Keyword: piltdownman

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  • John Hawks - Who were the ancestors of the Neanderthals?

    08/02/2020 1:20:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    Gorham's Cave Gibraltar on YouTube ^ | September 2018, February 11, 2019 | John Hawks
    The last 10 years have transformed the evidence concerning the early origins and evolution of Neanderthal populations. Genetic comparisons of Neanderthal and Denisovan ancient DNA suggest that the common ancestor of these populations separated from African ancestors of modern humans prior to 600,000 years ago, followed by a rapid differentiation in Eurasia. Later, additional episodes of gene flow brought genes into Neanderthal populations, including the mtDNA clade carried by all later Neanderthals. Yet, a number of western Eurasian fossil samples from the time between 600,000 and 100,000 years ago are difficult to accommodate within the category of "Neanderthals", including European...
  • Humans and Neanderthals More Similar Than Polar and Brown Bears

    06/28/2020 8:40:07 PM PDT · by fishtank · 13 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 6-28-2020 | Jeffrey Tomkins, PhD
    Humans and Neanderthals More Similar Than Polar and Brown Bears BY JEFFREY P. TOMKINS, PH.D. * | SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2020 A study led by Oxford University researchers was recently published confirming that Neanderthals and humans were very genetically similar and interfertile. They were even closer than polar and brown bears are to each other, which are known to mate and produce viable offspring in the wild quite easily.1 Along with a plethora of previous DNA studies, this research further confirms that Neanderthals were an ancient people group of the human family, descended from Noah’s three sons and their wives...
  • Recent Humans with Archaic Features Upend Evolution

    06/28/2020 8:43:37 PM PDT · by fishtank · 29 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 3-29-2019 | Jeffrey Tomkins, PhD
    Recent Humans with Archaic Features Upend Evolution BY JEFFREY P. TOMKINS, PH.D. * | FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2019 Ideas shaping the concept of human evolution have largely played out through images. Characters with large brow ridges and sloping foreheads—including Homo neanderthalensis and Homo erectus—have consistently been depicted as the earliest forms of evolving humans. Now, new fossil evidence is turning the whole paradigm upside down.
  • First evidence that ancient humans ate snakes and lizards is unearthed in Israel

    06/28/2020 12:17:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Live Science ^ | June 25, 2020 | Mindy Weisberger
    Human communities in the Levant at this time were known as Natufian. They were primarily hunters and foragers and are considered the first non-nomadic society; the semi-sedentary habits of Natufian culture were likely a precursor to humans settling down and becoming farmers. At the el-Wad Terrace settlement, the site was densely layered with animal remains, of which "a high percentage" belonged to lizards and snakes, the researchers reported in a new study, published online June 10 in the journal Scientific Reports. The quantity of squamate bones at the site was astonishing; that alone hinted at human consumption as a possible...
  • Researchers Sequence Genome of Neanderthal Woman from Chagyrskaya Cave

    06/21/2020 9:21:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Sci-News ^ | June 18, 2020 | Enrico de Lazaro
    One of these Neanderthal genomes was from an individual (Vindija 33) found in Vindija Cave in Croatia, whereas the other Neanderthal genome (Denisova 5 or the Altai Neanderthal) and the Denisovan genome (Denisova 3) both came from specimens discovered in Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains... The researchers found that Chagyrskaya 8 lived 80,000 years ago, about 30,000 years after the Denisova 5 Neanderthal and 30,000 years before the Vindija 33 Neanderthal. They also found that the Chagyrskaya Neanderthal was a female and that she was more closely related to Vindija 33 and other Neanderthals in western Eurasia than to...
  • Paleontologist Publishes Research on Cannibalism in Dinosaurs

    06/21/2020 9:42:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville ^ | May 28, 2020 | Amanda Womac
    Researchers surveyed more than 2,000 dinosaur bones from the Jurassic Mygatt-Moore Quarry, a 152-million-year-old fossil deposit in western Colorado, looking for bite marks. They found more than they were expecting. Big theropod dinosaurs such as Allosaurus and Ceratosaurus ate pretty much everything - including each other... There were theropod bites on the large-bodied sauropods, whose gigantic bones dominate the assemblage, bites on the heavily armored Mymoorapelta, and lots of bites on theropods too, especially the common remains of Allosaurus. There were hundreds of them, in frequencies far above the norm for dinosaur-dominated fossil sites. Some were on meaty bones like...
  • Paleontologists uncover remains of a 33-FOOT long megaraptor that lived 70 million years ago and would have been one of the last carnivorous dinosaurs to roam the Earth

    05/20/2020 11:56:23 AM PDT · by C19fan · 49 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 20, 2020 | Stacy Liberatore
    Paleontologists have uncovered the remains of megaraptor that lived 70 million years ago, making it one of the last carnivorous dinosaur to roam the Earth. Discovered in Argentina, the team found vertebrae, ribs and part of what would have been the dinosaur's chest and shoulder girdle. After a further analysis, they determined the creature was approximately 33 feet in length -the largest megaraptor found to date. Unlike the Tyrannosaurus rex, this lethal dinosaur had extremely long, muscular arms with massive claws at the end that were used to attack prey.
  • 300,000-year-old throwing stick documents the evolution of hunting

    04/26/2020 6:49:49 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    HeritageDaily ^ | April 22, 2020 | Universitaet Tuebingen
    Research at Schengen demonstrates that already 300,000 years ago Homo heidelbergensis used a combination of throwing sticks, spears and thrusting lances. Prof. Nicholas Conard and Dr. Jordi Serangeli, who lead the research team, attribute the exceptional discovery to the outstanding preservation of wooden artifacts in the water saturated lakeside sediments in Schengen. The throwing stick was recovered in layer 13 II-4, which in the 1990s yielded examples of throwing spears, a thrusting lance and additional wooden tools of unknown function. Like almost all of these finds, the new artifact was carefully carved from spruce wood. The throwing stick is 64.5...
  • Neandertals had older mothers and younger fathers

    04/25/2020 9:03:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 52 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 23, 2020 | Max Planck Society
    When the ancestors of modern humans left Africa 50,000 years ago they met the Neandertals. In this encounter, the Neandertal population contributed around two percent of the genome to present day non-African populations. A collaboration of scientists from Aarhus University in Denmark, deCODE Genetics in Iceland, and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have conducted the most comprehensive study to date using data obtained from 27,566 Icelanders, to figure out which parts of our genomes contain Neandertal DNA and what role it plays in modern humans. Every person of non-African decent shares around two percent of...
  • Israeli Archaeologists Solve Mystery of Prehistoric Stone Balls

    04/17/2020 2:41:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    Haaretz ^ | April 16, 2020 | Ariel David
    Stone artifacts painstakingly shaped into spheres were part of the daily lives of early humans for more than two million years. They have been unearthed by archaeologists in East Africa, humanity's ancestral home, and they litter prehistoric sites across Eurasia from the Middle East to China and India. Yet experts have been puzzled by their function since the early days of research into our evolutionary history. Now, an international team of archaeologists led by Tel Aviv University archaeologist researcher Ella Assaf, has produced evidence that these enigmatic artifacts were used for a very specific purpose: breaking the bones of large...
  • Fossil Skull Casts Doubt Over Modern Human Ancestry [Homo heidelbergensis]

    04/08/2020 7:41:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Griffith University ^ | April 2, 2020 | Etueni Ngaluafe
    Griffith University scientists have led an international team to date the skull of an early human found in Africa, potentially upending human evolution knowledge with their discovery. The Broken Hill (Kabwe 1) skull is one of the best-preserved fossils of the early human species Homo heidelbergensis and was estimated to be about 500,000 years old... Discovered in 1921 by miners in Zambia, the Broken Hill remains have been difficult to date due to their haphazard recovery and the site being completely destroyed by quarrying. Using radiometric dating methods, Professor Grün’s analyses now puts the skull at a relatively young date,...
  • Mysterious human ancestor finds its place in our family tree

    04/06/2020 1:34:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Science ^ | April 1, 2020 | Michael Price
    When it comes to deciphering our ancient family tree, DNA from fossils is the new gold standard. But after about half a million years, even the best-preserved DNA degrades into illegibility, leaving the story of our early evolution shrouded in mystery. A new study of proteins taken from the tooth of an enigmatic human ancestor reveals their rough place in the family tree -- and shows how ancient proteins can push beyond the limits of DNA. The new study is "a landmark paper," says Mark Collard, an archaeologist at Simon Fraser University who wasn't involved with the work. "Ancient protein...
  • The "Stoned Ape" Hypothesis Might Explain Extraordinary Leap in Evolution

    04/05/2020 12:27:49 PM PDT · by wildbill · 49 replies
    Inverse via Pocket ^ | 4/5/2020 | Sarah Sloat
    EVeryone knows the standard explanation of evolution but the rapid jump from Homo Erectus to Homo Sapiens has no satisfactory answers. A more radical interpretation of these events involves the same animals, dung, and plants but also includes psychedelic drugs. In 1992, ethnobotanist and psychedelics advocate Terence McKenna argued in the book Food of the Gods that what enabled Homo erectus to evolve into Homo sapiens was its encounter with magic mushrooms and psilocybin, the psychedelic compound within them, on that evolutionary journey. He called this the Stoned Ape Hypothesis. McKenna posited that psilocybin caused the primitive brain’s information-processing capabilities...
  • Direct human ancestor Homo erectus is older than we thought

    04/02/2020 12:45:01 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 37 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | April 2, 2020 | by University of Johannesburg
    A Homo erectus skullcap found northwest of Johannesburg in South Africa has been identified as the oldest to date, in research published in Science. The hominin is a direct ancestor of modern humans, experienced a changing climate, and moved out of Africa into other continents. The discovery of DNH 134 pushes the possible origin of Homo erectus back between 150,000 and 200,000 years. Credit: Therese van Wyk, University of Johannesburg. ____________________________________________________________________________________ An unusual skullcap and thousands of clues have created a southern twist to the story of human ancestors, in research published in Science on 3 April. The rolling hills...
  • Neanderthals walked upright just like the humans of today

    02/25/2019 6:22:19 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Monday, February 25, 2019 | University of Zurich
    Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture. However, these prehistoric humans were more similar to us than many assume. University of Zurich researchers have shown that Neanderthals walked upright just like modern humans - thanks to a virtual reconstruction of the pelvis and spine of a very well-preserved Neanderthal skeleton found in France... Since the 1950s, scientists have known that the image of the Neanderthal as a hunched over caveman is not an accurate one. Their similarities to ourselves - both in evolutionary and behavioral terms - have also long been known, but in recent years...
  • Following the last Neanderthals: Mammal tracks in Late Pleistocene coastal dunes of Gibraltar

    02/16/2019 12:18:51 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Gibraltar National Museum ^ | February 12, 2019 | admin
    The prestigious international journal Quaternary Science Reviews has just published a paper which has involved the participation of Gibraltarian scientists from the Gibraltar National Museum alongside colleagues from Spain, Portugal and Japan. The results which have been published come from an area of the Catalan Bay Sand Dune. This work started ten years ago, when the first dates using the OSL method were obtained. It is then that the first traces of footprints left by vertebrates were found. In subsequent years the successive natural collapse of sand has revealed further material and has permitted a detailed study including new dates....
  • Tiny-headed, ancient ‘Platypus’ with stegosaurus back plates unearthed

    01/25/2019 8:50:16 AM PST · by ETL · 22 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Jan 25, 2019 | Laura Geggel Senior Writer | LiveScience
    Just like the modern platypus, this 250-million-year-old, Triassic-age marine reptile likely used its cartilaginous bill to discover and seize its next meal, a new study finds. "This animal had unusually small eyes for the body, only rivaled by some living animals that rely on senses other than vision and feed in the dusk or darkness — for example some shrews, badgers and the duck-billed platypus," said study lead researcher Ryosuke Motani, a paleobiologist at the University of California, Davis. "So, it most likely used tactile senses [with its] platypus-like bill to detect prey in the dusk or darkness." ..." Previously,...
  • Convert to Creation (tr) interviews bird expert and former renowned evolutionist Dr Jon Ahlquist

    01/07/2019 7:48:38 AM PST · by fishtank · 10 replies
    Creation Ministries International ^ | 1-7-18 | Margaret Wieland
    Convert to Creation. Margaret Wieland interviews bird expert and former renowned evolutionist Dr Jon Ahlquist Dr Jon Ahlquist is a molecular biologist, ornithologist and artist who before his retirement specialized in molecular phylogenetics. With a B.S. from Cornell University, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from Yale University (all in biology) he subsequently taught and researched at Yale. He then held professorships at Ohio University, the University of Louisville (Kentucky), and several South Carolina universities.
  • Rejection Letter From Science Community(HUMOR!)

    12/15/2018 7:25:47 PM PST · by Mark · 3 replies
    Email | 12/15/18 | Unknown
    Paleoanthropology Division Smithsonian Institute 207 Pennsylvania Avenue Washington, DC 20078 Dear Sir: Thank you for your latest submission to the Institute, labeled “ 211-D, layer seven, next to the clothesline post . Hominid skull .” We have given this specimen a careful and detailed examination, and regret to inform you that we disagree with your theory that it represents “conclusive proof of the presence of Early Man in Oklahoma County two million years ago. .” Rather, it appears that what you have found is the head of a Barbie doll, of the variety one of our staff, who has small...
  • Ancient bird fossils have ‘the weirdest feathers I have ever seen’

    12/14/2018 2:52:50 PM PST · by ETL · 15 replies
    ScienceMag.org ^ | Dec 14, 2018 | John Pickerell
    One hundred million years ago, the sky was filled with birds unlike those seen today, many with long, streamerlike tail feathers. Now, paleontologists have found examples of these paired feathers preserved in exquisite detail in 31 pieces of Cretaceous amber from Myanmar. The rare 3D preservation reveals the feathers’ structure is completely different from that of modern feathers—and hints that they may have been defensive decoys to foil predators. Such tail streamers—in some cases longer than the bodies—have been observed in early bird fossils from China for several decades, in particular, the 125-million-year-old Confuciusornis sanctus. They may also be present...