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Keyword: massextinction

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  • The Planet Has Seen Sudden Warming Before. It Wiped Out Almost Everything

    12/09/2018 8:08:53 AM PST · by EdnaMode · 113 replies
    New York Times ^ | December 7, 2018 | Carl Zimmer
    Some 252 million years ago, Earth almost died. In the oceans, 96 percent of all species became extinct. It’s harder to determine how many terrestrial species vanished, but the loss was comparable. This mass extinction, at the end of the Permian Period, was the worst in the planet’s history, and it happened over a few thousand years at most — the blink of a geological eye. On Thursday, a team of scientists offered a detailed accounting of how marine life was wiped out during the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. Global warming robbed the oceans of oxygen, they say, putting many species...
  • Explosions In Space May Have Initiated Ancient Extinction On Earth

    04/12/2005 1:12:15 PM PDT · by doc30 · 38 replies · 1,259+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 4/12/05 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
    Explosions In Space May Have Initiated Ancient Extinction On Earth Scientists at NASA and the University of Kansas say that a mass extinction on Earth hundreds of millions of years ago could have been triggered by a star explosion called a gamma-ray burst. The scientists do not have direct evidence that such a burst activated the ancient extinction. The strength of their work is their atmospheric modeling -- essentially a "what if" scenario. The scientists calculated that gamma-ray radiation from a relatively nearby star explosion, hitting the Earth for only ten seconds, could deplete up to half of the atmosphere's...
  • 'Trickle of food' helped deep sea creatures survive asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs

    04/25/2016 9:28:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Thursday, April 14, 2016 | Cardiff University
    Study of fossil shells solves unanswered question of how deep sea creatures survived asteroid strike during immense upheaval of the world's oceans... Like the dinosaurs themselves, giant marine reptiles, invertebrates and microscopic organisms became extinct after the catastrophic asteroid impact in an immense upheaval of the world's oceans, yet deep sea creatures managed to survive. This has puzzled researchers as it is widely believed that the asteroid impact cut off the food supply in the oceans by destroying free-floating algae and bacteria. However, in a study published in the April issue of the journal Geology, a team led by researchers...
  • Meteor mega-hit spawned Australian continent: researchers

    06/03/2006 3:23:27 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 25 replies · 774+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 6/2/06 | AFP
    WASHINGTON (AFP) - A meteor's roaring crash into Antarctica -- larger and earlier than the impact that killed the dinosaurs -- caused the biggest mass extinction in Earth's history and likely spawned the Australian continent, scientists said. Ohio State University scientists said the 483-kilometer-wide (300-mile-wide) crater is now hidden more than 1.6 kilometers (one mile) beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. "Gravity measurements that reveal its existence suggest that it could date back about 250 million years -- the time of the Permian-Triassic extinction, when almost all animal life on Earth died out," the university said in a statement Thursday....
  • Diamonds Rained Down During Ice Age

    07/07/2008 2:05:25 PM PDT · by decimon · 42 replies · 439+ views
    Live Science ^ | JUL 7, 2008 | Ker Than
    Diamonds and precious metals found in the eastern United States might have rained down during the last Ice Age after a comet shattered over Canada and set North America ablaze, all leading to a mass die-off of animals and humans. New chemical analyses of diamond, gold and silver found in Ohio and Indiana reveal the minerals were transported there from Canada several thousand years ago. The question is, how?
  • EARTH was a BAKING LIFELESS DESERT for 5 MILLION years

    10/19/2012 9:11:14 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    The Register ^ | 10/19/2012 | By Brid-Aine Parnell
    Boffins have discovered that "lethally hot" ocean temperatures kept the Earth devoid of life for millions of years after the mass extinction that occurred 250 million years ago. The global wipeout that ended the Permian era, before dinosaurs, wiped out nearly all of the world's species. Mass extinctions like these in Earth's history are usually followed by a "dead zone", a period of tens of thousands of years before new species crop up. But the early Triassic dead zone lasted millions of years, not thousands. Boffins now reckon that the extra-long five million year dead zone was caused by screaming...
  • Most Of The Earth's Species Are About To Be Destroyed In A Giant Mass Extinction

    07/25/2014 3:48:40 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 79 replies
    Yahoo Finance ^ | 7/25/14 | Lauren F Friedman - businessinsider.com
    Approximately 65 million years ago, when the dinosaurs went extinct, 75% of the planet's many species went with them. It was the world's fifth, and most recent, mass extinction event. Now, according to a July 25 review in the journal Science, the Earth seems to be at the cusp of a sixth mass extinction. Only this time, an asteroid is not to blame. We are. "Human impacts on animal biodiversity are an under-recognized form of global environmental change," the team of ecologists and biologists warn in Science. "Among terrestrial vertebrates, 322 species have become extinct since 1500, and populations of...
  • "Cosmos- A SpaceTime Odessey" -–Tonight 'Rivers of Life' covers Evolution and Mass Extinction Events

    03/16/2014 3:02:10 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 40 replies
    The Daily Galaxy ^ | March 16, 2014
    "Cosmos- A SpaceTime Odessey" --Tonight in 'Rivers of Life' Neil deGrasse Tyson Covers Evolution and Mass Extinction Events Tonight, the second of 13 episodes of "Cosmos- A SpaceTime Odessey" hosted by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson airs at 9 pm tonight on Fox and at 10 pm Sunday night on the National Geographic channel. Tonight's episode is "The Rivers of Life" and covers evolution and natural selection processes that have made life on Earth as we know it today, and also covers mass extinction events such as asteroid impacts with our planet that have drastically altered the course and progress of...
  • Mammoths may have died after impact from space

    06/02/2013 10:13:01 PM PDT · by rjbemsha · 22 replies
    World Science ^ | 20 May 2013 | University of Cincinnati
    New re­search sug­gests wooly mam­moths, the gi­gantic cousins of mod­ern ele­phants, al­so died out as a re­sult of cli­mate change fol­low­ing a cos­mic im­pact—and that blast may have shocked hu­man popula­t­ions as well. Ei­ther a com­et scrap­ing the at­mos­phere or a me­te­or­ite slam­ming in­to the Earth caused glob­al-scale com­bus­tion, scorch­ing the air, melt­ing bed­rock and al­tered the course of Earth’s his­to­ry, ac­cord­ing to re­searcher Ken­neth Tanker­s­ley of the Uni­vers­ity of Cin­cin­nati. Tanker­s­ley said while the cos­mic strike had an im­me­di­ate and deadly ef­fect, the long-term side ef­fects were far more dev­as­tat­ing – si­m­i­lar to Kra­ka­to­a’s af­termath but many times worse...
  • Catastrophic Comet Chilled and Killed Ice Age Beasts (and Clovis people)

    05/21/2007 10:16:48 PM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 45 replies · 3,335+ views
    Live Science ^ | 05/21/07 | Jeanna Bryner
    Catastrophic Comet Chilled and Killed Ice Age Beasts Jeanna Bryner LiveScience Staff Writer LiveScience.com Mon May 21, 9:30 AM ET An extraterrestrial object with a three-mile girth might have exploded over southern Canada nearly 13,000 years ago, wiping out an ancient Stone Age culture as well as megafauna like mastodons and mammoths. The blast could be to blame for a major cold spell called the Younger Dryas that occurred at the end of the Pleistocene Epoch, a period of time spanning from about 1.8 million years ago to 11,500 years ago. Research, presented today at a meeting of the American...
  • Brightest Galactic Flash Ever Detected Hits Earth

    02/18/2005 6:11:56 PM PST · by Servant of the 9 · 73 replies · 3,443+ views
    Space.Com ^ | 18 February, 2005 | Robert Roy Britt
    A huge explosion halfway across the galaxy packed so much power it briefly altered Earth's upper atmosphere in December, astronomers said Friday.No known eruption beyond our solar system has ever appeared as bright upon arrival. But you could not have seen it, unless you can top the X-ray vision of Superman: In gamma rays, the event equaled the brightness of the full Moon's reflected visible light. The blast originated about 50,000 light-years away and was detected Dec. 27. A light-year is the distance light travels in a year, about 6 trillion miles (10 trillion kilometers). The commotion was caused by...
  • Mass-extinction controversy flares again (Chicxulub crater kills dinosaurs, or not?)

    04/11/2003 2:34:46 PM PDT · by SteveH · 29 replies · 1,280+ views
    Nature ^ | 10 April 2003 | Rex Dalton
    EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly, Nice, April 2003 Mass-extinction controversy flares again Core from asteroid crater fuels debate on what wiped out the dinosaurs. 10 April 2003 REX DALTON [photo] The dinosaurs were wiped out 65 million years ago. © alamy.com A claim that the asteroid that struck Mexico 65 million years ago did not cause the mass extinction that wiped out dinosaurs triggered heated debate at a meeting this week. The announcement is based on preliminary analysis of the first core drilled into the 185-kilometre Chicxulub asteroid crater near the Yucatan Peninsula. Gerta Keller of Princeton University in New Jersey says...
  • Blue Planet: The World Wide Web of life

    12/30/2002 5:07:19 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 3 replies · 106+ views
    UPI ^ | 12/27/2002 2:00 PM | Dan Whipple UPI Science News
    As the Earth undergoes the largest mass extinction since the elimination of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, one of the biggest unsettled questions is the phenomenon's effect on the intricate biological network upon which all life depends.Some have argued, for instance, that the disappearance of even a few species starts a reaction down the chain of life, with animals types toppling like dominoes in a line until the last one -- that is to say, humans -- is felled. Naturalist Aldo Leopold expressed this point of view when he said the first rule of intelligent tinkering was "saving all...