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Keyword: helixmakemineadouble

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  • So many people have had their DNA sequenced that they've put other people's privacy in jeopardy

    10/13/2018 5:13:59 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 91 replies
    L A Times ^ | Oct 12, 2018 | 3:00 AM | Deborah Netburn
    Everyone’s DNA sequence is unique. But for those who wish to maintain their genetic privacy, it may not be unique enough. A new study argues that more than half of Americans could be identified by name if all you had to start with was a sample of their DNA and a few basic facts, such as the region where they live and about how old they might be. It wouldn’t be simple, and it wouldn’t be cheap. But the fact that it has become doable will force all of us to rethink the meaning of privacy in the DNA age,...
  • Same-sex mice have babies

    10/12/2018 6:19:58 PM PDT · by Ennis85 · 24 replies
    BBC News ^ | 11th October 2018 | James Gallagher
    Baby mice have been made with two mums and no dad, say researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. It took a substantial feat of genetic engineering to break the rules of reproduction. The scientists said the "bimaternal" (two mammas) animals were healthy and went on to have pups of their own. But there was bad news on the all-male front. Mice with double-dads were attempted, but died within days of being born. Why even try?The researchers were trying to answer fundamental questions about why we have sex. Mammals, including us, can make babies only through sexual reproduction - aka...
  • Easter Island inhabitants collected freshwater from the ocean's edge in order to survive

    10/12/2018 12:24:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | October 9, 2018 | Binghamton University
    The process of coastal groundwater discharge makes it possible for humans to collect drinkable freshwater directly where it emerges at the coast of the island... "The porous volcanic soils quickly absorb rain, resulting in a lack of streams and rivers," Lipo said. "Fortunately, water beneath the ground flows downhill and ultimately exits the ground directly at the point at which the porous subterranean rock meets the ocean. When tides are low, this results in the flow of freshwater directly into the sea. Humans can thus take advantage of these sources of freshwater by capturing the water at these points." ...He...
  • Moving DNA to a different part of the nucleus can change how it works

    10/12/2018 10:28:35 AM PDT · by ETL · 13 replies
    ScienceMag.com ^ | Oct 11, 2018 | Elizabeth Pennisi
    Though the 3 meters of DNA inside the nuclei of our cells looks like a jumbled pile of spaghetti, the genome is, in fact, pretty well organized. Now, scientists have discovered—using a modified version of the gene-editing tool CRISPR—that the location of DNA, not just the order of its base pairs, can make a critical difference in how certain parts of the genome work. The nucleus is dynamic, with everything—the chromosomes, the nucleolus, and so on—swirling around seemingly randomly. But in the past decade, researchers have realized that DNA on chromosomes inside can reposition itself in specific ways, ways that...
  • We will find you: DNA search used to nab GS Killer can home in on about 60% of white Americans

    10/12/2018 9:58:52 AM PDT · by ETL · 91 replies
    ScienceMag.org ^ | Oct 11, 2018 | Jocelyn Kaiser
    If you’re white, live in the United States, and a distant relative has uploaded their DNA to a public ancestry database, there’s a good chance an internet sleuth can identify you from a DNA sample you left somewhere. That’s the conclusion of a new study, which finds that by combining an anonymous DNA sample with some basic information such as someone’s rough age, researchers could narrow that person’s identity to fewer than 20 people by starting with a DNA database of 1.3 million individuals. Such a search could potentially allow the identification of about 60% of white Americans from a DNA...
  • Broad genetic variation on the Pontic-Caspian Steppe [Scythians]

    10/09/2018 12:49:12 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 3, 2018 | Stockholm University
    The genetic variation within the Scythian nomad group is so broad that it must be explained with the group assimilating people it came in contact with. This is shown in a new study on Bronze and Iron Age genetics of the Pontic-Caspian Steppe, situated in the Black Sea region... This is likely the strategy needed for the group to have been able to grow as fast, expand as vast and to remain established for as long as they did. The findings emphasize the importance of assimilation to maintain Scythian dominance around the Black Sea region... The vast area of the...
  • Cuisine of early farmers revealed by analysis of proteins in pottery from Catalhoyuk

    10/08/2018 11:45:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    EurekAlert ^ | October 3, 2018 | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
    Çatalhöyük was a large settlement inhabited from about 7100 BC to 5600 BC by early farmers, and is located in what is now central Turkey. The site showcases a fascinating layout in which houses were built directly next to each other in every direction and stands out for its excellent preservation of finds... For this study, the researchers analyzed vessel sherds from the West Mound of Çatalhöyük, dating to a narrow timeframe of 5900-5800 BC towards the end of the site's occupation. The vessel sherds analyzed came from open bowls and jars, as shown by reconstructions and had calcified residues...
  • Humans delayed the onset of the Sahara desert by 500 years

    10/01/2018 9:21:20 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 73 replies
    phys.org ^ | October 1, 2018 | University College London
    Credit: Chris Ford via Flickr ====================================================================== Humans did not accelerate the decline of the 'Green Sahara' and may have managed to hold back the onset of the Sahara desert by around 500 years, according to new research led by UCL. The study by a team of geographers and archaeologists from UCL and King's College London, published in Nature Communications, suggests that early pastoralists in North Africa combined detailed knowledge of the environment with newly domesticated species to deal with the long-term drying trend. It is thought that early pastoralists in North Africa developed intricate ways to efficiently manage sparse...
  • Prehistoric art hints at lost Indian civilisation

    10/01/2018 4:59:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    BBC ^ | Monday, October 1, 2018 | unattributed
    The rock carvings -- known as petroglyphs -- have been discovered in their thousands atop hillocks in the Konkan region of western Maharashtra. Mostly discovered in the Ratnagiri and Rajapur areas, a majority of the images etched on the rocky, flat hilltops remained unnoticed for thousands of years... animals, birds, human figures and geometrical designs are all depicted. The way the petroglyphs have been drawn, and their similarity to those found in other parts of the world, have led experts to believe that they were created in prehistoric times and are possibly among the oldest ever discovered. "Our first deduction...
  • Research proves South East Asian population boom 4,000 years ago

    09/24/2018 7:38:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | September 20, 2018 | Australian National University
    Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have uncovered a previously unconfirmed population boom across South East Asia that occurred 4,000 years ago, thanks to a new method for measuring prehistoric population growth. Using the new population measurement method, which utilises human skeletal remains, they have been able to prove a significant rapid increase in growth across populations in Thailand, China and Vietnam during the Neolithic Period, and a second subsequent rise in the Iron Age. Lead researcher Clare McFadden, a PhD Scholar with the ANU School of Archaeology and Anthropology, said the population trend was consistent across samples taken...
  • Slave quarters of Sally Hemings, the maid who gave birth to six of Thomas Jefferson’s children found

    07/03/2017 6:20:40 PM PDT · by Bodleian_Girl · 376 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | 7/3/17 | CECILE BORKHATARIA
    Archaeologists have discovered an area in Thomas Jefferson's plantation home that was once the living quarters of Sally Hemings - a slave with whom he is believed to have had six children. Her room, which was built in 1809 and was 14 feet, 8 inches wide and 13 feet long, was next to Thomas Jefferson's room. However, the bedroom went unnoticed for decades and the area was even made into a men's bathroom in 1941. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4662350/Archaeologists-Sally-Hemings-room-Monticello.html#ixzz4lozvk7ZB Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
  • Scientists gave octopuses ecstasy and it revealed a secret genetic link to humans

    09/21/2018 11:13:49 AM PDT · by ETL · 77 replies
    News.com.au ^ | Sept 21, 2018 | Nick Whigham
    SCIENTISTS gave the popular party drug MDMA to a group of octopuses and the results were “completely unexpected” and reveal a hidden link to humans SCIENTISTS have discovered what happens when you give the party drug MDMA to an octopus, and say the animals surprising reaction has “amazing” implications. A team of researchers in the US decided to give a group of octopuses MDMA, often referred to as ecstasy or Molly to see how it would alter their behaviour.After being dosed, the sea creatures become much more social, friendly and interested in others.It made the animals — normally anti-social creatures...
  • A Rebuilt Neanderthal

    12/31/2002 4:38:20 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 107 replies · 36,191+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 12-31-02 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    In a laboratory in the upper recesses of the American Museum of Natural History, away from the public galleries, Dr. Ian Tattersall, a tall Homo sapiens, stooped and came face to face with a Neanderthal man, short and robust but bearing a family resemblance — until one looked especially closely. A paleoanthropologist who has studied and written about Neanderthals, Dr. Tattersall was getting his first look at a virtually complete skeleton from this famously extinct branch of the hominid family. Nothing quite like it has ever been assembled before, the foot bones connected to the ankle bones and everything else...
  • Rare, mummified Ice Age wolf pup and caribou dug up in Canada

    09/16/2018 12:08:39 PM PDT · by ETL · 15 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Sept 16, 2018 | Christopher Carbone
    Two stunningly preserved ice age mammals were unearthed by gold miners in northwest Canada and unveiled in a ceremony on Thursday. A wolf pup and a caribou calf were found by the miners in the Yukon territory in 2016 in the area's melting permaforst. It's exceedlingly rare for fur, skin and muscle tissues to be preserved in the fossil record, but all three are present on these specimens, which have radiocarbon-dated to more than 50,000 years old, reports the Guardian. The wolf pup is reportedly preserved in its entirety, including exceptional details of the head, tail, paws, skin and hair,...
  • [Aug 2018] Scientists may have uncovered what dinosaur DNA looks like

    09/14/2018 10:14:36 AM PDT · by ETL · 39 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Aug 28, 2018 | Christopher Carbone
    Life will find a way, as Jeff Goldblum's character puts it in Jurassic Park. Researchers at the University of Kent in the U.K. say they’ve discovered the genetic secret of how dinosaurs came to dominate Earth for 180 million years. The team of scientists used mathematical techniques to identify possible genetic characteristics of the first dinosaurs. They worked backwards from birds and turtles, which are the closest modern-day relatives of dinosaurs. The results of their work, published in Nature Communications in May, suggest that birds today have very similar DNA to ancient dinosaurs. Dinosaur DNA was likely organized into chunks...
  • Iberia’s Neolithic Farmers Linked to Modern-Day Basques

    09/08/2015 12:40:13 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    archaeology.org ^ | Tuesday, September 08, 2015
    DNA samples were obtained from eight early Iberian farmers whose remains were discovered in Spain’s El Portalón cave in Atapuerca. Like populations in central and northern Europe, the Iberian farmers had traveled from the south and mixed with local hunter-gatherer groups. “The genetic variation observed in modern-day Basques is significantly closer to the newly sequenced early farmers than to older Iberian hunter-gatherer samples,” “Parts of that early farmer population probably remained relatively isolated since then (which we can still see in the distinct culture and language of Basques)
  • Spanish documents suggest Irish arrived in America before Columbus

    05/14/2014 10:36:21 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 55 replies
    Irish Central ^ | May 13, 2014 04:12 AM | Kerry O’Shea
    While Christopher Columbus is generally credited with having discovered America in 1492, a 1521 Spanish report provides inklings of evidence that there were, in fact, Irish people settled in America prior to Columbus’ journey. […] In 1520, Peter Martyr d’Anghiera, a historian and professor, was appointed by Carlos V to be chronicler for the new Council of the Indies. Though Martyr died in 1526, his report, founded on several weeks of interviews, was published posthumously in a book named De Orbe Novo (About the New World). […] While interviewing Spanish colonists, Martyr took note of their vicious treatment of Chicora...
  • Christopher Columbus was actually a Scotsman called Pedro Scotto, historian says

    03/09/2009 8:02:54 AM PDT · by BGHater · 32 replies · 1,195+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 08 Mar 2009 | Telegraph
    The 15th century explorer who opened up the American continents to Europe was actually called Pedro Scotto - not Christopher Columbus - and his family originally hailed from Scotland, a Spanish historian has claimed. Alfonso Ensenat de Villalonga has disputed conventionally-accepted narratives on the explorer's origins - that he was the son of a weaver in Genoa, Italy, or that he was from Catalonia or Galicia in Spain. In fact, he was from Genoa, but he was "the son of shopkeepers not weavers and he was baptised Pedro not Christopher," Mr Villalonga told Spain's ABC newspaper on Sunday. And his...
  • Was Christopher Columbus Polish?

    11/30/2010 3:45:13 PM PST · by Coleus · 60 replies · 2+ views
    wbj ^ | 29th November 2010 | Andrew Shale
    A Portuguese historian believes he has solved the age-old mystery surrounding the nationality of Christopher Columbus. According to Manuel Rosa, a lecturer at Duke University, North Carolina, the explorer was in fact the son of Polish King Władysław III. It has always been thought that King Władysław III fell in battle against the forces of the Ottoman Empire at the Battle of Varna in 1444. According to Mr Rosa, however, the king managed to survive the battle unscathed and fled to the Portuguese island of Madeira where he lived out the rest of his life as a hermit and married...
  • Kabbalistic Signet Indicates Columbus was an Exiled Jew

    10/19/2008 12:29:21 AM PDT · by Nachum · 16 replies · 833+ views
    arutz 7 ^ | October 19, '08 | Tzvi Ben Gedalyahu
    (IsraelNN.com) Columbus was a Jew named Salvador Fernando Zarco and was among those expelled from Spain in 1492, a rare triangular Kabbalistic signet indicates. Jose Rodrigues Dos Santos has authored an historical novel, Codex 632: The Secret Identity of Christopher Columbus, which relates the deciphering of a rare triangular Kabbalistic signet. The interpretation of the recent discovery of the signet claims to reveal the secret identity of Columbus. The unique triangular monogram is similar to inscriptions on gravestones in Jewish cemeteries in Spain and southern France. The interpretation of the recent discovery of the signet claims to reveal the secret...