Keyword: highbloodpressure

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  • 2014 Evidence-Based Guideline for the Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults

    03/10/2014 6:59:25 PM PDT · by neverdem · 27 replies
    JAMA ^ | February 5, 2014 | Paul A. James et al.
    Report From the Panel Members Appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8) FREE Hypertension is the most common condition seen in primary care and leads to myocardial infarction, stroke, renal failure, and death if not detected early and treated appropriately. Patients want to be assured that blood pressure (BP) treatment will reduce their disease burden, while clinicians want guidance on hypertension management using the best scientific evidence. This report takes a rigorous, evidence-based approach to recommend treatment thresholds, goals, and medications in the management of hypertension in adults. Evidence was drawn from randomized controlled trials, which represent the...
  • Study finds eyes hold clues to stroke risk

    08/14/2013 6:15:39 AM PDT · by themedguru
    BELLEVUE, WA – -(Ammoland.com)- You heard it straight from the horse’s mouth. Jay Carney said Obama will sign the UN Arms Trade Treaty “before the end of August…We believe it’s in the interest of the United States.” This is very strategic timing considering Congress is on a 5 week vacation lasting thru the month of August! These back door tactics are nothing new for the Obama Administration, which is why we are using tactics of our own to stop his anti-gun agenda. We have the home fax numbers of every Senator so while they are absent from the Capitol we...
  • 1 in 10 U.S. Deaths Blamed on Salt

    03/22/2013 8:36:23 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 129 replies
    ABC News ^ | March 21, 2013 | Katie Moisse and some possible grant junkies
    On the heels of a study linking sugary drinks to 25,000 U.S. deaths a year, new research suggests salty food is even more dangerous.The new study, by the same Harvard research team, linked excessive salt consumption to nearly 2.3 million cardiovascular deaths worldwide in 2010. One in 10 Americans dies from eating too much salt, the researchers found.“The burden of sodium is much higher than the burden of sugar-sweetened beverages,” said Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, an epidemiologist at the Harvard School of Public Health and author of both the salt and sugary drink studies. “That’s because sugar-sweetened beverages are just one...
  • Study: "Disappointly weak" link between salt and high blood pressure

    12/06/2012 5:15:19 PM PST · by shove_it · 53 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 6 Dec 2012 | Lisa Collier Cool
    For decades table salt has been on a healthy heart’s most wanted list. Believing it’s responsible for skyrocketing blood pressure, Americans have banned salt from tables and stripped it from recipes. But new research says salt just might deserve a bit of a reprieve. The link between salt and blood pressure is thought to date back to the 1940s when Duke University researcher Walter Kempner, M.D., became famous for using salt restriction as a means to treat people with high blood pressure. During the next few decades, studies confirmed Kempner’s theory that reducing salt could help reduce hypertension. A Controversy...
  • Strokes are rising fast among young, middle-aged

    02/09/2011 3:57:04 PM PST · by jackspyder · 10 replies
    Yahoo News/Associated Press ^ | Feb. 9, 2011 | MARILYNN MARCHIONE
    Strokes are rising dramatically among young and middle-aged Americans while dropping in older people, a sign that the obesity epidemic may be starting to shift the age burden of the disease. The numbers, reported Wednesday at an American Stroke Association conference, come from the first large nationwide study of stroke hospitalizations by age. Government researchers compared hospitalizations in 1994 and 1995 with ones in 2006 and 2007. The sharpest increase — 51 percent — was among men 15 through 34. Strokes rose among women in this age group, too, but not as fast — 17 percent. "It's definitely alarming," said...
  • For black men with high blood pressure, the barber can be a lifesaver

    10/27/2010 12:58:17 AM PDT · by thecodont · 16 replies
    Los Angeles Times / latimes.com ^ | October 25, 2010|2:25 p.m. | Melissa Healy/Los Angeles Times
    A little off the top, some spirited sports commentary, neighborhood gossip and a bit of man-to-man advice on domestic affairs: it’s all there at the barbershop, an institution that plays a beloved and central role in the African American community. Increasingly, in recent years, the black barbershop owner has become an influential source of health advice too. Public health officials and researchers have been actively enlisting his help in an effort to narrow gaping disparities in healthcare access and uptake that put black men at a deep disadvantage compared with whites. And deputizing the barber—an already respected figure in many...
  • Practice Savory Eating: Use a Condiment

    10/16/2010 8:43:41 AM PDT · by neverdem · 40 replies
    American Thinker ^ | October 15, 2010 | Rod Jaros
    I consume a politically incorrect amount of table salt. It's not often that the taste of my food cannot be enhanced by a supplemental sprinkling of this much-maligned condiment. Occasionally, my thoughts turn salty, especially when confronted by one of those elfin, formal dining table shakers. You know, the ones with the bullet-like cap and one tiny hole that defies passage except by one grain at  a time, and not without athletic effort. I much prefer something on the order of perhaps a small mason jar, maybe with a side handle. I avoid low-sodium food products like the plague. They...
  • Revolutionary operation could 'cure' high blood pressure

    12/26/2009 4:19:18 PM PST · by FromLori · 36 replies · 2,675+ views
    Telegraph UK ^ | 12/26/09 | By Rebecca Smith
    A revolutionary new operation which could effectively cure high blood pressure has been developed by scientists, offering hope to hundreds of thousands of sufferers. In what is being hailed as the most exciting development in the field for 50 years, doctors can treat the condition with a simple procedure in under an hour. It could allow some sufferers to come off medication completely and offer hope for those for whom existing treatments have no effect. The technique, which is relatively straightforward and cheap for the NHS, could reduce the risk of a major heart attack or stroke in such patients...
  • Vitamin D Lack, Fructose Excess Linked To High Blood Pressure

    10/01/2009 11:20:54 AM PDT · by grey_whiskers · 13 replies · 870+ views
    FuturePundit ^ | Sept.29 2009 | Randall Parker
    Among women enrolled in the Michigan Bone Health and Metabolism Study high blood pressure developed at 3 times the rate in women who were vitamin D deficient before menopause. Do not wait until you get older before starting to take nutrition seriously. If you wait the damage will already be done before you act. <snip> CHICAGO, Sept. 23, 2009 — A high-fructose diet raises blood pressure in men, while a drug used to treat gout seems to protect against the blood pressure increase, according to research reported at the American Heart Association’s 63rd High Blood Pressure Research Conference.
  • Common virus may cause high blood pressure: study

    05/15/2009 12:29:52 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 17 replies · 1,358+ views
    reuters ^ | May 14, 2009 | Julie Steenhuysen
    A common virus may be a major cause of high blood pressure, researchers said on Thursday in a finding that may bring new approach to treating a condition that affects an estimated 1 billion people worldwide. Based on a series of studies in mice, they said cytomegalovirus or CMV -- a herpes virus that affects some 60 to 99 percent of adults globally -- appears to increase inflammation in blood vessels, causing high blood pressure. And when combined with a fatty diet, CMV may also cause hardening of the arteries, a major risk factor for heart attacks, strokes, and kidney...
  • Potassium loss from blood pressure drugs increases diabetes risk by 50%

    11/25/2008 2:33:47 PM PST · by fightinJAG · 96 replies · 2,760+ views
    News Medical Net ^ | Nov 25, 2008 | Staff
    According to researchers in the U.S. the loss of potassium experienced from taking blood pressure drugs may explain higher risk of adult diabetes. The researchers from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine say they have discovered that a drop in blood potassium levels caused by diuretics commonly prescribed for high blood pressure, could be the reason why people on those drugs are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. It seems that while the drugs help to accelerate the loss of fluids they also deplete important chemicals, including potassium and those prescribed them are generally advised to eat bananas and...
  • Selenium May Help Clarify Racial Differences in HT (hypertension, i.e. high blood pressure)

    11/07/2008 6:54:26 PM PST · by neverdem · 4 replies · 667+ views
    Family Practice News ^ | 1 October 2008 | SHARON WORCESTER
    NEW ORLEANS — Reduced serum selenium is an independent predictor of hypertension, according to an analysis of data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. The findings from this and other studies, that serum selenium concentrations are reduced in African Americans, compared with those in with whites, may in part explain the increased incidence of hypertension in African Americans, Dr. Chizobam Ani said in a poster at a meeting sponsored by the International Society on Hypertension in Blacks. Serum selenium is an essential component in substances shown to mediate the incidence of cardiovascular disease, such as glutathione peroxidase...
  • J&J paid at least $68 million to settle birth-control patch suits

    10/10/2008 6:28:44 PM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 3 replies · 460+ views
    by The Star-Ledger ^ | Friday October 10, 2008, 7:32 AM
    Johnson & Johnson has paid at least $68.7 million to settle hundreds of lawsuits related to its Ortho Evra birth-control patch, which has been linked to harmful blood clots. The patch exposes women to higher doses of estrogen than ordinary contraceptive pills. Some studies have suggested that increased exposure raises the risk of blood clots, which can lead to strokes or heart attacks. J&J says the patch is safe if used according to its Food and Drug Administration-approved label. According to the wire service: Of 562 complaints reviewed by Bloomberg News, the vast majority of users alleged the patch caused...
  • DNC delegate suffers stroke in Denver

    08/27/2008 11:40:26 AM PDT · by SilvieWaldorfMD · 21 replies · 220+ views
    Roxanne Taylor (D-Bowie), a Barack Obama Democratic National Committee delegate from the 5th District, suffered a stroke early this morning, WTOP reports. Fellow delegates noticed Taylor not looking well shortly after midnight while at Comptroller Peter Franchot's reception at a downtown Denver bar. They alerted emergency medical personnel who said she was having a stroke. She is currently at the Denver Medical Center, where she is listed in fair condition.
  • Monitors urged for all with high blood pressure

    05/23/2008 12:10:26 AM PDT · by neverdem · 19 replies · 156+ views
    San Luis Obispo Tribune ^ | May. 22, 2008 | MARILYNN MARCHIONE
    AP Medical Writer Everyone with high blood pressure - some 72 million Americans - should own a home monitor and do regular pressure checks, the American Heart Association and other groups urged Thursday in an unprecedented endorsement of a medical device for consumers. High blood pressure is a leading cause of heart attacks, strokes and death. Having it checked a few times a year in a doctor's office or at the drugstore is not enough to keep tabs on it, and regular home monitoring is more accurate, the new advice says. Closer checks would let doctors fine-tune the many medicines...
  • Aspirin at Night Effective in Lowering Blood Pressure

    05/16/2008 10:13:09 AM PDT · by nikos1121 · 11 replies · 1,232+ views
    USA Today ^ | 5/14/08 | Ed Edelson
    WEDNESDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- A daily aspirin can control prehypertension, but only if it is taken at bedtime, a Spanish study shows. An aspirin taken every morning didn't lower the blood pressure of prehypertensive people, but the evening regimen did, Dr. Ramon C. Hermida reported Wednesday at the American Society of Hypertension annual meeting, in New Orleans. A previous study by Hermida, who is director of bioengineering and chronobiology at the University of Vigo, showed the same beneficial effect of bedtime aspirin for people with moderately high blood pressure. The new report is the first study to show...
  • Roll Up Your Sleeve: Hypertension vaccine passes early test

    03/24/2008 12:13:13 AM PDT · by neverdem · 53 replies · 1,110+ views
    Science News ^ | Week of March 15, 2008 | Nathan Seppa
    A new vaccine lowers blood pressure in hypertensive people, a study shows. The finding breaks ground in a field dominated by drug therapy. Surges in blood pressure make physical exertion possible, but chronically elevated pressure spells trouble. Scientists have entertained the idea of immunizing people against high blood pressure for decades, but it hasn't been easy. The only other vaccine to reach the testing stage in people failed to reduce blood pressure. A vaccine may augment or offer an alternative to blood pressure medications, known to cause side effects. Several compounds orchestrate blood pressure changes, including a small protein called...
  • Alcohol Intake Increases Risk Of Hypertension, High Blood Pressure In Certain Populations

    03/05/2008 12:54:02 AM PST · by neverdem · 12 replies · 276+ views
    Previous observational studies have reported that heavy alcohol intake is a risk factor for hypertension but such studies may be confounded by factors such as diet, smoking, exercise levels and socio-economic position. Clinical trials exploring the link are difficult to implement and have limited follow-up time. The Bristol study, led by Dr Sarah Lewis of the University's Department of Social Medicine, took a different approach focused on people who have a mutation on a gene which affects their body's ability to eliminate alcohol. Alcohol is initially metabolised to an intermediate compound, acetaldehyde, which is further metabolised and then eliminated from...
  • Cherry Garcia and the End of Socialized Medicine

    10/10/2007 12:07:30 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 42 replies · 2,001+ views
    City Journal ^ | Autumn 2007 | Peter W. Huber
    On June 19, 1987, Ben & Jerry’s introduced Cherry Garcia, in honor of the man who played lead guitar for the Grateful Dead. The Food and Drug Administration struck back three months later, when it approved the first of a new family of statin drugs that curb cholesterol production in the human liver. A synthetic statin licensed a decade later would become the most lucrative drug in history. At its peak, Lipitor was streaming $14 billion a year into Pfizer’s coffers. Let’s not blame the victim: we don’t choose Cherry Garcia; it chooses us. Lipitor is a lifesaver for 600,000...
  • Continuous-Use Contraceptives to be Introduced in Britain Within Months

    09/30/2007 8:06:06 PM PDT · by monomaniac · 11 replies · 206+ views
    LifeSiteNews.com ^ | September 27, 2007 | Hilary White
    Continuous-Use Contraceptives to be Introduced in Britain Within Months By Hilary White LONDON, September 27, 2007 (LifeSiteNews.com) – The first contraceptive pill that provides a dose of active hormones every day that would halt menstruation, could be in use in Britain within a few months, according to the New Scientist. The drug, called Lybrel, is lauded for its ability to interrupt a woman’s normal fertility cycle and entirely stop her menstruation, potentially permanently. Its supporters say that once freed from their normal biological functions, women will be better able to compete with men in the workplace. The US Food and...
  • Limits proposed on fast-food restaurants (California, of course)

    09/10/2007 6:43:00 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 86 replies · 1,623+ views
    The Los Angeles Times ^ | Tami Abdollah
    As America gets fatter, policymakers are seeking creative approaches to legislating health. They may have entered the school cafeteria -- and now they're eyeing your neighborhood. Amid worries of an obesity epidemic and its related illnesses, including high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease, Los Angeles officials, among others around the country, are proposing to limit new fast-food restaurants -- a tactic that could be called health zoning. The City Council will be asked this fall to consider an up to two-year moratorium on new fast-food restaurants in South L.A., a part of the city where fast food is at...
  • Kids' high blood pressure goes untreated

    08/21/2007 11:37:33 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies · 525+ views
    SanLuisObispo.com ^ | Aug. 21, 2007 | LINDSEY TANNER
    AP Medical Writer CHICAGO --More than 1 million U.S. youngsters have undiagnosed high blood pressure, leaving them at risk for developing organ damage down the road, a study suggests. Calculating elevated blood pressure in children is trickier than in adults, and many doctors may not bother evaluating kids' numbers because they assume hypertension is an adult problem. But the study highlights that many children are affected, too, said lead author Dr. David Kaelber of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland and Harvard Medical School. Roughly 2 million U.S. youngsters have been estimated to have high blood pressure; the study suggests...
  • Online Video: Noted Endocrinologist Dispels the Myth of Health Benefits of the Pill - Part 2

    08/11/2007 8:56:07 PM PDT · by monomaniac · 22 replies · 661+ views
    LifeSiteNews.com ^ | August 9, 2007 | Elizabeth O'Brien
    Online Video: Noted Endocrinologist Dispels the Myth of Health Benefits of the Pill - Part 2 By Elizabeth O'BrienOTTAWA, August 9, 2007 (LifeSiteNews.com) - The lecture of noted endocrinologist Dr. Maria Kraw, speaking at the Humanae Vitae Conference "A New Beginning" last year, described the serious medical risks involved in taking hormonal birth control. It also debunked the common myths of the so-called "health benefits" of the pill. She began by noting that one of the major risks of taking hormonal contraceptives is an increased risk of cancer. Looking at 54 studies of the pill, she observed that researchers found...
  • Study: 1 in 3 adults has hypertension

    08/23/2004 6:42:17 PM PDT · by television is just wrong · 31 replies · 1,353+ views
    my way ^ | Aug. 23, 2004 | Jamie Stengle
    DALLAS (AP) - As Americans get older and fatter, the number of adults with high blood pressure has climbed to almost one in three over the past decade, putting more people at risk of a stroke, heart attack or kidney failure, government researchers said Monday. A little more than a decade ago, the number was closer to one in four. And two decades ago, it was falling. But then came the obesity surge in the late '80s. "It's not surprising because we've seen that Americans are getting fatter, and we know that blood pressure goes up when people gain weight,"...
  • Experts Set a Lower Low for Cholesterol Levels

    07/12/2004 11:48:01 PM PDT · by neverdem · 37 replies · 5,302+ views
    NY Times ^ | July 13, 2004 | GINA KOLATA
    Federal health officials yesterday sharply reduced the desired levels of harmful cholesterol for Americans who are at moderate to high risk for heart disease. The new recommendations call for treatment with cholesterol-lowering drugs for millions of Americans who had thought their cholesterol levels were fine. Already more than 10 million people take the drugs. But now, more should start, the recommendations say. For people at the highest risk, they suggest that the target level of L.D.L., the type of cholesterol that increases the likelihood of heart disease, should be less than 100. That is 30 points lower than previously recommended....
  • Fat: The Secret Life of a Potent Cell

    07/05/2004 11:01:06 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies · 996+ views
    NY Times ^ | July 6, 2004 | DENISE GRADY
    They are the building blocks of flab, the wages of cheesecake, the bloated little sacks of grease that make more of us - more than we can fit into our pants. Scorned and despised, they are sucked out surgically by the billions from bulging backsides, bellies and thighs. But they are not without admirers. "Fat cells are beautiful cells to look at," said Dr. Philipp E. Scherer, an associate professor of cell biology and medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. "I've been working with them for 10 years and I still enjoy looking at them." On...
  • Preserving a Delicate Balance of Potassium

    06/27/2004 4:45:54 PM PDT · by neverdem · 23 replies · 2,162+ views
    NY Times ^ | June 22, 2004 | JANE E. BRODY
    PERSONAL HEALTH Evolution is an excellent teacher when it comes to figuring out what and how much people should eat. For example, primates (including those with two legs and big brains) evolved on foods rich in potassium and very low in sodium. Early humans evolved to conserve sodium, which was hard to obtain, and to excrete excess potassium, abundant in many fruits and vegetables. But Western-style diets these days are the reverse of what those early humans consumed, rich in processed foods, loaded with sodium and relatively poor in potassium. Consequently, according to a report released this year by the...
  • A Glimmer of Hope for Fading Minds

    04/13/2004 8:50:02 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies · 205+ views
    NY Times ^ | April 13, 2004 | GINA KOLATA
    Alzheimer's disease can seem unrelentingly grim. There is no cure, no known way to prevent the illness, and the benefits of current treatments are modest at best. But in laboratories around the country, scientists are uncovering clues that may eventually — perhaps even in the next two decades — allow them to prevent, slow or even reverse the ruthless progression of the illness. "Things are more hopeful than perhaps people think," Dr. Karen Duff of the Nathan Kline Institute of New York University said. "We are on the cusp of having something really useful." That hope comes on the heels...
  • Alcohol's Benefits Extend to Hypertension

    03/23/2004 6:56:17 PM PST · by neverdem · 48 replies · 427+ views
    NY Times ^ | March 23, 2004 | DAVID TULLER
    Men with high blood pressure who drink moderate amounts of alcohol are less likely than nondrinkers to die of cardiovascular ailments like heart attacks and strokes, researchers reported yesterday. The study's findings suggest that moderate drinking not only has protective cardiovascular effects for the general population, as previous studies have shown, but that it is also protective for people who already have hypertension. The results are significant, the researchers said, because heavy drinking can contribute to high blood pressure, and some doctors warn hypertensive patients to avoid alcohol altogether. "There are plenty of people who seem to have the impression...
  • Bush Earned Our Hate

    02/02/2004 1:45:01 PM PST · by presidio9 · 186 replies · 962+ views
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | Monday, February 2, 2004 | Harley Sorensen
    <p>I would like to say a kind word about George W. Bush: He's usually not as dumb as he pretends to be.</p> <p>Acting dumb is Bush's style. He likes to sandbag people. He plays dumb, people underestimate him and, all of a sudden -- wap! He nails them.</p>
  • Health group urges less salt in foods

    11/13/2002 1:30:17 PM PST · by GeneD · 7 replies · 291+ views
    <p>PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The nation's largest public health group is recommending a 50% decrease in salt in processed food and restaurant meals over the next 10 years.</p> <p>The American Public Health Association said the reduction could save 150,000 lives a year from strokes, heart attacks and other illnesses linked to high blood pressure.</p>