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  • 125-million-year-old mammal fossil reveals the early evolution of hair and spines

    10/20/2015 10:47:15 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 33 replies ^ | October 14, 2015 | Provided by: University of Chicago Medical Center
    Skeleton of the Cretaceous mammal Spinolestes with preserved fur shadows. The outer ear can be seen at the upper edge of the photo (arrow). During preparation, the skeleton was transferred to a plastic matrix. Credit: Georg Oleschinski. With permission of Nature Publishing Group ====================================================================================================================== The discovery of a new 125-million-year-old fossil mammal in Spain has pushed back the earliest record of preserved mammalian hair structures and inner organs by more than 60 million years. The specimen, named Spinolestes xenarthrosus, was fossilized with remarkably intact guard hairs, underfur, tiny hedgehog-like spines and even evidence of a fungal hair infection. The unusually...
  • From a very old skeleton, new insights on ancient migrations

    10/12/2015 11:07:05 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 9 replies ^ | October 9, 2015 | Provided by: National Science Foundation
    In Mota cave, located in the Gamo highlands of Ethiopia, a group of NSF-supported researchers excavation a rock cairn. They discovered under it a burial site containing the remains of a 4,500-year skeleton. Credit: Kathryn and John Arthur ================================================================================================================= Three years ago, a group of researchers found a cave in Ethiopia with a secret: it held the 4,500-year-old remains of a man, with his head resting on a rock pillow, his hands folded under his face, and stone flake tools surrounding him. The team named the man "Bayira," which means "firstborn" in the Gamo language, a common name in the...
  • Petroglyph in Spain Marks when Atlantic and Mediterranean Cultures Met

    10/06/2015 6:17:04 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies ^ | Mon, Oct 05, 2015 | Staff
    Bronze Age rock carving depicts a Mediterranean style boat. Above: A graphic representation of the Auga dos Cebros petroglyph, showing the obvious boat feature at the bottom. This image is a screenshot of the same as depicted in the YouTube video (see below). =================================================================================================================== A unique petroglyph discovered near the Atlantic coast of northern Spain has provided evidence that contacts between ancient Atlantic cultures and contemporaneous cultures of the Mediterranean were earlier and perhaps more intense than previously thought. The rock art panel, located in the Costa dos Castros region and known as Auga dos Cebros, depicts a boat with...
  • Signs of ancient megatsunami could portend modern hazard

    10/02/2015 2:34:09 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies ^ | 10-02-2015 | Provided by: Columbia University
    Geologists think that the eastern slope of Fogo volcano crashed into the sea some 65,000 to 124,000 years ago, leaving a giant scar where a new volcano can be seen growing in this satellite image. Credit: NASA ========================================================================================================================================= Scientists working off west Africa in the Cape Verde Islands have found evidence that the sudden collapse of a volcano there tens of thousands of years ago generated an ocean tsunami that dwarfed anything ever seen by humans. The researchers say an 800-foot wave engulfed an island more than 30 miles away. The study could revive a simmering controversy over whether sudden...
  • Why are there whale fossils in California mountains?

    09/22/2015 11:17:09 AM PDT · by george76 · 168 replies
    The Christian Science Monitor. ^ | September 21, 2015 | Story Hinckley,
    Construction workers in California's Santa Cruz mountains were subject to a surprise delay last week when a team of archaeologists took over the site to remove an ancient whale fossil. The project site was expected to have a high potential for archaeological finds, so a monitor was assigned to the Scotts Valley development and found the fossil amid construction vehicles on Sept. 4. This project site is not the only one in California with fossils ... Since the 19th century, paleontologists have been studying the “Sharktooth Hill Bone Bed” near Bakersfield, California, where fossils and bones of ancient whales, seals,...
  • Archaeologists discover 'Roman Village' in Gernsheim

    09/17/2015 12:55:39 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies ^ | September 17, 2015 | Provided by: Goethe University Frankfurt
    Aerial Image of the foundation of a Roman stone building. Length of the leveling staff (White) at the upper edge of the Picture: 5 meters. Credit: Dennis Braks ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- During their first Gernsheim dig last year, Frankfurt University archaeologists suspected that a small Roman settlement must have also existed here in the Hessian Ried. Now they have discovered clear relics of a Roman village, built in part on the foundations of the fort after the soldiers left. This probably occurred around 120 AD. At the time the cohort (about 500 soldiers) was transferred from the Rhine to the Limes, and...
  • Medieval skeleton bursts out of the ground after centuries-old tree is ripped up by storm

    09/14/2015 4:51:36 PM PDT · by Straight Vermonter · 45 replies
    Irish Times ^ | 9-13-15 | Sam Webb
    Archaeologists were stunned when the thousand-year-old skeleton of a young man was found among the roots of a tree ripped from the ground. Storms blew over a 215-year old beech tree outside Collooney, Sligo, Ireland, unearthing a human skeleton. The National Monuments Service commissioned Sligo-Leitrim archaeological consultancy Archaeological Services (SLAS) to excavate and retrieve the badly disturbed remains. The burial was that of a young man (17-20 years old) and it id believed he suffered a violent death during the early medieval period. Radiocarbon dating puts the man's death at 1030-1200 AD. Several injuries were visible to the ribs and...
  • New Species of Human Relative Discovered in South African Cave (Homo Naledi)

    09/10/2015 6:00:52 AM PDT · by blam · 34 replies
    September 10, 2015 JOHANNESBURG—The discovery of a new species of human relative was announced today (Sept. 10) by the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits University), the National Geographic Society and the South African Department of Science and Technology/National Research Foundation (DST/NRF). Besides shedding light on the origins and diversity of our genus, the new species, Homo naledi, appears to have intentionally deposited bodies of its dead in a remote cave chamber, a behaviour previously thought limited to humans. The finds are described in two papers published in the scientific journal eLife and reported in the cover story of the October...

    09/04/2015 8:13:47 AM PDT · by Biggirl · 50 replies ^ | September 4, 2015 | Raymond Ibrahim
    The media is abuzz with news that a portion of the Koran, which Muslims believe was first recited by their prophet, Muhammad, may actually predate Muhammad himself. Many seem to think that such news will have a large impact on the Muslim world and make Muslims rethink the veracity of their faith.
  • Undersea Monolith Reveals Genius Engineering

    08/17/2015 8:27:43 AM PDT · by fishtank · 28 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 8-17-2015 | Brian Thomas
    Undersea Monolith Reveals Genius Engineering by Brian Thomas, M.S. * Of all the scientific disciplines, underwater archaeology may be one of the most fascinating. These researchers examine artifacts our ancestors left behind before global sea level rose and covered them. A newly discovered monolith—a gigantic rock placed in what is today the Mediterranean Sea—confronts a few evolution-based errors about human origins. Divers visited the monolith in 2014, capturing high resolution sonar images and underwater photographs. It lies on the undersea Adventure Plateau, found south of Sicily and north of Tunisia, Africa. Archaeologists from Italy and Israel described the results in...
  • Construction project leads to discovery of ancient Jewish ritual bath with mysterious writing

    08/12/2015 1:40:30 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies ^ | August 7, 2015 | by Bob Yirka
    Inscriptions on the walls of the ritual bath. Credit: Shai Halevy, the Israel Antiquities Authority ======================================================================================================================================== A team of researchers has descended down into what archaeologists are calling an ancient Jewish ritual bath with mysterious writing on the walls—dating back perhaps 2000 years. The bath was found by antiquity officials checking out a site designated for a new nursery building. The bath was found when a hole was discovered in a construction site and a rock fell down into it and disappeared. Investigation revealed an underground room, with a stone staircase. What was most surprising was the writing on the...
  • Gruesome Find: 100 Bodies Stuffed into Ancient House [China]

    08/03/2015 9:46:29 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 41 replies ^ | July 27, 2015 07:07am ET | by Owen Jarus
    The 5,000-year-old house found in China was about 14 by 15 feet in size. Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Archaeology ===================================================================================================================== The remains of 97 human bodies have been found stuffed into a small 5,000-year-old house in a prehistoric village in northeast China, researchers report in two separate studies. The bodies of juveniles, young adults and middle-age adults were packed together in the house — smaller than a modern-day squash court — before it burnt down. Anthropologists who studied the remains say a "prehistoric disaster," possibly an epidemic of some sort, killed these people. The site, whose modern-day name is "Hamin...
  • Vast hidden 'ocean' found under Chinese desert

    07/31/2015 1:22:24 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 53 replies ^ | July 30, 2015 20:30 BST | By Yasmin Kaye
    Workers digging a well for underground water are dwarfed by the sand dunes of the Taklimakan Desert, 13 September 2003, outside of Tazhong, in China's northwest Xinjiang province. ================================================================================================================== Chinese scientists have discovered what could be a huge hidden ocean underneath one of the driest places on earth, the South China Morning Post reported on 30 July. The Tarim basin in northwestern Xinjiang, China, is one of the driest places on Earth, but the vast amount of salt water concealed underneath could equal 10 times the water found in all five of the Great Lakes in the US. "This is...
  • 2000-Year-Old Cat Paw Prints Discovered on Tile

    07/31/2015 12:45:07 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies ^ | Jul 30, 2015 01:26 PM ET | by Rossella Lorenzi
    The cat paw print on the Roman roof tile. David Rice ================================================================================================================== Paw prints made by a cat 2,000 years ago have been found on a Roman roof tile kept at a museum in south west England. Dug up in Gloucester in 1969, the tile fragment had long lain unnoticed at Gloucester City Museum. Only recently, a researcher spotted the cat’s paw on the tile while going through the finds from the 1969 archaeological excavation. “At that time the archaeologists seem to have been more interested in digging things up than looking at what they found,” David Rice, curator at...
  • Researchers resurrect ancient viruses in hopes of improving gene therapy

    07/30/2015 10:20:42 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 30 replies ^ | July 30, 2015 | Provided by: Cell Press
    Researchers have recreated the evolutionary lineage of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) to reconstruct an ancient viral particle that is highly effective at delivering gene therapies targeting the liver, muscle, and retina. This approach, published July 30 in Cell Reports, could be used to design a new class of genetic drugs that are safer and more potent than those currently available. "Our novel methodology allows us to understand better the intricate structure of viruses and how different properties arose throughout evolution," says senior study author Luk H. Vandenberghe of Harvard Medical School. "We believe our findings will teach us how complex biological...
  • Strange 'conehead' skeleton unearthed at Russia's Stonehenge:

    07/29/2015 6:21:12 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 63 replies ^ | Updated: 15:18 EST, 27 July 2015 | Sarah Griffiths
    Elongated head was bound in tribal tradition 2,000 years ago Skeleton with long skull was unearthed in Arkaim, central Russia It's thought to belong to a woman living almost 2,000 years ago Her skull is elongated because it was bound out of tribal tradition Arkaim is known as Russia's Stonehenge because it may have been used by ancient people to study the stars, like the British site A skeleton with an unusual-shaped skull has been unearthed on a site known as Russia's Stonehenge. When images of the remains were first published, UFO enthusiasts rushed to claim they were proof that...
  • French teen finds 560,000 year-old tooth (Update)

    07/28/2015 12:23:38 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    A 16-year-old French volunteer archaeologist has found an adult tooth dating back around 560,000 years in southwestern France, in what researchers hailed as a "major discovery" Tuesday. "A large adult tooth—we can't say if it was from a male or female—was found during excavations of soil we know to be between 550,000 and 580,000 years old, because we used different dating methods," paleoanthropologist Amelie Viallet told AFP. "This is a major discovery because we have very few human fossils from this period in Europe," she said. The tooth was found in the Arago cave near the village of Tautavel, one...
  • Is the Amazon rainforest MAN-MADE? At least 8 MILLION humans may have lived and farmed the [tr]

    07/24/2015 6:22:31 AM PDT · by C19fan · 35 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | July 24, 2015 | Richard Gray
    It is often held aloft by environmental campaign groups as an example of one of the last remaining regions of unspoiled habitat left in the world. But instead of being a pristine rainforest untouched by human hands, the Amazon appears to have been profoundly shaped by mankind. An international team of researchers have published evidence that suggests the Amazon was once home to millions of people who lived and farmed in the area now covered by trees.
  • A DNA Search for the First Americans Links Amazon Groups to Indigenous Australians

    07/24/2015 6:56:41 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies ^ | July 21, 2015 | By Helen Thompson
    The new genetic analysis takes aim at the theory that just one founding group settled the Americas =========================================================================================================== Brazil's Surui people, like the man pictured above, share ancestry with indigenous Australians, new evidence suggests. (PAULO WHITAKER/Reuters/Corbis) ==================================================================================================================== More than 15,000 years ago, humans began crossing a land bridge called Beringia that connected their native home in Eurasia to modern-day Alaska. Who knows what the journey entailed or what motivated them to leave, but once they arrived, they spread southward across the Americas. The prevailing theory is that the first Americans arrived in a single wave, and all Native American populations...
  • 50 million year old sperm cells found in fossilized cocoon

    07/15/2015 2:23:53 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 13 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | July 15, 2015 | Bob Yirka
    Diagram illustrating the inferred mode of fossilization of microorganisms in clitellate cocoons, exemplified by a common medicinal leech (reproductive stages modified from Sims). (a) Two leeches mate; (b) a cocoon is secreted from the clitellum; (c) eggs and sperm are released into the cocoon before the animal retracts and eventually deposits the sealed cocoon on a suitable substrate (d). Insets depict enlargements of the inner cocoon-wall surface showing how spermatozoa and microbes become encased in the solidifying inner cocoon wall. Credit: Biology Letters, DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2015.0431 ============================================================================================= (—A small team of researchers with members from institutions in Sweden, Argentina and Italy,...
  • Foreign archaeological missions resume excavating Upper Egypt after 13-year ban

    07/06/2015 11:11:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Cairo Post ^ | 4th of July 2015
    For 13 years, the excavation permissions were limited only to Egyptian missions to explore treasures in Upper Egypt but due to the “successive requests from foreign Universities and researchers, the council agreed to give the licenses after 13 years of suspension,” Amin told Youm7 without going into further details on number of the foreign missions applied for the permits. Allowing any foreign mission to search the Egyptian artifacts should be approved by the Ministry of Tourism and five other sovereignty bodies, former head of the SCA Abdel Halim Nour el-Din told The Cairo Post Saturday. Moreover, the mission should be...
  • Researcher unravels century-old woolly tale to find truth behind massive bones

    07/06/2015 8:16:58 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | Jul 03, 2015 | by Mark Johnson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    Animals go extinct, places too. And stories change. Boaz, a small village in Richland County, Wis., has only 156 people these days. There are a half-dozen streets, a couple of taverns, a small park with a baseball diamond and, on the outskirts, a historic marker describing the village's lone claim to fame: "the Boaz Mastodon." The story on the marker is the one that's been told to schoolchildren for almost a century as they stare up at the mastodon skeleton, enshrined in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Geology Museum. It is a story that, until now, has endured largely unchanged: One...
  • BOFFIN: Will I soon be able to CLONE a MAMMOTH? YES. Should I? NO

    07/04/2015 1:40:42 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 34 replies ^ | ,3 Jul 2015 at 09:28, | Lewis Page
    It will definitely be possible within the foreseeable future to bring back the long-extinct woolly mammoth, a top geneticist has said. However, in his regretful opinion such a resurrection should not be carried out. The assertion comes in the wake of a new study of mammoth genetics as compared to their cousins the Asian and African elephants, which live in warm habitats very different from the icy northern realms of the woolly giant. The new study offers boffins many revelations as to the differences which let the elephants and mammoths survive in such different conditions. “This is by far the...
  • First comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome completed

    07/02/2015 1:34:26 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 07-02-2015 | Provided by University of Chicago Medical Center
    The first comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome reveals extensive genetic changes that allowed mammoths to adapt to life in the arctic. Credit: Giant Screen Films © 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC ======================================================================== The first comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome reveals extensive genetic changes that allowed mammoths to adapt to life in the arctic. Mammoth genes that differed from their counterparts in elephants played roles in skin and hair development, fat metabolism, insulin signaling and numerous other traits. Genes linked to physical traits such as skull shape, small ears and short tails were also identified. As a...
  • Spiky monsters: New species of 'super-armored' worm discovered

    06/30/2015 9:59:45 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 29 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-29-2015 | Provided by University of Cambridge
    Collinsium ciliosum, a Collins' monster-type lobopodian from the early Cambrian Xiaoshiba biota of China. Credit: Javier Ortega-Hernández A new species of 'super-armoured' worm, a bizarre, spike-covered creature which ate by filtering nutrients out of seawater with its feather-like front legs, has been identified by palaeontologists. The creature, which lived about half a billion years ago, was one of the first animals on Earth to develop armour to protect itself from predators and to use such a specialised mode of feeding. The creature, belonging to a poorly understood group of early animals, is also a prime example of the broad variety...
  • So, Just How Good Are You At Puzzles?

    06/22/2015 12:18:41 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    Popular Science ^ | Posted June 19, 2015 | By Chandra Clarke
    Put your jigsaw puzzle skills to the test with this archeological treasure Project: The Pictish Puzzle The Picts were a group of people that lived in Scotland during the Late Iron Age. You're probably familiar with their signature artwork: highly stylized animals, beautiful spirals, and intricate knots, all carved into stone, or worked in metal. And it's one of the most famous and beautiful Pictish stones that National Museums Scotland wants you to put back together. The Hilton of Cadboll Stone was carved between 700 and 800 AD. On one side (shown above) you can see a hunting scene. On...
  • Genetic analysis of 40,000-year-old jawbone reveals early modern humans interbred with Neandertals

    06/22/2015 8:57:42 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 39 replies
    PHYS.Org ^ | 06-22-2015 | Provided by Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    In 2002, archaeologists discovered the jawbone of a human who lived in Europe about 40,000 years ago. Geneticists have now analyzed ancient DNA from that jawbone and learned that it belonged to a modern human whose recent ancestors included Neanderthals. Neanderthals lived in Europe until about 35,000 years ago, disappearing at the same time modern humans were spreading across the continent. The new study, co-led by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator David Reich at Harvard Medical School and Svante Pääbo at the Max Planck Institute in Germany, provides the first genetic evidence that humans interbred with Neanderthals in Europe....
  • 3,800-year-old statuettes found in Peru

    06/17/2015 2:42:49 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 49 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Jun 09, 2015 | Staff
    Researchers in Peru have discovered a trio of statuettes they believe were created by the ancient Caral civilization some 3,800 years ago, the culture ministry said Tuesday. The mud statuettes were found inside a reed basket in a building at the ancient city of Vichama in northern Peru, which is today an important archaeological site. The ministry said they were probably used in religious rituals performed before breaking ground on a new building. Two of the figures, a naked man and woman painted in white, black and red, are believed to represent political authorities. The third, a women with 28...
  • Hidden secrets of 1491 world map revealed via multispectral imaging

    06/12/2015 10:43:35 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 65 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-12-2015 | Mike Cummings
    Henricus Martellus, a German cartographer working in Florence in the late 15th century, produced a highly detailed map of the known world. According to experts, there is strong evidence that Christopher Columbus studied this map and that it influenced his thinking before his fateful voyage. Martellus' map arrived at Yale in 1962, the gift of an anonymous donor. Scholars at the time hailed the map's importance and argued that it could provide a missing link to the cartographic record at the dawn of the Age of Discovery. However, five centuries of fading and scuffing had rendered much of the map's...
  • Ice age camel bones found in Yukon redraw species' lineage

    06/10/2015 1:31:42 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-10-2015 | Staff
    Miners in northwestern Canada have discovered ice age camel bones whose DNA is forcing scientists to redraw the family tree of the now-extinct species. Grant Zazula, a paleontologist with the Yukon's Department of Tourism and Culture, said three fossils recovered from a gold mine in the Klondike in 2008 are the first western camel bones found in the territory or Alaska in decades. Scientists had believed western camels that once lived in North America were related to llamas and alpacas common to South America, but they now have genetic proof that the animals are more closely tied to the camels...
  • 2500-Year-Old 'Wonder Woman' Found on Vase

    06/08/2015 2:22:47 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 37 replies ^ | Jun 5, 2015 11:24 AM ET | by Rossella Lorenzi
    A 2,500-year-old predecessor of DC Comics’ Wonder Woman super heroine has emerged on a vase painting kept at a small American museum. Drawn on a white-ground pyxis (a lidded cylindrical box that was used for cosmetics, jewelry, or ointments) the image shows an Amazon on horseback in a battle against a Greek warrior. Much like the fictional warrior princess of the Amazons, the horsewoman is twirling a lasso. “It is the only ancient artistic image of an Amazon using a lariat in battle,” Adrienne Mayor, a research scholar at Stanford University’s departments of classics and history of science, told Discovery...
  • Lethal wounds on skull may indicate 430,000-year-old murder

    05/27/2015 7:01:10 PM PDT · by Rebelbase · 65 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | 5/27/15 | Nohemi Sala et al
    Lethal wounds identified on a human skull in the Sima de los Huesos, Spain, may indicate one of the first cases of murder in human history, some 430,000 years ago, according to a study published May 27 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nohemi Sala from Centro Mixto UCM-ISCIII de Evolución y Comportamiento Humanos, Spain, and colleagues. The archeological site, Sima de los Huesos in northern Spain, is located deep within an underground cave system and contains the skeletal remains of at least 28 individuals that date to around 430,000 years ago, during the Middle Pleistocene. The only...
  • 'Eternal flames' of ancient times could spark interest of modern geologists

    05/18/2015 11:51:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 24 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-18-2015 | Provided by Springer
    Seeps from which gas and oil escape were formative to many ancient cultures and societies. They gave rise to legends surrounding the Delphi Oracle, Chimaera fires and "eternal flames" that were central to ancient religious practices - from Indonesia and Iran to Italy and Azerbaijan. Modern geologists and oil and gas explorers can learn much by delving into the geomythological stories about the religious and social practices of the Ancient World, writes Guiseppe Etiope of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Italy. His research is published in the new Springer book Natural Gas Seepage. "Knowing present-day gas fluxes...
  • Analysis of bones found in Romania offer evidence of human and Neanderthal interbreeding in Europe

    05/15/2015 1:52:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-14-2015 | Bob Yirka
    A Neanderthal skeleton, left, compared with a modern human skeleton. Credit: American Museum of Natural History DNA testing of a human mandible fossil found in Romania has revealed a genome with 4.8 to 11.3 percent Neanderthal DNA—its original owner died approximately 40,000 years ago, Palaeogenomicist Qiaomei Fu reported to audience members at a Biology of Genomes meeting in New York last week. She noted also that she and her research team found long Neanderthal sequences. The high percentage suggests, she added, that the human had a Neanderthal in its family tree going back just four to six generations. The finding...
  • Will Liquid Mercury Show The Way To King's Tomb In Mysterious City Of Teotihuacan?

    04/25/2015 12:33:02 PM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 45 replies ^ | 25 April, 2015 | unknown - A Mexican archeologist hunting for a royal tomb in a deep, dark tunnel beneath a towering pre-Aztec pyramid has made a discovery that may have brought him a step closer: liquid mercury,' according to Reuters' report. In the bowels of Teotihuacan, a mysterious ancient city that was once the largest in the Americas, Sergio Gomez this month found "large quantities" of the silvery metal in a chamber at the end of a sacred tunnel sealed for nearly 1,800 years. "It's something that completely surprised us," Gomez said at the entrance to the tunnel below Teotihuacan's Pyramid of the...
  • Evidence of Pre-Columbus Trade Found in Alaska House

    04/17/2015 5:39:17 PM PDT · by Rebelbase · 61 replies
    Live Science ^ | April 16, 2015 | Owen Jarus
    Archaeologists working at the Rising Whale site at Cape Espenberg, Alaska, have discovered several artifacts that were imported from East Asia. Bronze artifacts discovered in a 1,000-year-old house in Alaska suggest trade was occurring between East Asia and the New World centuries before the voyages of Columbus.
  • Archeologists Detect Ancient Pyramid Buried in Bolivia

    04/06/2015 11:01:12 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 39 replies
    Costa Rican Star ^ | 03-27-2015 | Staff
    La Paz, Mar 27 (EFE).- The government of Bolivia announced it will start exploratory excavations this year at the ancient fortress of Tiahuanaco after a buried pyramid was detected. Ludwing Cayo, director of the Tiahuanaco Archeological Research Center, told Efe that the formation is located in the area of Kantatallita, east of the Akapana pyramid. In a presentation for the media, Cayo outlined a five-year for further research at Tiahuanaco, an archaeological site 71 kilometers (44 miles) west of La Paz that was the cradle of an ancient civilization predating the Incas. Excavations may start in May or June, depending...
  • New instrument dates old skeleton—'Little Foot' 3.67 million years old

    04/01/2015 1:25:58 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 24 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-01-2015 | Provided by Purdue University
    A skeleton named Little Foot is among the oldest hominid skeletons ever dated at 3.67 million years old, according to an advanced dating method. Little Foot is a rare, nearly complete skeleton of Australopithecus first discovered 21 years ago in a cave at Sterkfontein, in central South Africa. The new date places Little Foot as an older relative of Lucy, a famous Australopithecus skeleton dated at 3.2 million years old that was found in Ethiopia. It is thought that Australopithecus is an evolutionary ancestor to humans that lived between 2 million and 4 million years ago. Stone tools found at...
  • Neanderthals Wore Eagle Talons As Jewelry 130,000 Years Ago

    03/13/2015 9:39:56 PM PDT · by blam · 40 replies
    Live Science ^ | 3-14-2015 | Megan Gannon
    Megan Gannon March 14, 2015The eight eagle talons from Krapina arranged with an eagle phalanx that was also found at the site. (Luka Mjeda, Zagreb) Long before they shared the landscape with modern humans, Neanderthals in Europe developed a sharp sense of style, wearing eagle claws as jewelry, new evidence suggests. Researchers identified eight talons from white-tailed eagles — including four that had distinct notches and cut marks — from a 130,000-year-old Neanderthal cave in Croatia. They suspect the claws were once strung together as part of a necklace or bracelet. "It really is absolutely stunning," study author David Frayer,...
  • Mysterious Jade May Have Been Offering to Gods [...or not]

    03/11/2015 2:02:44 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 24 replies ^ | Mar 11, 2015 09:30 AM ET | by Owen Jarus, LiveScience
    The jade artifact, which has cleft rectangles, incisions and a cone at its top, was discovered underwater in Veracruz, Mexico. Photo courtesy Professor Carl Wendt A mysterious corncob-shaped artifact, dating to somewhere between 900 B.C. and 400 B.C., has been discovered underwater at the site of Arroyo Pesquero in Veracruz, Mexico. Made of jadeite, a material that is harder than steel, the artifact has designs on it that are difficult to put into words. It contains rectangular shapes, engraved lines and a cone that looks like it is emerging from the top. It looks like a corncob in an abstract...
  • Alexander the Great-Era Treasure Found in Israeli Cave

    03/10/2015 6:20:38 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies ^ | Mar 9, 2015 07:00 PM ET | by Rossella Lorenzi
    A rare cache of jewelry and silver coins, minted during the reign of Alexander the Great, has been discovered in a stalactite filled cave in northern Israel, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) announced on Monday. The 2,300-year-old treasure was found by three members of the Israeli Caving Club who wriggled through a narrow passage at the entrance of the stalactite cave and wandered inside for several hours. Stashed inside a niche, one of the spelunkers, Hen Zakai, spotted two ancient silver coins. On one side of the coins was an image of Alexander the Great, while the other side portrayed...
  • Paid sick days and physicians at work: Ancient Egyptians had state-supported health care

    02/22/2015 9:14:50 AM PST · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 02-16-2015 | by Anne Austin, The Conversation
    We might think of state supported health care as an innovation of the 20th century, but it's a much older tradition than that. In fact, texts from a village dating back to Egypt's New Kingdom period, about 3,100-3,600 years ago, suggest that in ancient Egypt there was a state-supported health care network designed to ensure that workers making the king's tomb were productive. Paintings on the walls of King Merneptah’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings. Workers living in Deir el-Medina would have worked on tombs like this. Credit: Asmaa Waguih/Reuters Health care boosted productivity on the royal tombs...
  • Israel unveils its largest find of medieval gold coins

    02/22/2015 8:07:05 AM PST · by Red Badger · 2 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 02-18--2015 | by By Ariel Schalit
    Kobi Sharvit of The Israel Antiquities Authority Fatimid period gold coins that were found in the seabed in the Mediterranean Sea near the port of Caesarea National Park in Caesarea, Israel, Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2015. A group of amateur Israeli divers have stumbled upon the largest collection of medieval gold coins ever found in the country, dating back to the 11th century and likely from a shipwreck in the Mediterranean Sea. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit) Israel on Wednesday unveiled the largest collection of medieval gold coins ever found in the country, accidentally discovered by amateur divers and dating back about a...
  • How Humankind Conquered the World (Tree of Knowledge Mutation)

    02/18/2015 5:29:30 PM PST · by Maelstorm · 13 replies ^ | Feb. 2015 | By CHARLES C. MANN
    ... The book’s title is Mr. Harari’s reminder that, long ago, the world held half a dozen species of human, of which only Homo sapiens—thee and me—today survives. The trajectory of our species, Mr. Harari says, can be traced as a succession of three revolutions: the cognitive revolution (when we got smart), the agricultural revolution (when we got nature to do what we wanted), and the scientific revolution (when we got dangerously powerful). Humanity, Mr. Harari predicts, will see one more epochal event. We will vanish within a few centuries, either because we’ve gained such godlike powers as to become...
  • Chinese mummy suggests brain surgery was carried out 3,600 years ago...

    02/03/2015 2:28:29 PM PST · by Red Badger · 28 replies ^ | Updated: 16:13 EST, 3 February 2015 | By Victoria Woollaston
    A skull that's more than three and a half millennia old has revealed signs of an early form of brain surgery. The perforated skull belongs to a mummified woman found in the Xiaohe tomb in China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. Experts said that the hole, which measures around 2 inches (50mm) in diameter, was most likely an early form of craniotomy. A craniotomy involves temporarily removing a 'flap' of bone from the skull to give surgeons access to the brain. The amount of skull removed depends on the type of surgery being performed, and the flap is later replaced using...
  • Fossil Found In Asia Could Be A New Species Of Human

    01/28/2015 10:26:09 AM PST · by blam · 77 replies
    BI - Livescience ^ | 1-28-2015 | Charles Q. Choi
    Charles Q. Choi, LiveScience January 27, 2015An ancient human fossil discovered from the seafloor near Taiwan reveals that a primitive group of humans, potentially an unknown species, once lived in Asia, researchers say. These findings suggest that multiple lineages of extinct humans may have coexisted in Asia before the arrival of modern humans in the region about 40,000 years ago, the scientists added. Although modern humans, Homo sapiens, are the only surviving human lineage, others once walked the globe. Extinct human lineages once found in Asia include Neanderthals, the closest extinct relatives of modern humans; Denisovans, whose genetic legacy may...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...
  • Cultural Diffusion From East To West? (Sundaland)

    12/15/2014 7:42:15 AM PST · by blam · 13 replies
    (A few years back, Professor Stephen Oppenheimer wrote a book titled "Eden In The East" where he proposed that our culture flowed from east to west instead of west to east. Here's a rebuttal)Cultural diffusion from East to West? 2014/01/12 Oppenheimer’s theory is that “ … the roots of the great flowering of civilisation in the fertile crescent of the Ancient Near East lay in the sinking shorelines of Southeast Asia. The Sumerians and Egyptians themselves wrote about the skilled wise men from the East, a fact often dismissed as the embellishment of a fertile imagination.” Purely as an aside,...
  • Amphipolis skeleton from Alexander's time found in Greece

    11/12/2014 10:41:24 AM PST · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | 11/12/2014 | By Giorgos Christides
    Archaeologists in northern Greece have found a skeleton inside a tomb from the time of Alexander the Great, during a dig that has enthralled the public. The burial site at Amphipolis is the largest ever discovered in Greece. The culture ministry said the almost intact skeleton belonged to a "distinguished public figure", given the tomb's dimensions and lavishness. Chief archaeologist Katerina Peristeri said "the tomb in all probability belongs to a male and a general". The excavation has fascinated Greeks ever since Prime Minister Antonis Samaras visited the site in August 2014 and announced it amounted to "an exceptionally important...
  • Ancient DNA shows earliest European genomes weathered the Ice Age

    11/07/2014 1:36:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 12 replies ^ | Nov 06, 2014
    The study also uncovers a more accurate timescale for when humans and Neanderthals interbred, and finds evidence for an early contact between the European hunter-gatherers and those in the Middle East – who would later develop agriculture and disperse into Europe about 8,000 years ago, transforming the European gene pool. Scientists now believe Eurasians separated into at least three populations earlier than 36,000 years ago: Western Eurasians, East Asians and a mystery third lineage, all of whose descendants would develop the unique features of most non-African peoples - but not before some interbreeding with Neanderthals took place. Led by the...