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Keyword: mechanics

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  • Hummingbird Robots 1, Drones 0 Engineers just built a bird bot

    05/14/2019 1:25:47 AM PDT · by blueplum · 1 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | 13 May 2019 | David Grossman
    Full title: Hummingbird Robots 1, Drones 0 Engineers just built a bird bot that can fly better than unmanned aerial vehicles. Engineers at Purdue have built a flying robot to mimic one of the most expert flyers in the natural world: the hummingbird.... ... After going through the training, the robot has an understanding, so to speak, of when to pause and when to take flight. Even more impressive? The robot can't actually see. It senses by touching surfaces, with each touch altering an electrical current.
  • Southwest Airlines sues mechanics, claims frivolous "safety" write-ups are grounding....planes

    03/02/2019 7:53:21 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 47 replies
    cbs ^ | March 1, 2019 | Kris Van Cleave, Megan Towey, Brian Pascus
    Southwest filed suit in U.S. District Court in Dallas against its mechanics union, claiming the American Mechanics Fraternal Association (AMFA) and its leaders have not done enough to stop what Southwest alleges is an illegal job action aimed at disrupting the airline's operations. Southwest Airlines and the AMFA — which represents about 2,400 Southwest mechanics — have been locked in tense contract negotiations for six years. Central to the contract negotiations is Southwest's use of outside maintenance contractors, which factored into the mechanics rejecting a contract offer in the fall. According to documents obtained by CBS News, the suit alleges...
  • The Difficult Birth of the "Many Worlds" Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    03/26/2018 9:56:53 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 40 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 3/21/18 | Adam Becker
    The Difficult Birth of the "Many Worlds" Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics Hugh Everett, creator of this radical idea during a drunken debate more than 60 years ago, died before he could see his theory gain widespread popularity   By Adam Becker on March 21, 2018 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Email Print Share via Google+Stumble Upon Credit: Garik Barseghyan Pixabay Over several rounds of sherry late one night in the fall of 1955, the Danish physicist Aage Petersen debated the mysteries at the heart of quantum physics with two graduate students, Charles Misner and Hugh Everett, at Princeton University. Petersen was defending the...
  • Schrödinger's cat lives and dies in two boxes at once

    05/27/2016 11:17:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 39 replies
    Physics World ^ | May 27, 2016 | Staff
    Schrödinger's cat now has a second box to play in, thanks to an international team of physicists that has created a two-mode "Schrödinger's cat state" for the first time. The experiment brings together two purely quantum properties, in that the "cat" (i.e. the photons) is simultaneously "alive and dead" (in a superposition of states) while also in two locations at once (the two boxes are entangled with one another).
  • Entanglement Makes Quantum Particles Measurably Heavier, Says Quantum Theorist

    01/10/2015 12:41:17 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    medium.com | arXiv.org ^ | 12/12/14 | David Edward Bruschi (orig. paper)
    The discovery is a long sought-after link between the theories of quantum mechanics and general relativityThe two towering achievements of 20th century physics are Einstein’s theory of general relativity and quantum mechanics. Both have fundamentally changed the way we view the universe and our place within it. And yet they are utterly incompatible: quantum mechanics operates on the tiniest scales while relativity operates on the grandest of scales. Never the twain shall meet; although not for lack of trying on the part of several generations of theorists including Einstein himself. Now one theorist has shown that an exotic quantum effect...
  • Our quantum problem

    09/29/2014 4:34:42 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies
    Aeon ^ | 1/28/14 | Adrian Kent
    In 1909, Ernest Rutherford, Hans Geiger and Ernest Marsden took a piece of radium and used it to fire charged particles at a sheet of gold foil. They wanted to test the then-dominant theory that atoms were simply clusters of electrons floating in little seas of positive electrical charge (the so-called ‘plum pudding’ model). What came next, said Rutherford, was ‘the most incredible event that has ever happened to me in my life’. Despite the airy thinness of the foil, a small fraction of the particles bounced straight back at the source – a result, Rutherford noted, ‘as incredible as...
  • Quantum steps towards the Big Bang

    09/03/2013 5:19:44 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 27 replies
    A new approach to the unification of general theory of relativity and quantum theory Present-day physics cannot describe what happened in the Big Bang. Quantum theory and the theory of relativity fail in this almost infinitely dense and hot primal state of the universe. Only an all-encompassing theory of quantum gravity which unifies these two fundamental pillars of physics could provide an insight into how the universe began. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute) in Golm/Potsdam and the Perimeter Institute in Canada have made an important discovery along this route. According to their theory,...
  • Astrophysics: Fire in the hole! (Black hole firewalls, relativity vs. quantum mechanics)

    04/05/2013 5:46:23 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    Nature ^ | 4/3/13 | Zeeya Merali
    n March 2012, Joseph Polchinski began to contemplate suicide — at least in mathematical form. A string theorist at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara, California, Polchinski was pondering what would happen to an astronaut who dived into a black hole. Obviously, he would die. But how? According to the then-accepted account, he wouldn’t feel anything special at first, even when his fall took him through the black hole’s event horizon: the invisible boundary beyond which nothing can escape. But eventually — after hours, days or even weeks if the black hole was big enough — he...
  • Retro-Engineering: Photos of 1967 General Electric 'Hardiman' Electric Exoskeleton

    01/15/2013 7:18:30 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 11 replies
    Cybernetic Zoo ^ | 1967 | Cybernetic Zoo
    G.E. Hardiman I – Ralph Mosher (American) Hardiman is a name derived somehow, from "Human Augmentation Research and Development Investigation." and Man from MANipulator. Sometimes written as HardiMan, Hardi-Man, Hardi Man, Hardiman I. Said to also be officially called the "Powered Exo-skeleton." Note: some reports suggest that only one arm of Hardiman's was built. The above photo usually accompanies that comment, but it is incorrect. A complete Hardiman was built with both arms, but the comment refers to the earlier tests of just the single, upper manipulator. Later, even when the full machine was built, one side was made static,...
  • Quantum causal relations: A causes B causes A

    10/03/2012 4:33:24 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 48 replies
    EurekAlert ^ | 10/2/12
    One of the most deeply rooted concepts in science and in our everyday life is causality; the idea that events in the present are caused by events in the past and, in turn, act as causes for what happens in the future. If an event A is a cause of an effect B, then B cannot be a cause of A. Now theoretical physicists from the University of Vienna and the Université Libre de Bruxelles have shown that in quantum mechanics it is possible to conceive situations in which a single event can be both, a cause and an effect...
  • Will College Dropouts Save America?

    10/24/2011 2:17:20 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 15 replies
    New York Times ^ | 10/24/2011 | Michael Ellsberg
    I TYPED these words on a computer designed by Apple, co-founded by the college dropout Steve Jobs. The program I used to write it was created by Microsoft, started by the college dropouts Bill Gates and Paul Allen. And as soon as it is published, I will share it with my friends via Twitter, co-founded by the college dropouts Jack Dorsey and Evan Williams and Biz Stone, and Facebook — invented, among others, by the college dropouts Mark Zuckerberg and Dustin Moskovitz, and nurtured by the degreeless Sean Parker. American academia is good at producing writers, literary critics and historians....
  • Rethinking Einstein: The end of space-time

    08/09/2010 7:25:58 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 43 replies
    NewScientist ^ | 8/9/10 | Anil Ananthaswamy
    Physicists struggling to reconcile gravity with quantum mechanics have hailed a theory – inspired by pencil lead – that could make it all very simpleIT WAS a speech that changed the way we think of space and time. The year was 1908, and the German mathematician Hermann Minkowski had been trying to make sense of Albert Einstein's hot new idea - what we now know as special relativity - describing how things shrink as they move faster and time becomes distorted. "Henceforth space by itself and time by itself are doomed to fade into the mere shadows," Minkowski proclaimed, "and...
  • Quantum mechanics flummoxes physicists again

    07/24/2010 5:35:11 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 82 replies · 3+ views
    Nature ^ | 7/22/10 | Jon Cartwright
    A fresh take on a classic experiment makes no progress in unifying quantum mechanics and relativity. If you ever want to get your head around the riddle that is quantum mechanics, look no further than the double-slit experiment. This shows, with perfect simplicity, how just watching a wave or a particle can change its behaviour. The idea is so unpalatable to physicists that they have spent decades trying to find new ways to test it. The latest such attempt, by physicists in Europe and Canada, used a three-slit version — but quantum mechanics won out again. In the standard double-slit...
  • Scientists supersize quantum mechanics

    03/18/2010 9:10:58 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 28 replies · 720+ views
    Nature ^ | 3/17/10 | Geoff Brumfiel
    Largest ever object put into quantum state.A team of scientists has succeeded in putting an object large enough to be visible to the naked eye into a mixed quantum state of moving and not moving. Andrew Cleland at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and his team cooled a tiny metal paddle until it reached its quantum mechanical 'ground state' — the lowest-energy state permitted by quantum mechanics. They then used the weird rules of quantum mechanics to simultaneously set the paddle moving while leaving it standing still. The experiment shows that the principles of quantum mechanics can apply...
  • Air Force mechanics keep MRAPs rolling

    12/21/2009 4:09:12 PM PST · by SandRat · 12 replies · 557+ views
    Air Force ^ | Senior Airman Jarrod R. Chavana, USAF
    12/21/2009 - CAMP TAJI, Iraq (AFNS) -- Five Air Force vehicle maintainers deployed to Iraq and assigned to Detachment 3 of the 732nd Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron here are working to keep security forces personnel on the road, but they aren't working on patrol cars. The maintainers work on more than 60 vehicles, the most challenging being the mine resistant ambush protected vehicle on which they have had no prior training. "My Airmen are not sent to technical schools to learn how to work on MRAPs. They're learning how to fix these vehicles while deployed using technical manuals and field...
  • Mechanics keep vehicles mission ready (Gear-Heads)

    12/05/2009 1:45:59 PM PST · by SandRat · 1 replies · 276+ views
    Multi-National Force - Iraq ^ | Staff Sgt. April Mota, USA
    strong>With the help of an interpreter, Sgt. Steve Cyr, 101st Engineer Battalion, explains the best way to repair a faulty wiring harness to Spc. Murad, with the 6th Iraqi Army Field Engineer Regiment, Dec. 4. The U.S. and Iraqi Soldiers repaired equipment during a three-day maintenance course on Victory Base Complex, Baghdad. Photo by Staff Sgt. April Mota, 16th Engineer Brigade. BAGHDAD — U.S. Soldiers here recently instructed Iraqi Army Soldiers on how to repair various faults on their equipment and vehicles. Some of the repairs included a turret handle, door bracket, fuel leak, an air tank leak and a...
  • 100 Skills Every Man Should Know

    11/16/2009 11:19:58 AM PST · by Vigilanteman · 82 replies · 2,818+ views
    Popular Mechanics ^ | October 2008 | The Editors
    Automotive 1 | Handle a blowout “Instead of hitting the brakes, maintain your speed,” says Eric Espinosa, executive director of the Maryland-based National Institute of Vehicle Dynamics. Sudden changes of speed can compromise what structural integrity the tire may still have. Steer gently for the same reason. With things fully under control, slow gradually and pull over to the shoulder.
  • The 10 weirdest physics facts, from relativity to quantum physics

    11/12/2009 7:51:26 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 63 replies · 2,263+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 11/12/09 | Tom Chivers
    People who think science is dull are wrong. Here are 10 reasons why.Physics is weird. There is no denying that. Particles that don’t exist except as probabilities; time that changes according to how fast you’re moving; cats that are both alive and dead until you open a box. We’ve put together a collection of 10 of the strangest facts we can find, with the kind help of cosmologist and writer Marcus Chown, author of We Need To Talk About Kelvin, and an assortment of Twitter users. The humanities-graduate writer of this piece would like to stress that this is...
  • Mechanics Keep Troops Rolling in Afghanistan

    07/09/2009 4:34:38 PM PDT · by SandRat · 1 replies · 233+ views
    American Forces Press Service ^ | Pfc. Elizabeth Raney, USA
    NANGAHAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan, July 9, 2009 – The eastern Afghanistan terrain is demanding, not only on soldiers, but also on their equipment. Keeping vehicles running is essential to mission success. Army Pfc. Jonathan M. Hall works on a mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicle at Forward Operating Base Fenty in Afghanistan’s Nangarhar province, July 2, 2009. U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Elizabeth Raney   (Click photo for screen-resolution image);high-resolution image available. That’s the job of Army Pfc. Jonathan M. Hall, a native of Elizabethtown, Ky., and a light-wheeled vehicle mechanic who serves with Task Force Mountain Warrior here with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th...
  • Airline mechanics who can't read English

    05/18/2009 9:29:30 PM PDT · by MamaDearest · 46 replies · 2,546+ views
    WFAA-TV ^ | May 16, 2009 | Bryan Harris
    News 8 Investigates: Airline mechanics who can't read English 10:03 AM CDT on Saturday, May 16, 2009 By BYRON HARRIS / WFAA-TV News 8 has recently revealed serious flaws in the way the FAA licenses mechanics who fix planes. There is evidence of years of problems in testing these mechanics. There is also evidence that hundreds of mechanics with questionable licenses are working on aircraft in Texas. Now there is evidence of repair facilities hiring low-wage mechanics who can't read English. Twenty-one people were killed when U.S. Airways Express Flight 5481 crashed in Charlotte, North Carolina in 2003. The plane...