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Keyword: inflammation

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  • Keep your inflammatory words to yourself

    12/01/2015 6:09:40 AM PST · by artichokegrower · 28 replies
    Sacramento Bee ^ | November 30, 2015 | Erika D. Smith
    Republican presidential candidates, others too quick with reckless rhetoric Words don’t carry consequences of gun, but they can influence people Ramblings about ‘body parts’ in Planned Parenthood shooting is proof
  • Vitamin D prevents diabetes and clogged arteries in mice

    03/19/2015 7:27:28 PM PDT · by ConservativeMind · 26 replies
    In recent years, a deficiency of vitamin D has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease, two illnesses that commonly occur together and are the most common cause of illness and death in Western countries. Both disorders are rooted in chronic inflammation, which leads to insulin resistance and the buildup of artery-clogging plaque. Now, new research in mice at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests vitamin D plays a major role in preventing the inflammation that leads to type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. Further, the way key immune cells behave without adequate vitamin D may...
  • Study details a link between inflammation and cancer

    02/06/2015 2:34:01 PM PST · by Tired of Taxes · 9 replies
    MIT News ^ | January 15, 2015 | Anne Trafton
    A new study from MIT reveals one reason why people who suffer from chronic inflammatory diseases such as colitis have a higher risk of mutations that cause cancer. The researchers also found that exposure to DNA-damaging chemicals after a bout of inflammation boosts these mutations even more, further increasing cancer risk. The findings confirm a longstanding theory about why inflammation and cancer are linked, and offer possible ways to help prevent and treat cancer, says Bevin Engelward, an MIT professor of biological engineering and senior author of a Jan. 15 PLoS Genetics paper describing the findings. Chronic inflammation drives a...
  • Trying to Shut Off the Body's Friendly Fire

    06/05/2005 1:20:38 PM PDT · by neverdem · 56 replies · 2,004+ views
    NY Times ^ | June 5, 2005 | ANDREW POLLACK
    ROXANNE PEREZ had never really been sick in her life until, at age 27, the roof began falling in. During a Fourth of July weekend at the beach in 2000, she was rushed to an emergency room suffering from convulsions. In the months after, she had blood transfusions and her spleen removed. Then, in 2001, she suffered a heart attack that left her heart permanently weakened. Ms. Perez, who lives in San Antonio, had to give up her job, her home and car and move in with her parents. Now 32, she suffers from frequent fatigue, made worse when she...
  • Body Reveals Its Inflammation 'Off Switch'

    10/01/2006 6:32:34 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 1,403+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 10-1-2006 | Deb McKenzie
    Body reveals its inflammation 'off switch' 18:00 01 October 2006 NewScientist.com news service Deb MacKenzie Researchers have shed light on how the body switches off its immune response, a key step towards understanding autoimmune diseases and controlling inflammation. When immune cells die, they transform into sponges that soak up the molecules responsible for causing inflammation, researchers have discovered. The new information may lead to better drugs to treat inflammatory disorders, such as eczema. Inflammation is characterised by a red, painful swelling around a wound caused by blood fluids, proteins and immune cells flooding into an area of the body in...
  • Pomegranate peel may cure deadly brain disorders (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's)

    08/23/2014 3:43:03 AM PDT · by Innovative · 20 replies
    Business Standard ^ | Aug 23, 2014 | IANS
    Two years of research by a Nigerian scientist has shown that sufferers of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease could be helped by punicalagin, a compound extracted from pomegranates. Olumayokun Olajide from the University of Huddersfield in West Yorkshire showed how punicalagin could inhibit inflammation in specialised brain cells known as micrologia. He also found the painful inflammation that accompanies illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis and Parkinson's disease could be reduced using the same drug. "We do know that regular consumption of pomegranate has a lot of health benefits, including prevention of neuro-inflammation related to dementia," Olajide added.
  • Alzheimer's disease could be prevented after new blood test breakthrough

    07/08/2014 11:00:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 12:01AM BST 08 Jul 2014 | By Sarah Knapton, Science Correspondent
    Scientists at Oxford University and Kings College London develop blood test which can predict the onset of Alzheimer's so that drugs could target the disease before symptoms appear A blood test has been developed to predict if someone will develop Alzheimers within a year, raising hopes that the disease could become preventable. After a decade of research, scientists at Oxford University and Kings College London are confident they have found 10 proteins which show the disease is imminent. Clinical trials will start on people who have not yet developed Alzheimers to find out which drugs halt its onset. The blood...
  • Obesity is Inflammatory Disease, Rat Study Shows

    07/07/2014 5:38:08 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 42 replies
    Sci-News ^ | 2013 December 05 | Sci-News
    Scientists led by Dr David Fairlie from the University of Queensland, Australia, have found abnormal amounts of an inflammatory protein called PAR2 in the fat tissues of overweight and obese rats and humans. PAR2 is also increased on the surfaces of human immune cells by common fatty acids in the diet. When obese rats on a diet high in sugar and fat were given a new oral drug that binds to PAR2, the inflammation-causing properties of this protein were blocked, as were other effects of the high-fat and high-sugar diet, including obesity itself. "This important new finding links obesity and...
  • Obesity-related disease trigger found, says UCSD team

    06/24/2014 10:50:26 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    UT San Diego ^ | June 13, 2014 | Bradley J. Fikes
    Obesity-related diseases such as Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome are triggered by a lack of oxygen in adipose cells, according to a study led by UC San Diego researchers. An excess of fatty acids causes an increase in oxygen consumption, which outstrips the supply, triggering hypoxia, the study found. This leads to inflammation in the adipose cells, which in turn leads to insulin resistance, obesity and related diseases. And that's the short version. The full chain of events is even more complicated. The study, performed in mice, points to possible therapies in people, said researchers led by Dr. Jerrold...
  • Milestone study probes cancer origin

    08/17/2013 4:54:38 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | 2013 August 14 | James Gallagher
    Scientists are reporting a significant milestone for cancer research after charting 21 major mutations behind the vast majority of tumours. The disruptive changes to the genetic code, reported in Nature, accounted for 97% of the 30 most common cancers. Finding out what causes the mutations could lead to new treatments. Some causes, such as smoking are known, but more than half are still a mystery. Cancer Research UK said it was a fascinating and important study. A tumour starts when one of the building blocks of bodies, a cell, goes wrong. Over the course of a lifetime cells pick up...
  • Obesity is Inflammatory Disease, Rat Study Shows

    05/01/2014 3:12:41 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Dec 5, 2013 | NA
    Scientists led by Dr David Fairlie from the University of Queensland, Australia, have found abnormal amounts of an inflammatory protein called PAR2 in the fat tissues of overweight and obese rats and humans. PAR2 is also increased on the surfaces of human immune cells by common fatty acids in the diet. When obese rats on a diet high in sugar and fat were given a new oral drug that binds to PAR2, the inflammation-causing properties of this protein were blocked, as were other effects of the high-fat and high-sugar diet, including obesity itself.Zucker Rat, a pet rat that has developed...
  • Why dark chocolate really IS good for you:

    03/22/2014 8:06:52 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 27 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | 3-21-14 | Victoria Woollaston
    Love dark chocolate? Now you can eat it with much less guilt because scientists have discovered why it is so good for us. Previous studies have found daily consumption of dark chocolate reduces blood pressure and is good for the heart. Now scientists have discovered why this happens - and its down to how our guts ferment the fibre in cocoa beans. Researcher Maria Moore, from Louisiana State University said: 'We found that there are two kinds of microbes in the gut: the 'good' ones and the 'bad' ones. 'The good microbes, such as Bifidobacterium and lactic acid bacteria, feast...
  • Processed food NOT fat is the real cause of heart disease, claims heart surgeon

    01/29/2014 9:00:04 AM PST · by dennisw · 51 replies
    dailymail ^ | 29 January 2014
    Processed food NOT fat is the real cause of heart disease, claims heart surgeon who says a diet of natural food can even reverse the illness Dr. Dwight Lundell admits prescribing cholesterol-lowering medications, and a low-fat, high-simple carbohydrate diet for two-and-a-half decades was misguided 'These recommendations are no longer scientifically or morally defensible,' he writes in an essay that has ignited the Internet He vlaims these foods actively destroy the walls of our blood vessels by causing chronic inflammation, which in turn causes heart disease The cardiac surgeon recommends only eating foods your grandmother, or great-grandmother, would recognise An Arizona...
  • Novel Protein CPTP Offers Hope for Treatment of Cancer and Other Diseases

    08/07/2013 7:35:02 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 13 replies
    Sci-News ^ | August 6, 2013 | Sci-News
    The scientists discovered that the ceramide-1 phosphate transport protein (CPTP) regulates levels of biologically active lipids, which are molecules such as fatty acids that often play a role in cell signaling. They found that CPTP's main function is to transport ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P), a lipid that helps regulate cell growth, survival, migration and inflammation. Specifically, C1P increases the production of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids – powerful signaling molecules that contribute to chronic inflammation in diseases such as cancer, asthma, atherosclerosis and thrombosis – and the discovery of CPTP sheds a light on the cellular mechanisms that contribute to these diseases. "We may have...
  • Branded Curcumin Matches Effects of Prozac on Depression

    07/28/2013 11:19:21 AM PDT · by neverdem · 49 replies
    WholeFoods Magazine ^ | 7/24/13 | NA
    Chester, NJ—A recent clinical trial published in Phytotherapy Research indicated that a high-absorption curcumin (BCM-95 from Dolcas Biotech, based here) had similar effects as a generic form of Prozac (fluoxetine) on depression, sans the adverse effects. “It is a novel and surprising application for this natural medicine,” said Ajay Goel, Ph.D., Baylor Research Institute and Charles A Sammons Cancer Center, Baylor University Medical Center and study co-author. “People with depression have higher levels of inflammation in the brain. Also, people with depression have lower levels of neurogenesis in the brain, meaning they make fewer new brain cells than people with no...
  • Cholesterol limits lose their lustre

    03/02/2013 10:24:14 PM PST · by neverdem · 71 replies
    Nature News ^ | 26 February 2013 | Heidi Ledford
    Revised guidelines for heart health are set to move away from target-based approach. Soon after Joseph Francis learned that his levels of bad LDL cholesterol sat at twice the norm, he discovered the shortcomings of cholesterol-lowering drugs and of the clinical advice guiding their use. Francis, the director of clinical analysis and reporting at the Veterans Health Administration (VA) in Washington DC, started taking Lipitor (atorvastatin), a cholesterol-lowering statin and the best-selling drug in pharmaceutical history. His LDL plummeted, but still hovered just above a target mandated by clinical guidelines. Adding other medications had no effect, and upping the...
  • Zinc deficiency mechanism linked to aging, multiple diseases

    10/12/2012 4:34:27 PM PDT · by neverdem · 82 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | October 1, 2012 | NA
    A new study has outlined for the first time a biological mechanism by which zinc deficiency can develop with age, leading to a decline of the immune system and increased inflammation associated with many health problems, including cancer, heart disease, autoimmune disease and diabetes. The research was done by scientists in the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University and the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences. It suggests that it's especially important for elderly people to get adequate dietary intake of zinc, since they may need more of it at this life stage when their ability to...
  • A molecule central to diabetes is uncovered

    08/11/2012 3:20:17 PM PDT · by neverdem · 17 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | August 8, 2012 | NA
    At its most fundamental level, diabetes is a disease characterized by stress -- microscopic stress that causes inflammation and the loss of insulin production in the pancreas, and system-wide stress due to the loss of that blood-sugar-regulating hormone. Now, researchers led by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) have uncovered a new key player in amplifying this stress in the earliest stages of diabetes: a molecule called thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). The molecule, they've discovered, is central to the inflammatory process that leads to the death of the cells in the human pancreas that produce insulin. "This molecule...
  • BHR Pharma Expands SyNAPSe Trial into Thailand, China and Russia

    06/19/2012 10:56:42 PM PDT · by neverdem
    BHR Pharma via Yahoo ^ | Jun 12, 2012 | NA
    Study Evaluating Intravenous Progesterone Formulation BHR-100 to Treat Traumatic Brain Injury Set to Complete in 2013 BHR Pharma's SyNAPSe clinical trial is now enrolling patients suffering from severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) at 14 sites in Thailand, China and Russia. The trial currently has 153 participating sites (Level 1 and 2 trauma centers) worldwide. The 500th of 1,180 patients needed to complete the global Phase III, multi-center trial was enrolled at the end of May in the United States. SyNAPSe is evaluating the effectiveness of BHR-100, a... --snip-- TBI is a serious public health problem that affects more than 1.7...
  • New Epilepsy Tactic: Fight Inflammation

    06/06/2012 8:41:55 PM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    NY Times ^ | June 4, 2012 | ALASTAIR GEE
    In November 2008, when he was just 6, William Moller had his first epileptic seizure, during a reading class at school. For about 20 seconds, he simply froze in place, as if someone had pressed a pause button. He could not respond to his teacher. This is known as an absence seizure, and over the next year William, now 10, who lives with his family in Brooklyn, went from having one or two a day to suffering constant seizures. Not all were absence seizures; others were frightening tonic-clonics, also known as grand mals, during which he lost consciousness and convulsed....