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  • Wyoming cave dig unearths bones of ancient horses, cheetahs and bison

    08/09/2014 2:33:26 AM PDT · by blueplum · 31 replies
    Reuters ^ | August 8, 2014 5:23pm EDT | LAURA ZUCKERMAN
    (Reuters) - Scientists excavating an ancient Wyoming sinkhole containing a rare trove of fossils of Ice Age mammals have unearthed hundreds of bones of such prehistoric animals as American cheetahs, a paleontologist said on Friday. The two-week dig by an international team of researchers led by Des Moines University paleontologist Julie Meachen marked the first exploration of Natural Trap Cave at the base of the Bighorn Mountains in north-central Wyoming since its initial discovery in the 1970s. Meachen said the extensive excavation that began late last month uncovered roughly 200 large bones of animals like horses that roamed North America...
  • The Foul Tornado: On the centenary of World War I (Outstanding Read)

    07/14/2014 12:17:39 PM PDT · by mojito · 43 replies
    The American Spectator ^ | July/August 2014 | Peter Hitchens
    To say that that the First World War was the greatest cataclysm in human history since the fall of the Roman Empire is to put it mildly. The war destroyed so many good things and killed so many good people that civilization has not recovered and probably never will. Long after it officially ended, it continued to cause millions of deaths and tragedies, most obviously during its encore performance of 1939-45. But it did not stop even then. Many of its worst consequences came during official periods of peace and are unknown or forgotten, or remain unconnected with it in...
  • Fossilized Human Poop Reveals The Real Paleo Diet (Neanderthals)

    06/26/2014 7:54:45 PM PDT · by blam · 72 replies
    BI - Reuters ^ | 6-26-2014 | Will Dunham
    Will Dunham, Reuters Jun. 26, 2014 Don't laugh, but the discovery of the oldest known human poop is offering valuable scientific insight into the life of Neanderthals who lived in Spain some 50,000 years ago. Scientists said on Wednesday they found five samples of human fecal matter at an archeological site called El Salt, in the floor of a rock shelter where Neanderthals once lived. Analysis of the samples provided a new understanding of the diet of this extinct human species, offering the first evidence that Neanderthals were omnivores who also ate vegetables as part of their meat-heavy diet, they...
  • Here's The Fascinating Origin Of Almost Every Jewish Last Name

    06/18/2014 11:04:47 AM PDT · by blam · 40 replies
    BI - Slate ^ | 6-18-2014 | Bennett Muraskin
    Bennett MuraskinJan. 8, 2014 Richard Andree's 1881 map of the Jews of Central Europe. Ashkenazic Jews were among the last Europeans to take family names. Some German-speaking Jews took last names as early as the 17th century, but the overwhelming majority of Jews lived in Eastern Europe and did not take last names until compelled to do so. The process began in the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1787 and ended in Czarist Russia in 1844. In attempting to build modern nation-states, the authorities insisted that Jews take last names so that they could be taxed, drafted, and educated (in that order...
  • 3000 year old trousers discovered in Chinese grave oldest ever found

    06/12/2014 10:39:48 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    phys.org ^ | Jun 03, 2014 | by Bob Yirka
    (Phys.org) —A team of researchers working in the ancient Yanghai graveyard in China's Tarim Basin has uncovered what appears to be the earliest example of trouser wearing. The research team has published a paper in the journal Quaternary International describing the pants and why they were likely developed to assist with riding horses. The Tarim Basin in western China is host to the famous Yanghai tombs, a large ancient burial ground that dates back thousands of years—thus far over 500 individual gravesites have been excavated. In this latest find, two adult males (believed to be herders and warriors) both approximately...
  • Prehistoric Europeans Took Poppies and Mushrooms in Prayer

    05/17/2014 12:09:18 PM PDT · by Renfield · 24 replies
    It’s not much of a stretch to believe that getting stoned in the Stone Age was as popular among prehistoric Europeans as it is now. However, new evidence suggests that marijuana, mushrooms, alcohol and other mood-altering substances were used for more than zonking with Zonk – they played crucial roles in spiritual practices, especially burial rituals and communications with the after-world.Elisa Guerra-Doce of the Universidad de Valladolid in Spain has documented the cultural contexts in which forms of alcohol and drugs were used in prehistoric Europe. The forms she looked for were fossilized leaves and seeds of psychoactive plants, residues...
  • North America's Oldest Skeleton Discovery: 13,000-Year-Old Body of 'Naia' Discovered in Mexico

    05/16/2014 10:02:19 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 32 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | May 15, 2014 19:00 GMT | Lydia Smith
    One of the oldest human skeletons in North America has been discovered by a team of international scientists in an underwater Yucatn Peninsula cave. Named "Naia", the teenager fell to her death in a large pit called Hoyo Nego, meaning "black hole" in Spanish. Patricia Beddows, a cave-diving researcher from Northwestern University, said: "The preservation of all the bones in this deep water-filled cave is amazing - the bones are beautifully laid out." "The girl's skeleton is exceptionally complete because of the environment in which she died -- she ended up in the right water and in a quiet place...
  • Archaeologists find 5,600-year-old tomb in Egypt (Update)

    05/09/2014 1:49:04 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 18 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 07, 2014 | Staff
    Egypt said Wednesday archaeologists have unearthed a 5,600-year-old preserved tomb and mummy predating the pharaonic First Dynasty, a discovery that will shed new light on the pre-dynastic era. The tomb was built before the rule of king Narmer, the founder of the First Dynasty who unified Upper and Lower Egypt in the 31th century BC, the antiquities ministry said in a statement. The tomb was discovered in the Kom al-Ahmar region, between Luxor and Aswan, on the site of ancient Hierakonpolis, the city of the falcon, which was the capital of the Kingdom of Upper Egypt. The archaeologists found an...
  • Tomb of ancient Egyptian beer brewer unearthed

    05/09/2014 1:39:22 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Jan 03, 2014 | Staff
    Egypt's minister of antiquities says Japanese archeologists have unearthed the tomb of an ancient beer brewer in the city of Luxor that is more than 3,000 years old. Mohammed Ibrahim says Friday the tomb dates back to the Ramesside period and belongs to the chief "maker of beer for gods of the dead" who was also the head of a warehouse. He added that the walls of the tomb's chambers contain "fabulous designs and colors, reflecting details of daily life ... along with their religious rituals." The head of the Japanese team, Jiro Kondo, says the tomb was discovered during...
  • Tomb dating back to 1100 B.C. found in Egypt (Images)

    05/09/2014 1:34:37 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 12 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 08, 2014 | by Laura Dean
    Archeologists have found a tomb dating back to around 1100 B.C. south of Cairo, Egypt's Antiquities Ministry said Thursday. Antiquities Minister Mohamed Ibrahim said that the tomb belongs to a guard of the army archives and royal messenger to foreign countries. Ibrahim said the Cairo University Faculty of Archaeology's discovery at Saqqara adds "a chapter to our knowledge about the history of Saqqara." Ola el-Egeizy of Cairo University said the tomb contains "very nice inscriptions" of the funerary procession and the afterlife of the deceased. The tomb was found near another one dating back to the same period belonging to...
  • Egypt Archaeologists May Have Found Alexander the Greats Tomb

    05/03/2014 5:08:39 AM PDT · by blam · 52 replies
    Greek Worls Reporter ^ | Nikoleta Kalmouki
    Egypt Archaeologists May Have Found Alexander the Greats Tomb Nikoleta Kalmouki April 30, 2014 In Egypt, a team of archaeologists and historians from the Polish Center of Archaeology have revealed a mausoleum made of marble and gold that might be the tomb of Alexander the Great. The site is situated in an area known as Kom el-Dikka in the heart of downtown Alexandria, only 60 meters away from the Mosque of Nebi Daniel. The monument was apparently sealed off and hidden in the 3rd or 4th century AD, to protect it from the Christian repression and destruction of pagan monuments...
  • Birthplace of the domesticated chili pepper identified in Mexico

    04/18/2014 9:49:58 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-18-2014 | by Pat Bailey AND Journal reference: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
    Central-east Mexico gave birth to the domesticated chili peppernow the world's most widely grown spice cropreports an international team of researchers, led by a plant scientist at the University of California, Davis. Results from the four-pronged investigationbased on linguistic and ecological evidence as well as the more traditional archaeological and genetic datasuggest a regional, rather than a geographically specific, birthplace for the domesticated chili pepper. That region, extending from southern Puebla and northern Oaxaca to southeastern Veracruz, is further south than was previously thought, the researchers found. The region also is different from areas of origin that have been suggested...
  • Antiquities Robbers Caught Selling Rare Ancient Burial Chests

    03/31/2014 1:09:05 PM PDT · by BlueDragon · 9 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 3/31/2014 | Ari Yashar
    Some of the 11 Jewish ossuaries from Second Temple period still held bones, featured Hebrew script listing names of those interred. The Antiquities Authority and police cooperated last Friday to arrest suspects who allegedly stole ornate stone ossuary burial chests, which were used by Jews in Israel during the Second Temple period roughly 2,000 years ago. The suspects were caught while in possession of eleven ossuaries, some of them still containing skeletal remains. The suspected grave robbers, who were arrested and brought in for questioning, came from the Arab village of Abadiyah in Judea, located near Bethlehem, as well as...
  • Ancient Egyptian Soldier's Letter Home Deciphered

    03/07/2014 12:05:46 PM PST · by Red Badger · 54 replies
    Live Science ^ | March 05, 2014 10:18pm ET | Owen Jarus
    A newly deciphered letter home dating back around 1,800 years reveals the pleas of a young Egyptian soldier named Aurelius Polion who was serving, probably as a volunteer, in a Roman legion in Europe. In the letter, written mainly in Greek, Polion tells his family that he is desperate to hear from them and that he is going to request leave to make the long journey home to see them. Addressed to his mother (a bread seller), sister and brother, part of it reads: "I pray that you are in good health night and day, and I always make obeisance...
  • Ancient graves hint at cultural shift to Anglo-Saxon Britain

    02/17/2014 1:08:17 PM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 2-14-2014 | Alex Peel
    Human remains dug up from an ancient grave in Oxfordshire add to a growing body of evidence that Britain's fifth-century transition from Roman to Anglo-Saxon was cultural rather than bloody. The traditional historical narrative is one of brutal conquest, with invaders from the North wiping out and replacing the pre-existing population. But a new study, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, hints at a more peaceful process. Dr Andrew Millard, from Durham University, is one of the study's authors. 'The main controversy over the years has centred on how many Anglo-Saxons came across the North Sea,' he says. 'Was...
  • The Vikings Jtunvillur Runic Code is Solved

    02/12/2014 6:45:06 PM PST · by P.O.E. · 48 replies
    On this stick from the 1200s found in Bergen, two men named Sigurd and Lavran have written their names both in code and with regular runes. This helped runologist Jonas Nordby to solve the Jtunvillur code. For the first time, the Jtunvillur runic code is cracked. It can help to solve the mystery of the Vikings secret codes. Why did the Vikings use codes when they wrote runes? Was it a secret message or other reasons that they encrypted runic texts? This, we still know little about. But runologist Jonas Nordby think he may be one step closer to the...
  • Prehistoric Boy May Be Native American 'Missing Link' (Aznick Boy)

    02/12/2014 2:05:43 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies
    Live Science - Yahoo News ^ | 2-12-2014 | Charles Q. Choi
    Prehistoric Boy May Be Native American 'Missing Link' LiveScience.com By By Charles Q. Choi, LiveScience ContributorFebruary 12, 2014 A prehistoric boy's DNA now suggests that ancient toolmakers long thought of as the first Americans may serve as a kind of "missing link" between Native Americans and the rest of the world, researchers say. The findings reveal these prehistoric toolmakers are the direct ancestors of many contemporary Native Americans, and are closely related to all Native Americans. Scientists investigated a prehistoric culture known as the Clovis, named after sites discovered near Clovis, N.M. Centuries of cold, nicknamed the "Big Freeze," helped...
  • Scientists Find 800,000-Year-Old Footprints In UK

    02/07/2014 3:10:44 PM PST · by blam · 46 replies
    phys.org/news ^ | 2-7-2014 | Jill Lawless
    Scientists Find 800,000-Year-Old Footprints Inn UK (Update) Jill LawlessFebuary 7, 2014Undated handout photo issued by the British Museum Friday Feb. 7, 2014 of some of the human footprints, thought to be more than 800,000 years old, found in silt on the beach at Happisburgh on the Norfolk coast of England, with a camera lens They were a British family on a day outalmost a million years ago. Archaeologists announced Friday that they have discovered human footprints in England that are between 800,000 and 1 million years oldthe most ancient found outside Africa, and the earliest evidence of human life in...
  • 4,600-Year-Old Step Pyramid Uncovered in Egypt

    02/03/2014 4:52:14 PM PST · by gooblah · 22 replies
    Yahoo/Livescience ^ | Owen Jarus
    TORONTO Archaeologists working near the ancient settlement of Edfu, in southern Egypt, have uncovered a step pyramid that dates back about 4,600 years, predating the Great Pyramid of Giza by at least a few decades.
  • Here's What Happened When Neanderthals And Ancient Humans Hooked Up 80,000 Years Ago

    01/29/2014 3:14:52 PM PST · by blam · 54 replies
    BI ^ | 1-29-2014 | Dina Spector
    Here's What Happened When Neanderthals And Ancient Humans Hooked Up 80,000 Years Ago Dina Spector Jan. 29, 2014, 1:49 PM     Neanderthal REUTERS/Nikola Solic Hyperrealistic face of a neanderthal male is displayed in a cave in the new Neanderthal Museum in the northern Croatian town of Krapina February 25, 2010 By comparing the Neanderthal genome to modern human DNA, the authors of two new studies, both published on Wednesday, show how DNA that humans have inherited from breeding with Neanderthals has shaped us. Modern humans, Neanderthals, and their sister lineage, Denisovans, descended from a common ancestor. The...
  • Did toxic wine kill Alexander the Great? Scientists find plant behind ancient leaders

    01/11/2014 8:09:49 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 18 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 09:59 EST, 11 January 2014 | (Daily Mail Reporter)
    Alexander the Great built a legendary empire before his untimelyand mysteriousdeath at the age of just 32 in 323 BC. Some historians argued was death was due to natural causes, while others maintained he was secretly murdered at a celebratory banquet. Now, an Otago University scientist may have unraveled the case some 2,000 years later. National Poisons Center toxicologist Dr. Leo Schep thinks the culprit could be poisonous wine made from an innocuous-looking plant, according to a report in the New Zealand Herald. [] His research, co-authored by Otago University classics expert Dr. Pat Wheatley and published in the medical...
  • Ancient Humans Had Sex With A Mystery Species (Not Neanderthals Or Denisovans)

    12/05/2013 6:33:43 AM PST · by blam · 129 replies
    BI/Live Science ^ | 12-4-2013 | Stephanie Pappas
    Ancient Humans Had Sex With A Mystery Species Stephanie Pappas Live Science Dec. 4, 2013, 3:33 PM A new, improved sequencing of ancient human relative genomes reveals that Homo sapiens didn't only have sex with Neanderthals and a little-understood line of humans called Denisovans. A fourth, mystery lineage of humans was in the mix, too. As reported by the news arm of the journal Nature, new genetic evidence suggests that several hominids human relatives closer than humans' current living cousin, the chimpanzee interbred more than 30,000 years ago. This group of kissing cousins included an unknown human ancestor...
  • Ancient Etruscan Prince Emerges From Tomb: Photos

    12/03/2013 9:10:36 AM PST · by Beowulf9 · 18 replies
    http://news.discovery.com ^ | Sep 20, 2013 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Italian archaeologists have unearthed a 2,600-year-old intact Etruscan tomb that promises to reveal new depths of one of the ancient worlds most fascinating and mysterious cultures.
  • An Incredible New Skull Is Forcing Us To Rethink The Evolution Of Early Humans

    10/17/2013 3:20:40 PM PDT · by blam · 76 replies
    BI ^ | 10-17-2013 | Dina Spector
    An Incredible New Skull Is Forcing Us To Rethink The Evolution Of Early Humans Dina Spector Oct. 17, 2013, 2:01 PM Photo courtesy of Georgian National Museum A 1.8-million-year-old skull combines a small braincase with a long face and large teeth, which is unlike any other Homo fossils on record. Researchers have traditionally used differences among fossilized remains of ancient humans to define separate species among the earliest members of our Homo genus Homo erectus, Homo habilis, and Homo rudolfensis, for example. But an amazing new skull found in a republic of Georgia suggests that the specimens previously representing...
  • Scientists Have Found An Ancient Fossilized Mosquito Full Of Blood (46 Million Years OLD)

    10/14/2013 8:54:39 PM PDT · by blam · 19 replies
    BI ^ | 10-14-2013 | Jennifer Welsh
    Scientists Have Found An Ancient Fossilized Mosquito Full Of Blood Jennifer Welsh Oct. 14, 2013, 5:37 PMBlood engorged mosquito Researchers have just published an exciting find: a 46-million-year-old mosquito full of blood. Next stop "Jurassic Park"? Not so fast. The find is really interesting because it's the first example of blood-feeding in these ancient insects. We hadn't had clear evidence of when this began until now. They found the mosquito in shale sediments in Montana. They first found the presence of iron in the female mosquito's belly, then used a non-destructive technique to study the molecules inside the find. They...
  • The Old Bean: 4,000-Year-Old Brain Unearthed In Turkey

    10/07/2013 11:16:50 AM PDT · by blam · 17 replies
    Fox News ^ | 10-7-2013 | New Scientists
    <p>A 4,000-year-old human brain, preserved by a combination of mineral-rich soil, fire and something known as "corpse wax," has been found in Turkey.</p> <p>The brain looks more like a piece of burned log, notes New Scientist, but it could unlock clues to the prehistoric mind. Found in the Bronze Age settlement of Seyitmer Hyk, western Turkey, the tissue was amid four skeletons dug up there between 2006 and 2011. Scientists from Hali University, in Istanbul, who have been analyzing the brain, say special circumstances led to its preservation. The skeletons were found burned in a layer of sediment that also contained charred wood. It appears that an earthquake struck the region, flattened the settlement and buried the people before fire spread through the rubble, according to investigators.</p>
  • Reports: Rouhani Home with US 'Gift' of Silver Griffin

    09/28/2013 12:34:59 PM PDT · by ColdOne · 64 replies
    breitbart.com ^ | 9/28/13 | afp
    Iranian President Hassan Rouhani on Saturday brought home a 2,700-year-old Persian artifact the US administration gave him as "a special gift" to Iranians, media reports said. "The Americans contacted us on Thursday and said 'we have a gift for you'," Rouhani told reporters upon arrival at the airport in Tehran, the ILNA news agency reported. "They gave it back as a special gift to the Iranian nation." Rouhani was speaking of a 7th century BC silver Persian drinking cup in the shape of a winged Griffin, a legendary creature with the head of an eagle and body of a lion....
  • Head of goddess Aphrodite statue unearthed in Turkey

    09/22/2013 7:48:13 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    NBC ^ | 23 hours ago | Megan Gannon,
    Buried under soil for hundreds of years, the goddess of love and beauty has some chipping on her nose and face. Researchers think her presence could shed light on the extent of the Roman Empire's wide cultural influence at the time of its peak. Archaeologists found the sculpture while working at a site called Antiochia ad Cragum (Antioch on the cliffs), on the Mediterranean coast. The researchers believe the region, which is dotted with hidden inlets and coves, would have been a haven for Cilician pirates the same group who kidnapped Julius Caesar and held him for ransom around...
  • Preserved for millennia, Egypt's artifacts fall prey to Egypt's protests

    08/31/2013 10:58:40 AM PDT · by Innovative · 5 replies
    The Christian Science Monitor ^ | Aug 31, 2013 | Kristen Chick
    More than 1,000 Egyptian artifacts have been stolen from the Mallawi museum, which was ransacked the same day police violently dispersed Islamist sit-ins in Cairo. The museum was looted and ransacked on Aug. 14, when mobs across the country attacked churches, Christian homes and shops, police stations, and government institutions after police forcefully dispersed two Islamist protest camps. The devastated museum serves as a reminder of the toll that Egypt's two and a half years of upheaval including the most recent episode have taken not only on Egypt's people, but also on their history.
  • Earliest known iron artifacts come from outer space

    08/20/2013 11:10:14 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    PHYS.Org ^ | 08-19-2013 | Provided by University College London
    Researchers have shown that ancient Egyptian iron beads held at the UCL Petrie Museum were hammered from pieces of meteorites, rather than iron ore. The objects, which trace their origins to outer space, also predate the emergence of iron smelting by two millennia. Carefully hammered into thin sheets before being rolled into tubes, the nine beads which are over 5000 years-old - were originally strung into a necklace together with other exotic minerals such as gold and gemstones, revealing the high value of this exotic material in ancient times. The study is published in the Journal of Archaeological Science....
  • Mystery deepens in coffin-within-a-coffin found at Richard III site

    07/30/2013 7:56:16 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 48 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 07-30-2013 | Provided by University of Leicester
    Archaeologists have unearthed a mysterious coffin-within-a-coffin near the final resting place of Richard III. The University of Leicester team lifted the lid of a medieval stone coffin this week the final week of their second dig at the Grey Friars site, where the medieval king was discovered in September. This is the first fully intact stone coffin to be discovered in Leicester in controlled excavations and is believed to contain one of the friary's founders or a medieval monk. Within the stone coffin, they found an inner lead coffin and will need to carry out further analysis...
  • New Fossil Book Won't Showcase Obvious Catastrophe (article)

    06/20/2013 6:51:51 AM PDT · by fishtank · 365 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | June 17, 2013 | Brian Thomas
    New Fossil Book Won't Showcase Obvious Catastrophe by Brian Thomas, M.S. * Not just horses and fish, butlike a whole ancient zoo buried togetherlizards, alligators, stingrays, snakes, squirrel varieties, bats, long-tailed turtles, lemur-like primates, birds, frogs, insects, and sycamore, palm, and fern leaves were all fossilized in Wyoming's Green River Formation. A new book showcasing some of the more spectacular fossils provides secularists another opportunity to reinforce their ideas about how these diverse creatures were encased in what became a giant rock formation. Commonsense observations refute their slow-and-gradual scenario, however, and point to a more violent explanation. Lance Grande collected...
  • Archaeologists find secret chamber at Drum Castle

    07/06/2013 12:33:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Scotsman, STAHB ^ | Thursday, July 4, 2013 | Frank Urquhart
    Drum Castle, the seat of the Chief of Clan Irvine for centuries, has the oldest keep in Scotland and is the oldest intact building in the care of the trust. The trust is planning to bring in specialists to remove cement pointing on the ancient tower and replace it with traditional, breathable lime mortar to help preserve the historic keep. And the hidden chamber -- complete with its medieval toilet -- was uncovered while initial archaeological investigations were being conducted by Dr Jonathan Clark from FAS Heritage. Dr Clark...: "We were surprised that when we carefully unblocked the windows and...
  • Mummified women, human sacrifices discovered in ancient Peruvian tomb

    06/30/2013 5:54:39 AM PDT · by csvset · 13 replies
    Reuters ^ | 28 June 2013 | Mitra Taj
    Reuters) - Archaeologists in Peru on Thursday said they have unearthed a massive royal tomb full of mummified women that provides clues about the enigmatic Wari empire that ruled the Andes long before their better-known Incan successors. "For the first time in the history of archeology in Peru we have found an imperial tomb that belongs to the Wari empire and culture," lead archeologist Milosz Giersz said. Researchers said the discovery will help them piece together life in the Andes centuries before the rise of the Incan empire, which was written about in detail by the conquering Spaniards. The mausoleum,...
  • Massive submerged structure stumps Israeli archaeologists

    05/23/2013 11:36:43 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 39 replies
    http://www.foxnews.com ^ | 05-23-2013 | Staff
    The massive circular structure appears to be an archaeologist's dream: a recently discovered antiquity that could reveal secrets of ancient life in the Middle East and is just waiting to be excavated. It's thousands of years old -- a conical, manmade behemoth weighing hundreds of tons, practically begging to be explored. The problem is -- it's at the bottom of the biblical Sea of Galilee. For now, at least, Israeli researchers are left stranded on dry land, wondering what finds lurk below. The monumental structure, made of boulders and stones with a diameter of 230 feet, emerged from a routine...
  • The Real 'Hobbit' Had Larger Brain Than Thought

    04/17/2013 10:34:45 PM PDT · by blam · 7 replies
    Live Science ^ | 4-18-2013 | Charles Choi
    The Real 'Hobbit' Had Larger Brain Than Thought Charles Choi, LiveScience Contributor Date: 16 April 2013 Time: 07:01 PM ETThe hobbit, Homo floresiensis, lived on the island of Flores some 18,000 years ago, and now researchers have more evidence (its relatively large brain) the diminutive creature was a unique human species. The brain of the extinct "hobbit" was bigger than often thought, researchers say. These findings add to evidence that the hobbit was a unique species of humans after all, not a deformed modern human, scientists added. The 18,000-year-old fossils of the extinct type of human officially known as Homo...
  • Lost and found, the first find of an early human artwork

    03/21/2013 2:31:27 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 03-21-2013 | Provided by Natural History Museum
    This reindeer antler from Neschers in France is engraved with a stylised horse. It was created by early humans and found between 1830 and 1848. A 14,000-year-old engraved reindeer antler is possibly the first piece of early human art ever found. The specimen was uncovered in the 1800s and has been in the vast collections of the Natural History Museum. Its scientific importance, and clues as to how it was made are only now being revealed, scientists report today. Natural History Museum scientists have pieced together the antler's history. It was found between 1830 and 1848 in Neschers, France, by...
  • One of the world's oldest sun dial dug up in Kings' Valley

    03/19/2013 6:41:34 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 23 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 03-15-13 | Provided by University of Basel
    During archaeological excavations in the Kings' Valley in Upper Egypt a team of researchers from the University of Basel found one of the world's oldest ancient Egyptian sun dials. The team of the Egyptological Seminar under the direction of Prof. Susanne Bickel made the significant discovery while clearing the entrance to one of the tombs. During this year's excavations the researchers found a flattened piece of limestone (so-called Ostracon) on which a semicircle in black color had been drawn. The semicircle is divided into twelve sections of about 15 degrees each. A dent in the middle of the approximately 16...
  • Ancient Chinese coin found on Kenyan island by Field Museum expedition

    03/14/2013 11:12:05 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 40 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 03-14-2014 | Provided by Field Museum
    A joint expedition of scientists led by Chapurukha M. Kusimba of The Field Museum and Sloan R. Williams of the University of Illinois at Chicago has unearthed a 600-year-old Chinese coin on the Kenyan island of Manda that shows trade existed between China and east Africa decades before European explorers set sail and changed the map of the world. The coin, a small disk of copper and silver with a square hole in the center so it could be worn on a belt, is called "Yongle Tongbao" and was issued by Emperor Yongle who reigned from 1403-1425AD during the Ming...
  • Researchers: We may have found a fabled sunstone (Update)

    03/08/2013 11:05:59 AM PST · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 08 March 2013 | Raphael Satter
    A rough, whitish block recovered from an Elizabethan shipwreck may be a sunstone, the fabled crystal believed by some to have helped Vikings and other medieval seafarers navigate the high seas, researchers say. In a paper published earlier this week, a Franco-British group argued that the Alderney Crystala chunk of Icelandic calcite found amid a 16th century wreck at the bottom of the English Channelworked as a kind of solar compass, allowing sailors to determine the position of the sun even when it was hidden by heavy cloud, masked by fog, or below the horizon. That's because of a property...
  • Russia finds 'new bacteria' in Antarctic lake

    03/07/2013 9:51:30 AM PST · by Red Badger · 41 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 03-07-2013 | Staff
    Russian scientists believe they have found a wholly new type of bacteria in the mysterious subglacial Lake Vostok in Antarctica, the RIA Novosti news agency reported on Thursday. The samples obtained from the underground lake in May 2012 contained a bacteria which bore no resemblance to existing types, said Sergei Bulat of the genetics laboratory at the Saint Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics. "After putting aside all possible elements of contamination, DNA was found that did not coincide with any of the well-known types in the global database," he said. "We are calling this life form unclassified and unidentified," he...
  • Richard III: Facial reconstruction shows king's features

    02/25/2013 9:06:05 AM PST · by Red Badger · 59 replies
    BBC ^ | 5 February 2013 | Staff
    A facial reconstruction based on the skull of Richard III has revealed how the English king may have looked. The king's skeleton was found under a car park in Leicester during an archaeological dig. The reconstructed face has a slightly arched nose and prominent chin, similar to features shown in portraits of Richard III painted after his death. Historian and author John Ashdown-Hill said seeing it was "almost like being face to face with a real person". The development comes after archaeologists from the University of Leicester confirmed the skeleton found last year was the 15th Century king's, with DNA...
  • Researchers Just Dug Up A Half-Million-Year-Old Human Jawbone

    02/07/2013 4:04:53 PM PST · by blam · 37 replies
    TBI - Live Science ^ | 2-7-2013 | Tia Ghose
    Researchers Just Dug Up A Half-Million-Year-Old Human Jawbone Tia Ghose, LiveScienceFebruary, 2013 . An ancient hominin jawbone unearthed in a Serbian cave may be more than half a million years old. Scientists have unearthed a jawbone from an ancient human ancestor in a cave in Serbia. The jawbone, which may have come from an ancient Homo erectus or a primitive-looking Neanderthal precursor, is more than 397,000 years old, and possibly more than 525,000 years old. The fossil, described today (Feb. 6) in the journal PLOS ONE, is the oldest hominin fossil found in this region of Europe, and may change...
  • Subway work in Greece unearths ancient gold wreath

    02/01/2013 11:29:31 AM PST · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 01-25-2013 | Staff
    Excavation work during construction of a new subway network in Greece's second largest city has discovered an ancient wreath made of gold that was buried with a woman some 2,300 years ago. Archaeologists say Friday's find in Thessaloniki occurred on the site of an ancient cemetery in the west of the northern port city. A total 23,000 ancient and medieval artifacts have been found during archaeological excavations connected with the construction since 2006. Archaeologist Vassiliki Misailidou said the olive branch wreath made of gold was buried in a simple, box-shaped woman's grave. It dates to the late 4th or early...
  • Museum's ancient 'gaming' display actually primitive toilet paper

    01/21/2013 11:34:48 PM PST · by ApplegateRanch · 28 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 10:04 AM GMT 18 Jan 2013
    The Roman artefacts, deliberately shaped into flat discs, have been in the collection at Fishbourne Roman Palace since the 1960s. And up until now the museum thought the items were used for early games, such as draughts. But, a British Medical Journal article has now proposed they have a very different function. The broken pieces range in size from 1 inch to 4 inches in diameter and were excavated near to the museum in Chichester, West Sussex in 1960. It is well publicised that Romans used sponges mounted on sticks and dipped in vinegar as an alternative to toilet paper....
  • Drought May Have Killed Sumerian Language

    12/05/2012 6:54:00 AM PST · by blam · 3 replies
    Live Science ^ | 12-5-2012 | Tia Ghose
    Drought May Have Killed Sumerian Language Tia Ghose LiveScience Staff Writer Date: 04 December 2012 Time: 11:35 AM ETThe ancient Sumerians invented cuneiform, shown here on a clay tablet documenting barley rations issued monthly to adults and children. The language may have died out as a result of a 200-year drought 4,200 years ago. CREDIT: Public Domain SAN FRANCISCO A 200-year-long drought 4,200 years ago may have killed off the ancient Sumerian language, one geologist says. Because no written accounts explicitly mention drought as the reason for the Sumerian demise, the conclusions rely on indirect clues. But several pieces...
  • Archaeologists identify spear tips used in hunting a half-million years ago

    11/15/2012 12:05:23 PM PST · by Red Badger · 44 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Provided by University of Toronto
    A University of Toronto-led team of anthropologists has found evidence that human ancestors used stone-tipped weapons for hunting 500,000 years ago 200,000 years earlier than previously thought. "This changes the way we think about early human adaptations and capacities before the origin of our own species," says Jayne Wilkins, a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto and lead author of a new study in Science. "Although both Neandertals and humans used stone-tipped spears, this is the first evidence that the technology originated prior to or near the divergence of these two species," says...
  • Tomb of Ancient Egyptian Princess Discovered in Unusual Spot

    11/08/2012 11:09:40 AM PST · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | 11-08-2012 | Staff
    The tomb of an ancient Egyptian princess has been discovered south of Cairo hidden in bedrock and surrounded by a court of tombs belonging to four high officials. Dating to 2500 B.C., the structure was built in the second half of the Fifth Dynasty, though archaeologists are puzzled as to why this princess was buried in Abusir South among tombs of non-royal officials. Most members of the Fifth Dynasty's royal family were buried 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) to the north, in the central part of Abusir or farther south in Saqqara. (Saqqara holds a vast burial ground for the ancient...
  • Wingman to the Aces (Lt. Floyd Fulkerson: Ultimate Wingman-475th FG (P-38s))

    10/11/2012 4:38:06 AM PDT · by DCBryan1 · 22 replies
    Flight Journal ^ | 21 SEP 12 | John Dejanovich
    Lt. Floyd Fulkerson: Ultimate Wingman By John Dejanovich There are no great aces without great wingmen and young Lt. Floyd Fulkerson from Little Rock, Arkansas, was one of those wingmen. Although he had four confirmed victories, so he was nearly an ace himself, he sees his primary contribution to the war effort to have been the protection of his lead pilots, some of whom were Americas leading aces. During his time with the 475TH Fighter Group in the Pacific, Floyd flew with such notables as Major Richard Bong, Major Tommy McGuire, and even the much-celebrated Lone Eagle, Charles Lindbergh. Cover...
  • Romans, Han Dynasty were greenhouse gas emitters: study

    10/04/2012 8:37:26 AM PDT · by jmcenanly · 24 replies
    Reuters.com ^ | Wed Oct 3, 2012 4:35pm EDT | Alister Doyle
    (Reuters) - A 200-year period covering the heyday of both the Roman Empire and China's Han dynasty saw a big rise in greenhouse gases, according to a study that challenges the U.N. view that man-made climate change only began around 1800. A record of the atmosphere trapped in Greenland's ice found the level of heat-trapping methane rose about 2,000 years ago and stayed at that higher level for about two centuries. Methane was probably released during deforestation to clear land for farming and from the use of charcoal as fuel, for instance to smelt metal to make weapons, lead author...