Travel (General/Chat)

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  • Opening Weekend of Oktoberfest 2014 (photos)

    09/22/2014 1:00:13 PM PDT · by C19fan · 51 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | September 22, 2014 | Staff
    One million steins of beer were consumed over the weekend, organizers say, as tourists and locals kicked off the 181st Oktoberfest. The Bavarian beer festival, held on Munich's Theresienwiese, lasts 16 days and will welcome more than six million visitors from around the world. This year, the average price of a mug of beer at any of the tents this year comes to €10.67 ($13.70 U.S.). Gathered here are some of the scenes from the opening weekend of Oktoberfest 2014.
  • Village from the Roman period discovered in the Carpathians

    09/21/2014 2:11:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | September 17, 2014 | Science and Scholarship in Poland, tr. RL
    Village from the Roman period, dating from 3rd-4th century AD, has been discovered in Lipnica Dolna near Jasło (Subcarpathia). Among approx. one thousand archaeological objects there is a large pottery kiln, in which ceramics were fired. "The kiln is two meters in length and the same in width. It stands on a small tip in the Wisłoka valley. Its location shows that the wind blowing from the river was used to maintain the temperature during the firing cycle" - said Tomasz Leszczyński, archaeologist from the Subcarpathian Museum in Krosno. He added that "such kilns are extremely rare in the Carpathians"....
  • Highlight 14: Roman enamelled cockerel figurine. The Former Bridges Garage site, Cirencester

    09/21/2014 12:47:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Cotswold Archaeology ^ | retrieved September 20, 2014 | unattributed
    The find is believed to date to the middle decades of the second century AD. It came from the grave of a child aged 2–3 years. The child had been buried in a nailed wooden coffin and also accompanied by his or her shoes, of which only the iron hobnails survived, and a pottery feeding cup or ‘tettine’. Only eight finds of this type are known from the Roman world, from Britain, Germany and the Low Countries. It is believed that cockerel figurines of this type, together with other richly-enamelled bronze vessels of high workmanship, were made in northern Britain...
  • Ancient Egyptian Woman with 70 Hair Extensions Discovered

    09/21/2014 12:13:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 17, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    More than 3,300 years ago, in a newly built city in Egypt, a woman with an incredibly elaborate hairstyle of lengthy hair extensions was laid to rest. She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore "a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head," writes Jolanda Bos, an archaeologist working on the Amarna Project, in an article recently published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology. Researchers don't know her name, age or occupation, but she is one of hundreds...
  • Millennia-old sunken ship could be world’s oldest, researchers suggest

    09/21/2014 11:49:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Hürriyet Daily News ^ | Friday, September 5 2014 | Anadolu Agency
    Underwater excavations led by Ankara UniversityÂ’s Research Center for Maritime Archaeology (ANKÃœSAM) have uncovered sunken ships ranging from the second century B.C. to the Ottoman period in Ä°zmirÂ’s Urla district. A recent excavation uncovered a ship estimated to date back 4,000 years, which experts say would make it the oldest sunken ship to have been discovered in the Mediterranean. Urla Port is one of TurkeyÂ’s rare underwater excavation sites. Professor Hayat Erkanal, the head of Limantepe excavations for the underwater ancient city of Klozemenai and director of ANKÃœSAM, said the port dates back to the seventh century B.C. Klozemenai, he...
  • Pharaoh-Branded Amulet Found at Ancient Copper Mine in Jordan

    09/21/2014 11:21:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 19, 2014 | Megan Gannon
    ...The tiny artifact could attest to the fabled military campaign that Sheshonq I waged in the region nearly 3,000 years ago, researchers say... The site, which was discovered during excavations in 2002, was home to intense metal production during the Early Bronze Age, between about 3000 B.C. and 2000 B.C. But there is also evidence of more recent smelting activities at Khirbat Hamra Ifdan during the Iron Age, from about 1000 B.C. to 900 B.C. The hieroglyphic sequence on the scarab reads: "bright is the manifestation of Re, chosen of Amun/Re." That moniker corresponds to the throne name of Sheshonq...
  • China: Ancient Tomb of First Emperor Qin Shi Huang's Grandmother Discovered in Xi'an

    09/21/2014 10:33:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    International Business Times ^ | Mary-Ann Russon | September 11, 2014
    According to China.org.cn, the tomb complex covers an area measuring 173,325 square metres, stretching 550m in length and 310 meters in width, and is the second largest tomb to have ever been discovered in the country... Qin Shi Huang (260-210BC) was the first emperor to unify China and enact major economic and political reforms across the country. China had previously consisted of a multitude of warring states and kingdoms, each under the control of feudal overlords, leading to much instability... After the death of Qin Shi Huang's father, he took the throne at the age of 13. His mother took...
  • The Star-Spangled Banner: Family Keepsake

    09/21/2014 8:38:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | retrieved 2014 | unattributed
    While Francis Scott Key's song was known to most Americans by the end of the Civil War, the flag that inspired it remained an Armistead family keepsake. It was exhibited occasionally at patriotic gatherings in Baltimore but largely unknown outside of that city until the 1870s. The flag remained the private property of Lieutenant Colonel Armistead's widow, Louisa Armistead, his daughter Georgiana Armistead Appleton, and his grandson Eben Appleton for 90 years. During that time, the increasing popularity of Key's anthem and the American public's developing sense of national heritage transformed the Star-Spangled Banner from a family keepsake into a...
  • Cruising at 37,000 feet-is this TOO CLOSE?

    09/20/2014 3:25:22 PM PDT · by rlmorel · 108 replies
    9/20/2014 | Myself
    Cruising at 37,00 feet eastbound, surfing the Internet, I paused for a second and looked out the window and saw another airliner flash by going 180 degrees in the opposite direction. I readily admit I am no good at estimating relative distance in the air, I have never seen another plane pass this close...ever. I could have read the tail number, it was that close, but I was so startled I didn't even register the kind of plane it was, though it was white with an engine under each wing. Here is where it happened, at 1750 EST:
  • 10 Common Misconceptions About Britain

    09/20/2014 1:42:20 PM PDT · by Brother Cracker · 57 replies
    listverse ^ | April 14, 2009 | Listverse Staff
    If you are British, or know a lot about Britain, you won’t be surprised by the misconceptions below. However, you may be even MORE surprised to learn that in some places these things are believed! If you believe all or any of these points, sorry, but you are mistaken – but fortunately listverse is here to correct things. Here they are, in no particular order: 10 British Nation British-Flag.Jpg Misconception: Britain is a country. While “Britain” or “Great Britain” does refer to the general area, neither of them refers to a country. Britain is a general term for Wales, Scotland...
  • Flight bans from Ebola-hit countries will stay in effect, Kenya tells AU

    09/17/2014 6:06:33 PM PDT · by Morgana · 9 replies
    SABAHI ^ | staff
    The Kenyan government has declined to comply with a request from the African Union to resume flights to and from Ebola-effected countries of Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, Kenya's Capital FM reported Tuesday (September 16th). Kenya announced a ban on travellers from the three West African countries on August 19th, and grounded flights on those routes. "We have a protocol on how to lift the ban and it is a health protocol. Once we are satisfied that it is okay to lift it, then we will do it. For now, we have not done so," Principal Secretary for Health Khalifa...
  • Jurassic 'squirrels' push back clock on emergence of mammals

    09/17/2014 5:26:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | September 10, 2014 | Pete Spotts
    In placing three newly discovered species along the mammal family tree, researchers conclude that mammals emerged and exploded in diversity between 235 million and 201 million years ago... Over the past three years, a team of researchers has uncovered six 160-million-year-old fossils that represent three new species who were living in trees at the time of the dinosaurs. In placing these creatures along the mammal family tree, the researchers conclude that mammals emerged and exploded in diversity between 235 million and 201 million years ago, during the Triassic period. If the results hold up to additional scrutiny, they imply a...
  • The Lost Forest World of the World’s Largest Cave

    09/16/2014 8:13:52 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 32 replies
    mysteriousuniverse.org ^ | September 16, 2014 | Brent Swancer
    In 1991, a local farmer by the name of Ho Khanh was walking along a stretch of lush forest within the heart of the Phong Nha Ke Bang National Park in Quang Binh province, near the border between Laos and Vietnam....when suddenly the jungle floor opened up beneath him and Mr. Khanh only barely managed to hold on as the ground crumbled beneath him.... By pure chance and blind luck, this man had discovered an entrance that had remained hidden from man for millions of years into what would turn out to be the largest cave in the world, a...
  • Labour MP: Beat gridlock with a ban on owning a car and force motorists to share vehicles (UK)

    09/13/2014 6:40:49 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 36 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 05:46 EST, 13 September 2014 | (MailOnline Reporter)
    Owning a car should be “outlawed” to force people on to public transport, a senior Labour MP has suggested. Motorists who want to drive should instead be forced to join communal “car clubs” where the cars are shared by drivers and used only when needed. Dr. Alan Whitehead, a Labour MP for Southampton Test and a member of the Energy and Climate Change select committee, said the increase in car ownership would lead to “something approaching a national traffic jam before 2040”. He claimed that radical action would be needed to avoid national gridlock. …
  • A Few Words About Reclining Airline Seats

    09/12/2014 11:47:15 AM PDT · by 1rudeboy · 68 replies
    Reason ^ | Steve Chapman | September 8, 2014
    Face it, people: You've made it clear you want a low price more than you want comfort, so this airline has provided it. Good morning. This is your captain. We'll be cruising today at an altitude of 30,000 feet, and we expect to arrive at our destination on time. Then we'll spend 45 minutes on the tarmac waiting for a gate to open up, because apparently, the airport folks had no idea we were coming. Our flight crew will be coming through the cabin shortly to offer you a choice of lukewarm beverages along with a tiny chemical-infused snack that...
  • Queen Mary Gives Shops 30 Days To Vacate, Make Room For Newer Retail Stores

    09/09/2014 10:20:18 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    CBSLA.com) ^ | September 9, 2014 8:07 PM
    LONG BEACH (CBSLA.com) — The general manager running the legendary luxury-liner-turned-hotel RMS Queen Mary has sent a letter to staff and management of the ship’s numerous shops, telling them they have 30 days to vacate the ship to make room for newer retail shops. The letter, according to an article by the Long Beach Post, is reportedly from Queen Mary General Manager John Jenkins and advises the stunned workers and shop-owners that they have 30 days in which to close and leave, as the ship begins a consolidated retail agreement with a new company. The company, called Event Network, is...
  • Assembly Complete for NASA’s First Orion Crew Module Blasting off Dec. 2014

    09/09/2014 5:12:18 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | September 9, 2014 | Ken Kremer on
    This past weekend, technicians completed assembly of NASA’s first Orion crew module at the agency’s Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout (O & C) Facility at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida, signifying a major milestone in the vehicles transition from fabrication to full scale launch operations. Orion is NASA’s next generation human rated vehicle and is scheduled to launch on its maiden uncrewed mission dubbed Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) in December 2014. It replaces the now retired space shuttle orbiters. The black Orion crew module (CM) sits atop the white service module (SM) in the O & C high...
  • A question for Mississippi FReepers: is the Delta safe for a tourist?

    09/08/2014 7:44:52 AM PDT · by Zionist Conspirator · 38 replies
    Self | 9/8/'14 | Zionist Conspirator
    Because of my heritage as a descendant of Southern Unionist Republicans, I used to really admire Black Americans and their culture, going all the way back to the works of Joel Chandler Harris and B.A. Botkin. Because of this I've long been a fan of traditional acoustic country blues, especially from the Mississippi Delta (Charlie Patton!). I've been longing for years to visit the Dockery Plantation between Ruleville and Cleveland, which is where the blues was allegedly born and where so many of the great Delta bluesmen played and/or worked as farm hands. Several years ago I actually took a...
  • Filipina 'Savagely' Fights 3 Abductors in Kuwait

    09/07/2014 11:03:47 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    Emirates 24/7 ^ | Saturday, September 06, 2014
    They smack her before fleeingA Filipina in her 20s put up a tough fight against three men who tried to abduct her while she was walking back home in Kuwait during the day. The girl managed to foil the kidnap attempt but she paid a heavy price for her resistance, when the angry men gave her a big smack before fleeing. The unnamed girl was walking back home in the capital Kuwait City around noon when the three men intercepted her and tried to take her away to rape her. Residents who saw the battle from their flat windows called...
  • GM reports 1.2 percent August sales decline

    09/06/2014 10:56:41 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 12 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Sep. 3, 2014 9:47 AM EDT
    General Motors says its U.S. sales fell 1.2 percent last month as rising truck and SUV sales couldn’t offset falling car sales. Three of GM’s four brands reported declines for the month. GMC, which sells only trucks and SUVs, reported a 10 percent increase. …
  • Stonehenge 'complete circle' evidence found

    09/06/2014 5:54:49 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    BBC ^ | August 30, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists say the discovery adds weight to the theory that Stonehenge was once a complete circle. Evidence that the outer stone circle at Stonehenge was once complete has been found, because a hosepipe used to water the site was not long enough. Parch marks in the grass, in an area that had not been watered, have revealed places where two "missing" huge sarsen stones may once have stood. The marks were spotted by an English Heritage steward who alerted archaeologists to their existence. Previous scientific techniques such as geophysics failed to find any evidence. Historians have long debated whether Stonehenge...
  • Complex Design, Political Disputes Send World Trade Center Rail Hub's Cost Soaring

    09/05/2014 6:15:49 AM PDT · by C19fan · 6 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | September 3, 2014 | Eliot Brown
    The most expensive train station in the U.S. is taking shape at the site of the former World Trade Center, a majestic marble-and-steel commuter hub that was seen by project boosters as a landmark to American hope and resilience. Instead, the terminal connecting New Jersey with downtown Manhattan has turned into a public-works embarrassment. Overtaking the project's emotional resonance is a practical question: How could such a high-profile project fall eight years behind schedule and at least $2 billion over budget?
  • Feds relax oversight on highway, bridge projects

    09/05/2014 4:49:58 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 3 replies
    The Hill ^ | 09/04/14 03:31 PM EDT | Tim Devaney
    States will have more leeway to build highways and bridges without oversight from Uncle Sam under new rules from the Obama administration. […] Since the 1990s, the FHWA has required states to conduct a cost-benefit analysis known as value engineering on any highway improvement project that costs more than $25 million or any bridge project that costs more than $20 million. […] But the FHWA is loosening the requirements so that states do not have to go through the value engineering process unless they plan on spending more than $50 million for a highway project or more than $40 million...
  • North Korea Still Owes $393,000,000 For Volvos It Bought In 1974

    09/05/2014 12:11:28 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 9 replies
    Jalopnik ^ | Tuesday, September 2, 2014 12:19 pm | Jason Torchinsky
    When we ran a story a while back about the cars of North Korea, one photo in particular caught my eye. In that photo was a green 1974 Volvo 144, which made me wonder if it was part of those 1000 legendary stolen Volvos I’d heard rumors about. It was, because those rumors are true. It’s around the 40th anniversary of one of the greatest state-sponsored mass carjackings in history, a fact that Newsweek commemorated with an article last week. That article stated that the total amount owed for those thousand Volvos is now up to €300 million ($393 million...
  • Solution to Seat Rage: No More Reclining

    09/04/2014 6:56:11 AM PDT · by C19fan · 63 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | September 4, 2014 | Will Doig
    It’s a sign of our air-rage times: three separate planes forced to divert in the space of two weeks when cramped passengers went ballistic over someone reclining their seat. In one episode, two undercover air marshals subdued and handcuffed the irate traveler in question. In another, a woman swore at the reclining passenger in front of her and screamed for the pilot to “put this plane down.” The dust-ups don’t shock Robert Mann, a former airline executive who now runs an airline-industry analysis company. “August is the highest load-factor month of the year for a North American carrier, and it’s...
  • Pirouetting (Buckingham) Palace guardsman: Soldier captured on video showing off his dance moves ...

    09/03/2014 1:21:07 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 15 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | September 2, 2014 | Rebecca English
    The pirouetting Palace guardsman: Soldier captured on video showing off his dance moves to delighted tourists (but top brass aren't so impressed) Guarding the Queen’s home is a serious and solemn duty. So it’s a good thing Her Majesty was not around to see this soldier apparently pirouetting on the forecourt of Buckingham Palace. In his red tunic and bearskin, the Grenadier Guard was filmed seemingly trying to ease the boredom of his two-hour shift with a series of remarkably elegant dance moves. His antics delighted tourists but the Army and Ministry of Defence were not amused. He could now...
  • 9 places all cat-lovers need to visit before they die

    08/31/2014 7:17:17 PM PDT · by Slings and Arrows · 27 replies
    Metro [UK] ^ | 31 Aug 2014 | Hannah Gale
    Turns out there is actually more to the world than cat cafes. Who knew eh? But for all people who firmly believe that cats are more important than humans (well, they are aren’t they?) HotelClub has rounded up the best tourist destinations around the world which feature our favourite feline friends.
  • Neolithic site dating back 5,000 yrs discovered in C China

    08/30/2014 2:37:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    China Daily ^ | Friday, August 29, 2014 | Xinhua
    Archaeologists in Central China's Henan province have excavated a large neolithic settlement complete with moats and a cemetery. The Shanggangyang Site covers an area of 120,000 square meters and sits along a river in Zhengzhou, capital of Henan, dating 5,000 to 6,000 years back to the Yangshao culture, which was widely known for its advanced pottery-making technology. The site features two defensive moats surrounding three sides. Researchers have found relics of three large houses as well as 39 tombs, the large number suggesting several generations resided there, archaeologist Gao Zanling, a member of the Zhengzhou Administration of Cultural Heritage, said....
  • New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits

    08/30/2014 2:32:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | August 28, 2014 | Uppsala University
    The genetic changes that transformed wild animals into domesticated forms have long been a mystery. An international team of scientists has now made a breakthrough by showing that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication... The domestication of animals and plants, a prerequisite for the development of agriculture, is one of the most important technological revolutions during human history. Domestication of animals started as early as 9,000 to 15,000 years ago and initially involved dogs, cattle, sheep, goats and pigs. The rabbit was domesticated much later, about 1,400 years...
  • Heat Protecting Back Shell Tiles Installed on NASA’s Orion EFT-1 Spacecraft Set for Dec. 2014 Launch

    08/30/2014 6:12:18 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 2 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | August 30, 2014 | Ken Kremer on
    The cone-shaped back shell actually has a rather familiar look since its comprised of 970 black thermal protection tiles – the same tiles which protected the belly of the space shuttles during three decades and 135 missions of returning from space. However, Orion’s back shell tiles will experience temperatures far in excess of those from the shuttle era. Whereas the space shuttles traveled at 17,000 miles per hour, Orion will hit the Earth’s atmosphere at some 20,000 miles per hour on this first flight test. The faster a spacecraft travels through Earth’s atmosphere, the more heat it generates. So even...
  • What to do at Niagara Falls?(Vanity)

    08/29/2014 3:57:39 PM PDT · by Wingy · 84 replies
    Wingy | 8/29/2014 | Wingy
    So a few weeks ago, my Wonderful Wife got a bug in her bonnet to see Niagara Falls.
  • US Heavy Lift Mars Rocket Passes Key Review and NASA Sets 2018 Maiden Launch Date

    08/28/2014 8:17:24 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | August 28, 2014 | Ken Kremer on
    After a thorough review of cost and engineering issues, NASA managers formally approved the development of the agency’s mammoth heavy lift rocket – the Space Launch System or SLS – which will be the world’s most powerful rocket ever built and is intended to take astronauts farther beyond Earth into deep space than ever before possible – to Asteroids and Mars. The maiden test launch of the SLS is targeted for November 2018 and will be configured in its initial 70-metric-ton (77-ton) version, top NASA officials announced at a briefing for reporters on Aug. 27. On its first flight known...
  • Scientists Reveal the Genetic Prehistory of the New World Arctic Peoples

    08/28/2014 6:29:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, August 28, 2014 | unattributed
    Paleo-Eskimo people occupied the Arctic for more than 4,000 years, say researchers... Maanasa Raghaven of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues have tested this scenario by conducting genomic sequencing on extractions of 169 ancient human bone, teeth and hair samples from Arctic Siberia, Alaska, Canada, and Greenland. They compared them to the same from two present-day Greenlandic Inuit, two Nivkhs, one Aleutian Islander, and two Athabascans. What they found provides a new picture of the population history of the North American Arctic. Their analyses supports the model of the arrival of Paleo-Eskimos into North America as a separate migration from...
  • American Indian Oral Traditions and Ohio's Earthworks

    08/28/2014 6:21:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Ohio History Connection Archaeology Blog ^ | August 25, 2014 | Brad Lepper
    ...So, while my Journal of Ohio Archaeology paper concludes rather pessimistically that there are no documented early American Indian traditions that speak reliably to the original purpose and meaning of the ancient earthworks, there is no reason to believe that traditional stories of contemporary tribes with historic roots in the eastern Woodlands could not include themes and elements that echo, if faintly, traditions of the Hopewell culture. And if that’s conceivable, and I think it is, then it would be worthwhile to look for them... One reason why it’s important to take seriously what American Indians have had to say...
  • Utah's Great Gallery rock art younger than expected, say scientists [1K-2K]

    08/28/2014 6:13:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | August 25, 2014 | Mary-Ann Muffoletto
    "The most accepted hypotheses pointed to the age of these paintings as 2,000 to 4,000 years old or perhaps even 7,000 to 8,000 years old," says Pederson, associate professor in USU's Department of Geology and lead author on the paper. "Our findings reveal these paintings were likely made between 1,000 to 2,000 years ago." The USU-led team's findings strike a key point about the art's creators: They may have co-existed with the Fremont people, who are credited with carving distinctly different pictographs found in the same region. "Previous ideas suggested a people different from the Fremont created the paintings because...
  • Hadrian's Wall dig unearths 2,000-year-old toilet seat

    08/28/2014 6:07:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    BBC News ^ | August 27, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,000-year-old, perfectly preserved wooden toilet seat at a Roman fort on Hadrian's Wall in Northumberland. Experts at Vindolanda believe it is the only find of its kind and dates from the 2nd Century. The site, near Hexham, has previously revealed gold and silver coins and other artefacts of the Roman army. The seat was discovered in a muddy trench, which was previously filled with rubbish. Dr Andrew Birley, director of excavations at Vindolanda, said: "We know a lot about Roman toilets from previous excavations at the site and from the wider Roman world, which have included...
  • 2,800-Year-Old Zigzag Art Found in Greek Tomb

    08/28/2014 6:00:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Wednesday, August 20, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The tomb was built sometime between 800 B.C. and 760 B.C., a time when Corinth was emerging as a major power and Greeks were colonizing the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea. The tomb itself consists of a shaft and burial pit, the pit having a limestone sarcophagus that is about 5.8 feet (1.76 meters) long, 2.8 feet (0.86 m) wide and 2.1 feet (0.63 m) high. When researchers opened the sarcophagus, they found a single individual had been buried inside, with only fragments of bones surviving. The scientists found several pottery vessels beside the sarcophagus, and the tomb also contained...
  • Phoenician Artifacts Recovered Off Coast of Malta

    08/28/2014 4:25:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology mag ^ | Monday, August 25, 2014 | unattributed
    Scientists from the French National Research Agency and Texas A&M University are part of a team that has recovered 20 Phoenician grinding stones and 50 amphorae about one mile off the coast of Malta’s Gozo Island. Timothy Gambin of the University of Malta told the Associated Press that the ship was probably traveling between Sicily and Malta when it sank ca. 700 B.C. The team will continue to look for other artifacts and parts of the vessel, which sits at a depth of almost 400 feet and is one of the oldest shipwrecks to be discovered in the central Mediterranean....
  • "Slaves' Hill" Was Home to High-Status Craftsmen

    08/28/2014 3:44:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Thursday, August 28, 2014
    New information from excavations in southern Israel’s Timna Valley by Erez Ben-Yosef and Lidar Sapir-Hen of Tel Aviv University suggests that the laborers who smelted copper at the site 3,000 years ago were skilled craftsmen of high social status. Since the 1930s, it has been thought that the Iron Age camp was inhabited by slaves because of the massive barrier that had been unearthed and the harsh conditions created by the furnaces and desert conditions. The well-preserved bones, seeds, fruits, and fabric that have been recently recovered tell a different story, however. “The copper smelters were given the better cuts...
  • Baltimore opens shiny, new Horseshoe Casino

    08/27/2014 12:16:18 PM PDT · by C19fan · 26 replies
    Baltimore Sun ^ | August 26, 2014 | Jeff Barker
    Even on a normal night, casinos can assault the senses with glitz, flashing lights, showgirls, cocktails, high rollers, fancy food and blaring music. So it follows that the long-awaited opening night of the $442 million Horseshoe Casino Baltimore would include all of those things — but magnified tenfold.
  • Rain Delays Burning Man Voyagers at Reno Wal-Mart (People of Wal-Mart just got weirder)

    08/27/2014 12:16:06 PM PDT · by a fool in paradise · 23 replies
    AP via ABC News ^ | Aug 26, 2014 | SCOTT SONNER Associated Press
    Hundreds of travelers on the road to Burning Man in their quest for oneness with nature and celebration of self-expression on a peaceful playa in northern Nevada's desert didn't expect to spend their first night in the parking lot of a Wal-Mart or Reno resort casino. But most were taking it in stride and were largely optimistic — as so-called "Burners" are apt to be — that the gates to the counterculture event would reopen Tuesday after rare rain showers in the Black Rock Desert turned the ancient lake bottom to a muddy quagmire the day before... ...Dozens of RVs...
  • Survivor: San Juan del Sur — Blood vs. Water

    08/27/2014 11:04:44 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 33 replies
    Multiple links in body of thread | August 27, 2014
    Survivor: San Juan del Sur — Blood vs. Water is the 29th season of Survivor. It begins Wednesday, September 24, 2014 on CBS at 8/7c with a special 90 minute episode. References: Official Survivor site at CBSWikipedia article Each team will consist of nine players. Unlike the first Blood vs. Water, it will feature all new players. Unlike the first Blood vs. Water, there will be no Redemption Island. Redemption Island had been previously announced for this series, but was cancelled and replaced with a new twist before shooting was to begin. It will be held in San Juan del...
  • Boeing Completes All CST-100 Commercial Crew CCiCAP Milestones on Time and on Budget for NASA...

    08/26/2014 5:34:34 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | August 26, 2014 | Ken Kremer on
    Boeing is the first, and thus far only one of the three competitors to complete all their assigned milestone task requirements under NASA’s Commercial Crew Integrated Capability (CCiCap) initiative funded under the auspices of the agency’s Commercial Crew Program. The CST-100 is a privately built, man rated capsule being developed with funding from NASA via the commercial crew initiative in a public/private partnership between NASA and private industry. The overriding goal is restart America’s capability to reliably launch our astronauts from US territory to low-Earth orbit (LEO) and the International Space Station (ISS) by 2017.
  • Disney Eyes Drone Technology For Theme Park Parades, Firework Shows

    08/26/2014 3:26:32 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 2 replies
    CBSLA.com) ^ | August 26, 2014 3:02 PM
    ANAHEIM (CBSLA.com) — Larger-than-life-sized Disney characters could one day take to the skies over the Happiest Place On Earth using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). KNX 1070’s Mike Landa reports the Walt Disney Company has applied for three patents that could replace the more traditional air- and gas-filled blimps and balloons at Disneyland. Disney engineers have signaled plans to develop “multi-drone aerial display” systems using floating pixels, floating projection screens, and marionettes, according to the Orange County Register. The “floating pixel” patent could be used to replace potentially dangerous firework shows with an aerial display that would use the night sky...
  • Flight Diverted When Passengers Feud Over Reclining Seat

    08/26/2014 2:37:43 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 107 replies
    NPR ^ | August 26, 2014 | Eyder Peralta
    Flying is already a pain. But a story from the Associated Press Tuesday really brings home the point: The wire service reports that an entire plane was diverted on Sunday after a fight broke out over a passenger's right to recline her seat. The AP explains: "The spat began on United Airlines Flight 1462 because one passenger was using the Knee Defender, a $21.95 lock that attaches to a tray table and jams the reclining mechanism of the seat in front. "The male passenger, seated in a middle seat of Row 12, used the device to stop the woman in...
  • How windowless planes could be the future of cheap air travel

    08/26/2014 1:46:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 79 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 5:03PM BST 26 Aug 2014 | By Alice Philipson
    Windowless planes could be the future of cheaper air travel as a government technology centre develops a proposal to help airlines save on fuel. In place of windows, plastic display screens projecting the sky outside could line the cabin of an aircraft. It is hoped the technology will significantly reduce aircraft weight and cut fuel costs without worrying nervous passengers. The display screens will function using a technique called printable electronics, which involves the use of conductive inks to carry electric current in cardboard and plastic for just a few pence per unit. The technology could be rolled out in...
  • The Ghost Hotels of the Catskills

    08/25/2014 9:42:24 AM PDT · by C19fan · 50 replies
    The Daily Beast ^ | August 25, 2014 | Brandon Presser
    Phones on desks, linens on beds, catalog cards spilling out of the filing cabinets—all covered with a fine patina of dust. Neglected for years, and abandoned in seconds, it’s like a modern-day Pompeii in which the earth suddenly reclaimed its souls as they went about their daily business. But this isn’t fodder for the next Dean Koontz thriller; it’s real, and its 100 miles north of New York City. Sullivan County once boasted 538 hotels and over 50,000 bungalows, but today practically nothing remains of this illustrious, vacationing era, save crumbling towers and abandoned estates. Walking through the haunting wreckage—thirsty...
  • Sierra Leone Makes Hiding Ebola Patients Illegal

    08/23/2014 2:51:20 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 4 replies
    abc ^ | Aug 23, 2014, 3:58 PM ET | CLARENCE ROY-MACAULAY ,Marc-Andre Boisvert,Jonathan Paye-Layleh
    Sierra Leone has passed a new law imposing possible jail time for anyone caught hiding an Ebola patient — a common practice that the World Health Organization believes has contributed to a major underestimation of the current outbreak. The new law, passed Friday, imposes prison terms of up to two years for violators, said lawmaker Ansumana Jaiah Kaikai. It now goes for presidential approval. He said the measure was necessary to compel residents to cooperate with government officials, noting that some residents had resisted steps to combat Ebola and build isolation centers in their communities. A total of 2,615 infections...
  • Icelandic volcano could trigger Britain's coldest winter EVER this year

    08/23/2014 8:23:20 AM PDT · by george76 · 36 replies
    Daily Express ^ | August 22, 2014 | Nathan Rao
    BRITAIN could freeze in YEARS of super-cold winters and miserable summers if the Baroabunga volcano erupts, experts have warned. Depending on the force of the explosion, minute particles thrust beyond the earth’s atmosphere can trigger DECADES of chaotic weather patterns. Tiny pieces of debris act as billions of shields reflecting the sun’s light away from earth meaning winter temperatures could plunge LOWER THAN EVER before while summer will be devoid of sunshine. The first effect could be a bitterly cold winter to arrive in weeks with thermometers plunging into minus figures and not rising long before next summer. The Icelandic...
  • The Space Shuttle On Rails

    08/23/2014 4:25:33 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 11 replies
    Txchnologist ^ | July 14th, 2014 | Txchnologist staff
    On a clear July day in 1966, New York Central Railroad engineer Don Wetzel and his team boarded a specially modified Buddliner railcar. Bolted to the roof above them were two GE J47-19 jet engines. Wetzel throttled the engines up and tore down a length of track from Butler, Indiana, to Stryker, Ohio, at almost 184 mph, piloting the experimental vehicle into the record books as the world’s fastest jet-powered train.