Keyword: papyrus

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  • Unpublished Egyptian texts reveal new insights into ancient medicine

    08/22/2018 7:52:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | August 14, 2018 | Lise Brix, tr by Catherine Jex
    The University of Copenhagen in Denmark is home to a unique collection of Ancient Egyptian papyrus manuscripts. A large part of the collection has not yet been translated, leaving researchers in the dark about what they might contain. "A large part of the texts are still unpublished. Texts about medicine, botany, astronomy, astrology, and other sciences practiced in Ancient Egypt," says Egyptologist Kim Ryholt, Head of the Carlsberg Papyrus Collection at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark... "It's totally unique for me to be able to work with unpublished material. It doesn't happen in many places around the world," says PhD...
  • Papyrus in Ancient Greek reveals insults ...from man to man

    08/18/2018 10:37:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Keep Talking Greece ^ | August 16, 2018 | unattributed
    A certain Valerius and a certain Athanasius lived during the 5th century AD in Egypt. 1500 years ago, the certain Valerius wrote a letter to Athanasius in Ancient Greek. The letter contained insults and threats of lashing and burning. A fragment of the letter,  written on a Papyrus was translated by scientists. "You trickster, you traitor, you son of a b**** ..." Valerius writes to Athanasius. However, the reason why Valerius was fuming so much remains unknown as the rest of the papyrus is missing. An x-rated papyrus? 'Valerius to Athanasius: You trickster, you traitor, you son of a b****...
  • Pi, Phi and the Great Pyramid

    06/03/2008 7:59:35 AM PDT · by BGHater · 31 replies · 10,960+ views
    Al-Ahram Weekly ^ | 27 Mar 2008 | Assem Deif
    We can forget all the ideas crediting Atlanteans or space aliens with building the Great Pyramid of Giza, and instead imagine ourselves travelling back in time in H G Wells's time machine to try and work out not how the ancient Egyptians built this enormous edifice, because this lies beyond our present understanding, but rather what we can best judge to be its most appropriate proportions. Then, however, there were no electronic calculators, only ropes and rods. Constructing right angles at the four corners of a pyramid is easy. To do it, history tells us that the Egyptians were aware...
  • Researchers Solve Mystery of 1,800-Year-Old Basel Papyrus

    07/13/2018 4:18:58 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 10 replies
    Sci-news ^ | 7/13/18 | Enrico de Lazaro
    A team of scientists at the University of Basel, Switzerland, has discovered that a 1,800-year-old papyrus from the Basel Papyrus Collection is an ancient medical text from late antiquity and that it was likely written by the famous Roman physician Galen. The University Library in Basel possesses a collection of 65 papyri, mostly in Greek and several in Coptic, Hieratic and Latin. Less than half of this collection was published by Ernst Rabel in 1917 in Papyrusurkunden der Öffentlichen Bibliothek der Universität zu Basel. With mirror writing on both sides, one of the Basel papyri — dubbed P.Basel 1A —...
  • Remember That First-Century Mark Fragment? Now it’s been published, there’s good news and bad news.

    06/02/2018 5:38:46 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 40 replies
    Stand To Reason ^ | 06/01/2018 | Amy K. Hall
    Six years ago, Dan Wallace announced in a debate with Bart Ehrman that a paleographer had dated a recently-found papyrus fragment of Mark to the first century. Since then, I’ve received many requests for updates, and I finally have one to give. The fragment has now been published, and there’s good news and bad news. The bad news is that its official date is late second or early third century. Dan Wallace has written a post explaining what happened and offering an apology. Here’s a brief excerpt: In my debate with Bart, I mentioned that I had it on...
  • New Scanning Technique Allows Researchers to Read Words on Mummy Waste Wrap

    01/04/2018 3:32:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Phys.org ^ | January 3, 2018 | Bob Yirka
    Researchers have known for many years that workers in ancient Egypt recycled papyrus for different purposes -- one particular use was creating decorated boxes into which mummies were placed. Papyrus scraps were glued together using paste and plaster, similar to modern paper-mâché projects... The technique involved using a digital imaging method that interpreted light bounced back from a subject. Prior research had shown that the pigment in ink used by the ancient Egyptians over 2000 years ago could fluoresce under the proper infrared filter. By using such filters with digital imaging technology, the team was able to see the ink...
  • New discovery: Egypt's oldest harbor, collection of papyrus uncovered

    04/17/2013 1:56:37 PM PDT · by NYer · 28 replies
    Catholic Online ^ | April 16, 2013
    LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Dating back to the days of the Pharaoh Khufu, or Cheops in the Fourth Dynasty, the harbor dates back 4,500 years. The Great Pyramid of Giza serves as the tomb of Khufu, who died around 2566 B.C. The harbor was built on the Red Sea shore in the Wadi al-Jarf area, 112 miles south of Suez. The harbor was discovered by a French-Egyptian mission from the French Institute for Archaeological Studies. The site "predates by more than 1,000 years any other port structure known in the world," according to the mission's director, Pierre...
  • The touching 1,800-year-old letter from a Roman legionary to his family

    04/06/2017 2:01:34 PM PDT · by NYer · 17 replies
    Aletelia ^ | April 6, 2017 | Daniel Esparza
    A PhD candidate at Rice University translated the letter in its entirety, as part of his work in papyrology. In 2012, when Grant Adamson was still a student at Rice University in Houston, he finished deciphering the contents of the letter that an Egyptian soldier named Aurelius Polion (a volunteer in the Roman legions) sent his family 1,800 years ago.If it is surprising that Aurelius was able to read and write (the letter is written in koine Greek, the lingua franca of the Mediterranean colonies of the Roman Empire), the content of the letter is all the more touching. The...
  • Oldest Egyptian writing on papyrus displayed for first time

    07/14/2016 3:35:11 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 16 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 7/14/16 | AFP
    Cairo (AFP) - The Egyptian Museum in Cairo is showcasing for the first time the earliest writing from ancient Egypt found on papyrus, detailing work on the Great Pyramid of Giza, antiquities officials said Thursday. The papyri were discovered near Wadi el-Jarf port, 25 kilometres (15 miles) south of the Gulf of Suez town of Zafarana, the antiquities ministry said. The find by a French-Egyptian team unearths papers telling of the daily lives of port workers who transported huge limestone blocks to Cairo during King Khufu's rule to build the Great Pyramid, intended to be his burial structure. One document...
  • 'Jesus's wife' papyrus is likely a fake, professor now says

    06/20/2016 11:26:12 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 74 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jun 20, 2016 2:16 PM EDT
    A Harvard professor who caused a huge splash when she unveiled a small fragment of papyrus that she said referred to Jesus being married now says it’s likely a forgery. In 2012, Harvard Divinity School Professor Karen King presented the fragment, which includes the phrase, “Jesus said to them, my wife.” Since then, other scholars have raised doubts about the fragment’s authenticity. …
  • The World's Oldest Papyrus and What It Can Tell Us About the Great Pyramids

    09/29/2015 12:38:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | Monday, September 28, 2015 | Alexander Stille
    Astonishingly, the papyri were written by men who participated in the building of the Great Pyramid, the tomb of the Pharaoh Khufu, the first and largest of the three colossal pyramids at Giza just outside modern Cairo. Among the papyri was the journal of a previously unknown official named Merer, who led a crew of some 200 men who traveled from one end of Egypt to the other picking up and delivering goods of one kind or another. Merer, who accounted for his time in half-day increments, mentions stopping at Tura, a town along the Nile famous for its limestone...
  • Religious scholar finds ancient New Testament papyrus on eBay for $99

    12/09/2015 8:45:54 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 11 replies
    NewOK ^ | 11/25/2015 | Herb Scribner, Deseret News
    You could have bought an ancient religious text online for less than $100. That text was an ancient Greek papyrus fragment of the Gospel of John (likely John 1:50-51), and was listed on eBay with an opening bid of $99, according to The New York Times. The papyrus -- called the "Willoughby Papyrus" since it belonged to Harold Willoughby, a University of Chicago professor, according to the eBay listing -- didn’t stay there for long. Dr. Geoffrey Smith, who researches Christianity at the University of Texas, contacted the seller and asked if he could research the fragment, The Times reported....
  • OLDEST KNOWN GOSPEL RETRIEVED FROM MUMMY MASK, RESEARCHERS CLAIM

    01/21/2015 11:34:40 AM PST · by bkopto · 76 replies
    Breitbart/UPI ^ | Jan 21, 2015 | staff
    The mummy masks of ancient commoners are a treasure trove of classical and religious documents — Christian scripture, Phoenician histories, Greek poetry. While the rich and royal members of ancient Egyptian society were buried in mummy masks of flaked gold and other precious metals, common people were forced to construct theirs with recycled pieces of paper. Recently, archaeologists found what they believe to be the world’s oldest piece of scripture in the mask of mummy from the first century. Researchers say the new scrap of spiritual papyrus is a portion of the the Gospel of Mark, the second chapter of...
  • Papyrus Found in Mummy Mask May Hold Oldest Known Gospel Text

    01/23/2015 9:20:32 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 18 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 01/23/2015 | By James Maynard
    The Gospel of Mark has been discovered written on a tiny fragment of ancient papyrus, found within a mummy mask. During the era when the mask was created, papyrus was expensive, and the religious text was reused to create the decorative wear for the mummy. This discovery could represent the oldest gospel text ever found by archaeologists. The oldest samples of Christian scripture date from the Second Century of the Common Era. Pharaohs and wealthy individuals were often adorned with mummy masks made of gold and precious materials. Masks for people from lower economic classes were often manufactured from papyrus,...
  • Mummy Mask May Reveal Oldest Known Gospel

    01/19/2015 11:10:30 PM PST · by SteveH · 30 replies
    livescience ^ | January 18, 2015 | Owen Jarus
    A text that may be the oldest copy of a gospel known to exist — a fragment of the Gospel of Mark that was written during the first century, before the year 90 — is set to be published. At present, the oldest surviving copies of the gospel texts date to the second century (the years 101 to 200). This first-century gospel fragment was written on a sheet of papyrus that was later reused to create a mask that was worn by a mummy. Although the mummies of Egyptian pharaohs wore masks made of gold, ordinary people had to settle...
  • 1,500-year-old Papyrus the Last Supper gives valuable insight into Christianity

    09/06/2014 10:09:41 PM PDT · by chessplayer · 12 replies
    A group of researchers have claimed to have unearthed one of the oldest Christian amulets in the form of a 1,500-year-old Greek papyrus fragment with writing that connotes to the biblical Last Supper and ‘manna from heaven’. In a statement, Mazza said, “This is an important and unexpected finding as it is one of the first recorded documents to use magic in the Christian context, while the first charm ever found to refer to the Eucharist – the Last Supper – as the manna of the Old Testament”.
  • Ancient ‘Last Supper’ Papyrus Gives Glimpse into Early Christianity

    09/05/2014 8:29:58 PM PDT · by lbryce · 37 replies
    Fox News ^ | September 5, 2014 | James Rogers
    A 1,500-year old piece of papyrus recently re-discovered in a U.K. university library contains some of the earliest documented references to the Last Supper and ‘manna from heaven.’ The papyrus fragment with Greek writing, held by the University of Manchester’s John Rylands library since 1901, has also been identified as one of the world’s earliest Christian charms. Experts believe that the fragment originated near the ancient Egyptian town of Hermoupolis.
  • 1,500-year-old 'magical' papyrus is first to refer to Last Supper

    09/02/2014 10:11:49 AM PDT · by CorporateStepsister · 72 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 2 September 2014 | Sarah Griffiths for
    It has laid largely unstudied in a university library for more than 100 years. But now a 1,500-year-old papyrus has been identified as one of the world’s earliest surviving Christian charms. The ‘remarkable’ document contains some of the earliest documented references to The Last Supper and sheds new light on early Christian practices, experts say.
  • The Wife of Jesus Tale (Evidence Points to Forgery of "Jesus' Wife" Fragment)

    04/28/2014 12:04:46 PM PDT · by mojito · 15 replies
    Weekly Standard ^ | 5/5/2014 | Charlotte Allen
    ....Two weeks ago, on April 10, in a manner reminiscent of King’s carefully controlled original unveiling of the fragment, the Harvard Divinity School issued a press release declaring that a “wide range of scientific testing indicates that a papyrus fragment containing the words ‘Jesus said to them my wife’ is an ancient document” and that “its contents may have been composed as early as the second to fourth centuries.” Harvard had given an advance viewing of the test results and an interview with King to reporters for just three newspapers—the New York Times, the Boston Globe, and the Harvard student...
  • Guarding grapes and other tales from papyri

    03/24/2014 12:48:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    Phys dot org, University of Cincinnati ^ | Monday, March 24, 2014 | Tom Robinette
    If you weren't careful, you might end up beaten by grape thieves skulking in the darkness. A University of Cincinnati graduate student writes about the contractual obligations of vineyard guards and researchers from around the world contribute more stories from ancient times in the most recent volumes of the Bulletin of the American Society of Papyrologists (BASP)... The latest volume of BASP is the 50th in the series and the eighth to have been edited at UC. The recently published journal features 35 contributions from 26 writers from 11 countries. The previous year's volume features 44 contributions from 41 writers...