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  • Dogs lived and died with humans 10,000 years ago in the Americas

    04/17/2018 5:40:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 37 replies
    Science News ^ | April 16, 2018 | Bruce Bower
    A trio of dogs buried at two ancient human sites in Illinois lived around 10,000 years ago, making them the oldest known domesticated canines in the Americas. Radiocarbon dating of the dogs’ bones shows they were 1,500 years older than thought, zooarchaeologist Angela Perri said April 13 at the annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The previous age estimate was based on a radiocarbon analysis of burned wood found in one of the animals’ graves. Until now, nearly 9,300-year-old remains of dogs eaten by humans at a Texas site were the oldest physical evidence of American canines.
  • Why archaeologists are arguing about sweet potatoes

    04/13/2018 9:30:13 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 75 replies
    www.popsci.com ^ | 04/13/2018 | Staff
    A Japanese variety of sweet potato Pixabay _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ At some point, sweet potatoes crossed the Pacific. This much we know. As for the rest—How? When? Why?—we’re just not sure. Or, to be more clear, some people are sure they’re sure, and others disagree. Sweet potatoes have been at the center of a massive archaeological debate for many decades now, and a new paper in Current Biology has only stoked the flames. It uses genetic data from sweet potatoes and their relatives to establish a phylogenetic tree of their evolution, thereby demonstrating that the tubers existed in Polynesia before humans lived...
  • A new study squelches a treasured theory about Indians’ origins [Aryan Invasion]

    04/08/2018 5:51:46 AM PDT · by C19fan · 37 replies
    The Economist ^ | April 5, 2018 | Staff
    A CENTURY and a half ago linguists invented a new map of the world. Their research showed that a single family tree stretches its branches almost unbroken across most of Eurasia: from Iceland to Bangladesh, most people speak languages descended from “Proto-Indo-European”. The philologists had a theory to explain why Sanskrit, the ancient forebear of Hindi, has closer cousins in Europe than in south India. They speculated that at some point before the composition of the Vedas, the oldest texts of Hinduism, an Aryan people had migrated into India from the north-west, while their kin pushed westward into Europe. Long...
  • Archaeologists Discover Possible Burial Site of the World's Richest Pirate

    04/06/2018 8:36:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    NewsWeak ^ | March 30, 2018 | Janissa Delzo
    A newly discovered 300-year-old pirate burial site may be the largest-ever found on U.S. soil, according to archaeologists. More than 100 skeletal remains were found at the Massachusetts site, some of which might belong to Captain "Black Sam" Bellamy, thought to be the world’s richest pirate... "Over 100 pirates washed ashore on Cape Cod [after the wreck], and our team believe that we have located it," Casey Sherman, author and filmmaker who partnered with the research team, told The Telegraph... Bellamy and his crew are thought to have drowned in 1717, when their ship, the Whydah Gally, was wrecked. In...
  • Once were warriors: gene linked to Maori violence

    08/10/2006 1:51:50 AM PDT · by Marius3188 · 20 replies · 676+ views
    The Sidney Morning Herald ^ | 09 Aug 2006 | AAP
    MAORIS carry a "warrior" gene that makes them more prone to violence, criminal acts and risky behaviour, a scientist has controversially claimed. Dr Rod Lea, a New Zealand researcher, and his colleagues told an Australian genetics conference that Maori men had a "striking over-representation" of monoamine oxidase - dubbed the warrior gene - which they say is strongly associated with aggressive behaviour. He says the unpublished studies prove that Maoris have the highest prevalence of this strength gene, first discovered by US researchers but never linked to an ethnic group. This explains how Maoris migrated across the Pacific and survived,...
  • The Alien Observatory --"We May Soon Discover Worlds That Host Lifeforms with Strange...

    04/02/2018 6:23:28 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies
    In 2016, NASA sequenced DNA in space for the first time, but alien life, we may soon discover, may be vastly different on other planets and moons, particularly as we expand our efforts to explore ocean worlds with our solar system and beyond. “Most strategies for life detection rely upon finding features known to be associated with Earth's life, such as particular classes of molecules,” the researchers wrote. DNA and RNA are the building blocks of life on Earth, but the molecules of life might differ substantially on another planet. A new paper by scientists at Georgetown University, published online...
  • Controversial DNA scientist retires (DNA linked to IQ and race flap)

    10/25/2007 6:05:43 PM PDT · by ECM · 79 replies · 110+ views
    AP via Yahoo! News ^ | Thu Oct 25, 10:06 AM ET | AP
    James Watson, the Nobel laureate who sparked an international furor last week with comments about intelligence levels among blacks, has retired from his post at a prestigious research institution. ADVERTISEMENT Watson, 79, and the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York announced his departure Thursday. Watson was chancellor of the institution, and his retirement was effective immediately.
  • 'Black people are less intelligent than whites', claims DNA pioneer (James Watson)

    10/17/2007 1:36:52 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 459 replies · 3,325+ views
    Daily Mail ^ | 10/17/07
    'Black people are less intelligent than whites', claims DNA pioneer One of the world's most eminent scientists is at the centre of a row after claiming black people are less intelligent than whites. James Watson, who won the Nobel Prize for his part in discovering the structure of DNA, has drawn condemnation for comments made ahead of his arrival in Britain tomorrow for a speaking tour. Dr Watson, who now runs one of America's leading scientific research institutions, made the controversial remarks in an interview in The Sunday Times. The 79-year-old geneticist said he was "inherently gloomy about the prospect...
  • DNA tests for IQ are coming, but it might not be smart to take one

    04/02/2018 6:59:34 AM PDT · by mairdie · 63 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | April 2, 2018 | Antonio Regalado
    Ready for a world in which a $50 DNA test can predict your odds of earning a PhD or forecast which toddler gets into a selective preschool? Robert Plomin, a behavioral geneticist, says that’s exactly what’s coming. For decades genetic researchers have sought the hereditary factors behind intelligence, with little luck. But now gene studies have finally gotten big enough—and hence powerful enough—to zero in on genetic differences linked to IQ. A year ago, no gene had ever been tied to performance on an IQ test. Since then, more than 500 have, thanks to gene studies involving more than 200,000...
  • First Americans Arrived Recently, Settled Pacific Coast, DNA Study Says

    02/02/2007 4:52:13 PM PST · by blam · 40 replies · 1,453+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 2-2-2007 | Stefan Lovgren
    First Americans Arrived Recently, Settled Pacific Coast, DNA Study Says Stefan Lovgren for National Geographic News February 2, 2007 A study of the oldest known sample of human DNA in the Americas suggests that humans arrived in the New World relatively recently, around 15,000 years ago. The DNA was extracted from a 10,300-year-old tooth found in a cave on Prince of Wales Island off southern Alaska in 1996. The sample represents a previously unknown lineage for the people who first arrived in the Americas. The findings, published last week in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, shed light on how...
  • Humanity’s Genes Reveal Its Tangled History

    03/26/2018 7:16:59 AM PDT · by C19fan · 26 replies
    National Review ^ | March 26, 2018 | Razib Khan
    In the early 19th century, Jean-François Champollion used the Rosetta Stone to begin the process of deciphering the hieroglyphics of ancient Egypt. We already knew Egypt through the Bible and the histories of the Greeks, but even Herodotus wrote 2,000 years after the beginning of the Old Kingdom. With the translation of hieroglyphics, the legend of Egypt came to life. What had been cloudy became clear. In Who We Are and How We Got Here: Ancient DNA and the New Science of the Human Past, David Reich, a geneticist at Harvard’s Medical School and the Broad Institute, introduces us to...
  • A New Batch of Neanderthal Genome Provides Insights Into Their Complex History

    03/26/2018 3:35:09 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    Seeker ^ | Wednesday, March 21, 2018 | Jen Viegas
    People today of Native American, European, Asian, and North African heritage have Neanderthal DNA in their genomes, with percentages estimated between 1-4 percent. As a result, the majority of people alive today are related to these humans that, as a distinct population, are thought to have gone extinct 39,000-41,000 years ago. An international team of researchers led by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has just overcome the problem, allowing for whole genome sequencing of five Neanderthals who lived 39,000-47,000 years ago. The findings, reported in the journal Nature, provide important insights into Neanderthal history before and...
  • Winterfyre Norwegian Forest Cats

    01/06/2005 8:32:07 AM PST · by theFIRMbss · 107 replies · 1,500+ views
    Winterfyre website ^ | 2005 | Winterfyre
    Philosophy When our breeding endeavor began, we were fortunate to have the opportunity to gain exposure and knowledge through contacts in both the United States and in Europe. Differing opinions are a staple in any community, and the Norwegian Forest cat lovers/breeders are certainly no exception to this rule. We have learned from observing breeding programs and participating in shows both in the United States and in Europe and have developed our own ideas about the Norwegian Forest cat, but our end goal is ultimately the same as breeders around the globe. Our philosophy is quite simple, taking into consideration...
  • Maine Coon Cat (Straight Dope Mailbag)

    08/05/2004 11:19:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 524+ views
    Straight Dope Science Advisory Board ^ | 29-Jun-1999 | SDSTAFF Jill
    One of the oldest breeds of cats in North America is the Maine Coon Cat, and some say 40% of the originals had extra toes. One article said it evolved as a "snowshoe foot" to help these cats walk in the snow. Cute story, but probably [expletive deleted] ...The breed closest to the Maine Coon Cat is the Norwegian Forest Cat which evolved in the same climate and lends credence to one theory that ancestors of the Coon Cat may have even come to the New World onboard Viking ships. I like that theory best.
  • A Medieval Coin in New England Soil

    09/12/2010 3:35:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Beachcombing 'blog ^ | September 11, 2010 | eponymous blogger
    It was only when the coin was later identified as Viking that the game heated up. By then poor Mellegren -- who, Beachcombing must say was someone with a reputation for integrity -- had passed away. Beachcombing has no illusions about much of the nonsense written about pre-Columbian visits to North America. But in this case he would give a thumb and a half followed by two cheers and three quarters. There is a good chance that this really is what it seems: A European coin that found its way to North America in the twelfth century. Minted in Norway,...
  • VIKING KITTIES

    09/22/2016 1:31:05 PM PDT · by Einherjar · 32 replies
    FACEBOOK ^ | SEPT 21 | SAMME
    You’ve heard of ancient Egyptian cats. But Viking cats? Scientists studying cat DNA say that they found cat remains at a Viking site dating to between the eighth and eleventh century A.D. in northern Germany.
  • The Secret History of the Vikings: New DNA-driven research...

    03/26/2018 2:49:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    Discover Magazine ^ | March 2018 | Gemma Tarlach
    More than a thousand years ago, the Vikings arrived on the world stage as swiftly as their longships cut through the waves. They raided and traded, conquered and colonized. They left their mark on four continents -- not just at archaeological sites, but also in the flora and fauna, the languages and local populations. The Viking Age did not last long -- it's generally defined as beginning in the late eighth century and ending in most areas by the early 12th century -- but the explorers still capture our imagination today. "The Vikings epitomized the freedom and strength we like...
  • Haifa U. Reveals Role of Pigeons in Turning the Negev Green 1,500 Years Ago

    03/24/2018 8:16:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | March 21, 2018 | JNi.Media
    The study, which focused on the ancient settlements of Shivta and Sa'adon, found archaeological evidence that the Byzantines in the Negev did not raise their pigeons for food, but to fertilize the dry loess soil and making it more suitable for intensive agriculture. Loess is made up of fragment of geological detritus, formed by the accumulation of wind-blown dust. But despite its lowly origins, loess tends to develop into very rich soils. Under appropriate climatic conditions, it forms some of the most agriculturally productive terrain in the world. "The pigeon droppings are rich in phosphorus, potassium and nitrogen, which are...
  • Was a Tiny Mummy in the Atacama an Alien? No, but the Real Story Is Almost as Strange

    03/22/2018 4:22:31 PM PDT · by blueplum · 20 replies
    NYT ^ | 22 March 2018 | Carl Zimmer
    Nearly two decades ago, the rumors began: In the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, someone had discovered a tiny mummified alien. An amateur collector exploring a ghost town was said to have come across a white cloth in a leather pouch. Unwrapping it, he found a six-inch-long skeleton. Despite its size, the skeleton was remarkably complete. It even had hardened teeth. And yet there were striking anomalies: it had ten ribs instead of the usual 12, giant eye sockets and a long skull that ended in a point. {snip} On Thursday, a team of scientists presented a very different explanation...
  • Entomologist Confirms First Saharan Farming 10,000 Years Ago

    03/22/2018 4:05:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | St Patrick's Day, Saturday, March 17, 2018 | editors
    The team has been investigating findings from an ancient rock shelter at a site named Takarkori in south-western Libya. It is desert now, but earlier in the Holocene age [our present age], some 10,000 years ago, it was part of the "green Sahara" and wild cereals grew there. More than 200,000 seeds - in small circular concentrations - were discovered at Takarkori, which showed that hunter-gatherers developed an early form of agriculture by harvesting and storing crops. But an alternative possibility was that ants, which are capable of moving seeds, had been responsible for the concentrations...The site has yielded other...