon where rowing and canoe athletes will compete when the Games start on Aug. 5. The findings from two unpublished academic studies seen by Reuters concern Rio's most popular spots for tourists and greatly increase the areas known to be infected by the microbes normally found only in hospitals. ... A study published in late 2014 had shown the presence of the super bacteria - classified by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as an...
  • Evenflo Car Seat That Reminds Driver Child Is In Car Is Promising, Not Perfect Yet

    06/09/2016 6:51:50 AM PDT · by SMGFan · 27 replies
    Consumerist ^ | June 8, 2016
    Technology can’t solve all of our problems, but maybe there’s a technological solution that can help with a tragedy that has affected parents of all walks of life: leaving small children in hot cars to overheat and die. The happens to an average of 38 kids every year, and car seat maker Evenflo responded to safety advocates by making a seat and harness that integrates with your car’s electronics. Before you insist that this could never happen to you because you’re a good parent, review the Pulitzer-Prize-winning article on the subject from the Washington Post that explains the mechanism in...
  • Remnants of 19th century boat found under Highlands home [New Jersey]

    06/08/2016 7:48:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    News12 ^ | May 26, 2016 | unattributed
    A historic discovery was made underneath a home in Monmouth County when a family discovered remnants of an old boat. The Scanlon family was in the process of getting one of their cottages raised when the discovery was made. The Highlands residents were affected by Superstorm Sandy and were finally able to get the homes raised. Tuesday morning, while crews were working on the home, they found the remains of a boat believed to date back to the 1800s. Eileen Scanlon says that in 2009, she had an inspector look at the property and saw the rudder of the boat....