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Keyword: thegreatwar

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  • How J.R.R. Tolkien Found Mordor on the Western Front

    07/01/2016 5:10:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 23 replies
    NY Times ^ | June 30, 2016 | Joseph Laconte
    IN the summer of 1916, a young Oxford academic embarked for France as a second lieutenant in the British Expeditionary Force. The Great War, as World War I was known, was only half-done, but already its industrial carnage had no parallel in European history. Junior officers were being killed off, a dozen a minute, recalled J. R. R. Tolkien. Parting from my wife, he wrote, doubting that he would survive the trenches, was like a death.
  • Battle of the Somme: Royals at Somme centenary commemoration

    07/01/2016 7:45:08 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 11 replies
    bbc ^ | 1 july 2016
    More than a million men were killed or wounded on all sides at the Somme. The Battle of the Somme, one of WW1's bloodiest, was fought in northern France and lasted five months, with the British suffering almost 60,000 casualties on the first day alone... This was followed by the hymn Abide With Me... "It was in many ways the saddest day in the long story of our nation."
  • British accuse Australia of banning them from WWI Battle of Fromelles centenary commemoration

    02/05/2016 2:40:36 PM PST · by naturalman1975 · 24 replies
    news.com.au ^ | 5th February 2016 | Sophie Aubrey
    THE relatives of slain British soldiers have accused the Department of Veterans' Affairs of banning them from attending centenary commemorations for a catastrophic WWI battle that killed thousands of Australian soldiers. The Battle of Fromelles is among Australia's bloodiest military encounters and the brutal loss has long been blamed on a disastrous incompetence of British military strategy. A special service to mark the battle's 100th anniversary is to take place on July 19 this year at the Pheasant Wood military cemetery in Fromelles, northern France. The slaughter is viewed by historians as the darkest 24 hours in the Australia's history...
  • Battle Without End: The casualties of Verdun

    03/04/2016 8:33:58 AM PST · by C19fan · 40 replies
    Weekly Standard ^ | March 14, 2016 | Geoffrey Norman
    There is something hard, cold, and brutal about the structure. It looks like a concrete airplane hangar and rising above it is what is called the Lantern of the Dead." The shape suggests, appropriately, an artillery shell. When you walk around the outside of the building you find small windows, and when you look through them what you see are bones. Human bones and skulls. Piles of them. They are the remains of more than 130,000 men who were killed here and whose bodies could not be recovered or identified and so remained in the mud, blown apart again and...
  • Looking for a good book recommendation on WWI

    04/15/2014 4:18:24 PM PDT · by KosmicKitty · 104 replies
    4-15-2014 | Kosmickitty
    After listening to one of my favorite podcaster, Dan Carlin & his Hardcore History, about the beginning of World War I, I would love to find out more about this time in history. I know that Freepers are a well read bunch and I am asking for any recommendations you may care to make in a good book covering this time in history.
  • 100 Years Ago Today: Battle of Verdun starts

    02/21/2016 7:38:14 PM PST · by abishai · 41 replies
    Centenary News ^ | February 21, 2016
    A massive artillery bombardment on the morning of February 21st 1916 signalled the start of the German attack on Verdun, the longest single battle of the First World War. More than 1,200 guns opened fire before German troops began their assault on fortifications of major symbolic inportance to France. Even by the standards of the Great War, the Battle of Verdun was a particularly brutal campaign of attrition, fuelled by the determination of both sides not to give way as the struggle wore on. The battle was to last 300 days, almost until Christmas, on a narrow front stretching no...
  • Hitler had son with French teen

    02/17/2012 12:13:28 PM PST · by bkopto · 74 replies · 1+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | Feb 17, 2012 | Peter Allen
    Jean-Marie Loret, who died in 1985 aged 67, never met his father, but went on to fight Nazi forces during the Second World War. His extraordinary story has now been backed up by a range of compelling evidence, both in France and in Germany, which is published in the latest edition of Paris's Le Point magazine. Hitler is said to have had an affair with Mr Loret's mother, Charlotte Lobjoie, 16, as he took a break from the trenches in June 1917. Although he was fighting the French near Seboncourt, in the northern Picardy region, Hitler made his way to...
  • Did Hitler Have a Secret Son? Evidence Supports Alleged Sons Claims

    02/21/2012 8:32:58 PM PST · by lbryce · 20 replies · 1+ views
    ABC News ^ | February 21, 2012 | Candace Smith
    Until his death in 1985, Jean-Marie Loret believed that he was the only son of Adolf Hitler. There is now renewed attention to evidence from France and Germany that apparently lends some credence to his claim. Loret collected information from two studies; one conducted by the University of Heidelberg in 1981 and another conducted by a handwriting analyst that showed Lorets blood type and handwriting, respectively, were similar to the Nazi Germany dictator who died childless in 1945 at age 56. The evidence is inconclusive but Lorets story itself was riveting enough to warrant some investigation. The French newspaper Le...
  • Φωτογραφίες Χρονολογίου

    01/01/2016 10:43:30 PM PST · by Rabin · 5 replies
    http://el-gr.el-gr.fb.me/NationalCryptologicMuseum/photos/a.350346695032536.76645.318661104867762/99
    First use of Code Talkers in combat, 1918 The use of pre American languages to protect U.S. voice com began in, 1918. Early on, in World War I, "Captain Lawrence noted conscripts speaking Choctaw bla bla, and recognized a potential to secure line active, field communications. Choctaw com contributed directly to constriction and later withdrawal of two companies during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and were later used in the implementing a successful surprise attack on the Germans at Forest Farm. A belated program expanded in to World War II. http://www.comanchemuseum.com/code_talkers Comanche Code Talkers of World War II. In late 1940, 17...
  • In Flanders Fields

    11/11/2015 8:53:37 AM PST · by Uncle Miltie · 28 replies
    Ubiquitous ^ | May 3, 1915 | Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae
    In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders fields.
  • Lone Pine battle marked at Gallipoli

    08/06/2015 2:37:50 PM PDT · by naturalman1975 · 3 replies
    news.com.au ^ | 7th August 2015
    THE Battle of Lone Pine was more a "vicious armed brawl" than an example of modern war, Governor-General Peter Cosgrove has told a centenary service to mark the bloody conflict. HUNDREDS of people endured sweltering heat on the Gallipoli Peninsula on Thursday to attend the service on a battleground where some 800 Australians died, 1500 were wounded and seven Victoria Crosses were won. In recognition of such gallantry VC winners Mark Donaldson, Daniel Keighran and Keith Payne took part in the service along with Doug Baird, the father of VC winner Corporal Cameron Baird who was killed in Afghanistan in...
  • A Century After Armenian Genocide, Turkeys Denial Only Deepens

    04/16/2015 8:03:17 PM PDT · by E. Pluribus Unum · 7 replies
    The New York Slimes ^ | 2015-04-16 | TIM ARANGO
    Nearly 1.5 million Armenians died at the hands of the Ottoman Empire in 1915, during World War I. Turks by and large do not believe mass killings were planned. CUNGUS, Turkey The crumbling stone monastery, built into the hillside, stands as a forlorn monument to an awful past. So, too, does the decaying church on the other side of this mountain village. Farther out, a crevice is sliced into the earth, so deep that peering into it, one sees only blackness. Haunting for its history, it was there that a century ago, an untold number of Armenians were tossed...
  • When Jerusalem Met Gallipoli 100 Years Ago; When Turks Met Jews on the Battlefield

    03/29/2015 3:42:59 AM PDT · by wtd · 7 replies
    Israel Picture a Day ^ | March 29, 2015 | Our Mission
    WW100: When Jerusalem Met Gallipoli 100 Years Ago; When Turks Met Jews on the Battlefield Ottoman Imperial Archives Image image/mapWorld War I began in Europe in the summer of 1914 with major battles between the Central Powers of Germany and Austria-Hungary versus the Triple Alliance of the United Kingdom, France and Russia. The Ottoman Empire (Turkey) joined with the Central Powers and attacked the British at the Suez Canal in January 1915. In an attempt to put pressure on Germany and Turkey, Britain sent warships to the Dardanelle Straits in April 1915, planning sail up the narrow, 60-mile-long waterway...
  • In WWI, Alvin York Captured 132 German Soldiers Pretty Much Single Handed

    03/13/2015 2:02:20 PM PDT · by daniel1212 · 54 replies
    Vacca Foeda Media ^ | Jan. 24, 1010 | Daven Hiskey
    In WWI Alvin York almost single handedly captured 132 German soldiers using nothing but a rifle and a pistol, while the German soldiers having among them 32 machine guns along with rifles and pistols and the advantage of being above him in the biggest of the forays. And did I mention York was out in the open during the largest gun fight? Ya, when the Germans attacked they pretty much mowed down almost the entire unit that York was with, including Yorks commanding officer, which put him in charge. The other soldiers left from the original group of 17, were...
  • I shall never forget it: 100 years since WWI Christmas truce

    12/24/2014 4:34:35 PM PST · by Whenifhow · 14 replies
    Fox News ^ | Dec 24, 2014 | Unknown
    With British and German forces separated only by a no-man's land littered with fallen comrades, sounds of a German Christmas carol suddenly drifted across the frigid air. "It was a beautiful moonlit night, frost on the ground, white almost everywhere: and at about 7 or 8 in the evening there was a lot of commotion in the German trenches and there were these lights -- I don't know what they were. And then they sang, "Silent Night" "Stille Nacht." I shall never forget it, it was one of the highlights of my life. I thought, what a beautiful tune,"...
  • World War I in Photos: A Century Later

    12/20/2014 8:40:23 AM PST · by NKP_Vet · 37 replies
    http://www.theatlantic.com ^ | June 29, 2014 | Alan Taylor
    Yesterday, June 28, 2014, marked the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. Assassin Gavrilo Princip fired the first shot in what was to become a horrific years-long bloodbath. However, after the sound of gunfire was silenced on Armistice Day, the deaths continued to mount. Revolutions spawned in Russia and Germany, arbitrary redrawing of national borders set the stage for decades of conflict, harsh reparation demands inspired the rise of Nazi Germany and the onset of World War II. The first World War continues to kill to this day - just this past March, two Belgian construction workers...
  • The forgotten sneak attack on Britain that backfired on the Kaiser

    12/14/2014 6:32:50 AM PST · by the scotsman · 33 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 14th December 2014 | Tony Rennell
    'A bank of fog was sitting a couple of miles out at sea and a heavy mist lay over the East Coast resort of Scarborough as postman Alfred Beal climbed the wide front steps of Dunollie, a porticoed mansion high on the towns South Cliff. He never reached the door that fateful morning on December 16, 1914, almost exactly a century ago. Three German warships had burst out of the fog bank and were now steaming past the headland, firing volley after volley of shells. One caught poor Beal and blasted his shattered body back down the drive. A second...
  • Where Americans Turned the Tide in World War I

    10/26/2014 1:45:28 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 24 replies
    nytimes.com ^ | OCT. 24, 2014 | RICHARD RUBIN
    Retreat? Hell, we just got here!
  • Fire When Ready: Flamethrowers were horrific and effective

    10/27/2014 6:00:03 AM PDT · by C19fan · 12 replies
    War is Boring ^ | October 25, 2014 | Paul Richard Huard
    Between July and November of 1917, one of the greatest disasters of the Great War unfolded near the Belgian town of Ypres, where the British and their allies fought the Germans for control of some ridges running through Flanders. Better known as the Battle of Passchendaele, hundreds of thousands of men occupied trenches, dugouts and underground tunnels on the front lines. Among the British forces there were many seasoned infantrymen who could claim to have seen all the technological terrors so far gathered together on World War I battlefieldsmachine gun fire, poison gas, strafing and bombing by aircraft. But for...
  • Germany puts 700,000 WWI docs online

    07/23/2014 3:36:07 PM PDT · by fso301 · 23 replies
    The Local ^ | 07/23/2014 | Staff Writers
    More than 700,000 records relating to WWI, as well as photos, films and audio recordings were made accessible on a new portal on the Federal Archive's website. The collection includes private material as well as files of military and civilian authorities, records left by politicians and military officers, documentaries and propaganda films. Access to the complete archive is free. The archive will also help people compiling family histories, say curators, since it has extensive information about locations where individual soldiers served. It also contains letters written to and by combatants in the war, which began on July 28, 1914, and...
  • Vessel Believed to be Russian Tsarist Submarine Discovered in the Baltic

    06/26/2014 10:41:11 PM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 6 replies
    The Moscow Times ^ | Jun. 26 2014 21:00 | The Moscow Times
    Estonian divers have discovered a watercraft in the Baltic Sea that they believe to be one of Russia's first battle submarines, Estonian media reported. The Shark, which was first launched in 1911, disappeared in 1915 at the height of World War I. It was carrying a crew of 35 at the time, whose fate has since remained unknown.
  • WWI in color photos

    04/18/2014 8:52:59 PM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 29 replies
    Austrian Soldier, Eastern Europe, 1915 German troops in Berlin, 1914 Ambulances in Palestine, 1918 French trenches, 1916 Senegalese troops, France, 1917 Dead Italian soldiers, Italy, 1915
  • World War I Claims Two More Casualties ... in 2014

    03/20/2014 7:23:24 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 44 replies
    The Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | 19 March 2014 | Luke Garratt
    First World War bomb kills two construction site workers 100 years after it was fired at Belgian battlefield Armament was disturbed and exploded evacuation works at the site Killed two and injured two, all construction workers working in the area This area of Belgium is rife with unexploded bombs from the Great War It is the former Flanders battleground where many shells were fired A First World War bomb killed two construction site workers when it exploded 100 years after being fired at a Belgian battlefield. The bomb had laid dormant for a century at an...
  • Germany started the Great War, but the Left cant bear to say so

    01/08/2014 6:10:44 AM PST · by C19fan · 82 replies
    UK Daily Telegraph ^ | January 6, 2014 | Boris Johnson
    One of the reasons I am a Conservative is that, in the end, I just cant stand the intellectual dishonesty of the Left. In my late teens I found I had come to hate the way Lefties always seemed to be trying to cover up embarrassing facts about human nature, or to refuse to express simple truths and I disliked the pious way in which they took offence, and tried to shoosh you into silence, if you blurted such a truth. Let me give you a current example of this type of proposition. It is a sad but undeniable...
  • British plan ANZAC whitewash

    01/08/2014 2:13:41 PM PST · by naturalman1975 · 28 replies
    news.com.au ^ | 9th January 2013
    A PC push by British politicians is threatening to downplay the role of Aussie diggers in WW1 in favour of developing nations. The ANZAC whitewash comes despite the 62,000 Australians who died in the Great War fighting for the British Empire and another 156,000 wounded, with no 100-year anniversary events planned by Britain recognising the sacrifice. ..... British government sources have confirmed internal briefings on WWI commemorations have not mentioned Australia or New Zealand once, instead staff from departments and cabinet offices have been briefed to concentrate on other British Empire contributions by soldiers from countries such as Nigeria and...
  • Echoes of 1919

    12/24/2013 7:15:45 PM PST · by Nachum · 18 replies
    CarolineGlick.com ^ | 12/24/13 | Caroline Glick
    Both critics and supporters of US President George W. Bush's post-September 11 vision of a new, freedom-loving Middle East have noted the strong similarities between the president and his predecessor Woodrow Wilson. In 1917, the 28th president brought US forces into World War I with the promise that an allied victory against Germany and its allies would make the world "safe for democracy." Wilson's vision of a postwar world was a bit out of place in the war being fought on the killing fields of Belgium and France. Neither the Allies nor the Central Powers were fighting the war for...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "Lawrence of Arabia"(1962)

    12/15/2013 11:02:13 AM PST · by ReformationFan · 28 replies
    You Tube ^ | 1962 | David Lean
  • We don't remember the Great War fallen; yet we still mourn them

    11/09/2013 2:48:03 PM PST · by Dysart · 33 replies
    Telegraph ^ | 11-9-13 | Daniel Hannan
    I find Remembrance Sunday sadder each year. Its partly that Im becoming sentimental I find it increasingly difficult to recite any poetry without a catch in my voice but its mainly that the fallen are now closer in age to my children than to me. When I was a small boy, I was, as small boys are, uncomplicatedly pro-war. At around eleven or twelve, I started to read the First World War poets, but I was still mainly attracted by the heroic element in their writing: their endurance in monstrous circumstances. Later, as a teenager, I began to...
  • Wear a poppy don't burn it: Muslim leaders urge followers to show respect for Remembrance Sunday

    11/03/2013 11:29:15 AM PST · by the scotsman · 16 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 3rd November 2013 | Leon Watson
    'Mosques will take the unprecedented step of urging British Muslims to 'wear the poppy, rather than burn it' this week in a bid to counter claims of being unpatriotic. Poppy stalls will be set up at around the country leading up to Remembrance Sunday in a move backed by government ministers and the Royal British Legion. It follows high-profile protests in the past by Muslim extremists, including those linked to the hate preacher Anjem Choudary, and the murder of Drummer Lee Rigby outside Woolwich barracks in south-east London.'
  • World War One in Colour - Part 1 - Everyday Life During Wartime

    10/31/2013 6:58:45 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 13 replies
    CityNoise ^ | July 2, 2010 | Franny Wentzel
    Images collected from the French National Archives of soldiers and civilians on or near the Western Front. One must presume these were taken during a lull in the fighting due to the long exposure times required by colour film.
  • 'Catastrophe' by Max Hastings - magisterial and humane history of the First World War

    10/26/2013 11:49:11 AM PDT · by Ravnagora · 35 replies
    The Telegraph UK ^ | October 17, 2013 | Nigel Jones
    German soldiers cross into Belgium in August 1914 Photo: RA/Lebrecht Music & Arts Like one of Field Marshal Haigs family whiskies, Max Hastings is a dram that steadily improves with age. His own trenchant views on war, and caustic opinions of the commanders who ran them, tended to obtrude too obviously in his early works, suggesting that if only he had been present at key military conferences costly errors would have been avoided. However, Hastingss recent massive volumes on his specialist subject, the Second World War, have shown why his position as Britains leading military historian is now unassailable. They...
  • Two unknown soldiers (discovered in the Presena Glacier in the Italian Alps)

    10/19/2013 6:48:56 AM PDT · by NYer · 22 replies
    Economist ^ | October 9, 2013
    THE BLACK stain on the ice was instantly recognisable. The technician checking a tarpaulin stretched over a section of the Presena Glacier in the Italian Alpsan experimental attempt to slow the melting quickly called in a rescue party. The block of ice was airlifted to the nearby city of Vicenza. Inside were two soldiers who had fallen at the Battle of Presena in May 1918 and were buried in a crevasse.Their uniforms and their location indicated that they could well have been Kaiserschtzen, specialised mountain troops who fought on behalf of the Austro-Hungarian Empire to defend these mountains from...
  • PHOTOS: Cigarettes Save Life! - WWI Cravan "A" Cigarette Tin With The Shot It Stopped Still Inside

    10/17/2013 6:53:44 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 19 replies
    Retronaut ^ | circa WWI | Retronaut
    “Arthur Mann joined the Royal Flying Corps in 1914. His daughter-in-law says he was shot down by the Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen – Arthur’s parachute caught in a tree. He also fought in the trenches – when Arthur was shot, the bullet bounced off this tin and saved his life. He also survived gassing, but this experience badly affected his long-term health. He died in 1953″ Explore Europeana 1914 – 1918
  • Schwerpunkt at Fismette, August 27, 1918

    10/01/2013 6:29:09 PM PDT · by robowombat · 11 replies
    Army Heritage Education Center ^ | August 27, 2010 | Shane Reilly
    Schwerpunkt at Fismette, August 27, 1918 August 27, 2010 By Shane Reilly, Army Heritage Education Center The forest for the trees: Soldiers of the 28th Division are shown in hiding among trees during service in France in World War I(WWI Signal Corps Collection). Related Links A Working Bibliography of MHI Sources: 28th Infantry Division A Working Bibliography of MHI Sources: World War I- AEF Overview In the early morning hours of August 27, 1918, 230 Pennsylvanians of the 28th Division trudged across the Vesle River into their defensive positions in the rubble- strewn village of Fismette, France. Less than an...
  • Extraordinary chivalry of British PoW who returned to German prison after visiting dying mother

    09/03/2013 7:14:35 PM PDT · by the scotsman · 18 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 4th September 2013 | Yahoo News
    'A British PoW captured by the Germans in World War I was freed to see his dying mother - but went back to the prison camp after giving the Kaiser 'his word' he would return. Capt Robert Campbell, aged 29, was gravely injured and captured just weeks after Britain declared war on Germany in July, 1914. But after two years in Magdeburg Prisoner of War Camp, the British officer received word from home his mother Louise Campbell was close to death. He speculatively wrote to Kaiser Wilhelm II, begging to be allowed home to visit his mother one final time....
  • Revealed: Extraordinary story of British WWI captain released by Kaiser from German prison camp

    09/03/2013 3:56:34 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | September 3, 2013
    A British soldier was freed from a German POW camp during World War One to see his dying mother - and kept his promise to the Kaiser by returning, historians have discovered. Captain Robert Campbell, aged 29, was captured just weeks after Britain declared war on Germany in July, 1914. But after two years in Magdeburg Prisoner of War Camp the British officer received word from home his mother Louise Campbell was close to death. He speculatively wrote to Kaiser Wilhelm II begging to be allowed home to visit his mother one final time. Incredibly the German leader granted the...
  • Historical World War I PHOTO: Harley Davidson Motorcycle with Mounted Machine-Gun

    08/04/2013 12:33:23 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 47 replies
    Retronaut ^ | (est. 1917) World War I | Retronaut
    In 1917, the United States entered World War I and the military demanded motorcycles for the war effort. Harleys had already been used by the military in the Pancho Villa Expedition, but World War I was the first time the motorcycle had been adopted for combat service. Harley-Davidson provided about 15,000 machines to the military forces during World War I. - Wikipedia
  • Sergeant Stubby ... Vintage World War I Photos of American War Dog, circa 1918

    07/29/2013 7:06:33 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 33 replies
    Retronaut ^ | Circa 1918 | Retronaut
    "Sergeant Stubby" Sergeant Stubby (1916 or 1917 April 4, 1926), was the most decorated war dog of World War I and the only dog to be promoted to sergeant through combat. America's first war dog, Stubby served 18 months 'over there' and participated in seventeen battles on the Western Front. He saved his regiment from surprise mustard gas attacks, found and comforted the wounded, and even once caught a German spy by the seat of his pants (holding him there until American Soldiers found him). Back home his exploits were front page news of every major newspaper. ...
  • Horror of the First World War revealed in amazing collection of '3D'...

    07/07/2013 8:54:06 AM PDT · by Para-Ord.45 · 25 replies
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | July 06 2013 | By JAMES DANIEL
    Horror of the First World War revealed in amazing collection of '3D' stereoscopic images found in an attic after decades A Toronto photography studio has stumbled across a stereoscopic camera, and its photographic slides, that captured scenes of World War I in 3D. The photographs were taken in the trenches, streets, and battlefields of World War I. The striking images, acquired using a handheld stereoscopic camera called the Verascope and were captured by soldiers in the French army. When the camera was acquired it was still in pristine condition and included the original leather carrying case and glass slides. Each...
  • Rare 3D Camera Found Containing Photos from WWI

    07/07/2013 5:48:13 AM PDT · by NYer · 42 replies
    io9 ^ | July 5, 2013
    SWhile visiting an estate in Ontario's Niagara Falls two years ago, a film enthusiast stumbled upon a rare World War I Richard Verascope stereo camera previously owned by the French Army. Here's what he found inside. The verascope camera, which was purchased by A Nerd's World's Chris Hughes, was found in pristine condition and included the original leather carrying case and glass slides. The antique had been in the possession of an elderly man who was clearing out his camera collection in preparation for retirement. S"Each slide is a piece of history in photographic form and I get shivers...
  • Some 3D Photos of World War I from Rare, Vintage Stereo Camera

    07/04/2013 7:30:55 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 30 replies
    A Nerd's World ^ | circa, WWI | A Nerd's World
    Rare 3D Camera Found Containing Photos from WWI "One cold morning last year, we attended an estate in the Niagara Falls where we were fortunate enough to come across and purchase a rare World War I Richard Verascope stereo camera previously owned by the French Army. The camera is in pristine condition and included the original leather carrying case and glass slides. Each slide is a piece of history in photographic form and I get shivers every time I place a glass slide into the 3D stereo viewer. Only at A Nerds World 986 Bathurst street can you see the...
  • 1915 WWI Vintage Photo: Captured Turk Sniper Disguised as a Tree (Early Camouflage)

    06/24/2013 7:16:53 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 35 replies
    Retronaut ^ | June 1915 | Retronaut
    From The Great War: A History, volume III, 1916 (litho)
  • A History of Liberal White Racism (By a Person of the Left)

    04/18/2013 4:04:32 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 9 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | APR 18 2013 | TA-NEHISI COATES
    Probably the most bracing aspect of Ira Katznelson's new history of the New Deal, Fear Itself, is his portrait of the marriage of progressive domestic policy and white supremacy. I knew the outlines of this stuff, but for a flaming commie like me, the extent of the embrace is hard to take: Far more enduring was the New Deal's intimate partnership with those in the South who preached white supremacy. For this whole period -- the last in American history when public racism was legitimate in speech and action -- southern representatives acted not on the fringes but as an...
  • Historical Photo: Section of German WWI Submarine Being Pulled Through New York City (1918)

    1918: Amanda Uren - Pulling a section of a submarine through New York City
  • World War I era ammunition frozen in a glacier for nearly a century has been found in N. Italy

    09/02/2012 7:17:19 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 28 replies
    Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | September 2, 2012 | Alex Gore
    First World War ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been found as glacier melts WWI ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been discovered in northern Italy. More than 200 pieces of the ammunition were revealed at an altitude of 3,200 metres by a melting glacier on the Ago de Nardis peak in Trentino. The 85-100mm caliber explosives weighed between seven and 10 kilos and explosives experts have been to the site to safely dispose of the weaponry. The once-perennial glacier began partially melted during a recent heat wave, allowing the Finance Police Alpine rescue...
  • 10 Best World War I Movies Ever Made

    07/30/2012 7:53:45 PM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 116 replies
    guns & ammo ^ | 7-24-12 | garry james
    Without question, more movies have been made about World War II than any other, but before World War II there was World War I, and some of the best if not the best war films ever made were inspired by that conflict. Most movies about the Great War incorporate strong anti-war messages, and to be fair, I can think of few other conflicts (except perhaps the Crimean War or the Thirty Years War) in which this attitude is more appropriate. Youll see this thread running through almost every one of my picks its just the way it...
  • World's last' WWI veteran Florence Green dies aged 110

    02/07/2012 3:28:51 PM PST · by YankeeReb · 10 replies · 1+ views
    BBC News ^ | 7 February 2012 | Staff
    A woman thought to be the world's last known surviving service member of World War I has died aged 110. Florence Green, from King's Lynn, Norfolk, served as a mess steward at RAF bases in Marham and Narborough. She died in her sleep on Saturday night at Briar House care home, King's Lynn. Mrs Green had been due to celebrate her 111th birthday on 19 February. The world's last known combat veteran of World War I, Briton Claude Choules, died in Australia aged 110 in May 2011. The last three World War I veterans living in the UK - Bill...
  • Dog tag lost in World War I returned to soldier's son

    01/13/2012 7:12:54 AM PST · by Daffynition · 37 replies · 1+ views
    reuters via Yahoo ^ | Jan 13, 2012 | Kevin Murphy
    KANSAS CITY, MO (Reuters) - Somehow, maybe in a struggle to remove his helmet, Kent Potter lost his dog tag on a French battlefield in World War I. Private Potter, who worked on an Army supply train that consisted mostly of mules and horses, survived the war and returned home to Kansas without the tag, which remained buried for more than 90 years. At a ceremony hosted in the small town of Cottonwood Falls on Thursday, however, the worn, round metal tag finally landed back with the Potter family thanks to the efforts of two Frenchmen.
  • Amazingly Good Audio of Woodrow Wilson Speaking During 1912 Presidential Campaign

    09/04/2011 2:48:29 PM PDT · by PJ-Comix · 30 replies
    Self | September 4, 2011 | PJ-Comix
    Okay, I know that Glenn Beck really hates Woodrow Wilson but let us leave aside the politics to discuss this absolutely amazing AUDIO of Wilson speaking during the 1912 Presidential campaign. Three things really strike me about this audio: 1. Clarity. I can't believe how CLEAR this audio sounds keeping in mind when it was recorded which was 1912. 2. Wilson's speaking voice. I never realized that Wilson's voice was so clear. If he lived today, he could easily be a radio announcer. His voice is that good. 3. Wilson's accent. Although Woodrow Wilson spent his boyhood in the South...
  • Last living US WWI vet dies in West Virginia

    02/28/2011 4:57:31 PM PST · by Military family member · 14 replies
    WTHI TV 10 ^ | 2/28/2011 | WTHI TV 10
    MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP) - What was it like? What was it like in the trenches? What was it like in all those places whose names have faded in the dusty recesses of memory, places like Ypres and Gallipoli, Verdun and the Marne? What was it like to fight the war that was supposed to make the world safe for democracy? There's no one left to ask.