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Keyword: milkyway

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  • Astronomers discover a free-range planet with incredible magnetism

    08/05/2018 9:48:03 AM PDT · by Simon Green · 22 replies
    Astronomy.com ^ | 08/03/18 | Jake Parks
    A bizarre rogue planet without a star is roaming the Milky Way just 20 light-years from the Sun. And according to a recently published study in The Astrophysical Journal, this strange, nomadic world has an incredibly powerful magnetic field that is some 4 million times stronger than Earth’s. Furthermore, it generates spectacular auroras that would put our own northern lights to shame. The new observations, made with the National Science Foundation’s Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), not only are the first radio observations of a planetary-mass object beyond our solar system, but also mark the first time...
  • Our Milky Way Had a Cosmic Cataclysm With a 'Sausage Galaxy' Billions of Years Ago

    07/06/2018 3:35:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    ScienceAlert ^ | Mike McRae | Thursday, July 5, 2018
    It turns out that our galaxy looks the way it does today thanks to a run-in with something called the 'Gaia Sausage'. As greasy as space is, we're not talking cosmic processed foods here. Rather, astronomers have found signs that a small galaxy smashed into the Milky Way billions of years ago, leaving behind a mess of stars with some rather unusual orbits. So, what makes this cosmic object a 'sausage'? Cambridge University astronomer Wyn Evans says it all came down to the paths of the stars following the impact... Collisions between galaxies aren't all that unusual, and the Milky...
  • Astronomers access huge amounts of data on the stars in our galaxy from Gaia space telescope

    04/25/2018 3:44:06 PM PDT · by BBell · 10 replies
    Aa Astronomers are celebrating a massive data release that offers them the richest ever map of the Milky Way. The information comes from ESA's GAIA space telescope, which has surveyed almost two billion stars in our galaxy. They now have very precise data on billions of stars around our galaxy that will make for decades of analysis. It gives them the possibility to research the history of our galaxy and postulate what might happen in the future, too.Astronomer François Mignard was one of the founding fathers of the GAIA mission. So why does this data release make such a difference...
  • Astronomers Spy Swarms of Black Holes at Our Galaxy's Core

    04/04/2018 12:39:19 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 31 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 4/4/18 | Lee Billings
    Anticipated but never before seen, the existence of tens of thousands of these dark objects at the galactic center could have far-reaching implications for astrophysics An artist's rendering of the Milky Way's core, with a supermassive black hole at its center. Scientists have discovered what appear to be twelve smaller black holes orbiting our galaxy's central giant. Each is thought to actually be a binary system composed of a black hole and a low-mass star. Gas siphoned from the star glows in x-rays as it falls into the black holes, allowing them to be seen. Credit: Columbia University For the...
  • Take a 360 degree tour of the Milky Way: Incredible Nasa visualisation (tr)

    01/12/2018 12:13:13 AM PST · by Oshkalaboomboom · 7 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Jan 11, 2018 | Tim Collins
    Budding astronauts can take a virtual space flight to the deepest depths of our galaxy, thanks to a stunning new interactive graphic produced by Nasa. The immersive 360° visualisation depicts the heart of the Milky Way, roughly 26,000 light years (150,000 trillion miles) away from Earth. It was created using data taken by satellites, which capture light that has managed to escape the monster black hole that lies in the middle of our spiral galaxy. Watch video hereThe project, made using data from Nasa’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, lets viewers control their own exploration of the fascinating environment of volatile giant...
  • Detailed map shows mysterious fast-moving gas covering 13% of the sky

    12/05/2017 9:39:23 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    The map covers the entire sky and shows curious clouds of neutral hydrogen gas that are moving at a different speed to the normal rotation of the Milky Way. ... The map was compiled by capturing an image of the sky and masking out gas that is moving at the same pace as the Milky Way in order to show the location of gas travelling at a different speed. As a result, the most sensitive and highest-resolution all-sky map of high-velocity clouds ever was created. ... The research used data from a survey known as HI4PI, a study of the...
  • Hidden Supercluster Could Solve Milky Way Mystery

    11/23/2017 8:41:02 AM PST · by MtnClimber · 30 replies
    Qanta Magazine ^ | 21 Nov, 2017 | Liz Kruesi
    The Milky Way, just like every galaxy in the cosmos, moves. While everything in the universe is constantly moving because the universe itself is expanding, since the 1970s astronomers have known of an additional motion, called peculiar velocity. This is a different sort of flow that we seem to be caught in. The Local Group of galaxies — a collection that includes the Milky Way, Andromeda and a few dozen smaller galactic companions — moves at about 600 kilometers per second with respect to the leftover radiation from the Big Bang. Over the past few decades, astronomers have tallied up...
  • Massive black hole 100,000 times bigger than the Sun discovered

    09/11/2017 8:29:48 AM PDT · by ETL · 42 replies
    The Sun, via FoxNews.com/Science ^ | September 08, 2017 | Aletha Adu
    An immense black hole 100,000 times bigger than the sun has been discovered at the heart of the Milky Way. The enormous void, which lies around 25,000 light years from Earth, could help scientists uncover the how stars, galaxies and even life itself came to be in the universe. ..." According to reports, this newly-discovered black hole could rank as the second largest ever seen in the Milky Way. Despite its immense size, scientists have called it a "mini me" version of its super-massive "cousin" known as Sagittitarius A*.
  • Massive black hole discovered near heart of the Milky Way

    09/05/2017 3:47:40 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 25 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 9/4/17 | Ian Sample
    Astronomers find evidence of enormous black hole one hundred thousand times more massive than the sun in a gas cloud near the galaxy’s centre If confirmed, the black hole will rank as the second largest black hole ever seen in the Milky Way after the supermassive black hole known as Sagittarius A*. An enormous black hole one hundred thousand times more massive than the sun has been found hiding in a toxic gas cloud wafting around near the heart of the Milky Way. If the discovery is confirmed, the invisible behemoth will rank as the second largest black hole ever...
  • Half the atoms in every human are ALIEN in origin and come from outside the Milky Way

    07/27/2017 9:08:16 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 34 replies
    The Sun ^ | 07/27/2017 | By Jasper Hamill
    Every one of us contains alien atoms that originated in a galaxy far, far away, a new study suggests. Scientists have discovered that up to half the matter making up our galaxy, the Milky Way, used to belong to other clusters of stars. The sun, the Earth, and even our own bodies probably contain a large proportion of this galaxy-hopping material, which migrated to our part of the universe across vast expanses of space. Lead researcher Dr Daniel Angles-Alcazar, from Northwestern University in the US, said: “Given how much of the matter out of which we formed may have come...
  • Hubble solves the mystery bulge at the center of the Milky Way

    03/10/2017 8:25:30 AM PST · by MtnClimber · 16 replies
    Astronomy Magazine ^ | 9 Mar, 2017 | Alison Klesman
    The Milky Way appears as a relatively flat structure when viewed along its plane in visible light. Gamma-ray emission, however, paints a different picture: two huge structures billowing outward from the galaxy’s bulge like an enormous hourglass. Named the Fermi Bubbles, these structures are the result of the Milky Way’s supermassive black hole gorging itself on interstellar gas in the past. Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), astronomers have now determined just when these structured formed. A team of astronomers led by Rongmon Bordoloi of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has used distant quasars to trace the structure and motion...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Arp 286: Trio in Virgo

    07/06/2016 6:12:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, July 06, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A remarkable telescopic composition in yellow and blue, this scene features a trio of interacting galaxies almost 90 million light-years away, toward the constellation Virgo. On the right, two, spiky, foreground Milky Way stars echo the trio galaxy hues, a reminder that stars in our own galaxy are like those in the distant island universes. With sweeping spiral arms and obscuring dust lanes, NGC 5566 is enormous, about 150,000 light-years across. Just above it lies small, blue NGC 5569. Near center, the third galaxy, NGC 5560, is multicolored and apparently stretched and distorted by its interaction with NGC 5566....
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- From Alpha to Omega in Crete

    06/29/2016 7:39:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, June 29, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This beautiful telephoto composition spans light-years in a natural night skyscape from the island of Crete. Looking south, exposures both track the stars and record a fixed foreground in three merged panels that cover a 10x12 degree wide field of view. The May 15 waxing gibbous moonlight illuminates the church and mountainous terrain. A mere 18 thousand light-years away, huge globular star cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) shining above gives a good visual impression of its appearance in binoculars on that starry night. Active galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is near the top of the frame, some 11 million...
  • New Map Shows the Dark Side of Artificial Light at Night

    06/11/2016 8:53:26 AM PDT · by samtheman · 76 replies
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/ ^ | June 10, 2016 | Lee Billings
    New Map Shows the Dark Side of Artificial Light at Night ... The most fundamental difficulty, however, has been that no one knows exactly how severe the problem is.
  • Light Pollution Hides Milky Way From 80 Percent Of North Americans, Atlas Shows

    06/10/2016 12:01:21 PM PDT · by C19fan · 67 replies
    NPR ^ | June 10, 2016 | Nell Greenfieldboyce
    The luminous glow of light pollution prevents nearly 80 percent of people in North America from seeing the Milky Way in the night sky. That's according to a new atlas of artificial night sky brightness that found our home galaxy is now hidden from more than one-third of humanity.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 5078 and Friends

    05/25/2016 3:16:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, May 25, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This sharp telescopic field of view holds two bright galaxies. Barred spiral NGC 5101 (top right) and nearly edge-on system NGC 5078 are separated on the sky by about 0.5 degrees or about the apparent width of a full moon. Found within the boundaries of the serpentine constellation Hydra, both are estimated to be around 90 million light-years away and similar in size to our own large Milky Way galaxy. In fact, if they both lie at the same distance their projected separation would be only 800,000 light-years or so. That's easily less than half the distance between the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way Over the Spanish Peaks

    05/24/2016 4:28:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    NASA ^ | Tuesday, May 24, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: That's not lightning, and it did not strike between those mountains. The diagonal band is actually the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy, while the twin peaks are actually called the Spanish Peaks -- but located in Colorado, USA. Although each Spanish peak is composed of a slightly different type of rock, both are approximately 25 million years old. This serene yet spirited image composite was meticulously created by merging a series of images all taken from the same location on one night and early last month. In the first series of exposures, the background sky was built...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way and Planets Near Opposition

    05/21/2016 12:47:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | Saturday, May 21, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In this early May night skyscape, a mountain road near Bursa, Turkey seems to lead toward bright planets Mars and Saturn and the center of our Milky Way Galaxy, a direction nearly opposite the Sun in planet Earth's sky. The brightest celestial beacon on the scene, Mars, reaches its opposition tonight and Saturn in early June. Both will remain nearly opposite the Sun, up all night and close to Earth for the coming weeks, so the time is right for good telescopic viewing. Mars and Saturn form the tight celestial triangle with red giant star Antares just right of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Falcon 9 and Milky Way

    05/14/2016 1:08:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | Saturday, May 14, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: On May 6, the after midnight launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lit up dark skies over Merritt Island, planet Earth. Its second stage bound for Earth orbit, the rocket's arc seems to be on course for the center of the Milky Way in this pleasing composite image looking toward the southeast. Two consecutive exposures made with camera fixed to a tripod were combined to follow rocket and home galaxy. A 3 minute long exposure at low sensitivity allowed the rocket's first stage burn to trace the bright orange arc and a 30 second exposure at high sensitivity...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way in Moonlight

    04/23/2016 11:47:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | Saturday, April 23, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A waning crescent moon, early morning twilight, and Al Hamra's city lights on the horizon can't hide the central Milky Way in this skyscape from planet Earth. Captured in a single exposure, the dreamlike scene looks southward across the region's grand canyon from Jabal Shams (Sun Mountain), near the highest peak in Oman, on the Arabian Peninsula. Mist, moonlight, and shadows still play along the steep canyon walls. Dark rifts along the luminous band of the Milky Way are the galaxy's cosmic dust clouds. Typically hundreds of light-years distant, they obscure starlight along the galactic plane, viewed edge-on from...