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Keyword: evolution

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  • Marine life quickly recovered after global mass extinction

    06/17/2016 9:19:33 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 24 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 6/17/2016 | Becky Oskin
    Reptiles rapidly invaded the seas soon after a global extinction wiped out most life on Earth, according to a new study led by University of California, Davis, researchers. Global climate change -- likely triggered by massive volcanic eruptions -- killed off more than 95 percent of all species about 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian period. Land reptiles colonized the ocean in just 3.35 million years at the beginning of the Triassic, a speedy recovery in geologic time, the researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports. "Our results fit with the emerging view that the recovery...
  • Bird brain? Ounce for ounce birds have significantly more neurons in their brains

    06/15/2016 9:34:48 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 11 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 6/13/2016 | Seweryn Olkowicz, et al
    The macaw has a brain the size of an unshelled walnut, while the macaque monkey has a brain about the size of a lemon. Nevertheless, the macaw has more neurons in its forebrain -- the portion of the brain associated with intelligent behavior -- than the macaque. That is one of the surprising results of the first study to systematically measure the number of neurons in the brains of more than two dozen species of birds ranging in size from the tiny zebra finch to the six-foot-tall emu, which found that they consistently have more neurons packed into their small...
  • Popcorn-like fossils provide evidence of environmental impacts on species numbers

    06/11/2016 5:42:04 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 6/10/2016 | University of Southampton
    The number of species that can exist on Earth depends on how the environment changes, according to new research led by the University of Southampton. By analysing the fossil record of microscopic aquatic creatures called planktonic foraminifera, whose fossil remains now resemble miniaturised popcorn and date back millions of years, the research provided the first statistical evidence that environmental changes put a cap on species richness. Dr Ezard added: "We used mathematical models to reveal how environmental changes influence both the rate of diversification among species and how many species can co-exist at once. Our results suggest that the world...
  • Alien Minds Part II: Do Aliens Think Big Brains are Sexy Too?

    06/01/2016 12:19:36 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 8 replies
    Universe Today ^ | 5/31/16 | Paul Patton
    '); } //--> The peahen (at left) and the peacock (at right). The peacock's elaborate plumage and many other similar animal ornaments posed a troubling difficulty for Charles Darwin in his development of the theory of evolution, since they seemed to have no value for survival. The peacocks that were everywhere present in English gardens were a frustrating and ever-present reminder of the difficulty. "The sight of a feather in a peacock's tail", Darwin wrote, "whenever I gaze at it, makes me sick!". Darwin solved the problem with his theory of sexual selection, which posits that such ornaments evolved...
  • Charlie Daniels: How Much Longer Will a Just God Allow America to Prosper?

    05/16/2016 7:23:25 PM PDT · by PROCON · 32 replies
    cnsnews.com ^ | May 16, 2016 | Charlie Daniels
    When I look at the unfathomable vastness of the universe, the intricate workings of the solar system, the constant, predictable journey of the moon around the earth and the earth around the sun, it's incomprehensible to me that it just happened. It is inconceivable for me to believe that it was just a random occurrence, nothing more than the explosion of gases in space that luckily resulted in a nine planet solar system, with the third one from the center being the only known inhabited planet in existence. When I consider the process by which a child is conceived and...
  • Cosmic dust reveals Earth's ancient atmosphere

    05/12/2016 10:00:37 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 22 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 5/11/2016 | Monash University
    Using the oldest fossil micrometeorites -- space dust -- ever found, Monash University-led research has made a surprising discovery about the chemistry of Earth's atmosphere 2.7 billion years ago. The findings of a new study published today in the journal Nature -- led by Dr Andrew Tomkins and a team from the School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment at Monash, along with scientists from the Australian Synchrotron and Imperial College, London -- challenge the accepted view that Earth's ancient atmosphere was oxygen-poor. The findings indicate instead that the ancient Earth's upper atmosphere contained about the same amount of oxygen as...
  • Dinosaurs 'already in decline' before asteroid apocalypse

    04/18/2016 2:00:44 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 17 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/18/2016 | University of Bristol
    Dinosaurs were already in an evolutionary decline tens of millions of years before the meteorite impact that finally finished them off, new research has found. The findings provide a revolution in the understanding of dinosaur evolution. Palaeontologists previously thought that dinosaurs were flourishing right up until they were wiped out by a massive meteorite impact 66 million years ago. By using a sophisticated statistical analysis in conjunction with information from the fossil record, researchers at the Universities of Reading, UK and Bristol, UK showed that dinosaur species were going extinct at a faster pace than new ones were emerging from...
  • Prehistoric peepers give vital clue in solving 300 million year old 'Tully Monster'

    04/13/2016 4:03:37 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 12 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/12/2016 | University of Leicester
    A 300 million year-old fossil mystery has been solved by a research team led by the University of Leicester, which has identified that the ancient 'Tully Monster' was a vertebrate -- due to the unique characteristics of its eyes. Tullimonstrum gregarium or as it is more commonly known the 'Tully Monster', found only in coal quarries in Illinois, Northern America, is known to many Americans because its alien-like image can be seen on the sides of large U-haul™ trailers which ply the freeways. Despite being an iconic image -- a fossil with a striped body, large tail, a pair of...
  • Yet another old-earther accuses a creationist of believing in evolution

    04/12/2016 7:52:06 AM PDT · by fishtank · 101 replies
    Creation Ministries International ^ | 4-12-2016 | Nick Sabato
    Yet another old-earther accuses a creationist of believing in evolution by Nick Sabato Published: 12 April 2016 (GMT+10) On a 28 March 2016 blog post, Professor Ken Keathley made the allegation that Ken Ham now embraces evolution. He bases this unfounded assertion on a recent article where Ham discusses how the diversity of species present today can be traced back to their respective “kinds” represented on the Ark. For Keathley, it is “big news” that a prominent creationist “has embraced macro-evolution.” However, as will be seen, creationists in general embraced speciation for decades; it is not just a property of...
  • Primate evolution in the fast lane

    04/08/2016 8:45:34 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 37 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/7/2016 | Cornell University
    The pace of evolution is typically measured in millions of years, as random, individual mutations accumulate over generations, but researchers at Cornell and Bar-Ilan Universities have uncovered a new mechanism for mutation in primates that is rapid, coordinated, and aggressive. The discovery raises questions about the accuracy of using the more typical mutation process as an estimate to date when two species diverged, as well as the extent to which this and related enzymes played a role in primate evolution. Alon Keinan, associate professor of Biological Statistics and Computational Biology at Cornell, and Erez Levanon, co-senior author and an associate...
  • Supernovae showered Earth with radioactive debris

    04/06/2016 3:50:53 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 27 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/6/2016 | Australian National University
    An international team of scientists has found evidence of a series of massive supernova explosions near our solar system, which showered Earth with radioactive debris. The scientists found radioactive iron-60 in sediment and crust samples taken from the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The iron-60 was concentrated in a period between 3.2 and 1.7 million years ago, which is relatively recent in astronomical terms, said research leader Dr Anton Wallner from The Australian National University (ANU). "We were very surprised that there was debris clearly spread across 1.5 million years," said Dr Wallner, a nuclear physicist in the ANU Research...
  • Traces of ancient humans found in Vietnam's biggest archaeological discovery

    04/06/2016 5:53:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Thanh Nien News ^ | Monday, April 04, 2016 | Tran Hieu,
    In what has been described as a breakthrough, Vietnamese and Russian archaeologists have found valuable artifacts in the Central Highlands province of Gia Lai that they say belonged to ancient humans around 800,000 years ago. The traces of homo erectus or "upright man," including fossils and more than 200 stone tools, were discovered at 12 locations around An Khe Town, according to the findings announced by the scientists on Friday. It was "the biggest and most important" archeological discovery not only for Vietnam but Asia, Dr. Nguyen Giang Hai, chief of Vietnam's Institute of Archeology, told Tuoi Tre newspaper. The...
  • Megalodons were wiped out when killer whales invaded: Competition for food drove 60ft sharks [tr]

    03/31/2016 11:34:01 AM PDT · by C19fan · 47 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 31, 2016 | Abigail Beall
    Jaws may have terrified you at the cinema, but the iconic great white would have been dwarfed by Carcharocles megalodon, the largest shark in the history of the planet. The giant creatures lived between 23 million and 2.6 million years ago and scientists are divided over how and why the species perished. Now, details of fossils from the huge shark that lived alongside the dinosaurs have been studied for the first time in an attempt to solve this mystery.
  • Scientists attempt to clone Ice Age Lion Cubs

    03/06/2016 3:19:44 AM PST · by PIF · 26 replies
    The Mirror (UK) ^ | 19:22, 4 Mar 2016 Updated 14:16, 5 Mar 2016 | Rhian Lubin
    Two cubs were found in Russia's Sakha Republic last August in a near-perfect state thanks to the deep-freeze conditions where they lay. Scientists are attempting to clone extinct Ice Age lion cubs by finding DNA in the remains of the creatures. Researchers hope to find living tissues containing DNA in the remains, which will allow them to recreate the now extinct Ice Age cave lion. The 12,000-year-old cave lion cubs were found frozen in ice last year- so well preserved their whiskers are still bristling. The pair of prehistoric predators, named Uyan and Dina, are the most unspoilt examples of...
  • Indonesian 'Hobbits' may have died out sooner than thought

    03/31/2016 2:58:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | March 30, 2016 | Griffith University
    An ancient species of pint-sized humans discovered in the tropics of Indonesia may have met their demise earlier than once believed, according to an international team of scientists who reinvestigated the original finding. Published in the journal Nature this week, the group challenges reports that these inhabitants of remote Flores island co-existed with modern humans for tens of thousands of years. They found that the youngest age for Homo floresiensis, dubbed the 'Hobbit', is around 50,000 years ago not between 13,000 and 11,000 years as initially claimed. Led by Indonesian scientists and involving researchers from Griffith University's Research Centre of...
  • Ice Age puppies found preserved in Russian permafrost - were they caveman’s best friends?

    03/29/2016 9:22:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    www.scmp.com ^ | UPDATED : Monday, 28 March, 2016, 2:25pm | Staff
    The hunters searching for mammoth tusks were drawn to the steep riverbank by a deposit of ancient bones. To their astonishment, they discovered an Ice Age puppy’s snout peeking out from the permafrost. Five years later, a pair of puppies perfectly preserved in Russia’s far northeast region of Yakutia and dating back 12,460 years has mobilised scientists across the world. “To find a carnivorous mammal intact with skin, fur and internal organs - this has never happened before in history,” said Sergei Fyodorov, head of exhibitions at the Mammoth Museum of the North-Eastern Federal University in the regional capital of...
  • A fossilised skull has revealed when the last 'Siberian unicorn' lived on Earth

    03/28/2016 1:54:16 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 27 MAR 2016 | JOSH HRALA
    For decades, scientists have estimated that the Siberian unicorn - a long-extinct species of mammal that looked more like a rhino than a horse - died out some 350,000 years ago, but a beautifully preserved skull found in Kazakhstan has completely overturned that assumption. Turns out, these incredible creatures were still around as recently as 29,000 years ago. Before we talk about the latest discovery, yes, there was a very real 'unicorn' that roamed Earth tens of thousands of years ago, but it was nothing like the one found in your favourite children’s book. (Sorry - it’s a bummer for...
  • Amazing Blind Cavefish Walks Up Rocks and Waterfalls

    03/28/2016 12:51:51 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 17 replies
    Live Science ^ | 3/25/2016 | Mindy Weisberger, Senior Writer
    When the first water-dwelling creature wriggled up onto land about 400 million years ago, it took the first steps down an evolutionary path that would eventually lead to a diverse range of tetrapods — animals with backbones and four limbs — that navigate the world in a number of Now, scientists have discovered a blind cave-dwelling fish that "walks" around its rocky home, shuffling forward by shifting its pelvis back and forth in a way that is unique among fish alive today, but recalls adaptations that may have once allowed ancient fish to transition from water to land, hundreds of...
  • More Ancient Viruses Lurk In Our DNA Than We Thought

    03/28/2016 6:19:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    University of Michigan ^ | March 22, 2016 | Kara Gavin
    One whole endogenous retrovirus genome -- and bits of 17 others -- were spotted in a study of 2,500 human genomes... Nineteen new pieces of DNA -- left by viruses that first infected our ancestors hundreds of thousands of years ago -- have just been found, lurking between our own genes. And one stretch of newfound DNA, found in about 50 of the 2,500 people studied, contains an intact, full genetic recipe for an entire virus, say the scientists who published their findings today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Whether or not it can replicate, or...
  • Land bridges linking ancient India, Eurasia were 'freeways' for biodiversity exchange

    03/26/2016 11:21:19 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 17 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 3/24/16 | Jesse L. Grismer, et. al.
    For about 60 million years during the Eocene epoch, the Indian subcontinent was a huge island. Having broken off from the ancient continent of Gondwanaland, the Indian Tectonic Plate drifted toward Eurasia. During that gradual voyage, the subcontinent saw a blossoming of exceptional wildlife, and when the trove of unique biodiversity finally made contact with bigger Eurasia, the exchange of animals and plants between these areas laid the foundations for countless modern species. "Today, mainland Asia and India have all this unique biodiversity -- but did the mainland Asian biodiversity come from India, or did the Indian biodiversity come from...
  • A golden age of ancient DNA science begins

    03/25/2016 5:05:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Phys dot Org ^ | March 22, 2016 | Darren Curnoe, UNSW Australia
    ...following some remarkable technical developments in that time, including next generation sequencing, ancient DNA research is beginning to come of age... Here are three big issues which I think geneticists are making headway on, following decades of stalled progress by fossil specialists. 1. There's been a shift from merely documenting the occurrence of interbreeding between modern humans and archaic groups, like the Neanderthals and Denisovans, to a focus on the circumstances surrounding it and its consequences for living people... Around 2 per cent of the genome of non-African people was inherited from Neanderthals, with slightly more DNA in Indigenous Oceanic...
  • Site in Germany yields human presence over 1 million years ago

    03/25/2016 5:53:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Spring 2016 Issue | Journal of Human Evolution
    The late Early Pleistocene site near Untermassfeld, in Germany, is now well known for a rich array of fauna dating back to about 1.07 million years ago, including simple 'Mode 1' (or Oldowan-type) stone tools evidencing early human occupation. Now researchers Günter Landeck and Joan Garcia Garriga report, for the first time, evidence of early human butchery in the form of cut marks on animal bones and intentional hammerstone-related bone breakage. These human-modified bones were recovered in a small faunal subsample excavated from levels with simple 'Mode 1' stone tools. The butchered assemblage was found during fieldwork and surveying of...
  • Technocracy As A Religion: Satan’s Alternative Plan Of Salvation?

    03/25/2016 11:04:27 AM PDT · by spirited irish · 12 replies
    Technocracy News ^ | March 22, 2016 | Linda Kimball
    The contemporary chiliastic-evolutionary movement is Technocracy. The world is being actively transformed by an amoral power elite and their minions according to a very narrow economical/political/social philosophy called Technocracy, and it is impacting every segment of society in every corner of the world:
  • We Finally Know How Much the Dino-Killing Asteroid Reshaped Earth

    03/22/2016 10:32:51 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 48 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 2/25/2016 | Jane Palmer
    More than 65 million years ago, a six-mile wide asteroid smashed into Mexico's Yucatán peninsula, triggering earthquakes, tsunamis and an explosion of debris that blanketed the Earth in layers of dust and sediment. Now analysis of commercial oil drilling data—denied to the academic community until recently—offers the first detailed look at how the Chicxulub impact reshaped the Gulf of Mexico. Figuring out what happened after these types of impacts gives researchers a better idea of how they redistribute geological material around the world. It also gives scientists an idea of what to expect if another such impact were to occur...
  • Evolutionary Tyranny Still Casts Cloud Over Science

    03/21/2016 9:30:20 AM PDT · by fishtank · 118 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Mar. 21, 2016 | Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D.
    Evolutionary Tyranny Still Casts Cloud Over Science by Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D. * A recent scientific paper, published in the high-profile journal PLOS ONE, made three separate references to the amazing design of the human hand…and rightly attributed them to the Creator.1 Evolutionists cried foul and raised such an uproar that the journal retracted the paper. Evolutionary scientists often claim they are objective in their work as researchers and educators. They also claim that creationist research isn't valid because creationists don't publish in secular journals. Nothing could be further from the truth. The reality is that evolutionists are seldom objective...
  • Early human habitat, recreated for first time, shows life was no picnic

    03/10/2016 9:42:39 AM PST · by JimSEA · 33 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 3/10/16 | Rutgers University
    Scientists have pieced together an early human habitat for the first time, and life was no picnic 1.8 million years ago. Our human ancestors, who looked like a cross between apes and modern humans, had access to food, water and shady shelter at a site in Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. They even had lots of stone tools with sharp edges, said Gail M. Ashley, a professor in the Rutgers Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences in the School of Arts and Sciences. But "it was tough living," she said. "It was a very stressful life because they were in continual competition...
  • Mysterious new dwarf human species probed after scientists find 3 million year old skull in cave

    03/16/2016 2:03:22 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 72 replies
    www.mirror.co.uk ^ | Updated 17:33, 16 Mar 2016 | By Siobhan McFadyen
    A multi-disciplinary team of scientists have discovered the skull of a weird, unique extinct human and who was found in an underground cave Homo naledi fragments of skull and jaw ======================================================================================================= Scientists have discovered a skull belonging to a previously unknown species of human from three million years ago. The research team made up of paleoanthropologists stumbled across the remains in an underground cave and have now put together a skeleton which stands at 4ft 9 tall and is described as "a really, really strange creature." Lee Berger of the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg and his co-horts stumbled...
  • 400,000-year-old fossils from Spain provide earliest genetic evidence of Neandertals

    03/20/2016 2:54:37 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Max Planck Gesselschaft ^ | March 14, 2016 | SJ, SP, MM/HR
    Previous analyses of the hominins from Sima de los Huesos in 2013 showed that their maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA was distantly related to Denisovans, extinct relatives of Neandertals in Asia. This was unexpected since their skeletal remains carry Neandertal-derived features. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have since worked on sequencing nuclear DNA from fossils from the cave, a challenging task as the extremely old DNA is degraded to very short fragments. The results now show that the Sima de los Huesos hominins were indeed early Neandertals. Neandertals may have acquired different mitochondrial genomes...
  • Ancient Denisovan DNA excavated in modern Pacific Islanders

    03/20/2016 2:51:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | March 17, 2016 | University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine
    Many recent studies have tried to understand when and where archaic hominins and our modern ancestors co-existed and interbred. Most of this research has been intent on cataloging Neanderthal gene sequences remaining in the genomes people of European or Asian descent. According to Vernot, "Different populations of people have slightly different levels of Neanderthal ancestry, which likely means that humans repeatedly ran into Neanderthals as they spread across Europe." Where the ancestors of modern humans might have had physical contact with Denisovans is debatable. The best guess, Akey said, is that Denisovans may have had a broad geographic range that...
  • Dinosaur-like lower leg created on bird through molecular experiment

    03/11/2016 7:08:42 PM PST · by Mellonkronos · 30 replies
    Science Daily ^ | March 10, 2016
    [I posted this under science and food. Why? Because it's a story about genetically engineering a chicken so it's legs will grow like a dinosaurs, from which it evolved. But think about it. Instead of drumsticks you can eat dino-legs! And what will they taste like? Chicken, of course! Yummy!Dinosaur-like lower leg created on bird through molecular experimentAny one that has eaten roasted chicken can account for the presence in the drumstick (lower leg) of a long, spine-like bone. This is actually the fibula, one of the two long bones of the lower leg (the outer one). In dinosaurs, which...
  • Evolutionary leap from fins to legs was surprisingly simple

    03/08/2016 10:19:08 AM PST · by JimSEA · 115 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 3/8/16 | Univ. of Lincoln
    New research reveals that the limbs of the earliest four-legged vertebrates, dating back more than 360 million years ago, were no more structurally diverse than the fins of their aquatic ancestors. The new finding overturns long-held views that the origin of vertebrates with legs (known as tetrapods) triggered an increase in the anatomical diversity of their skeletons. The research was carried out by Dr Marcello Ruta from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Lincoln and Professor Matthew Wills from the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath in the UK. The authors found that fish...
  • Chinese Femur Refutes Human Evolution

    03/01/2016 9:23:45 AM PST · by fishtank · 70 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Mar 2016 | Brian Thomas
    Chinese Femur Refutes Human Evolution by Brian Thomas, M.S. * Evidence for Creation Textbooks around the world contain the well-known illustration of walking apes transitioning into a modern human. I recently heard a college student, raised in a Christian home, say these pictures convinced her of evolution. She probably represents countless others swayed by this simplistic icon. But those willing to question the concept that man descended from apes can welcome the recent study of a discovery from China. It adds to the list of important finds that refute human evolution and its illustrations.
  • Trump: I'm 'Changing' My Position on Immigrant Visas

    03/03/2016 7:16:20 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 359 replies
    Donald Trump on Thursday night said he's changing his stance on visas for highly skilled immigrant workers. "I’m changing it, and I’m softening the position because we need to have talented people in this country," Trump said at the Fox News GOP debate in Michigan. Trump's comments came after debate moderator Megyn Kelly raised the issue. Kelly noted that Trump had previously opposed those visas, saying they "decimate American workers," but appeared to change his position at an earlier CNBC debate. Trump said recipients of the visas go to high-profile U.S. universities and "desperately" want to remain in the country....
  • The Most Common Misunderstandings About Evolution

    02/22/2016 10:38:03 AM PST · by EveningStar · 147 replies
    RealClearScience ^ | February 20, 2016 | Paula Kover
    Given its huge success in describing the natural world for the past 150 years, the theory of evolution is remarkably misunderstood. In a recent episode of the Australian series of "I'm a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here", former cricket star Shane Warne questioned the theory - asking "if humans evolved from monkeys, why haven't today's monkeys evolved"? Similarly, a head teacher from a primary school in the UK recently stated that evolution is a theory rather than a fact. This is despite the fact that children in the UK start learning about evolution in Year 6 (ten to 11-year-olds),...
  • Neanderthals and modern humans mated 50,000 years earlier than we thought, scientists say.

    02/21/2016 5:06:59 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 108 replies
    CS Monitor ^ | 02/20/2016 | By Eva Botkin-Kowacki,
    Ever since geneticists sequenced the first Neanderthal genome in 2010, researchers have been reporting just how related humans are to their ancient, extinct cousins. Since then, there's been more research. And more. And more. As it turns out, non-African modern humans have Neanderthals to thank for 1 to 4 percent of their DNA. The two species were thought to have interbred around 50,000 to 60,000 years ago, based on the Neanderthal DNA found in anatomically modern human specimens and people living today. But scientists had yet to find a signature of such mating interactions in Neanderthal DNA, until now. "Instead...
  • Ancient Lone Star Lizard Lounged in Lush Tropical Texas

    02/20/2016 9:00:43 AM PST · by JimSEA · 10 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 2/19/2016 | Univ. of Texas, Austin
    Researchers have discovered a new species of extinct worm lizard in Texas and dubbed it the "Lone Star" lizard. The species -- the first known example of a worm lizard in Texas -- offers evidence that Texas acted as a subtropical refuge during one of the great cooling periods of the past. Worm lizard is the common name for a group of reptiles called amphisbaenians, whose long bodies and reduced or absent limbs give them an earthworm-like appearance. The group includes extinct species as well as ones still living today. Solastella belonged to a subgroup called Rhineuridae, a group with...
  • Creationist Ken Ham: The State Has Created 'The Church of Evolution With Darwin As The High Priest'

    02/17/2016 10:25:28 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 38 replies
    Cybercast News Service ^ | February 16, 2016 | 4:07 PM EST | Michael W. Chapman
    Ken Ham, a biologist and supporter of young Earth creationism, said evolution is a "belief," not a "theory" -- a "fairy tale" for people who "try to explain life without God" -- and he added that the secular State has established a church, the "Church of Evolution, with Darwin as the High Priest," and teachers and professors as "priests" who push the Darwin religion in the schools. In an interview on VCY America on Feb. 10, two days before the international Darwin Day, host Jim Schneider said to Ken Ham, "I was disturbed in my spirit to hear we have...
  • Early human ancestor didn't have the jaws of a nutcracker

    02/08/2016 9:25:11 AM PST · by JimSEA · 67 replies
    Science Daily ^ | February 8, 20 | Washington University in St. Louis
    South Africa's Australopithecus sediba, discovered in 2008 at the archaeological site of Malapa in the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, is again helping us to study and understand the origins of humans. Research published in 2012 garnered international attention by suggesting that a possible early human ancestor had lived on a diverse woodland diet including hard foods mixed in with tree bark, fruit, leaves and other plant products. But new research by an international team of researchers now shows that Australopithecus sediba didn't have the jaw and tooth structure necessary to exist on a steady diet of hard foods....
  • The Dark God of Gnostic Progressive Spirituality

    02/04/2016 4:35:11 AM PST · by spirited irish · 12 replies
    Renew America ^ | Feb. 3, 2016 | Linda Kimball
    We are at the dawn of a new consciousness, a radically fresh approach to our life...Perhaps the best name for this new segment of historical experience is the Interspiritual Age." Wayne Teasdale, "The Mystic Heart" "At the outbreak of the modern era, the (gnostic) system of inverse biblical exegesis was once again activated." Ioan Couliano, "The Tree of Gnosis" The Gnostic system of inverse exegesis begins with evolution, which has persuaded people, "...to think of everything in nature as the fruit of a gradual growth rather than an original creation." Such inverse thinking means it is now impossible for educated...
  • Appendixes Might Actually Be Useful, According To New Studies

    01/20/2016 6:39:11 AM PST · by SoFloFreeper · 34 replies
    bustle.com ^ | 1/19/16 | Lily Feinn
    Most people think little about their appendix, and that's only natural, because the function of the appendix has been considered unknown - until now. New research supports that our appendixes might actually be useful after all, and doctors may soon be changing their tune about this neglected organ. The appendix, which looks like a slim tube measuring between two and four inches long, sits in our lower right abdomen. It was originally thought to be vestigial - a part of the body that evolution forgot. Popular belief was that this leftover organ was originally part of a fermenting chamber in...
  • Ancient tools may shed light on the mysterious ‘hobbit’

    01/15/2016 7:21:04 PM PST · by Utilizer · 25 replies
    Science Mag ^ | Jan. 13, 2016 | Elizabeth Culotta
    The "hobbit" had neighbors. Back in 2004, researchers announced the discovery of this tiny, ancient human, which apparently hunted dwarf elephants with stone tools on the Indonesian island of Flores 18,000 years ago. Its discoverers called the 1-meter-tall creature Homo floresiensis, but skeptics wondered whether it was just a stunted modern human. In the years since, researchers have debunked many of the "sick hobbit" hypotheses. Yet scientists have continued to wonder where the species came from. Now, an international team originally led by the hobbit discoverer reports stone tools, dated to 118,000 to 194,000 years ago, from another Indonesian island,...
  • Webbed Feet, Cat's Eyes and Gills: How Humans Could Evolve [trunc](Global Warming)

    01/12/2016 7:13:53 PM PST · by Up Yours Marxists · 35 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | January 13, 2016 00:13 UTC | Colin Fernandez
    Humans may evolve bizarre features such as webbed feet and eyes like cats in response to changing environments, a scientist claims today. Experts calculated how our physical appearance could change under a number of scenarios, including a 'water world' if melting ice caps cause rising sea levels. They also considered what would happen in a second ice age which could be triggered by an asteroid strike, and if humans colonised other planets. Dr Matthew Skinner, a paleoanthropologist at the University of Kent, examined the three scenarios and worked with artist Quentin Devine to help visualise how humans could look in...
  • Humans could evolve webbed feet if sea levels rise, scientist claims

    01/12/2016 11:42:04 PM PST · by Cincinatus' Wife · 107 replies
    Telegraph ^ | January 13, 2016 | Sarah Knapton
    The perils of climate change are well known, but rising sea levels could also alter human evolution, scientists have claimed. Rising sea levels could force communities to live in underwater or semi-aquatic towns which could change out physiology. Dr Matthew Skinner a paleoanthropologist from the University of Kent, claims that humans could evolve to have webbed hands and feet and less body hair so they could move quickly through the water. Our eyes would even become more like cats, so we could see in the murky gloom of seas and rivers and our lungs would shrink as we became used...
  • Google's Christmas-Free Doodle vs. Animated Celebration of Evolution

    12/25/2015 10:29:13 AM PST · by governsleastgovernsbest · 20 replies
    NewsBusters ^ | Mark Finkelstein
    A very Merry Christmas to NewsBusters readers everywhere! Just out of curiosity, I took a look at the Google doodle for this Christmas Day. See below: it's bland, boring and above all, void of any reference at all to the holiday itself. I decided to have a look at the ways Google observed other days with its doodles. And sure enough, exactly one month to the day before Christmas Eve, Google celebrated "the 41st anniversary of the discovery of Lucy," she being the skeleton of a hominin found in Ethiopia. Google's animated gif doodle shows a monkey walking on all...
  • Mysterious 14,000-year-old leg bone may belong to archaic human species

    12/20/2015 12:39:43 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 18 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 12/20/2015 | By Eva Botkin-Kowacki
    A 14,000-year-old thigh bone may upend human history. Unearthed in southwest China, this femur resembles those of an ancient species of humans thought to be long extinct by the Late Pleistocene, scientists say. The scientists compare the leg bone to ancient and modern human femurs in a paper published Thursday in the journal PLOS ONE, arguing that this specimen represents a population of ancient humans that lived surprisingly recently. If they're right, this could dramatically change the way we see human history. Today, our species, Homo sapiens, are the only humans to walk the Earth. But it hasn't always been...
  • Influence of Earth's history on the dawn of modern birds

    12/13/2015 11:06:28 AM PST · by JimSEA · 25 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 12/11/2015 | American Museum of Natural History
    New research led by the American Museum of Natural History reveals that the evolution of modern birds was greatly shaped by the history of our planet's geography and climate. The DNA-based work, published today in the journal Science Advances, finds that birds arose in what is now South America around 90 million years ago, and radiated extensively around the time of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event that killed off the non-avian dinosaurs. The new research suggests that birds in South America survived this event and then started moving to other parts of the world via multiple land bridges while diversifying during...
  • 'Truly amazing' scientific discovery on adaptation of Yakutian horses to cold

    11/29/2015 7:27:04 PM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 48 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | November 28, 2015
    'Truly amazing' scientific discovery on adaptation of Yakutian horses to cold By The Siberian Times reporter 28 November 2015 Fast track evolution as great Siberian symbol is surprisingly unmasked as an immigrant breed. Researchers say these horses, which seem so well attuned to the harsh cold with thick, dense winter coats, their armour against temperatures of minus 70C (minus 94F), are incomers that only arrived in these parts within the last 800 years. Picture: Maria Vasilyeva The resilient Yakutian horses are one of the great native sights of the Sakha Republic - or Yakutia. In their way as much a part of...
  • Extinction is key to terrestrial vertebrate diversity, new research reveals

    11/29/2015 11:11:30 AM PST · by JimSEA · 30 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/23/2015 | University of Lincoln
    Periods of high extinction on Earth, rather than evolutionary adaptations, may have been a key driver in the diversification of amniotes (today's dominant land vertebrates, including reptiles, birds, and mammals), according to new research published in Scientific Reports. The new study reveals that mass extinctions among some groups of amniotes coincide with numerous and large diversifications in other closely related groups. Conducted by scientists from the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin, Germany, and the University of Lincoln, UK, the research challenges commonly held views that support a relationship between the evolution of "key innovations" in a group and the rapid...
  • Creationist Group 'Answers in Genesis' Disputes 'Lucy' Ancestry Claim

    11/27/2015 11:55:20 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 103 replies
    PJ Media ^ | 11/27/2015 | BY MICHAEL T. HAMILTON
    Earlier this week Google's logo mutated (if you will) from its usual form into a Google Doodle adorned with a series of images depicting an ape evolving into a human. Clicking the Doodle led to information about "AL 288-1," less esoterically known as "Lucy the Australopithecus," or simply "Lucy." Many scientists regard the fossil as an intermediary link between apes and humans.The same day, Googling "lucy australopithecus controversy" turned up a different interpretation of the fossil, including several from Answers in Genesis. The apologetics ministry, which focuses primarily on whether evolution or biblical creation provides the most accurate interpretation...
  • Leading Harvard physicist has a radical new theory for why humans exist

    11/15/2015 7:47:38 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 63 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 11/15/2015 | Jessica Orwig
    Where do we come from? There are many right answers to this question, and the one you get depends on who you ask. For example, an astrophysicist might say that the chemical components of our bodies were first forged in the nuclear fires of stars. On the other hand, an evolutionary biologist might look at the similarities between our DNA and that of other primates' and conclude we evolved from apes. Lisa Randall, a theoretical physicist at Harvard University, has a different, and novel answer, which she describes in her latest book, "Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs." Randall has written...