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Keyword: huntergatherers

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  • Dogs lived and died with humans 10,000 years ago in the Americas

    04/17/2018 5:40:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 37 replies
    Science News ^ | April 16, 2018 | Bruce Bower
    A trio of dogs buried at two ancient human sites in Illinois lived around 10,000 years ago, making them the oldest known domesticated canines in the Americas. Radiocarbon dating of the dogs’ bones shows they were 1,500 years older than thought, zooarchaeologist Angela Perri said April 13 at the annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The previous age estimate was based on a radiocarbon analysis of burned wood found in one of the animals’ graves. Until now, nearly 9,300-year-old remains of dogs eaten by humans at a Texas site were the oldest physical evidence of American canines.
  • Why archaeologists are arguing about sweet potatoes

    04/13/2018 9:30:13 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 75 replies
    www.popsci.com ^ | 04/13/2018 | Staff
    A Japanese variety of sweet potato Pixabay _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ At some point, sweet potatoes crossed the Pacific. This much we know. As for the rest—How? When? Why?—we’re just not sure. Or, to be more clear, some people are sure they’re sure, and others disagree. Sweet potatoes have been at the center of a massive archaeological debate for many decades now, and a new paper in Current Biology has only stoked the flames. It uses genetic data from sweet potatoes and their relatives to establish a phylogenetic tree of their evolution, thereby demonstrating that the tubers existed in Polynesia before humans lived...
  • Haifa U. Reveals Role of Pigeons in Turning the Negev Green 1,500 Years Ago

    03/24/2018 8:16:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | March 21, 2018 | JNi.Media
    The study, which focused on the ancient settlements of Shivta and Sa'adon, found archaeological evidence that the Byzantines in the Negev did not raise their pigeons for food, but to fertilize the dry loess soil and making it more suitable for intensive agriculture. Loess is made up of fragment of geological detritus, formed by the accumulation of wind-blown dust. But despite its lowly origins, loess tends to develop into very rich soils. Under appropriate climatic conditions, it forms some of the most agriculturally productive terrain in the world. "The pigeon droppings are rich in phosphorus, potassium and nitrogen, which are...
  • Entomologist Confirms First Saharan Farming 10,000 Years Ago

    03/22/2018 4:05:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | St Patrick's Day, Saturday, March 17, 2018 | editors
    The team has been investigating findings from an ancient rock shelter at a site named Takarkori in south-western Libya. It is desert now, but earlier in the Holocene age [our present age], some 10,000 years ago, it was part of the "green Sahara" and wild cereals grew there. More than 200,000 seeds - in small circular concentrations - were discovered at Takarkori, which showed that hunter-gatherers developed an early form of agriculture by harvesting and storing crops. But an alternative possibility was that ants, which are capable of moving seeds, had been responsible for the concentrations...The site has yielded other...
  • Tree rings tell tale of drought in Mongolia over the last 2,000 years

    03/19/2018 9:41:20 PM PDT · by George - the Other · 15 replies
    Science News ^ | March 19, 2018 | DAN GARISTO
    "It was suspected that a harsh drought from about 2000 to 2010 that killed tens of thousands of livestock was unprecedented in the region’s history and primarily the result of human-caused climate change. But the tree ring data show that the dry spell, while rare in its severity, was not outside the realm of natural climate variability, researchers report online March 14 in Science Advances."
  • The 900 Billion dollar fungus

    03/14/2018 7:58:50 PM PDT · by Fungi · 47 replies
    Blog.oup ^ | February, 2018 | Nicholas Money
    I never post, but this is noteworthy. Brewer's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is responsible for five percent of our gross domestic product. From bread to beer and beyond, this fungus has an incredible impact on our lives. Fungi are important!
  • Wild horses are EXTINCT: Domesticated breeds are now the only ones to survive on the planet, [tr]

    02/23/2018 5:44:36 AM PST · by C19fan · 39 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | February 23, 2018 | Joe Pinkstone
    The last 'wild' horses is the world are not truly wild, according to a shock DNA study. Przewalski's horses, a breed thought to be the last 'wild' species, are the descendants of escaped once-domesticated animals. The research turns the mysterious origin of domesticated horses 'upside down', experts claim.
  • Brewing Stone Age beer

    08/05/2012 7:33:03 AM PDT · by Renfield · 51 replies
    sciencenordic.com ^ | 7-20-2012 | Asle Rønning
    Beer enthusiasts are using a barn in Norway’s Akershus County to brew a special ale which has scientific pretensions and roots back to the dawn of human culture. The beer is made from einkorn wheat, a single-grain species that has followed humankind since we first started tilling the soil, but which has been neglected for the last 2,500 years. “This is fun − really thrilling. It’s hard to say whether this has ever been tried before in Norway,” says Jørn Kragtorp. He started brewing as a hobby four years ago. He represents the fourth generation on the family farm of...
  • Scientists have isolated the very first rust pathogen gene that wheat plants detect...

    12/21/2017 3:31:44 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    Mr Jiapeng Chen, a PhD candidate from the University of Sydney who initiated the work by sequencing and analysing the genome of a virulent rust isolate, said this was the first important step in addressing the diagnostic challenges posed by ever-changing fungi, which result in new rust pathogen strains. Professor Park explained: "It's like an ongoing arms race - we've got to keep one step ahead of this changing pathogen. "The last major epidemic of wheat stem rust in Australia alone, in 1973, caused $AU300 million in damage - imagine what that would be today." Co-corresponding author, Dr Peter Dodds...
  • Ancient barley took high road to China

    11/26/2017 3:45:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, November 22, 2017 | Washington University in St. Louis
    First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research... "Wheat was introduced to central China in the second or third millennium B.C., but barley did not arrive there until the first millennium B.C.," Liu said. "While previous research suggests wheat cultivation moved east along the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, our study calls attention to the possibility of a southern route...
  • Was Johnny Appleseed for real?

    11/26/2017 8:46:53 AM PST · by Kaslin · 29 replies
    CBS News ^ | November 26, 2017
    AN APPLE A DAY may or may not keep the doctor away, but it's a sentiment shared by just about everyone our Mo Rocca has been visiting: At the Johnny Appleseed Festival in Fort Wayne, Ind., there's no such thing as a bad apple. There you can indulge in apple dumplings -- a skinless apple wrapped in dough, and deep-fried. Rocca asked, "How healthy is this? "Very healthy -- it's an apple!" he was told Or partake of apple petals ("Better than apple dumplings!" enthused cutthroat vendor Logan Forbing), and sample some apple sausages. Fort Wayne is where John Chapman...
  • Shuwaymis (oldest leashed dog carvings) (Seems to be origin of large number of new articles)

    11/19/2017 6:19:12 AM PST · by mairdie · 26 replies
    Shuwaymis is an area about 370 km southwest of the city of Ha’il, near the town of al-Ha’it, in southern Ha’il province. The petroglyphs were known by local Bedouin for centuries, but only drawn to the attention of authorities by a local school headmaster, Mamdouh al Rasheedi, in 2001. Professor Saad Abdul Aziz al-Rashid, calls Shuwaymis “a unique and very important find.” The setting differs significantly from Jubbah in being surrounded by striking lava flows that impede travel, especially by camels and horses. Wadis are therefore important avenues for herders, and it is in these valleys that Neolithic and later...
  • World’s earliest evidence of wine-making found in Georgia

    11/14/2017 6:38:30 AM PST · by C19fan · 20 replies
    AFP ^ | November 14, 2017 | Staff
    he world's earliest evidence of grape wine-making has been detected in 8,000-year-old pottery jars unearthed in Georgia, making the tradition almost 1,000 years older than previously thought, researchers said Monday. Before, the oldest chemical evidence of wine in the Near East dated to 5,400-5,000 BC (about 7,000 years ago) and was from the Zagros Mountains of Iran, said the report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a peer-reviewed US journal.
  • Earliest Roman Restaurant Found in France: Night Life Featured Heavy Drinking

    07/03/2016 8:14:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Haaretz ^ | February 23, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    An ancient tavern believed to be more then 2,100 years old has been found in the town of Lattes, southern France, making it the oldest Roman restaurant found in the Mediterranean. They also found evidence that while Romanization changed the locals' dining habits, it didn't do much for the cuisine. Evidently some things never change, though. The excavators in the town of Lattes found indoor gristmills and ovens for baking pita, each about one meter across. This oven, called a tabouna or taboon, is still used throughout the Middle East and Israel. In another room, across the courtyard from the...
  • The world’s oldest paycheck was cashed in beer

    06/29/2016 7:23:28 PM PDT · by ameribbean expat · 30 replies
    On one tablet excavated from the area we can see a human head eating from a bowl, meaning “ration”, and a conical vessel, meaning “beer”. Scattered around are scratches recording the amount of beer for a particular worker. It’s the world’s oldest known payslip.
  • Ancient Canaanites Imported Animals from Egypt

    06/25/2016 5:03:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 21, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The ancient Canaanites living in Gath some 5,000 years ago weren't sacrificing their own livestock to appease the gods. They were importing animals from ancient Egypt, archaeologists have now proven. A donkey, as well as some sheep and goats whose remains were found in Early Bronze Age layers at Gath dating to 4900 years ago turn out to have been born and bred in the Nile valley.The discovery at the archaeological site of Tell el-Safi shows that animals were part of the extensive trading relations between the Old Kingdom of Egypt and Early Bronze Age Canaan (circa 2900-2500 BCE).... Until...
  • Farming Invented Twice In Middle East, Genomes Study Reveals

    06/22/2016 11:55:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Nature ^ | June 20, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Study of 44 ancient Middle Eastern genomes supports idea of independent farming revolutions in the Fertile Crescent. Two Middle Eastern populations independently developed farming and then spread the technology to Europe, Africa and Asia, according to the genomes of 44 people who lived thousands of years ago in present-day Armenia, Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Iran. ...the research supports archaeological evidence about the multiple origins of farming, and represents the first detailed look at the ancestry of the individuals behind one of the most important periods in human history — the Neolithic revolution. Some 11,000 years ago, humans living in the...
  • Clemson's first harvest of ancient Southern wheat exceeds expectations

    06/20/2016 10:37:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    phys.org ^ | 06-20-2016 | by Jim Melvin & Provided by: Clemson University
    Clemson University scientist Brian Ward and his team harvested about 145 pounds of Purple Straw seed, which was grown from less than half a pound. Credit: Scott Miller / Clemson University ================================================================================================= The first step of an ongoing-process designed to bring a valuable heirloom wheat back from the brink of extinction has been completed with flying colors. Last month, Clemson University scientist Brian Ward and his team harvested about 145 pounds of Purple Straw seed, which was grown from less than half a pound. Purple Straw is the only heirloom wheat to have been cultivated continually in the South from...
  • Oldest noodles unearthed in China

    10/12/2005 1:36:46 PM PDT · by bigmac0707 · 78 replies · 1,386+ views
    BBC News ^ | 9/12/05 | BBC News
    Oldest noodles unearthed in China Late Neolithic noodles: They may settle the origin debate The 50cm-long, yellow strands were found in a pot that had probably been buried during a catastrophic flood. Radiocarbon dating of the material taken from the Lajia archaeological site on the Yellow River indicates the food was about 4,000 years old. Scientists tell the journal Nature that the noodles were made using grains from millet grass - unlike modern noodles, which are made with wheat flour. The discovery goes a long way to settling the old argument over who first created the string-like food. Professor Houyuan...
  • 'Farming in India began much earlier'

    12/05/2006 10:59:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 403+ views
    Hindustan Times ^ | December 3, 2006 | HT Correspondent
    Professor VD Mishra said that new researches have revealed that agricultural practices in India started in Mesolithic period (6-7,000 BC), much before the Neolithic period (4000 BC) as is generally believed. This discovery has proved that agriculture in India started simultaneously with other parts of the world. He said that Sativa rice, discovered from excavations at Chopni in Belan valley, has proved that India did not lag behind in agriculture... Joshi said that encroachments around historical monuments should be stopped because it harms our heritage. Citing an example, he said that Gwalior Fort could not be declared World Heritage due...