Keyword: ssri

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Almost All Mass Shootings Have This in Common… And It Has Nothing to Do With Guns

    10/22/2014 6:50:05 PM PDT · by Impala64ssa · 44 replies
    Liberals would have Americans believe that mass shootings are caused by the ready access to firearms in the United States. If that were true, however, it would not explain why over nine out of 10 mass shootings occur in areas where it is more difficult to own or carry a firearm, as a recent study proved. Nor would it explain why mass murders committed with guns, which outnumber bicycles in the United States by a factor of three-to-one, are responsible for about 4% as many deaths as bicycle accidents. There is, however, a possible link between mass murderers who use...
  • Antidepressant Could Be Prophylactic for Alzheimer’s

    05/15/2014 8:01:03 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 11 replies
    the-scientist ^ | May 14, 2014 | Rina Shaikh-Lesko
    An antidepressant drug appears to deter the formation of amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study published today (May 14) in Science Translational Medicine. A team led by Yvette Sheline of the University of Pennsylvania studied the effects of citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), on mice and a small group of people.Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles can be found in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, but it’s not clear if the plaques are precursors to neurodegenerative problems or an effect of them. Citalopram, which is marketed as Celexa and Cipramil, is typically used to treat...
  • 1st Trimester Antidepressant Use Tied to Autism Risk

    04/17/2014 6:11:13 AM PDT · by Scoutmaster · 37 replies
    PsychCentral ^ | April 17, 2014 | Rick Nauert
    A new Johns Hopkins study discovers an association between prenatal exposure to antidepressant medications, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and developmental delays (DD) in boys. Researchers from the Bloomberg School of Public Health found that early prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) — commonly prescribed for depression, anxiety, and other disorders — increased the risk for ASD three-fold. Common SSRIs include citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil, Pexeva), and sertraline (Zoloft). The study of 1,000 mother-child pairs is published in the online edition of Pediatrics. In the study, investigators analyzed data from large samples of ASD and...
  • Caring for the next Miriam Carey

    10/17/2013 6:08:37 PM PDT · by neverdem · 12 replies
    Baltimore Sun ^ | October 09, 2013 | Rada K. Dagher
    Miriam Carey, a 34 year-old dental hygienist, created a media frenzy last week when she was shot and killed by Capitol police after ramming a White House barricade in her car while her one-year-old daughter was in the back seat. Why did she do it? What mental illness did she suffer from? Ms. Carey's mother said her daughter was diagnosed with postpartum depression after her baby was born, and months later she was hospitalized for feeling sick and depressed. Some media outlets took that to mean that postpartum depression was behind Ms. Carey's erratic behavior. These assumptions threaten to stigmatize...
  • Americans 'snapping' by the millions ( record fear, stress, suicide)

    04/21/2013 2:04:54 PM PDT · by Perseverando · 102 replies
    WND ^ | Arpil 21, 2013 | David Kupelian
    Terrorism. Chaos. Fear of the future. In the age of Obama, America is undergoing a “fundamental transformation” – that much everyone knows. But what few seem to realize about this transformation is that the sheer stress of living in today’s America is driving tens of millions to the point of illness, depression and self-destruction. Consider the following trends: Suicide has surpassed car crashes as the leading cause of injury death for Americans. Even more disturbing, in the world’s greatest military, more U.S. soldiers died last year by suicide than in combat; Fully one-third of the nation’s employees suffer chronic debilitating...
  • NY Gun Confiscation Underway – Citizens Told to Turn in Pistol Owner ID & Firearms

    04/10/2013 7:09:18 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 86 replies
    AmmoLand ^ | April 8, 2013 | Dan Roberts
    Remember all those who denied that firearms confiscation as a result of New York’s new gun laws was too “insane” to even consider? That it was strictly in the realm of paranoid conspiracy theorists and the “it cant happen here crowd”? Those were and remain some of the standard replies to anyone who even thought about the possibility, let alone gave voice to it, despite the fact that Gov Cuomo and numerous other officials made public comments about such a plan, as I discussed in my article “Feinstein & Cuomo Admit Planning Australian Style Government Gun Buy Back” . Elected...
  • A Form of Gun Confiscation Has Reportedly Begun in New York State

    04/09/2013 5:50:14 PM PDT · by rmlew · 90 replies
    The Blaze ^ | Apr. 9, 2013 | Mike Opelka
    Despite promises from the president and a host of other politicians who are pushing for more gun control that nobody is coming for your guns, the confiscation of guns and gun permits has apparently started in some form in New York State. One attorney representing several people who have been forced to surrender their guns spoke with TheBlaze and alerted us to some disturbing facts: Gun owners are losing their 2nd Amendment rights without due process.HIPAA Laws are likely being compromised and the 4th and 5th Amendments are being violated in some of these cases How did confiscation start happening...
  • Suicides and Homicides in Patients Taking Paxil, Prozac, and Zoloft: Why They Keep Happening

    02/13/2013 11:12:14 AM PST · by Jyotishi · 32 replies
    MedicationSense.com ^ | February 12, 2013 | Jay S. Cohen M.D.
    Suicides and Homicides in Patients Taking Paxil, Prozac, and Zoloft: Why They Keep Happening -- And Why They Will Continue Underlying Causes That Continue to Be Ignored by Mainstream Medicine and the Media From almost the day that they were introduced in the late 1980s and early 1990s, sudden, unexpected suicides and homicides have been reported in patients taking serotonin-enhancing antidepressants such as Prozac, Paxil, and Zoloft. I'm not surprised this problem hasn't disappeared, nor will it unless we look deeper. I never hesitate to say that these drugs -- selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) -- help millions of people....
  • Pfizer disputes suit claiming Zoloft doesn't work

    01/31/2013 6:11:39 PM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies
    Niami Herald ^ | 01.31.13 | LINDA A. JOHNSON
    AP BUSINESS WRITER TRENTON, N.J. -- The maker of Zoloft is being sued in an unusual case alleging the popular antidepressant has no more benefit than a dummy pill and that patients who took it should be reimbursed for their costs. --snip-- He said Pfizer produced two studies showing Zoloft worked better than placebo - the FDA's requirement for approval - but most Zoloft studies showed its effect was the same as a placebo. Dr. Michael Thase, who heads the mood and anxiety disorders program at the University of Pennsylvania's medical school, said research by others using the same unpublished...
  • School Shootings and SSRI Antidepressants

    12/18/2012 10:33:31 AM PST · by Dead Dog · 29 replies
    The report [51] provided a clinical window into the development of obsessive violence and a school shooter mentality. A twelve-year-old boy on fluoxetine developed nightmares about becoming a school shooter and then began to lose track of reality concerning these events. This case occurred in a controlled clinical trial and the investigators did not know that the child was getting fluoxetine until they broke the double-blind code. The child’s reaction occurred long before any of the well-known school shootings had taken place. Therefore, his reaction was not inspired by the school shootings; it was not a “copycat”: [51] R. King,...
  • The day Christmas died (Newtown Massacre)

    12/18/2012 9:50:21 AM PST · by Perseverando · 10 replies
    WND ^ | December 16, 2012 | Barbara Simpson
    Exclusive: Barbara Simpson questions role of prescription meds in shootings The countdown had begun. Christmas Eve was just 10 days away. For the children, excitement was building, as it should. Then, in a burst of what can only be described as naked evil, it was over. What had begun as a normal school day took a turn no one could have anticipated or even imagined. Sandy Hook Elementary School, grades K through 4, in the quiet village of Newtown, Conn., became the target of a plot that was carried out with diabolical accuracy that turned classrooms into a charnel house....
  • Popular Drugs May Help Only Severe Depression

    01/24/2010 1:28:55 AM PST · by PghBaldy · 11 replies · 672+ views
    New York Times ^ | January 5 | BENEDICT CAREY
    Some widely prescribed drugs for depression provide relief in extreme cases but are no more effective than placebo pills for most patients, according to a new analysis released Tuesday. The latest study may settle a debate about drugs like Prozac. The findings could help settle a longstanding debate about antidepressants. While the study does not imply that the drugs are worthless for anyone with moderate to serious depression — many such people do seem to benefit — it does provide one likely explanation for the sharp disagreement among experts about the drugs’ overall effectiveness.
  • Against Depression, a Sugar Pill Is Hard to Beat

    08/15/2008 3:56:28 PM PDT · by grundle · 26 replies · 176+ views
    The Washington Post ^ | May 7, 2002 | Shankar Vedantam
    Against Depression, a Sugar Pill Is Hard to Beat Placebos Improve Mood, Change Brain Chemistry in Majority of Trials of Antidepressants By Shankar Vedantam Washington Post Staff Writer Tuesday, May 7, 2002; Page A01 A new analysis has found that in the majority of trials conducted by drug companies in recent decades, sugar pills have done as well as -- or better than -- antidepressants.Companies have had to conduct numerous trials to get two that show a positive result, which is the Food and Drug Administration's minimum for approval. What's more, the sugar pills, or placebos, cause profound changes in...
  • Fraud in Medical Research - GSK Bribes Exposed

    02/16/2009 9:46:15 AM PST · by drashok · 5 replies · 667+ views
    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article556899.ece ^ | August 22, 2005 | Nigel Hawkes, Health Editor
    Systematic Consumer Fraud by GSK (GlaxoSmithKline)in conspiracy with researchers who were bribed to suppress or obscure suicide risk data during clinical trials of one of the highest selling medicines-Paroxetine.
  • Antidepressants may damage more sex lives

    12/15/2008 6:33:47 AM PST · by Fractal Trader · 19 replies · 1,148+ views
    Boston Globe ^ | 15 December 2008 | Carey Goldberg
    Such sexual symptoms have long been known side effects of the popular Prozac class of antidepressants, but a growing body of research suggests that they are far more common than previously thought, perhaps affecting half or more of patients. And a handful of recent medical and psychological journal articles document a small number of cases in which sexual problems remain even after a patient goes off the drugs. "This is such an upsetting issue," said Aline Zoldbrod, a Lexington psychologist and sex therapist. "There are people for whom SSRIs are really life-saving, I think, but the idea that someone would...
  • Is Mad Money’s Jim Cramer, a Big Democratic Donor, Deliberately Feeding Panic?

    10/08/2008 6:25:04 PM PDT · by vadum · 51 replies · 1,809+ views
    Capital Research Center ^ | October 6, 2008 | Matthew Vadum
    Is TV stock picker Jim Cramer, a longtime Democratic donor, doing his best to spread hysteria in the stock market? Today before the market opened Cramer sounded almost apocalyptic, and before the trading day was over, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was below 10,000 for the first time since 2004. According to MSNBC.com: Bullish investors should turn into shrinking violets as the stock market continues its shocking downward spiral, CNBC’s “Mad Money” host Jim Cramer told Ann Curry on TODAY Monday. In what Curry called a “dramatic statement,” Cramer emphatically urged any investor who has money they may need in...
  • Autopsy report suggests teen wasn't taking meds properly

    05/17/2008 3:16:10 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies · 156+ views
    The Fresno Bee ^ | 05/16/08 | Pablo Lopez
    Coroner officials released an autopsy report Friday suggesting that a slain Roosevelt High School sophomore who attacked a campus police officer was not taking proper dosages of drugs prescribed to control his mental illness. Dr. David Hadden, Fresno County coroner, said it's clear that Jesus "Jesse" Carrizales, 17, had a high dose of the antidepressant Lexapro in his blood that could have caused him to be paranoid. But the teen's blood also revealed he was not taking antipsychotic drugs. Carrizales' family has said he was taking Lexapro and Geodon, an antipsychotic medication, for depression. Hadden said it's far too early...
  • Gunman's Contradictions Confound Police (NIU Murders)

    02/19/2008 10:39:43 AM PST · by Esther Ruth · 43 replies · 1,409+ views
    ap.google.com ^ | Feb 17, 2008 | ASHLEY M. HEHER and CARYN ROUSSEAU
    Gunman's Contradictions Confound Police By ASHLEY M. HEHER and CARYN ROUSSEAU – DEKALB, Ill. (AP) — Steven Kazmierczak had the look of a boyish graduate student — except for the disturbing tattoos that covered his arms. Professors and students knew him as a bright, helpful scholar, but his past included a stint in a mental health center. Many saw him as happy and stable, but he had developed a recent interest in guns and was involved in a troubled — possibly abusive — on-again, off-again relationship. What people initially told police about the Northern Illinois University shooter didn't add up,...
  • Girlfriend: [NIU] Shooter was taking cocktail of 3 drugs

    02/20/2008 3:31:12 PM PST · by do not press 2 for spanish · 146 replies · 502+ views
    CNN Special Investigations Unit ^ | 2/20/2008 | Abbie Boudreau and Scott Zamost
    Steven Kazmierczak had been taking three drugs prescribed for him by his psychiatrist, the Northern Illinois University gunman's girlfriend told CNN. Jessica Baty said Steven Kazmierczak was irritable but not erratic before his shooting rampage. Jessica Baty said Tuesday that her boyfriend of two years had been taking Xanax, used to treat anxiety, and Ambien, a sleep agent, as well as the antidepressant Prozac. Baty said the psychiatrist prescribed the medications, a fact that made her so "nervous" that she tried to persuade Kazmierczak to stop taking one of the drugs.
  • Reports of Gunman’s Use of Antidepressant Renew Debate Over Side Effects (NIU shooting)

    02/20/2008 2:37:25 PM PST · by dynachrome · 28 replies · 217+ views
    NYT ^ | 2-19-08 | BENEDICT CAREY
    Steven P. Kazmierczak stopped taking Prozac before he shot to death five Northern Illinois University students and himself, his girlfriend said Sunday in a remark likely to fuel the debate over the risks and benefits of drug treatment for emotional problems. A funeral on Monday in Cicero, Ill., for Catalina Garcia, 20, who was one of five students killed in a shooting Thursday in a lecture hall at Northern Illinois University. Over the years, the antidepressant Prozac and its cousins, including Paxil and Zoloft, have been linked to suicide and violence in hundreds of patients. Tens of millions of people...
  • Antidepressants are all the rage but have a dark side

    02/18/2008 9:26:24 PM PST · by neverdem · 156 replies · 996+ views
    Chicago Tribune ^ | February 3, 2008 | Christopher Weber
    Despite recent bad publicity over withheld studies showing marginal results, the resume of America's arsenal of antidepressants is enviable: consort to celebrities, subject of best-selling books and tabloid headlines. They may be the most celebrated pills since Valium. Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, Celexa and Lexapro, among others, have become both household words and medicine-cabinet staples. Known collectively as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, these antidepressants are prescribed for anxiety, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and numerous conditions besides depression. SSRIs are now the most commonly prescribed of all medications in this country. The rate at which physicians prescribed SSRIs more than...
  • Gun laws stronger, but not foolproof ("he had stopped taking prescription medicines for anxiety.")

    02/18/2008 2:19:07 PM PST · by neverdem · 57 replies · 334+ views
    Chicago Tribune ^ | February 17, 2008 | Jeff Coen and E.A. Torriero
    The quandary: Preventing deadly campus shootings while respecting rights A week ago, Steven Kazmierczak walked into Tony's Guns & Ammo, a yellow shop in a back yard near the University of Illinois, and bought a Remington shotgun and a 9 mm Glock pistol. Around the same time, family members noticed that Kazmierczak was acting "erratically," after he had stopped taking prescription medicines for anxiety. Kazmierczak used his two new guns, and two more he had also purchased legally, to kill five students and himself Thursday in a shooting rampage at Northern Illinois University that leaves policymakers again scrambling to figure...
  • Why so many Americans today are 'mentally ill'

    08/14/2007 7:07:09 AM PDT · by SkyPilot · 164 replies · 4,396+ views
    World Net Daily ^ | 14 Aug 07 | David Kupelian
    "When I was lying in my bed that night, I couldn’t sleep because my voice in my head kept echoing through my mind telling me to kill them." You're reading the words of 12-year-old Christopher Pittman, struggling to explain why he murdered his grandparents, who had provided the only love and stability in his turbulent life. He was angry with his grandfather, who had disciplined him earlier that day for hurting another student during a fight on the school bus. So later that night, he shot both of his grandparents in the head with a .410 shotgun as they...
  • Making Sense of the Great Suicide Debate

    02/17/2008 12:23:43 AM PST · by neverdem · 11 replies · 182+ views
    NY Times ^ | February 10, 2008 | BENEDICT CAREY
    AN expression of true love or raw hatred, of purest faith or mortal sin, of courageous loyalty or selfish cowardice: The act of suicide has meant many things to many people through history, from the fifth-century Christian martyrs to the Samurais’ hara-kiri to more recent literary divas, Hemingway, Plath, Sexton. But now the shadow of suicide has slipped into the corridors of modern medicine as a potential drug side effect, where it is creating a scientific debate as divisive and confounding as any religious clash. And the shadow is likely to deepen. After a years-long debate about whether antidepressant drugs...
  • Supreme Court asked to hear Zoloft case

    12/18/2007 1:06:45 PM PST · by neverdem · 91 replies · 1,739+ views
    Charlotte.com ^ | Dec. 18, 2007 | MEG KINNARD
    Associated Press Attorneys have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear the case of a teen sentenced to 30 years in prison for killing his grandparents when he was 12, arguing that the sentence is cruel. Christopher Pittman shoot his grandparents Joe and Joy Pittman with a shotgun in 2001, then set fire to their home. During his trial four years later, Pittman's attorneys unsuccessfully argued the slayings were influenced by the antidepressant Zoloft - a charge the maker of the drug vigorously denied. In the brief submitted to the high court late Monday, attorneys from the University of Texas...
  • Talking Back to Prozac

    12/03/2007 4:19:00 PM PST · by neverdem · 36 replies · 325+ views
    The New York Review of Books ^ | December 6, 2007 | Frederick C. Crews
    The Loss of Sadness: How Psychiatry Transformed Normal Sorrow into Depressive Disorder by Allan V. Horwitz and Jerome C. Wakefield Oxford University Press, 287 pp., $29.95 Shyness: How Normal Behavior Became a Sickness by Christopher Lane Yale University Press, 263 pp., $27.50 Let Them Eat Prozac: The Unhealthy Relationship Between the Pharmaceutical Industry and Depression by David Healy New York University Press, 351 pp., $18.95 (paper) 1. During the summer of 2002, The Oprah Winfrey Show was graced by a visit from Ricky Williams, the Heisman Trophy holder and running back extraordinaire of the Miami Dolphins. Williams was there to...
  • 1 in 40 Infants Experience Baby Blues, Doctors Say, Mental Health of Parents Can Effect Child

    11/10/2006 9:45:12 PM PST · by Coleus · 43 replies · 763+ views
    ABC News ^ | 11.09.06
    Parents do a lot of guessing on what could be troubling a fussy baby.  If he's crying, he may be hungry or tired. But could he be depressed?  Any parent knows that young children have to be protected from a mind-boggling number of risks, but many will be surprised to learn that infant depression could be one of them.  "Babies can be depressed," said Dr. Jess Shatkin, director of education and training at New York University's Child Study Center. "It's not a terribly common phenomenon. We think maybe one in 40 or so — but it can certainly happen."Although it's...
  • New Depression Findings Could Alter Treatments

    08/11/2006 9:01:19 PM PDT · by neverdem · 72 replies · 1,963+ views
    NY Times ^ | August 8, 2006 | BENEDICT CAREY
    The results of two new studies may signal a substantial shift in the way psychiatrists and researchers think about treatment for severely depressed patients. --snip-- In the other, psychiatrists in New York found evidence that antidepressant drugs significantly increased the risk that some children and adolescents would attempt or commit suicide. Doctors have debated this risk for years, but the authors of the study were skeptical of it, and their report may sway others. --snip-- The study of suicide risk, led by Dr. Mark Olfson of Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, was based on an analysis...
  • Savage LIVE Thread Wed. May 3, 2006

    05/03/2006 3:01:38 PM PDT · by fishtank · 52 replies · 1,357+ views
    Gettin' ready!!!!
  • PROZAC BACKLASH, Trouble in Prozac Nation

    11/16/2005 6:33:00 PM PST · by Coleus · 104 replies · 1,947+ views
    Fortune ^ | 11.28.05 | David Stipp
    Wonder drugs of the 1990s, Prozac and its kin have been prescribed to tens of millions of people. But a growing backlash may portend the end of an era. (Photo: Phil Toledano) Can Prozac make you want to die? The idea seems strange, given that the drug and similar antidepressants are supposed to do just the opposite. Yet that is what Kimberly Witczak believes happened to her husband. Two years ago Tim "Woody" Witczak killed himself at age 37, soon after going on Pfizer's Zoloft—the top-selling member of Prozac's class of drugs, known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs....
  • A Self-Effacing Scholar Is Psychiatry's Gadfly

    11/16/2005 5:37:36 AM PST · by neverdem · 16 replies · 852+ views
    NY Times ^ | November 15, 2005 | BENEDICT CAREY
    Scientist at Work | David Healy His mother in Ireland is entirely unaware of his international reputation, as far as he can tell. His neighbors in the hamlet of Porthaethwy, on an island off the coast of Wales, are equally oblivious, or indifferent. His wife, who knows too well the furor he has caused, says simply, "How could you be right and everyone else wrong?" Dr. David Healy, a psychiatrist at the University of Cardiff and a vocal critic of his profession's overselling of psychiatric drugs, has achieved a rare kind of scientific celebrity: he is internationally known as both...
  • Stronger Warnings for Antidepressant Drugs

    07/24/2005 10:31:37 PM PDT · by Coleus · 11 replies · 655+ views
    Health Central ^ | 07.23.05
    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) mandated a new warning label be added to antidepressants more than a year ago, cautioning physicians to pay close attention to patients taking the drugs for signs of suicidal behavior. Now the agency issued its second (much stronger) warning, urging the monitoring of adults who use antidepressants for signs of suicidal thoughts and deepening depression.FDA's New AdvisoryThe new warning, which is applicable to children and adults, was in the wake of recent studies that linked suicidal behavior in adults to their use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the most commonly prescribed class of...
  • Family Wonders if Prozac Prompted School Shootings

    03/26/2005 11:20:55 AM PST · by neverdem · 56 replies · 1,913+ views
    NY Times ^ | March 26, 2005 | MONICA DAVEY and GARDINER HARRIS
    Polaris Jeff Weise, whose rampage killed 10 people, took antidepressants. RED LAKE, Minn., March 25 - In their sleepless search for answers, the family of Jeff Weise, the teenager who killed nine people and then himself, says it is left wondering about the drugs he was prescribed for his waves of depression. On Friday, as Tammy Lussier prepared to bury Mr. Weise, who was her nephew, and her father, who was among those he killed, she found herself looking back over the last year, she said, when Mr. Weise began taking the antidepressant Prozac after a suicide attempt that...
  • TROUBLED YOUTH (MN school shooting)

    03/24/2005 11:31:08 PM PST · by neverdem · 5 replies · 2,740+ views
    The News Hour with Jim Lehrer ^ | March 24, 2005 | NA - Interview
    Following the teen shootings in Minnesota, Fred de Sam Lazaro of Twin Cities Public Television visits the Red Lake Indian Reservation to see how the community is coping. Then, two school safety analysts discuss detecting warning signs of teen violence. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: A remote, reclusive community in northern Minnesota, the Red Lake Reservation has cut itself off even more since the shootings. The anguish of the 5,000 or so Ojibwa Indians who live here has been mostly kept from the public. The media has been denied free access. We were offered one glimpse of a community's distress with...
  • School shooter took mood-altering drug

    03/24/2005 10:23:57 PM PST · by neverdem · 90 replies · 1,840+ views
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES ^ | March 25, 2005 | Joyce Howard Price
    The Washington Timeswww.washingtontimes.com School shooter took mood-altering drugBy Joyce Howard PriceTHE WASHINGTON TIMESPublished March 25, 2005 The teen who went on a deadly shooting rampage at a Minnesota high school Monday was on Prozac, adding to the list of youths involved in similar crimes who were taking antidepressants or other mood-altering medications.     But medical experts say the role the drugs played in the school shootings is debatable.     "When you look at the school shooters, some were on Luvox, Prozac, Ritalin, and Paxil. These are mood elevators, but they can push up the psyche and can cause agitation," said Robert...
  • Antidepressant Safety Debate May Include Adult Patients

    02/17/2005 9:30:35 PM PST · by neverdem · 23 replies · 647+ views
    NY Times ^ | February 18, 2005 | BENEDICT CAREY
    The yearlong debate over whether antidepressant drugs increase the risk of suicide in some children may soon widen to include adults, as English and Canadian scientists are reporting findings from three new analyses of suicide risk in people over age 18 who have taken the medications. The new findings are mixed, and apparently contradictory, and likely to encourage both patient advocates who believe that antidepressants like Prozac have hidden dangers, and manufacturers who insist that the medications are safe, experts said. One of the reports, an analysis of data on antidepressants from previous studies, found that adults taking the drugs...
  • Suicide Rate Down in the Era of Prozac (A skeptic says gun laws might be the cause.)

    02/03/2005 8:31:44 PM PST · by neverdem · 7 replies · 414+ views
    LA Times ^ | February 3, 2005 | Alan Zarembo
    THE NATION Numbers have declined since a 1980s peak when such drugs came into use, a study finds. A skeptic says gun laws might be the cause. The U.S. suicide rate has fallen steadily since Prozac and related antidepressants came into use in the late 1980s, according to an analysis by researchers worried that evidence linking the drugs to suicide in children could reduce their use. The suicide rate, which reached a peak in 1988 of nearly 13 deaths per 100,000 people, fell steadily to about 10.5 in 2002. Most suicides are the result of untreated depression, not adverse reactions...
  • Antidepressants Can Affect Newborns, Study Finds

    02/03/2005 5:11:11 PM PST · by neverdem · 10 replies · 516+ views
    NY Times ^ | February 3, 2005 | BENEDICT CAREY
    In the wake of a yearlong debate over the risks of antidepressants to minors, a new analysis of World Health Organization medical records has found that infants whose mothers take the drugs while pregnant may suffer withdrawal symptoms shortly after they are born. The study challenges the assurances that many doctors have long given pregnant women with depression that taking the drugs would not affect their babies. But experts said that the study, appearing today in the journal Lancet, was not definitive, and must be weighed against the benefits of drug treatment. Untreated maternal depression can also harm a developing...
  • A Pill's Surprises, for Patient and Doctor Alike

    01/24/2005 9:22:03 PM PST · by neverdem · 37 replies · 1,643+ views
    NY Times ^ | January 25, 2005 | RICHARD A. FRIEDMAN, M.D.
    CASES As a psychopharmacologist, I know that every patient responds slightly differently to medication. But it wasn't until I met Susan that I understood just how differently. She'd come to see me because she was depressed, and I'd successfully treated her with a course of Zoloft, a popular antidepressant. But as often happens, Susan's desire for sex had vanished along with her depressed mood. "I kind of miss it, but I feel really bad for my husband, who's getting very frustrated," she said. The sexual side effects of antidepressants like Zoloft and Prozac - the class of drugs known as...
  • Was the Prozac Link to Suicide Covered Up?

    01/19/2005 8:29:29 PM PST · by Coleus · 1 replies · 348+ views
    BMJ ^ | 01.01.05
      An anonymous source sent confidential drug company documents that had been missing for more than 10 years to the British Medical Journal. The documents, which suggest a link between Prozac (fluoxetine, made by Eli Lilly) and suicide attempts and violence, will be reviewed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The documents went missing during a 1994 product liability suit. They include reviews and memos indicating that as far back as the 1980s, Eli Lilly officials were not only aware that Prozac had side effects, but also they attempted to minimize those negative effects.The liability suit surrounded...
  • Therapy? Or Pills? A Quandary in Britain

    12/31/2004 1:13:02 PM PST · by neverdem · 11 replies · 422+ views
    NY Times ^ | December 21, 2004 | LIZETTE ALVAREZ
    LONDON, Dec. 20 - One year after British drug regulators advised against prescribing a new generation of antidepressants, except Prozac, for depressed adolescents, British doctors say they are in a frustrating bind. Warned away from using the antidepressants, they are recommending psychotherapy for their young patients instead. But under the British health system, depressed teenagers face a six- to nine-month waiting list for psychotherapy, a situation unlikely to improve in the short term. "On the ground, we feel very much abandoned," said Dr. Dick Churchill, a general practitioner and senior lecturer at Nottingham University. "The advice seems to be these...
  • FDA to review "missing" drug company documents (Prozac + AK-47 + workplace, guess what?)

    12/30/2004 10:16:24 PM PST · by neverdem · 23 replies · 1,185+ views
    The British Medical Journal ^ | 1 January 2005 | Jeanne Lenzer
    Home Help Search Archive Feedback Table of Contents Author Keyword(s) Vol Page [Advanced] BMJ  2005;330:7 (1 January), doi:10.1136/bmj.330.7481.7 Extract of this article PDF of this article Email this article to a friend Respond to this article Download to Citation Manager Search Medline for articles by: Lenzer, J. Alert me when: New articles cite this article News FDA to review "missing" drug company documents Jeanne Lenzer New York The US Food and Drug Administration has agreed to review confidential drug company documents that went missing during a controversial product liability suit more than 10 years ago. The documents appear to suggest a link...
  • Teen Says Antidepressants Led to Slayings

    12/04/2004 2:32:26 PM PST · by neverdem · 35 replies · 2,749+ views
    My Way News ^ | Dec 4, 2004 | JEFFREY COLLINS
    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - Authorities say three years ago, Christopher Pittman, then 12, shot his grandparents as they slept because they had scolded him for fighting. But Christopher's father, Joe Pittman, thinks his son killed because his sense of right and wrong was clouded by the anti-depressant Zoloft. Joe Pittman spoke out against the drug in a Food and Drug Administration hearing early this year. The boy, who had threatened suicide, was put on the drug three weeks before the slayings, and his dose was doubled just two days earlier. Joe Pittman's hands shook as he read his son's confession...
  • The Antidepressant Dilemma (long read)

    11/20/2004 7:07:55 PM PST · by neverdem · 69 replies · 6,755+ views
    NY Times ^ | November 21, 2004 | JONATHAN MAHLER
    Looking back, Mark and Cheryl Miller would have done a lot of things differently with their 13-year-old son, Matt. They probably would never have left Lenexa, Kan. They would have sent him to a different school, and they certainly would have chosen a different therapist. But most of all, they wouldn't have given him Zoloft. ''It's not a pleasant thing living with the thought that you had a hand in your son's death,'' Mark Miller told me recently. ''Making him take those pills was done out of love for Matt, but it was still the wrong thing to do.'' We...
  • Depressingly Low Scientific Standards

    09/28/2004 8:18:59 PM PDT · by rmlew · 4 replies · 221+ views
    American Outlook/ Hudson Institute ^ | Fall 2002 | Michael Fumento
    Few drugs inspire more animosity among people who don’t use them than Prozac and its antidepressant cousins. On the one hand, they’re derisively described as “happy pills,” capable of slapping a smiley face on anyone. Actually, decades of research have shown that only those suffering true clinical depression benefit from them. Even then, the pills merely bring patients up to the level of non-depressed persons. A second, contradictory claim is that the pills don’t work at all, except psychosomatically. Every so often a researcher releases an analysis of clinical drug trials that purportedly shows that antidepressants are little more effective...
  • Defense for a Boy's Rampage: The Medicine Made Him Kill

    08/22/2004 7:15:30 PM PDT · by neverdem · 25 replies · 2,537+ views
    NY Times ^ | August 23, 2004 | BARRY MEIER
    Christopher Pittman said he remembered everything about that night in late 2001 when he killed his grandparents: the blood, the shotgun blasts, the voices urging him on, even the smoke detectors that screamed as he drove away from their rural South Carolina home after setting it on fire. "Something kept telling me to do it," he later told a forensic psychiatrist. Now, Christopher, who was 12 years old at the time of the killings, faces charges of first-degree murder. The decision by a local prosecutor to try him as an adult could send him to prison for life. While prosecutors...
  • FDA Study Confirms Antidepressant Risks

    08/10/2004 7:00:53 PM PDT · by neverdem · 18 replies · 843+ views
    The Washington Post ^ | August 10, 2004 | Shankar Vedantam
    Drugs Linked to More Suicides Among Children, Unpublished Analysis Says Six months after the Food and Drug Administration withheld an internal finding that antidepressant medications were associated with an increased risk of suicide among children, a second staff analysis has arrived at the same conclusion. The agency has not publicly disclosed either report, despite growing pressure from critics and Congress. Agency officials say they do not plan to discuss the data until a scheduled meeting in September, which would come nine months after British authorities warned physicians not to prescribe Paxil, Zoloft, Celexa and similar drugs to depressed children, and...
  • Has the Romance Gone? Was It the Drug?

    05/12/2004 9:40:19 AM PDT · by neverdem · 17 replies · 486+ views
    NY Times ^ | May 4, 2004 | ANAHAD O'CONNOR
    For most people taking antidepressants, the risk of a diminished sex drive may seem like a worthwhile sacrifice for the benefits from the drugs. Up to 70 percent of patients on antidepressants report sexual side effects, yet the number of Americans who take the drugs has ballooned since Prozac was introduced in the late 1980's. Last year, studies show, doctors in the United States wrote 213 million prescriptions for antidepressants. But what if the sexual side effects of the drugs, often considered little more than a nuisance, had more serious consequences, impairing not only sexual desire in some people, but...
  • Antidepressant Use in Children Soars Despite Efficacy Doubts

    04/18/2004 7:38:09 AM PDT · by neverdem · 40 replies · 404+ views
    The Washington Post ^ | April 18, 2004 | Shankar Vedantam
    The number of depressed American children being treated with antidepressants has soared over the past decade -- a tectonic shift in the practice of psychiatry -- but new scientific reviews of the research that fueled the trend suggest that the drugs' benefits have been dramatically oversold. The use of antidepressants among children grew three- to tenfold between 1987 and 1996, data from various studies indicate, and a newer survey found a further 50 percent rise in prescriptions between 1998 and 2002. The explosion in antidepressant use occurred even though the vast majority of clinical trials have failed to prove that...
  • Study Advises Against Drugs for Children in Depression

    04/10/2004 7:43:31 AM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies · 756+ views
    NY Times ^ | April 9, 2004 | GARDINER HARRIS
    Pediatricians and family physicians should not prescribe antidepressants for depressed children and adolescents because the drugs barely work and their side effects are often significant, Australian researchers have concluded. The researchers analyzed data from five published trials of three antidepressants, Prozac, Zoloft and Paxil, in depressed patients under age 18. They found that the drugs offered only a "very modest" benefit over placebos. At the same time, the drugs carry significant risks, the researchers said in their report, published in today's issue of the British medical journal BMJ. "If the drugs were highly advantageous over placebo, then you'd live with...