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Science (Bloggers & Personal)

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  • Graphene: the wonder material that could solve the world's water crisis

    05/25/2018 3:37:56 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | May 3, 2018 | Aisha Majid
    Graphene, the much-hailed wonder material, may be the solution to the world’s water crisis. One in nine people around the world do not have access to clean, safe water close to their homes and at least 2 billion people are forced to use a drinking water source contaminated with faeces. Dirty water is a serious public health concern and drinking or washing in dirty water spreads diseases such as diarrhoea, cholera and typhoid. Contaminated drinking water causes over 500,000 deaths each year from diarrhoea, a leading killer of children under five. First developed by scientists at the University of Manchester...
  • The World’s First Kosher Cheeseburger Is Here

    05/25/2018 2:44:15 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 45 replies
    The Jewish Daily Forward ^ | May 22, 2018 | Shira Feder
    The trail-blazing Impossible Burger, the world’s only kosher cheeseburger, created sustainably, is now officially on the Orthodox Union’s kosher database registry. The Impossible Burger entered development in 2011 and debuted in July 2016 at the fashionably erstwhile Chef David Chang’s Momofuku Nishi in Manhattan. It’s since won a 2017 Tasty Award and a 2018 Fabi Award from the National Restaurant Association - and it’s the only plant-based burger to ever have done so. “Getting kosher certification is an important milestone,” said Impossible Foods CEO and Founder Dr. Patrick O. Brown. “We want the Impossible Burger to be ubiquitous, and that...
  • These 4 Tech Trends Are Driving Us Toward Food Abundance

    05/25/2018 2:33:39 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 34 replies
    Singularity Hub ^ | May 18, 2018 | Peter H. Diamandis, MD
    From a first-principles perspective, the task of feeding eight billion people boils down to converting energy from the sun into chemical energy in our bodies. Traditionally, solar energy is converted by photosynthesis into carbohydrates in plants (i.e., biomass), which are either eaten by the vegans amongst us, or fed to animals, for those with a carnivorous preference. Today, the process of feeding humanity is extremely inefficient. If we could radically reinvent what we eat, and how we create that food, what might you imagine that “future of food” would look like? In this post we’ll cover: 1.Vertical farms 2.CRISPR engineered...
  • Rebooting food: Finding new ways to feed the future

    05/24/2018 1:16:03 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    Reuters ^ | May 24, 2018 | Thin Lei Win
    VIENNA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Banana trees that fit in a test tube. Burgers made without a cow in sight. Fish farmed in the desert. Robots picking fruit. Welcome to the brave new world of food, where scientists are battling a global time-bomb of climate change, water scarcity, population growth and soaring obesity rates to find new ways to feed the future. With one in nine people already short of enough food to lead a healthy, active life, supporters pushing for a Second Green Revolution argue without major changes hunger will become one of the biggest threats to national security...
  • Could 3D printing solve the organ transplant shortage?

    05/21/2018 10:25:43 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 23 replies
    The Manchester Guardian ^ | July 30, 2017 | Tim Lewis
    Erik Gatenholm first saw a 3D bioprinter in early 2015. His father, Paul, a professor in chemistry and biopolymer technology at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, had bought one for his department. It cost somewhere in the region of $200,000. “My father was like, ‘This thing can print human organs,’” Gatenholm recalls, still awestruck. “I said, ‘Bulls#*+!’ Then it printed a little piece of cartilage. It wasn’t cartilage, but it was like, this could be cartilage. That was the moment when it was like, ‘This is frickin’ cool!’” Gatenholm, who had long owned a regular 3D printer, decided then...
  • Mysterious 'Planet Nine' gets more evidence from weird space rock

    05/21/2018 2:30:59 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    Fox News ^ | May 21, 2018 | Elizabeth Howell, Space.com
    The solar system just got a bit stranger. As astronomers continue their ongoing quest to find the elusive Planet Nine, a team found a space rock that lends credence to the idea that a huge super-Earth planet really exists in the outer reaches of our solar system. The newfound asteroid, called 2015 BP519, adds to a growing body of evidence about little worlds in the solar system being perturbed by something big. Astronomers detailed its discovery and description in a new paper, adding that its bizarre angle of its orbit gives more weight to the idea that a big planet...
  • World's largest metal 3D-printer scales up additive manufacturing

    05/21/2018 10:34:39 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 18 replies
    New Atlas ^ | May 17, 2018 | Darren Quick
    Australian company Titomic has unveiled what it claims is the world's largest metal 3D printer at its fully automated Melbourne facility. Utilizing a patented process co-developed with Australian federal scientific research agency the CSIRO, the 3D metal printer boasts a build area 9 m long, 3 m wide and 1.5 m high (29.5 x 9.8 x 4.9 ft), however the printing process isn't constrained to this booth size, meaning it could be used to print even larger objects. The unit prints layer by layer like existing 3D printers, but rather than relying on metal powders that are fused using extreme...
  • FUTURE LIVING 3D printed homes built in less than 24 hours will ‘be mainstream by 2025’ in UK

    05/21/2018 8:25:39 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 46 replies
    The Sun ^ | May 21, 2018 | Sean Keach, Digital Technology and Science Editor
    EXPERTS say 3D-printed houses will be "mainstream by 2025", and could put an end to Britain's housing crisis. A new report details how Brits are less than a decade away from enjoying lower house prices thanks to a robot revolution in the construction of homes. 3D printing, or "additive manufacturing", is a process of layering up a material to build complicated structures. It works just like regular home printers – but instead of ink, a 3D printer will use materials like plastic or metal. Using giant 3D printers, it's been proven possible to quickly and cheaply build homes. Sadly the...
  • Honeycomb Battery Tech Breakthrough Could Bring 100X Improvement In Device Runtime

    05/19/2018 11:43:28 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 17 replies
    Hot Hardware ^ | May 17, 2018 | Shane McGlaun
    A group of researchers at the University of Missouri have developed a new battery breakthrough that could have a big impact on runtimes for the gadgets. The researchers have developed new material that can address the two chief complaints of batteries used in electronic devices now: relatively runtimes life and unwanted heat production. The team has applied for a patent for a magnetic material that has a unique honeycomb lattice structure that offers distinct electronical properties. “Semiconductor diodes and amplifiers, which often are made of silicon or germanium, are key elements in modern electronic devices,” said Deepak K. Singh, head...
  • Graphene confines light to one atom to enable ultra small optical switches, detectors and sensors

    05/16/2018 4:56:57 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    Next Big Future ^ | May 16, 2018 | Brian Wang
    Researchers have been able to confine light down to a space one atom, the smallest possible. This will pave the way to ultra-small optical switches, detectors and sensors. Light can function as an ultra-fast communication channel, for example between different sections of a computer chip, but it can also be used for ultra-sensitive sensors or on-chip nanoscale lasers. There is currently much research into how to further shrink devices that control and guide light. New techniques searching for ways to confine light into extremely tiny spaces, much smaller than current ones, have been on the rise. Researchers had previously found...
  • Scientists accidentally create mutant enzyme that eats plastic bottles

    05/15/2018 11:00:57 AM PDT · by TBP · 36 replies
    The Blaze ^ | May 14, 2018 | Digital Shorts
    One million plastic water bottles are sold every minute. Only 14 percent are recycled. The rest end up in landfill or in the ocean, taking years to decompose. Scientists have been working on an enzyme that can destroy all these bottles — and now they have succeeded by accident. UK and US scientists discovered an enzyme in the soil of a plastic landfill. While researching the enzyme, they accidentally caused it to mutate and created an enzyme that can break down plastic much faster than landfills. Currently, plastic bottles can only be recycled into carpets or clothing but this new...
  • EMP: An Elaborate Hoax or a Legitimate Threat?

    05/15/2018 9:47:05 AM PDT · by Perseverando · 61 replies
    The Organic Prepper ^ | May 14, 2018 | Daisy Luther
    As a prepper and avid reader of post-apocalyptic fiction like One Second After, Alas Babylon, and Going Home, an EMP has long been on my mind as one of the most catastrophic threats we could face. After reading numerous reports from the Congressional EMP Commission, I figured that the reality of such a threat was a given. So when I recently wrote about making Faraday cages, imagine my surprise when I saw this comment: I appreciate the attempt to help people prepare for all kinds of disasters, but I’m going to have to throw a conversational bomb into this room,...
  • Washington Post Article: Who are you Going to Believe? Us or Your Lyin' Eyes?

    05/15/2018 5:55:22 AM PDT · by marktwain · 15 replies
    Gun Watch ^ | 15 May, 2018 | Dean Weingarten
    image from pagunblog.com The Washington Post published an article meant to convince the American people that their perceptions of gun ownership in the United States are wrong. They attempt to convince people that surveys showing lower numbers are goodthink. The article admits that gun ownership numbers are hotly disputed. They admit that ownership numbers are difficult to determine. Then they make the claim that ownership rates are falling and that  "In reality, only about 25 percent of Americans own a gun." From the Washington Post: As some 70,000 people attended the NRA’s annual convention last week, nearly three months after...
  • I watched an entire Flat Earth Convention for my research—here’s what I learned

    05/13/2018 3:38:18 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 62 replies
    Ars Technica | May 6, 2018 | Harry T. Dyer
    Link only due to copyright issues: https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/05/i-watched-an-entire-flat-earth-convention-for-my-research-heres-what-i-learned/
  • A flesh-eating disease is spreading in Australia and officials have no idea how to stop it

    05/13/2018 1:13:22 PM PDT · by LucyT · 32 replies
    DCClothesline ^ | May 13, 2018 | IsabelleZ
    A frightening flesh-eating disease is currently making its way across Australia, and puzzled scientists and officials aren’t sure how to stop this mysterious condition from wreaking havoc. Cases of an infection known as Buruli ulcer have spiked in recent years in the country, rising 150 percent from 74 cases in 2013 to 186 in 2016. It shows no signs of slowing down; last year saw a projected 286 cases. The infection causes unsightly skin ulcers that destroy the skin and the soft tissue around it. Complicating matters is the fact that scientists aren’t sure how it is spread or how...
  • Students work to establish first archaeology fraternity in the country

    05/11/2018 12:42:11 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 22 replies
    The George Washington Hatchet ^ | April 30, 2018 | Lizzie Mintz
    A group of 19 students wants to establish the first archaeology fraternity in the nation. After registering as a student organization in November, Delta Iota Gamma recruited 12 members to its inaugural pledge class earlier this semester. The group plans to become a nationally recognized fraternity by the fall because members want to help students studying archaeology or classics build professional networks – a resource they said is needed on campus. Members said this semester they’ve worked to trademark the group’s letters and write governing documents. As they continue to gain recognition, they are also planning to host social events,...
  • My Friend Donald Cowling is Dying, I am a little Busy (May 11, 2018)

    05/11/2018 10:44:30 AM PDT · by marktwain · 38 replies
    Gun Watch ^ | 11 May, 2018 | Dean Weingarten
    My friend is dying in front of my eyes and I can do nothing but say a few words now and then. He exhibits no sign of awareness or understanding. I have been told that hearing is the last sense to go as the body shuts down. I have been praying for him for years. He has been an agnostic for 80 years. When I told him I would be praying for him when this started in January, He said he could use all the help he could get. I have known Don for about 48 years. I met...
  • Gender and Sex: They Are NOT Interchangeable - Don't Allow Leftists to Define Terms

    05/08/2018 12:37:22 PM PDT · by walford · 27 replies
    Facebook ^ | 05/08/2018 | walford
    Your genitals determine your biological SEX -- which is male or female. What determines gender [masculine, feminine, neutral] is culture. So in some cultures, a skirt is feminine while in others it is masculine.#YouMightBeALiberal if the Divine was fallible in making you, but you are infallible in what you think you should be. Sex is biological and gender is cultural. There is no such thing, for example, as "neutral sex" -- even if you get your male junk cut off. Then you are an emasculated male. The Left tries to make them interchangeable to so they can blur the...
  • Ships Unearthed in Virginia Offer Glimpse of Colonial Era

    05/06/2018 9:31:06 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 18 replies
    MSN ^ | May 6, 2018 | Emily Cochrane, The New York Times
    OLD TOWN ALEXANDRIA, Va. — Nestled in centuries of dirt and debris, several well-preserved ships and artifacts have been unearthed that offer a glimpse of life at what was once one of the busiest ports in the North American colonies. At the site for Robinson Landing, a new townhouse and condominium development along the Potomac River here, excavations have uncovered the protruding, curved wooden bones of the ships. Three ships were scuttled and buried here centuries ago as Alexandria sought to expand its land into the deeper waters of the river. “It tells us a lot about the resourcefulness of...
  • Marine Corps Commandant: In 15 Years, Our Aircraft Won't Need a Human in the Cockpit

    05/04/2018 2:53:20 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 29 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | May 1, 2018 | Kyle Mizokami
    The head of the United States Marine Corps says the Marines' air power could be completely uncrewed within 15 years. General Robert B. Neller, commandant of the Marine Corps, says the technology exists to realize this future. Neller stressed, however, that aircraft would not be completely autonomous, and would still be directed by a human being making key decisions. The Marine Corps Times quoted Neller from an event at the Brookings Institution saying: “I don’t know what war is going to look like in the future, [but] I think things that fly in the sky, the great majority of them...