Keyword: evolution

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  • Oxygen levels were key to early animal evolution, strongest evidence now shows

    09/23/2016 3:50:31 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 64 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 9/23/2016 | University College London
    It has long puzzled scientists why, after 3 billion years of nothing more complex than algae, complex animals suddenly started to appear on Earth. Now, a team of researchers has put forward some of the strongest evidence yet to support the hypothesis that high levels of oxygen in the oceans were crucial for the emergence of skeletal animals 550 million years ago. The new study is the first to distinguish between bodies of water with low and high levels of oxygen. It shows that poorly oxygenated waters did not support the complex life that evolved immediately prior to the Cambrian...
  • New Study Shows Awe Bad for ‘Science’ (If by ‘Science’ You Mean Atheism)

    09/14/2016 12:00:07 PM PDT · by Heartlander · 39 replies
    The Stream ^ | September 14, 2016 | Douglas Axe
    New Study Shows Awe Bad for ‘Science’ (If by ‘Science’ You Mean Atheism) Douglas Axe Psychology professors from Claremont McKenna, Yale and Berkeley have just published a study that should be “disconcerting to those interested in promoting an accurate understanding of evolution.” Specifically, they’ve identified an insidious factor that has crept into science films and videos, undermining the ability of viewers to be good Darwinists.Awe is the culprit, they say. All those jaw-dropping nature documentaries have been messing with our minds.Most wildlife shows are packaged with the usual Darwinian narrative, spoken in an authoritative tone that isn’t supposed to be...
  • How Germany tried to kill off the Herero people... feeding on ideas of evolutionary superiority ...

    09/14/2016 7:50:12 AM PDT · by fishtank · 31 replies
    Creation Ministries International ^ | 9-14-16 | Marc Ambler
    Herero genocide by Marc Ambler Like most visitors to Namibia,1 one of the memorable pictures I carried away was of the noble-looking Herero people. Their women wear colourful, voluminous Victorian-style dresses and hats, and the men wear uniforms on ceremonial occasions. How terribly sad it was to learn that 100 years ago, their great-grandparents had been the victims of the first genocide of the 20th century. ... That the German settlers and a high-ranking officer like General von Trotha would hold to these ‘superior race’, ‘survival-of-the-fittest-through-“cleansing”-of-the-weakest’ views is hardly surprising. Darwin’s On the Origin of Species (which is subtitled By...
  • Genetic analysis uncovers four species of giraffe, not just one

    09/08/2016 11:16:42 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 54 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 9/8/2016 | Fennessy
    Up until now, scientists had only recognized a single species of giraffe made up of several subspecies. But, according to the most inclusive genetic analysis of giraffe relationships to date, giraffes actually aren't one species, but four. For comparison, the genetic differences among giraffe species are at least as great as those between polar and brown bears. The unexpected findings reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on September 8 highlight the urgent need for further study of the four genetically isolated species and for greater conservation efforts for the world's tallest mammal, the researchers say. "We were extremely...
  • The Cambrian Explosion: Falsification of Darwinian Evolution

    09/07/2016 11:34:29 AM PDT · by kimtom · 277 replies
    www.apologeticspress.org ^ | 5/1/2016 | Jeff Miller, Ph.D.
    One important task of science is to develop testable theories. And one important characteristic of a theory is the ability to falsify it with evidence gathered from experimentation. Predictions should be able to be made that would verify the theory if those predictions play out, or falsify the theory if the evidence contradicts the theory. If, for example, one theorizes that gravity is a force that causes objects with much larger mass, if unimpeded, to pull objects with smaller mass towards it, one can make the prediction that if he drops an apple from his hand, the larger mass of...
  • Major Evolutionary Blunders: The Imaginary Archaeoraptor

    09/01/2016 7:41:12 PM PDT · by lasereye · 8 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 09/01/2016 | Randy J. Guliuzza, P.E., M.D.
    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is quite serious about flying safety. If an aircraft crashes, the FAA will conduct an investigation called a Root Cause Analysis. This involves methodical detective work that tracks events from the moment of the crash back in time. Flight and voice data recorders are invaluable to the inquiry. Root Cause Analysis identifies the most obvious problem that led to the crash and then lists the problem’s cause. That cause is then treated like a problem in itself, and the cause for its occurrence is investigated. This cycle is repeated until the very first cause is...
  • Life thrived on young Earth: scientists discover 3.7-billion-year-old fossils

    08/31/2016 4:24:39 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 53 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/31/2016 | Allen P. Nutman, et al
    In an extraordinary find, a team of Australian researchers have uncovered the world's oldest fossils in a remote area of Greenland, capturing the earliest history of the planet and demonstrating that life on Earth emerged rapidly in the planet's early years. Led by the University of Wollongong's (UOW) Professor Allen Nutman, the team discovered 3.7-billion-year-old stromatolite fossils in the world's oldest sedimentary rocks, in the Isua Greenstone Belt along the edge of Greenland's icecap. The findings are outlined in a study published in Nature, with co-authors Associate Professor Vickie Bennett from The Australian National University (ANU), the University of New...
  • New techniques boost understanding of how fish fins became fingers

    08/19/2016 2:56:56 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 44 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/17/2016 | University of Chicago Medical Center
    One of the great transformations required for the descendants of fish to become creatures that could walk on land was the replacement of long, elegant fin rays by fingers and toes. In the Aug. 17, 2016 issue of Nature, scientists from the University of Chicago show that the same cells that make fin rays in fish play a central role in forming the fingers and toes of four-legged creatures. After three years of painstaking experiments using novel gene-editing techniques and sensitive fate mapping to label and track developing cells in fish, the researchers describe how the small flexible bones found...
  • What Did the First Living Cell Eat?

    08/18/2016 6:34:03 AM PDT · by fwdude · 86 replies
    Creation Moments Radio Transcripts ^ | 08/18/16 | Creation Moments, et. al
    Colossians 1:16 "For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him:" Not long ago, I was talking with another creationist about the impossibility of the first living cell coming into being through natural causes from non-living chemicals. I asked him, "Even if such a thing were possible, what would the first living cell eat?" Without missing a beat, my friend said: "Cellery?" The two of us shared a good laugh together,...
  • Eye lens radiocarbon reveals centuries of longevity in the Greenland shark 400 yo)

    08/12/2016 12:42:21 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 23 replies
    Science ^ | 8/8/2016 | Julius Nielsen
    We tend to think of vertebrates as living about as long as we do, give or take 50 to 100 years. Marine species are likely to be very long-lived, but determining their age is particularly difficult. Nielsen et al. used the pulse of carbon-14 produced by nuclear tests in the 1950s—specifically, its incorporation into the eye during development—to determine the age of Greenland sharks. This species is large yet slow-growing. The oldest of the animals that they sampled had lived for nearly 400 years, and they conclude that the species reaches maturity at about 150 years of age. The Greenland...
  • Evidence from China shows how plants colonized the land

    08/10/2016 10:15:05 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 14 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/8/2016 | University of Bristol
    New fossil finds from China push back the origins of deep soils by 20 million years, new research has uncovered. This is a key part of the stepwise conquest of the land and transformation of the continents, researchers from the universities of Peking and Bristol have discovered. One of the greatest transitions in Earth history was the greening of the land. Up to 450 million years ago, there was no life outside water, and the land surface was a rocky landscape. Without plants there were no soils, and the rocky landscape eroded fast. Then the first tiny plants crept out...
  • Archaeology team makes world-first tool discovery

    08/08/2016 6:38:05 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 30 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/8/2016 | A. Nowell
    How smart were human-like species of the Stone Age? New research published in the Journal of Archaeological Science by a team led by paleoanthropologist April Nowell of the University of Victoria reveals surprisingly sophisticated adaptations by early humans living 250,000 years ago in a former oasis near Azraq, Jordan. The research team from UVic and partner universities in the US and Jordan has found the oldest evidence of protein residue -- the residual remains of butchered animals including horse, rhinoceros, wild cattle and duck -- on stone tools. The discovery draws startling conclusions about how these early humans subsisted in...
  • Evolutionary Crisis and the Third Way

    08/03/2016 10:47:03 AM PDT · by fishtank · 5 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Aug. 2016 | Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D.
    Evolutionary Crisis and the Third Way by Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D. * Evidence for Creation Modern evolutionary theory has never been without its problems and controversies—even among secular scientists. Famed evolutionist Douglas Futuyma recently stated: Ever since the Evolutionary Synthesis of the 1930s and 1940s, some biologists have expressed doubt that the Synthetic Theory [the prevailing modern version of evolution, also called neo-Darwinism], based principally on mutation, genetic variation, and natural selection, adequately accounts for macroevolution, or evolution above the species level.1 In fact, two of the most prominent and vocal skeptics were actually the leading neo-Darwinist evolutionists of their...
  • Where there's smoke -- and a mutation -- there may be an evolutionary edge for humans

    08/03/2016 6:24:49 AM PDT · by samtheman · 19 replies
    www.sciencedaily.com/ ^ | August 2, 2016 | Penn State
    A genetic mutation may have helped modern humans adapt to smoke exposure from fires and perhaps sparked an evolutionary advantage over their archaic competitors, including Neanderthals, according to a team of researchers.
  • Marine life quickly recovered after global mass extinction

    06/17/2016 9:19:33 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 24 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 6/17/2016 | Becky Oskin
    Reptiles rapidly invaded the seas soon after a global extinction wiped out most life on Earth, according to a new study led by University of California, Davis, researchers. Global climate change -- likely triggered by massive volcanic eruptions -- killed off more than 95 percent of all species about 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian period. Land reptiles colonized the ocean in just 3.35 million years at the beginning of the Triassic, a speedy recovery in geologic time, the researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports. "Our results fit with the emerging view that the recovery...
  • Bird brain? Ounce for ounce birds have significantly more neurons in their brains

    06/15/2016 9:34:48 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 11 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 6/13/2016 | Seweryn Olkowicz, et al
    The macaw has a brain the size of an unshelled walnut, while the macaque monkey has a brain about the size of a lemon. Nevertheless, the macaw has more neurons in its forebrain -- the portion of the brain associated with intelligent behavior -- than the macaque. That is one of the surprising results of the first study to systematically measure the number of neurons in the brains of more than two dozen species of birds ranging in size from the tiny zebra finch to the six-foot-tall emu, which found that they consistently have more neurons packed into their small...
  • Popcorn-like fossils provide evidence of environmental impacts on species numbers

    06/11/2016 5:42:04 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 6/10/2016 | University of Southampton
    The number of species that can exist on Earth depends on how the environment changes, according to new research led by the University of Southampton. By analysing the fossil record of microscopic aquatic creatures called planktonic foraminifera, whose fossil remains now resemble miniaturised popcorn and date back millions of years, the research provided the first statistical evidence that environmental changes put a cap on species richness. Dr Ezard added: "We used mathematical models to reveal how environmental changes influence both the rate of diversification among species and how many species can co-exist at once. Our results suggest that the world...
  • Alien Minds Part II: Do Aliens Think Big Brains are Sexy Too?

    06/01/2016 12:19:36 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 8 replies
    Universe Today ^ | 5/31/16 | Paul Patton
    '); } //--> The peahen (at left) and the peacock (at right). The peacock's elaborate plumage and many other similar animal ornaments posed a troubling difficulty for Charles Darwin in his development of the theory of evolution, since they seemed to have no value for survival. The peacocks that were everywhere present in English gardens were a frustrating and ever-present reminder of the difficulty. "The sight of a feather in a peacock's tail", Darwin wrote, "whenever I gaze at it, makes me sick!". Darwin solved the problem with his theory of sexual selection, which posits that such ornaments evolved...
  • Charlie Daniels: How Much Longer Will a Just God Allow America to Prosper?

    05/16/2016 7:23:25 PM PDT · by PROCON · 32 replies
    cnsnews.com ^ | May 16, 2016 | Charlie Daniels
    When I look at the unfathomable vastness of the universe, the intricate workings of the solar system, the constant, predictable journey of the moon around the earth and the earth around the sun, it's incomprehensible to me that it just happened. It is inconceivable for me to believe that it was just a random occurrence, nothing more than the explosion of gases in space that luckily resulted in a nine planet solar system, with the third one from the center being the only known inhabited planet in existence. When I consider the process by which a child is conceived and...
  • Cosmic dust reveals Earth's ancient atmosphere

    05/12/2016 10:00:37 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 22 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 5/11/2016 | Monash University
    Using the oldest fossil micrometeorites -- space dust -- ever found, Monash University-led research has made a surprising discovery about the chemistry of Earth's atmosphere 2.7 billion years ago. The findings of a new study published today in the journal Nature -- led by Dr Andrew Tomkins and a team from the School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment at Monash, along with scientists from the Australian Synchrotron and Imperial College, London -- challenge the accepted view that Earth's ancient atmosphere was oxygen-poor. The findings indicate instead that the ancient Earth's upper atmosphere contained about the same amount of oxygen as...
  • Dinosaurs 'already in decline' before asteroid apocalypse

    04/18/2016 2:00:44 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 17 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/18/2016 | University of Bristol
    Dinosaurs were already in an evolutionary decline tens of millions of years before the meteorite impact that finally finished them off, new research has found. The findings provide a revolution in the understanding of dinosaur evolution. Palaeontologists previously thought that dinosaurs were flourishing right up until they were wiped out by a massive meteorite impact 66 million years ago. By using a sophisticated statistical analysis in conjunction with information from the fossil record, researchers at the Universities of Reading, UK and Bristol, UK showed that dinosaur species were going extinct at a faster pace than new ones were emerging from...
  • Prehistoric peepers give vital clue in solving 300 million year old 'Tully Monster'

    04/13/2016 4:03:37 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 12 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/12/2016 | University of Leicester
    A 300 million year-old fossil mystery has been solved by a research team led by the University of Leicester, which has identified that the ancient 'Tully Monster' was a vertebrate -- due to the unique characteristics of its eyes. Tullimonstrum gregarium or as it is more commonly known the 'Tully Monster', found only in coal quarries in Illinois, Northern America, is known to many Americans because its alien-like image can be seen on the sides of large U-haul™ trailers which ply the freeways. Despite being an iconic image -- a fossil with a striped body, large tail, a pair of...
  • Yet another old-earther accuses a creationist of believing in evolution

    04/12/2016 7:52:06 AM PDT · by fishtank · 101 replies
    Creation Ministries International ^ | 4-12-2016 | Nick Sabato
    Yet another old-earther accuses a creationist of believing in evolution by Nick Sabato Published: 12 April 2016 (GMT+10) On a 28 March 2016 blog post, Professor Ken Keathley made the allegation that Ken Ham now embraces evolution. He bases this unfounded assertion on a recent article where Ham discusses how the diversity of species present today can be traced back to their respective “kinds” represented on the Ark. For Keathley, it is “big news” that a prominent creationist “has embraced macro-evolution.” However, as will be seen, creationists in general embraced speciation for decades; it is not just a property of...
  • Primate evolution in the fast lane

    04/08/2016 8:45:34 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 37 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/7/2016 | Cornell University
    The pace of evolution is typically measured in millions of years, as random, individual mutations accumulate over generations, but researchers at Cornell and Bar-Ilan Universities have uncovered a new mechanism for mutation in primates that is rapid, coordinated, and aggressive. The discovery raises questions about the accuracy of using the more typical mutation process as an estimate to date when two species diverged, as well as the extent to which this and related enzymes played a role in primate evolution. Alon Keinan, associate professor of Biological Statistics and Computational Biology at Cornell, and Erez Levanon, co-senior author and an associate...
  • Supernovae showered Earth with radioactive debris

    04/06/2016 3:50:53 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 27 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/6/2016 | Australian National University
    An international team of scientists has found evidence of a series of massive supernova explosions near our solar system, which showered Earth with radioactive debris. The scientists found radioactive iron-60 in sediment and crust samples taken from the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The iron-60 was concentrated in a period between 3.2 and 1.7 million years ago, which is relatively recent in astronomical terms, said research leader Dr Anton Wallner from The Australian National University (ANU). "We were very surprised that there was debris clearly spread across 1.5 million years," said Dr Wallner, a nuclear physicist in the ANU Research...
  • Traces of ancient humans found in Vietnam's biggest archaeological discovery

    04/06/2016 5:53:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Thanh Nien News ^ | Monday, April 04, 2016 | Tran Hieu,
    In what has been described as a breakthrough, Vietnamese and Russian archaeologists have found valuable artifacts in the Central Highlands province of Gia Lai that they say belonged to ancient humans around 800,000 years ago. The traces of homo erectus or "upright man," including fossils and more than 200 stone tools, were discovered at 12 locations around An Khe Town, according to the findings announced by the scientists on Friday. It was "the biggest and most important" archeological discovery not only for Vietnam but Asia, Dr. Nguyen Giang Hai, chief of Vietnam's Institute of Archeology, told Tuoi Tre newspaper. The...
  • Megalodons were wiped out when killer whales invaded: Competition for food drove 60ft sharks [tr]

    03/31/2016 11:34:01 AM PDT · by C19fan · 47 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 31, 2016 | Abigail Beall
    Jaws may have terrified you at the cinema, but the iconic great white would have been dwarfed by Carcharocles megalodon, the largest shark in the history of the planet. The giant creatures lived between 23 million and 2.6 million years ago and scientists are divided over how and why the species perished. Now, details of fossils from the huge shark that lived alongside the dinosaurs have been studied for the first time in an attempt to solve this mystery.
  • Scientists attempt to clone Ice Age Lion Cubs

    03/06/2016 3:19:44 AM PST · by PIF · 26 replies
    The Mirror (UK) ^ | 19:22, 4 Mar 2016 Updated 14:16, 5 Mar 2016 | Rhian Lubin
    Two cubs were found in Russia's Sakha Republic last August in a near-perfect state thanks to the deep-freeze conditions where they lay. Scientists are attempting to clone extinct Ice Age lion cubs by finding DNA in the remains of the creatures. Researchers hope to find living tissues containing DNA in the remains, which will allow them to recreate the now extinct Ice Age cave lion. The 12,000-year-old cave lion cubs were found frozen in ice last year- so well preserved their whiskers are still bristling. The pair of prehistoric predators, named Uyan and Dina, are the most unspoilt examples of...
  • Indonesian 'Hobbits' may have died out sooner than thought

    03/31/2016 2:58:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | March 30, 2016 | Griffith University
    An ancient species of pint-sized humans discovered in the tropics of Indonesia may have met their demise earlier than once believed, according to an international team of scientists who reinvestigated the original finding. Published in the journal Nature this week, the group challenges reports that these inhabitants of remote Flores island co-existed with modern humans for tens of thousands of years. They found that the youngest age for Homo floresiensis, dubbed the 'Hobbit', is around 50,000 years ago not between 13,000 and 11,000 years as initially claimed. Led by Indonesian scientists and involving researchers from Griffith University's Research Centre of...
  • Ice Age puppies found preserved in Russian permafrost - were they caveman’s best friends?

    03/29/2016 9:22:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    www.scmp.com ^ | UPDATED : Monday, 28 March, 2016, 2:25pm | Staff
    The hunters searching for mammoth tusks were drawn to the steep riverbank by a deposit of ancient bones. To their astonishment, they discovered an Ice Age puppy’s snout peeking out from the permafrost. Five years later, a pair of puppies perfectly preserved in Russia’s far northeast region of Yakutia and dating back 12,460 years has mobilised scientists across the world. “To find a carnivorous mammal intact with skin, fur and internal organs - this has never happened before in history,” said Sergei Fyodorov, head of exhibitions at the Mammoth Museum of the North-Eastern Federal University in the regional capital of...
  • A fossilised skull has revealed when the last 'Siberian unicorn' lived on Earth

    03/28/2016 1:54:16 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 27 MAR 2016 | JOSH HRALA
    For decades, scientists have estimated that the Siberian unicorn - a long-extinct species of mammal that looked more like a rhino than a horse - died out some 350,000 years ago, but a beautifully preserved skull found in Kazakhstan has completely overturned that assumption. Turns out, these incredible creatures were still around as recently as 29,000 years ago. Before we talk about the latest discovery, yes, there was a very real 'unicorn' that roamed Earth tens of thousands of years ago, but it was nothing like the one found in your favourite children’s book. (Sorry - it’s a bummer for...
  • Amazing Blind Cavefish Walks Up Rocks and Waterfalls

    03/28/2016 12:51:51 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 17 replies
    Live Science ^ | 3/25/2016 | Mindy Weisberger, Senior Writer
    When the first water-dwelling creature wriggled up onto land about 400 million years ago, it took the first steps down an evolutionary path that would eventually lead to a diverse range of tetrapods — animals with backbones and four limbs — that navigate the world in a number of Now, scientists have discovered a blind cave-dwelling fish that "walks" around its rocky home, shuffling forward by shifting its pelvis back and forth in a way that is unique among fish alive today, but recalls adaptations that may have once allowed ancient fish to transition from water to land, hundreds of...
  • More Ancient Viruses Lurk In Our DNA Than We Thought

    03/28/2016 6:19:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    University of Michigan ^ | March 22, 2016 | Kara Gavin
    One whole endogenous retrovirus genome -- and bits of 17 others -- were spotted in a study of 2,500 human genomes... Nineteen new pieces of DNA -- left by viruses that first infected our ancestors hundreds of thousands of years ago -- have just been found, lurking between our own genes. And one stretch of newfound DNA, found in about 50 of the 2,500 people studied, contains an intact, full genetic recipe for an entire virus, say the scientists who published their findings today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Whether or not it can replicate, or...
  • Land bridges linking ancient India, Eurasia were 'freeways' for biodiversity exchange

    03/26/2016 11:21:19 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 17 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 3/24/16 | Jesse L. Grismer, et. al.
    For about 60 million years during the Eocene epoch, the Indian subcontinent was a huge island. Having broken off from the ancient continent of Gondwanaland, the Indian Tectonic Plate drifted toward Eurasia. During that gradual voyage, the subcontinent saw a blossoming of exceptional wildlife, and when the trove of unique biodiversity finally made contact with bigger Eurasia, the exchange of animals and plants between these areas laid the foundations for countless modern species. "Today, mainland Asia and India have all this unique biodiversity -- but did the mainland Asian biodiversity come from India, or did the Indian biodiversity come from...
  • A golden age of ancient DNA science begins

    03/25/2016 5:05:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Phys dot Org ^ | March 22, 2016 | Darren Curnoe, UNSW Australia
    ...following some remarkable technical developments in that time, including next generation sequencing, ancient DNA research is beginning to come of age... Here are three big issues which I think geneticists are making headway on, following decades of stalled progress by fossil specialists. 1. There's been a shift from merely documenting the occurrence of interbreeding between modern humans and archaic groups, like the Neanderthals and Denisovans, to a focus on the circumstances surrounding it and its consequences for living people... Around 2 per cent of the genome of non-African people was inherited from Neanderthals, with slightly more DNA in Indigenous Oceanic...
  • Site in Germany yields human presence over 1 million years ago

    03/25/2016 5:53:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Spring 2016 Issue | Journal of Human Evolution
    The late Early Pleistocene site near Untermassfeld, in Germany, is now well known for a rich array of fauna dating back to about 1.07 million years ago, including simple 'Mode 1' (or Oldowan-type) stone tools evidencing early human occupation. Now researchers Günter Landeck and Joan Garcia Garriga report, for the first time, evidence of early human butchery in the form of cut marks on animal bones and intentional hammerstone-related bone breakage. These human-modified bones were recovered in a small faunal subsample excavated from levels with simple 'Mode 1' stone tools. The butchered assemblage was found during fieldwork and surveying of...
  • Technocracy As A Religion: Satan’s Alternative Plan Of Salvation?

    03/25/2016 11:04:27 AM PDT · by spirited irish · 12 replies
    Technocracy News ^ | March 22, 2016 | Linda Kimball
    The contemporary chiliastic-evolutionary movement is Technocracy. The world is being actively transformed by an amoral power elite and their minions according to a very narrow economical/political/social philosophy called Technocracy, and it is impacting every segment of society in every corner of the world:
  • We Finally Know How Much the Dino-Killing Asteroid Reshaped Earth

    03/22/2016 10:32:51 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 48 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 2/25/2016 | Jane Palmer
    More than 65 million years ago, a six-mile wide asteroid smashed into Mexico's Yucatán peninsula, triggering earthquakes, tsunamis and an explosion of debris that blanketed the Earth in layers of dust and sediment. Now analysis of commercial oil drilling data—denied to the academic community until recently—offers the first detailed look at how the Chicxulub impact reshaped the Gulf of Mexico. Figuring out what happened after these types of impacts gives researchers a better idea of how they redistribute geological material around the world. It also gives scientists an idea of what to expect if another such impact were to occur...
  • Evolutionary Tyranny Still Casts Cloud Over Science

    03/21/2016 9:30:20 AM PDT · by fishtank · 118 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Mar. 21, 2016 | Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D.
    Evolutionary Tyranny Still Casts Cloud Over Science by Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D. * A recent scientific paper, published in the high-profile journal PLOS ONE, made three separate references to the amazing design of the human hand…and rightly attributed them to the Creator.1 Evolutionists cried foul and raised such an uproar that the journal retracted the paper. Evolutionary scientists often claim they are objective in their work as researchers and educators. They also claim that creationist research isn't valid because creationists don't publish in secular journals. Nothing could be further from the truth. The reality is that evolutionists are seldom objective...
  • Early human habitat, recreated for first time, shows life was no picnic

    03/10/2016 9:42:39 AM PST · by JimSEA · 33 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 3/10/16 | Rutgers University
    Scientists have pieced together an early human habitat for the first time, and life was no picnic 1.8 million years ago. Our human ancestors, who looked like a cross between apes and modern humans, had access to food, water and shady shelter at a site in Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. They even had lots of stone tools with sharp edges, said Gail M. Ashley, a professor in the Rutgers Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences in the School of Arts and Sciences. But "it was tough living," she said. "It was a very stressful life because they were in continual competition...
  • Mysterious new dwarf human species probed after scientists find 3 million year old skull in cave

    03/16/2016 2:03:22 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 72 replies
    www.mirror.co.uk ^ | Updated 17:33, 16 Mar 2016 | By Siobhan McFadyen
    A multi-disciplinary team of scientists have discovered the skull of a weird, unique extinct human and who was found in an underground cave Homo naledi fragments of skull and jaw ======================================================================================================= Scientists have discovered a skull belonging to a previously unknown species of human from three million years ago. The research team made up of paleoanthropologists stumbled across the remains in an underground cave and have now put together a skeleton which stands at 4ft 9 tall and is described as "a really, really strange creature." Lee Berger of the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg and his co-horts stumbled...
  • 400,000-year-old fossils from Spain provide earliest genetic evidence of Neandertals

    03/20/2016 2:54:37 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Max Planck Gesselschaft ^ | March 14, 2016 | SJ, SP, MM/HR
    Previous analyses of the hominins from Sima de los Huesos in 2013 showed that their maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA was distantly related to Denisovans, extinct relatives of Neandertals in Asia. This was unexpected since their skeletal remains carry Neandertal-derived features. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have since worked on sequencing nuclear DNA from fossils from the cave, a challenging task as the extremely old DNA is degraded to very short fragments. The results now show that the Sima de los Huesos hominins were indeed early Neandertals. Neandertals may have acquired different mitochondrial genomes...
  • Ancient Denisovan DNA excavated in modern Pacific Islanders

    03/20/2016 2:51:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | March 17, 2016 | University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine
    Many recent studies have tried to understand when and where archaic hominins and our modern ancestors co-existed and interbred. Most of this research has been intent on cataloging Neanderthal gene sequences remaining in the genomes people of European or Asian descent. According to Vernot, "Different populations of people have slightly different levels of Neanderthal ancestry, which likely means that humans repeatedly ran into Neanderthals as they spread across Europe." Where the ancestors of modern humans might have had physical contact with Denisovans is debatable. The best guess, Akey said, is that Denisovans may have had a broad geographic range that...
  • Dinosaur-like lower leg created on bird through molecular experiment

    03/11/2016 7:08:42 PM PST · by Mellonkronos · 30 replies
    Science Daily ^ | March 10, 2016
    [I posted this under science and food. Why? Because it's a story about genetically engineering a chicken so it's legs will grow like a dinosaurs, from which it evolved. But think about it. Instead of drumsticks you can eat dino-legs! And what will they taste like? Chicken, of course! Yummy!Dinosaur-like lower leg created on bird through molecular experimentAny one that has eaten roasted chicken can account for the presence in the drumstick (lower leg) of a long, spine-like bone. This is actually the fibula, one of the two long bones of the lower leg (the outer one). In dinosaurs, which...
  • Evolutionary leap from fins to legs was surprisingly simple

    03/08/2016 10:19:08 AM PST · by JimSEA · 115 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 3/8/16 | Univ. of Lincoln
    New research reveals that the limbs of the earliest four-legged vertebrates, dating back more than 360 million years ago, were no more structurally diverse than the fins of their aquatic ancestors. The new finding overturns long-held views that the origin of vertebrates with legs (known as tetrapods) triggered an increase in the anatomical diversity of their skeletons. The research was carried out by Dr Marcello Ruta from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Lincoln and Professor Matthew Wills from the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath in the UK. The authors found that fish...
  • Chinese Femur Refutes Human Evolution

    03/01/2016 9:23:45 AM PST · by fishtank · 70 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Mar 2016 | Brian Thomas
    Chinese Femur Refutes Human Evolution by Brian Thomas, M.S. * Evidence for Creation Textbooks around the world contain the well-known illustration of walking apes transitioning into a modern human. I recently heard a college student, raised in a Christian home, say these pictures convinced her of evolution. She probably represents countless others swayed by this simplistic icon. But those willing to question the concept that man descended from apes can welcome the recent study of a discovery from China. It adds to the list of important finds that refute human evolution and its illustrations.
  • Trump: I'm 'Changing' My Position on Immigrant Visas

    03/03/2016 7:16:20 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 359 replies
    Donald Trump on Thursday night said he's changing his stance on visas for highly skilled immigrant workers. "I’m changing it, and I’m softening the position because we need to have talented people in this country," Trump said at the Fox News GOP debate in Michigan. Trump's comments came after debate moderator Megyn Kelly raised the issue. Kelly noted that Trump had previously opposed those visas, saying they "decimate American workers," but appeared to change his position at an earlier CNBC debate. Trump said recipients of the visas go to high-profile U.S. universities and "desperately" want to remain in the country....
  • The Most Common Misunderstandings About Evolution

    02/22/2016 10:38:03 AM PST · by EveningStar · 147 replies
    RealClearScience ^ | February 20, 2016 | Paula Kover
    Given its huge success in describing the natural world for the past 150 years, the theory of evolution is remarkably misunderstood. In a recent episode of the Australian series of "I'm a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here", former cricket star Shane Warne questioned the theory - asking "if humans evolved from monkeys, why haven't today's monkeys evolved"? Similarly, a head teacher from a primary school in the UK recently stated that evolution is a theory rather than a fact. This is despite the fact that children in the UK start learning about evolution in Year 6 (ten to 11-year-olds),...
  • Neanderthals and modern humans mated 50,000 years earlier than we thought, scientists say.

    02/21/2016 5:06:59 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 108 replies
    CS Monitor ^ | 02/20/2016 | By Eva Botkin-Kowacki,
    Ever since geneticists sequenced the first Neanderthal genome in 2010, researchers have been reporting just how related humans are to their ancient, extinct cousins. Since then, there's been more research. And more. And more. As it turns out, non-African modern humans have Neanderthals to thank for 1 to 4 percent of their DNA. The two species were thought to have interbred around 50,000 to 60,000 years ago, based on the Neanderthal DNA found in anatomically modern human specimens and people living today. But scientists had yet to find a signature of such mating interactions in Neanderthal DNA, until now. "Instead...
  • Ancient Lone Star Lizard Lounged in Lush Tropical Texas

    02/20/2016 9:00:43 AM PST · by JimSEA · 10 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 2/19/2016 | Univ. of Texas, Austin
    Researchers have discovered a new species of extinct worm lizard in Texas and dubbed it the "Lone Star" lizard. The species -- the first known example of a worm lizard in Texas -- offers evidence that Texas acted as a subtropical refuge during one of the great cooling periods of the past. Worm lizard is the common name for a group of reptiles called amphisbaenians, whose long bodies and reduced or absent limbs give them an earthworm-like appearance. The group includes extinct species as well as ones still living today. Solastella belonged to a subgroup called Rhineuridae, a group with...