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Keyword: surveillancestate

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  • Republican Lawmaker Pushes Tax-Per-Mile To Replace Gas Tax

    03/15/2018 12:07:32 PM PDT · by rktman · 80 replies
    pjmedia.com ^ | 3/15/2018 | Tom Knighton
    Americans love their cars. The United States has one of the highest car ownership rates per capita in the world. We're a mobile culture and we like it that way. But a tax-per-mile plan being pushed by Republican Rep. Sam Graves of Missouri might have drivers re-thinking those weekend joyrides instead of feeling all the pain at the pump.
  • Keeping Dissidents Busy

    03/12/2018 12:08:09 PM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 1 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 03/21/18 | Joanna Rosamund
    Hubertus Knabe: The dark secrets of a Surveillance State Latif Yahia, Uday Hussein’s former body double reminisced that his imposed “employer” promised him and other torture victims to make them “happy”. No matter the continent or regime, political dissidents remember (and still hear…) an equally sickening threat: “We will keep you busy”. When German government declassified Stasi files (1992), the greatest shock was delivered not by the facts that special machines had “discreetly” opened letters, or that human scent had been “collected”, but by the methodology of Zersetzung – “biodegradation” of dissidents.
  • It Can Happen Here

    02/08/2018 7:54:45 AM PST · by Kaslin · 14 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | February 8, 2018 | Judge Andrew Napolitano
    We remain embroiled in a debate over the nature and extent of our own government's spying on us. The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which was enacted in 1978 as a response to the unlawful government spying of the Watergate era, was a lawful means for the government to engage in foreign surveillance on U.S. soil, but it has morphed into unchecked government spying on ordinary Americans. The journey that domestic spying has taken in 40 years has been one long steady march of massive increase in size and scope. The federal government now employs more than 60,000 people to spy...
  • Secret mobile phone surveillance by German authorities on the rise: report

    01/24/2018 2:25:19 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 15 replies
    TheLocal.de ^ | 24 January 2018 11:03 CET+01:00
    German security authorities are increasingly using mobile phones to secretly locate suspects, according to a media report published on Tuesday. More and more, in order to determine the location of suspects, the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution (BfV) and the Federal Criminal Police Office (BKA) are using mobile phones to send out hidden text messages, according to a report in Handelsblatt. In the second half of 2017 alone, the BfV sent out around 180,000 such messages. In the same period the previous year, the BfV did this about 144,000 times. By using this technique, security authorities can...
  • NSA deleted surveillance data it pledged to preserve

    01/19/2018 8:02:54 PM PST · by grey_whiskers · 48 replies
    "Pollutico" ^ | 1-19-2018 | Josh Gerstein
    The agency tells a federal judge that it is investigating and 'sincerely regrets its failure.' The National Security Agency destroyed surveillance data it pledged to preserve in connection with pending lawsuits and apparently never took some of the steps it told a federal court it had taken to make sure the information wasn’t destroyed, according to recent court filings. Word of the NSA’s foul-up is emerging just as Congress has extended for six years the legal authority the agency uses for much of its surveillance work conducted through U.S. internet providers and tech firms. President Donald Trump signed that measure...
  • Germany starts enforcing hate speech law

    12/31/2017 6:45:10 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 34 replies
    BBC News ^ | 31 December 2017
    Germany is set to start enforcing a law that demands social media sites move quickly to remove hate speech, fake news and illegal material. Sites that do not remove “obviously illegal” posts could face fines of up to €50 million (Ł44.3 million; $60 million). The law gives the networks 24 hours to act after they have been told about lawbreaking material. Social networks and media sites with more than two million members will fall under the law’s provisions. Facebook, Twitter and YouTube will be the law’s main focus, but it is also likely to be applied to Reddit, Tumblr and...
  • Twelve Days in Xinjiang: How China’s Surveillance State Overwhelms Daily Life

    12/19/2017 7:40:16 PM PST · by bitt · 29 replies
    wall street journal ^ | 12/19/2017 | Josh Chin and Clément Bürge
    URUMQI, China—This city on China’s Central Asia frontier may be one of the most closely surveilled places on earth. Security checkpoints with identification scanners guard the train station and roads in and out of town. Facial scanners track comings and goings at hotels, shopping malls and banks. Police use hand-held devices to search smartphones for encrypted chat apps, politically charged videos and other suspect content. To fill up with gas, drivers must first swipe their ID cards and stare into a camera. China’s efforts to snuff out a violent separatist movement by some members of the predominantly Muslim Uighur ethnic...
  • German intelligence agency gets spy satellite system funds

    11/05/2017 7:22:25 AM PST · by Olog-hai
    Deutsche Welle ^ | 11.05.2017 | Jefferson Chase
    The German government has allocated €400 million ($465 million) to fund the construction of up to three spy satellites for the country’s foreign intelligence service, the BND. This has been reported by a consortium of newspapers and is part of a general trend within Germany of increasing surveillance and surveillance capabilities. It is expected that the system, which has been nicknamed “Georg,” could be launched into space by the early 2020s. A confidential sub-committee within the budget committee of the German parliament reportedly approved the money for the project, away from public scrutiny, this June. The newspapers cited a document...
  • Facial recognition used to publicly shame jaywalkers and toilet paper thieves in China

    10/21/2017 9:29:11 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 11 replies
    TheJournal.ie ^ | 10/21/2017 | AFP
    From toilet-paper dispensers to fast-food restaurants, travel and crimefighting, China is taking the lead in rolling out facial-recognition technology. But while advocates warn it makes life easier, quicker and safer, opponents counter that it is another example of how the Chinese government keeps a sinister and increasingly close eye on its 1.4 billion people. Shanghai and other Chinese cities have recently started deploying facial recognition to catch those who flout the rules of the road. Jaywalkers at some Shanghai intersections have their images flashed up on a nearby screen for public shaming and must pay a fine of 20 yuan...
  • Germany: Full Censorship Now Official

    10/21/2017 3:01:21 AM PDT · by markomalley · 35 replies
    Gatestone Institute ^ | 10/21/17 | Judith Bergman
    Germany has made no secret of its desire to see its new law copied by the rest of the EU. When employees of social media companies are appointed as the state's private thought police and given the power to shape the form of current political and cultural discourse by deciding who shall be allowed to speak and what to say, and who shall be shut down, free speech becomes nothing more than a fairy tale. Or is that perhaps the point? Perhaps fighting "Islamophobia" is now a higher priority than fighting terrorism? A new German law introducing state censorship...
  • British Police Arrest At Least 3,395 People For ‘Offensive’ Online Comments in One Year

    10/14/2017 9:32:50 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 60 replies
    Breitbart ^ | 10/14/17 | Jack Montgomery
    British police forces arrested at least nine people a day for “offensive” online comments last year. Figures obtained by The Times through the Freedom of Information Act reveal that 3,395 people across 29 forces were arrested last under section 127 of the Communications Act 2003, which makes it illegal to intentionally “cause annoyance, inconvenience or needless anxiety to another”, in 2016. The true figure is likely to be significantly higher, as thirteen police forces refused to provide the requested information and two did not provide usable data. Around half of the investigations were abandoned before being brought to prosecution, which...
  • New law allows police to spy on encrypted messaging services [Germany]

    06/24/2017 5:44:14 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 7 replies
    TheLocal.de ^ | 23 June 2017 09:32 CEST+02:00 | AFP
    Germany on Thursday passed a controversial new law that expands the power of authorities to spy on the content of encrypted message services such as WhatsApp and Skype. Amid the wave of jihadist attacks in Europe, German lawmakers voted in favor of the law designed “to reinforce the effectiveness of criminal procedures”. German investigators will now be able to insert into users’ cellphones and computers spy software (or a “Trojan horse”) to access data in encrypted message services such as popular applications WhatsApp and Skype, including as part of criminal investigations. Up to now, such surveillance tools were not authorized...
  • EU transport chief calls for European car toll system

    03/25/2017 3:26:32 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 5 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Mar 25, 2017 7:18 AM EDT
    The European Union’s transport commissioner is calling for a continent-wide car toll system that would enable motorists to use all European roads without having to stop at borders. […] [Transport Commissioner Violeta] Bulc said every country could decide for itself whether it wants a car toll system, but those that do should participate in a standardized electronic system. She said tolls would be collected via a prepaid system or monthly bills, and the proceeds would go to participating nations. …
  • Germany passes law increasing video surveillance in public

    03/10/2017 3:01:02 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 4 replies
    TheLocal.de ^ | 10 March 2017 15:51 CET+01:00 | DPA/The Local
    After a marathon sitting lasting the whole week, the German parliament (Bundestag) agreed upon a law on Friday that will relax restrictions on video surveillance in shops, stadiums and stations. The law, drafted in response to a series of violent crimes in 2016, several attached to terror group ISIS, will make it easier for private companies to install CCTV. Specifically mentioned in the law as places where CCTV will become more prevalent are shopping centers, the area in front of football stadiums, and parking lots. […] The package of laws passed by the Bundestag also allows for police to use...
  • Welcome Aboard... But First US Marshals Will Scan Your Retina

    02/27/2017 7:52:23 AM PST · by Ciaphas Cain · 97 replies
    ZeroHedge ^ | February 26, 2017 | Jeffrey Tucker
    For some 15 years, airport security has become steadily more invasive. There are ever more checkpoints, ever more requests for documents as you make your way from the airport entrance to the airplane. Passengers adapt to the new changes as they come. But my latest flight to Mexico, originating in Atlanta, presented all passengers with something I had never seen before. We had already been through boarding pass checks, passport checks, scanners, and pat downs. At the gate, each passenger had already had their tickets scanned and we were all walking on the jet bridge to board. It’s at this...
  • Prefecture in China's Xinjiang to track cars by satellite

    02/20/2017 10:00:29 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 8 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Feb 21, 2017 12:52 AM EST | Gerry Shih
    A prefecture in China’s far western Xinjiang region is requiring all vehicles to install satellite tracking systems as part of stepped-up measures against violent attacks. Traffic police in Bayingolin Mongol Autonomous Prefecture announced the regulation on Sunday, shortly after thousands of heavily armed police paraded in the Xinjiang capital and ruling Communist Party officials vowed to ramp up their campaign against separatists and Islamic militants. The vehicle-tracking program in Bayingolin will utilize China’s homegrown Beidou satellite system, launched in recent years to reduce China’s reliance on U.S.-based GPS providers for sensitive applications. Authorities said they will also track cars using...
  • Most Germans favor additional security measures — poll

    12/26/2016 11:17:29 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 10 replies
    Deutsche Welle ^ | 12.26.2016 | mm/kl (dpa)
    Sixty percent of Germans want more video surveillance in public spaces, according to a new YouGov poll published on Sunday. The public call comes in the wake of the Berlin Christmas market attack. Appearing to support government plans to change the law to allow increased video surveillance, 73 percent of Germans polled supported the idea of having larger police forces. The YouGov survey for the German news agency dpa was carried out days after Tunisian national Anis Amri plowed a truck into a Christmas market, killing 12 people and wounding nearly 50 others. Amri, who was the prime suspect, was...
  • U.S. to disclose estimate of number of Americans under surveillance

    12/16/2016 8:22:25 PM PST · by dynachrome · 27 replies
    reuters ^ | 12-16-16 | Dustin Volz
    The U.S. intelligence community will soon disclose an estimate of the number of Americans whose electronic communications have been caught in the crosshairs of online surveillance programs intended for foreigners, U.S. lawmakers said in a letter seen by Reuters on Friday. The estimate, requested by members of the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee, is expected to be made public as early as next month, the letter said. Its disclosure would come as Congress is expected to begin debate in the coming months over whether to reauthorize or reform the so-called surveillance authority, known as Section 702, a provision that...
  • Sweeping UK spy bill dubbed 'snoopers' charter' becomes law

    11/26/2016 6:50:23 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 18 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Nov 26, 2016 8:06 AM EST | Jill Lawless
    In Britain, Big Brother just got bigger. After months of wrangling, Parliament has passed a contentious new snooping law that gives authorities — from police and spies to food regulators, fire officials and tax inspectors — powers to look at the internet browsing records of everyone in the country. The law requires telecoms companies to keep records of all users’ web activity for a year, creating databases of personal information that the firms worry could be vulnerable to leaks and hackers. Civil liberties groups say the law establishes mass surveillance of British citizens, following innocent internet users from the office...
  • Malls, stores consider new ways to protect shoppers

    09/30/2016 7:38:56 AM PDT · by PROCON · 50 replies
    AP ^ | Sep. 30, 2016 | ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
    NEW YORK (AP) — More sophisticated cameras. Security robots. Customers feeling shaken by recent attacks at U.S. malls may not notice huge changes — but mall operators are testing and putting in place new technologies and other measures to offer people more protection without intruding too much on their shopping time. Mall executives say shoppers have been adamantly opposed to airport security tactics like metal detectors. So they're trying other things, and increasingly using mass notifications that let them send text and email alerts to tenants within seconds in case of a crisis.